OCR Interpretation


The Arizona sentinel. [volume] (Arizona City [Yuma], Yuma County, A.T. [Ariz.]) 1872-1911, April 11, 1900, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84021912/1900-04-11/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

? Tft TtiJA p i &
The Pioneer Sournai
ft Locally and Editorially tho k
l Papai for the People
Best Advertising Medium
-. .r . jl
LosulLy and Edticr:rt!y the
Papet the Pcp!s
5$.
Jj Best Advertising Medium -
Iiiclepeideii t in -All Tilings.
35
VOL. XXIX.
YUMA, ARIZONA, "WEDNESDAY, APHIL 11, 1900.
NO. 22:
3 The Pionees Journal .
IIED EVERY WEDNESDAY.
AT
YumiB, Arizona,
BY
.1. W. S8S5Ei:S3TOIS, Prep.
SUBSCRIPTION.
5 ix mop 'hs -One
'."car - -
$1 05
2 00
OVERUSING RATES made known on appiication
Address, ARIZONA SENTINEL,,
Tama. Ariaona
w., r.Bn-i-1 is ket on file at E. C
lh 0 f ArtK Dke's Advertisin
gcncy, G-l and 6? Merchants Exchange,
.San Francisco, California, where contracts
for advertis made for it.
OFFICsTASj BJTlESTBC'S'O'K'E'.
1 EkKITORIAL 01T1CBRS.
nM.KOI1 N. 0. MTJRPHy
kctt"". C. S. AKERS
hCttfeTM" VI,-TCKRS
Auditor - VAwnn-rrr
Attorkky Gkseeal C. VAORiH
1 EASUREU W" Tt TONJ
D E IKG ATE T 6 COS rr'lW UROWV
Svrr. Terp.itor! Aii Prison. ...HERBLKT BROttJN
' TCCSON hXSO OlfFICK.
K istkr
AftCIUYER......
....MII.TONR. MOORE
"."."..". ..... J OliN II. BOWMAN
COUXTY OFFICER!!.
,., . WEBSTEr. STREET
CL OF DISTRICT CO0RT.6. chajman.a V.
SurERVisoRS ' ieedEN ami T, W. UNDERHILL
OwsrK OF BOARD OF S0rRR7l8ORS. ...V, , Of If
SHERTAX COIR ASD VM80R.JOH M- Sgh
BKR-SUER1FF n't- njnWN'
D isTRicr Attorset dkVaNE
Treasurer w jj kl,U0TT
ORVKTOR nR GREENLEAF
OffKTT PlIYSIClA W. E. MARVIN
Constv Recoruer
i-rsotkct ornccas.
G.M.THURLOW
Justice of the Tcace WENNINGER,
fortb H. McPHAUL and GEO.WILDEIt.
asteo, of YumaSehool Dirt. J. PWJgggJ
eiTTorncKRS,
.... .1. H. SHAKS EY
r o. H.WITiUS
1
Counoltatn
v u.." pEARCE EVANS
City Attorney , L REDONDO
City ilecorder p. q. CO ITER
Assessor A MODESTI
Treasurer X BIENKOWSKI
tarshau
RULES OF POST OFFICE.
Mail open oa Sundays from 8 to 9
it. m.
Week days 8 a. in. to 6 p. m.
No money order business on Sun
day. Mail closes at 7 o'clock p. m.
11. H. CHANDLER. P. M.
lUHi. LODGE, 0. 7, A. U. U. Ytr.
Meets every Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock.
Visting Brethren in good standing are in
cited to attend. Yours in C. H. and P.
F. L. Ewing. M. W.
E. a. Blaisdell, R.
I T TT f
Surgeon, uuice iu v.. -
M'
OLLEU, L. X., M. D.
Physician and Surgeon.
Levy Cottage, Main Street
OULLARD, PURDY GEO.
ATTORNEY-AT-LA.W.
Practices in all Courts-
rmPtly teiuled tjK Offlc.
ROOM 4, THIBODO B JILDING.
PHOENIX. " " AR!Z-
jgLLIOTT, V li-
CIVIL ENGINEER & SURVEYOR
U. S. Deputy Mineral Surveyor.
Yuma. A. T.
JUKE, CKO. A.
NOTARY PUBLIC
Yuma, ----- Ahtzona
Wanted-Sn U
tt-u. aim MiTnV
thlii to cateat?
We keep in stock mining location
nc.f)rdinr to the latest An-
JlUtl--'
xona law.
puis'
SjiS'origria! Offer Price $15.50 s4t
30 "?f i?2ht h-s JiarDine weighs 120 ,wundsindthefre'M ; will Vi&"Sl 5g.git-UM
itnnto?wca5k500mne2.8eiVE IT .THREE U0NTH& IV MJ" hWk'
wtI.ciL . ; faUr described In our Free StKing
tawSfwIf -this BKOP DESK CAHIjET r.lKl.lCC (a N
fiygsypc imitations aapgass MrireyM
TE3URPIS8i bfew liid n
-afjr--'Jrnjni t"e best raaierial Money Jij ft asai c.4
MmM SOLID QUARTER SAWED OAK ?BmsmjlH;,P
" SliSHEsSSria Vmipd (head droppinc Irom eipht) to he used as a center tabic, ttand
8 SHPSES ?.l ottw&iritli funienpt'i table acd Head in p ace for
Z fenja . " 7te5ri3 nld.flulcn.td. OUARANIft.u aiutomfut H fam!h! and our Free It
s 0 S Ml G&ff i"3KS4 l!s iu67ho"aSyone can run it and do either plain or fmr
l&M&$&M-&k cV??nrt 1 20-VS- Ulndins flurM.ti3 sent with every machine.
our
YOU SAN GST ONE OR MORE PIECES AT A TIME
UNTIL YOU SESURE A SOMPLETE SET,
111 FOR COUPON TICKETS,
Mo. of Tickets for each Article.
One Pie Plate.
One Breakfast Plate 142
One Dinner Plate 16 X
One Cup and Saucer : 201
One Individual Butter 4SOneS-in Long Vegetable Dish 48
One Fruit Dish. 4 in 8 1 One Pickle Dish 40
One Sugar Bowl 64
One Cream Pitcher 32
One Covered Butter 96
One Gravy Boat 4S
One Platter, 8 in 30
One Plaltor, 10 in 50
One Plattec, 12 in 96
One 5-in. Round Vegetable Dish 24
Co!d Air Storage Market
DAVID BALZ, Prop.
Wholesale and Hetal 1
Dealer in-
8EEF, MUTTON. PORK,
mi sid sausage.
Alfalfa fed cattle from Salt
River Valley received
by rail here.
entetl Hcticl, :sw UBoandler.
tile jis ESov ever ttiirneil.
SfO PER ACRE.
PERPETUAL WATER RIGHT UNDER
the celebrated Mohawk Canal in thv,
Celebrated Mohawk Valley. Each half sec
tion has FORTY ACRES ALL LEVELED,
FENCED AND READY FOR FARMING.
Inquire of
Arizona,
Or GEORGE W. NORTON,
Mohawk, Ycma ('o.. Ar.iz.
THE GEM,
C, V, MEEDEN, Prop,,
flairs street.
C3201CO
WINE, LIQUORS and GiG&RS
EVERYTHING
in every respe and
POPULAR P.IJCES.
5?a
LEVY & CO,
.- . . . Arizona
basil bustorn rs
4-
No. of Tickets for each Article.
12One6-in Round Vegetable Dish 28
One 7-in Round Vegetable Dish 40
One 8-in Round Vegetable Dish 48
One 7-in Long Vegetable Dish 40
One 8-in Covered Dish 120
One Celery Tray 80
One Cracker Jar 96
One Salad Dish 120
One Berry Dish 80
One Bread Plate 48
One J umbo Cup and Saucer 60
THE UMA
Is. Si. ISOGiiS,
PROPRIETOR
ALPALFA-FED BEEF, fresh from the far-lamed
meadows of the Salt Tiivor Valley.
Trices the Lowest In Town.
Free delivery to all parts of the cit
MAIN STREET.
YUMA, ARIZONA
Norton's Hotel,
Stage and
Telehpone
Lines
FROM MOHAWK TO TEXAS MIL
OX S. P. RAILROAD.
The Stage leaves Mohawk for Toxas
Hill daily except Sunday -nd con
nects with the westbound passen
ger train. Stage leaves Texas
Hill for Mohawk at 9:30 a. m.
daily or on arrival of westbound
passenger train.
Telephone service from Texas Hill
to King of Arizona mine.
Parties wanting teams to meet them
on arrival of any train can tele
phone for them. Their orders
will be promptly attended to.
Rigs fitted out to take parties to the
different mining camps on the
north side of the Gila River. King
of Arizona Mines, the Oregonian
Mines, Buena Vieta and La
JVexicana Mines, Mohawk Copper
Mines, Ete, Etc.
Good Hotel accommodations at Mo
hawk. Ferry across the Gila river
3.olia.ivlc. Arizona.
Land Script,
Tlie cheapest and most convenient
way of securing title to public land
Any non-mineral government land in
the United States which is open to en
try, surveyed or unsurveyed, can be
ocated, immediately without any re
quirement of residence or improve
ment. For particulars address Here
ford & Hazzard, attorueys-at-law,
Tucson, Arizona. ft
meat Market
C"
If your liver is out of order, causing
Biliousness, Sick Headache, Heart
burn, or Constipation, take a dose of
Fitor Pills
On retiring, and tomorrow your di
gestive organs will be regulated and
fyou will be bright, active and ready
f6r any kind of work. This has
been the experience of others; it
will be yours. HOOD'S PILLS are
sold by all medicine dealers. -25 cts.
New York Wdricl
a-WeekEditrtion
ait 1 tJJ
Practically a Daily at tnc price of a fl'celly
The striking and important events
of the last year have established the
overwhelming value- of the Thrice A
Week World to eyery reader. Ior
an almost nominal sum it lias kept
its subscribers informed of the pro
gress of all our wars and, moreover,
has reported them as promptly and
fully as if it were a daily. With our
interests still extending throughout
the world, with our troops operating
in the Philppines, and the great pres
ident'al campaign, too, at hand, its
value is further increased.
The motto of the Thrice-a-Week
World is improvement. It strives
each year to be better than it was the
year before, and public confidence in
it is shown by the fact that it now
circulates more than twice as many
papers every week as any other news
paper, not a -daily, published in
America.
To all new subscribers we offer this
unequaled newspaper and The Ari
zona Sentinel together one year for
$2.65.
UPHOLSTERING,
FURNITURE REPAIRING '
BED MATRESSES A SPECIALTY
FRANK VAN KOLKAU,
Opposite Hotel Gandolfo.
FOREST LIEU SELECTION.
U. S. Land Omen, Tucson, Arizona.
February 5. 1900.
Notice is hereby given that Thomas O.
Toland. whose post-office address is Ven
tura, Ventura county, California, has made
application to select under the Act of June
i, 1S97, ( 30 Stats., 36) the following tract of
unsurveyed land in Cibola valley, Yuma
county, Arizona:
The NEX of the SH and the SV of
the of Subdivision 16, and the E& of
theSEj of Subdivision 17 ot the Cibola
vallpy, Yuma county, Arizona, containing
160 acres, as said lands and subdivisions
arc shown, designated, and delineated upon
the map of said valley entitled "Subdivi
sion and Irrigation map of Cibola valley,
Yunfa county, Arizona, made by John A.
Barry, surveyor. November, 1899," filed in
this office November 25, 1S99, by Stephen
B. Sea'y and others, Desert Land claimants,
and according to the map marked "Exhibit
A" attached to ths application for this
selection .
Within the next tlrrty days from the
date of the first publication of this notice
protests or contests against the selection
on the ground that the land described, or
ny portion thereof, is more valuable for
its minerals than for agricultural purposes,
will be received and noted for report to the
Commissioner 0 the General Land Office.
Milton R. Mooke, Register.
First publication February 14, 1900.
DESERT LAND, F1XAL TROOF-
KOTIOE FOR PUBLICATION.
United States Lakh Office,)
Tucson, Ariz., February 5, 1800. J
Notice is hereby given that Epes Ran
dolph, of Tucson, Arizona, has filed notice
of intention to make proof on ins desert
land claim No. 2761, for lots 1, 2, 3, & 4, E
V. N. W. 4 & E. V S. W. K Sec- IS, T. 9 S
R. 23 W., G. & S. R. B. & M.. before the
Clerk of the District Court at Yuma, Ariz
ona, on Wednesday, the 21st day of March,
1900.
He names the following witnesses to
prove the complete irrigation and reclama
tion of said land : Eugene S. Ives. Thomas
A. Jordan, Frank Jordan and William C.
Pruet.all of Yuma, Arizona.
Milton R. Moore,
Register.
Piles! Piles! Itching Piles.
Symitom8 Moisture: ense itching and stiiigins
most at nisrht: worse by scratching. It allowed to
continue tumors form, which often bleed and ul-
tn 1. verr sore. Swaysk's Ointment
stops the itchinc and bleeding, heels ulceration
and In most cases removes the tumors. At drug-
nr hv mail, for 50 cent. Jr. Swayne & Son,
Phlladdi
'TfTtJURES WHtRt ALL ElbE FAILS. gg
K3 Bast CouRh Syr-vp. Tastes Good, use K$
Intimc 111 b'' g""""1- fi
THE FE UTILE DESERT.
The revival of the project .for
the irrigation of a large section of
the Colorado De?ert, to which re
ference is made in another depart
ment of The Times today, reminds
one that has coming quarter of the
century may witness as marvelous
a transportation in that great sec
tion of the arid Southwest as we
have seen accomplished during the
past twenty-five years in San 13er
nardino and Riverside counties. It
would not be a n y new thing to in
troduce water for irrigation in that
desert, which is only ad.csert-be-cause'
it is dry, tlie land" being
en&rmous fertile. Along the fcot
hills may be seen traces of pre
historic canals, built by people
whose very name is now forgotten.
Here, as in New Mexico and Ari
zona, these ancient settlers set an
example to modern enterprise, j
Notwithstanding their crude facili
ties, so accurate was their work
that in some cases engineers in
Arizona have followed the route of
these old canals with scarcely the
variation of an inch. It is difficult
to over-estimate the change that
may be wrought in the appearance
of that section should the proposed
irrigation project be carried out.
Before long w may see a dozen
Ontarios and Riversides and Po
monas where now is nothing but
shifting sand. The soil of a large
portion of the Colorado Desert,
composed of humus that has been
brought down by the Colorado
River during ages, is wonderfully
deep and rich. This has been
shown whenever there has been an
overflow ol the river, when within
an incredibly short time the previ
ously arid land wouid be covered
with a mass of herbage waist high,
on which thousands of cattle have
been pastured. Along the river in
the neighborhood of Yuma the In
dians drill shallow holes in the
soil after the river goes down, just
& s Th ey cl oa I olig-1 h e Ija n R s b F tli e
Nile, and plant corn, melons and
other seeds, which grow up with
the rapidity of Jack's bean stalks.
While the reclamation and settle
ment of the Lower Colorado Valley
is being discussed, there are signs
of revival along Che Upper Colorado.
This river the nearest approach
to a real river with real water in
Southern California was the scene
of lively development work from
twenty-five to thirty years ago,
when there were half a dozen im
portant mining camps between
Yuma and the Needles, such as
Ehrenberg and La Paz, both of
which are at present little more
than ruins. A number of steamers
used to ply regularly along the
river, carrying large quantities of
supplies and bringing down ore.
A revival of this section is promis
ed through the discovery of the fact
that the gravel banks along the
Colorado contain gold, It is true
that the precious metal is found in
small quai tities, but it is distribut
ed over an immense area, and ex
perts believe that with modern
processes of extraction it will be
possible to secure an amount of
gold that will even put the Klon
dike and the Transvaal into the
shade. One enthusiast dec. ares
that there are 5,000,000 acres of
clay soil between the Gulf of Colo
rado and the Grand Canyon, vary
ing from one to 100 feet thick. He
estimates that these clays contain
' more gold than nas ever been coin
ed by all countries in the world.
It is said that you can dip up a
bucket, of water in the Colorado
anv where between the Grand Canon
and the Gulf, and after letting it
settle and pouring off the water the
mud in the bottom will assay from
25 to 75 cents per ton in gold
What with gold dredging on the
Upper Colorado and farming in the
lower valleys, we mar yet seehun
diedsof thousands of men profitably
employed in that arid .and at pres
ent uninhabited corner of the Unittd
States. Naturally, this wou.d be a
big thing for Los Angeles which
with due. apologies to San Diego is
the only important commercial
center between Kansas City and
San Francisco. If you put your
ear to the ground you . may hear
the rumbling of great things com
ing to this section within the next
twenty years. L. A. Times.
THE REAL P0E3T0 RiCAN ISSUE.
"Keep the real U-suein sight, and
let the President and tho party be
judged by that," is the wise con
clusion of a very able article in the
Seattle "Post-Intelligencer" on the
Puerto Rican question. Obviously
this excellent editorial treatment of
a much-discussed subject is the
product of some knowledge and
sme thinking. Unfortunately the
same cannot be said of a vast vol
ume of matter that has found 11$
way Into print relative to tbs Puerto
Rican topic. No writer hag stated
the issue more clearly or more in
telligently than it is stated by the
uPost-InteIligencer," thus.
"It is not a question whether we
ought to impose a dut3rof25 per
cent, or one of 15 per cent, or none
at all upon commerce between that
island and the United Stales. It is
whether this Government has con
stitutional power to levy such a tax
under any circumstances; whether
Puerto Rico is territory to be gov
erned a3 all other territory added
has been, by the disposition of Con
gress, or whether its people ac
quired, by the treaty of Paris, con
stitutional rights within the United
States that compel recognition by
us and leave us no choice but to
acknowledge the new possessions
as an integral part of the nation
under the Constitution, and finally
to admit them as States."
Rightly the l'Post Intelligencer"
insists that the contest is not waged
on the question whether Puerto
Rican trade should be free or un
taxed. The opposition to the pend
ing bill is based upon no such con
sideration. It cares nothing about
the question either of Tariff or of
revenue. Engineered by clever
Free-Trade and anti-imperialist
strategists, the movement, intended
solely to "put the administration in
.a hole,?' hasecured the adhesion
of a considerable number of Repub
licans who seem to be unable to
discover the use that is "being made
of them. They are apparently
blind to -the fact, so clearly pointed
out by the "Post-Intelligencer,"
that:
"The constitutional question is
the real bone of contention. The
Republicanparty cannocabandonits
position tipon that without revers
ing all our precedents and destroy
ing the practical possibility ot
huilding up a migrity commerce in
the Far East by exchanging for the
open door in the Philippines the
open door in the vast portion of
Asia under European control.
"We believe that those who have
differed honestly from the party's
policy in this particular will a,''ree
with it when they come to see what
is involved; and how cunningly the
advocates of retirement from the
Philippine have sought to make
that necessary by a pretended fight
over the Puerto Rican Tariff."
If only the army of dissenters
from the policy of the Republican
party could once grasp the idea
that a much bigger and more por
tentons question than that of 25
per cent., 15 per cent., or no Tariff
at all is involved in the Puerto
Ricari proposition, it would might
iiy help to clear up the situation.
S VH. HOUSTON'S SECRET.
"A mystery in which the Amer
ican people were once deeply con
cerned was that which shadowed
thelife of one of the most remark
able characters of the country,"
writes William Perrine of "The
Mysteries of the Century," in the
April Ladies' Home Journal. "In
1829 Samuel Houston, or, as he
called and signed himself, 'Sam'
Houston, was Guvernor of Tennes
see. It was in the midst of a cam
paign for reelection to the Guber
natorial chair that Tennessee wa$
startled by a report that he had
resigned his office. He had been
married to the daughter of an in
fluential family; three months af
terward she returned to his father's
house, and her husband resolved to
pass the rest of his life in tho' wilder
ness ..
i; Houston brilook himself to the
tribes of Cheroees in' the Indian
Awarded .
Siigiiest Honors World's Fair;
Gold Medal, Midwinter FairJ
58. 8
:7 1
CHAM
irmMiyliii
- AJSnra-G rn po "Crca iti f-Ts ris? Powder.
40 YEARS THE STANDARD,
Territory; he adopted their eostume.
appearing in all the trappings ofp
an Indian brave, letting his.haif
grow down his back, and visiting
Washington with a buckskin hunt
ing-shirt, yellow leggings, a hugs
blanket and turkeT feathers around
his head. No one could induce hioJ
to reveal the secraff of his metamor
phosis and his abandonment of the
ways and habits of civilization.
He married again after he emerged
from his Indian life, and he lived
to be an . old man, dying in the
mid-t of the Civil War, but no one
was ever able to persuade him to
unlock the mystery of his life. Ner
would his first wife, who also mar
ried again, throw any light oh the
mystery."
FJREE .GOLD FOUND.
Jerome (A. T.) April 2. Today.
the city is almost depopulated of
its male inhabitsinta. Every livery
rig in the city and special passenger
trains have been carrying the peo-.
pie to a point eight miles north of
Jerome, on the United Verde and
Pacific railro.-id. where an enorm
ously rich vein of free gold waa
discovered by section hands on this
railroad.
The ground where the gold bear
ing quartz is found has been pros:
pootod-foj-m u n w ycxirc-asixl hoav-y
cuts made througb it by the United
Verde and Pacific railroad.
No one suspected the presence of
the precious metal. At this hour,-'
very little work has been done on
the discovery claim, a hole four feet
deep has been made and a sample'
assay which 3hows the startling
result of $25,000 a ton. Thequartz:
is white. . ,
Last year sixty-two new silk mills
were start-d in ths United States.
The raw material must be imported,
but American workmanship is
producing great results in its manu
facture.
THE j&O Til EK LESS CHILI?.
One by ojie the long, dark shadows
Take some form upon the wall;
Dinilj burns the cheerless fire,
Hushed as death the ashes fall, . .. .
A lonely childs grieves for her mother,
Soirow bows the lit.t!e head,
As the following ashes answer,
Little girl, yonr mother's deal,
Never will her mamma listen
To her footsteps through the hall,
Never will he hide in doset3 :
"When she hears her mamma call
Who will tell her little stories? ' ...
Whc will siRg her little sings ?
Who will kiss away her pouting
As she folds her in her arms. .
Her litfie heart is beating wildly, .
Burdened not with childish care; .
But with grief which has no. ending -
'Copt in heaven only there!
Motherless child! God help her!
Strange the world is to her now;
But her mother hovers o'er her .
And will guide her safely thiough.
tlarker grows the ghostly shatows,
Formles3 now noon tho wall; . .. : - .
'Hound the house the night wind whistlesg
Softly j'et the ashes fall.
Hoy.' the little sad face brightens,
Bright as iFwith Heavenly beam-!
Sleeping while her darling mofchor.
Sooth her sorro y ia htr Gum3. 4
FORTUNA. . ,
3 iral??? fi BBSS &
1 iMMIl
SAW FRAMCISJCO, CAL.
:

xml | txt