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Arizona sun. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1942-196?, March 06, 1953, Image 6

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84021917/1953-03-06/ed-1/seq-6/

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PAGE SIX
'Lite-a-Bumper'
For Safety
By FORREST R. ZELLMER
Safety Chairman
Junior Chamber of Commerce
Mr. Marion W. Trowbridge,
head of the Maricopa County
Chapter of the National Safety
Council, was recently saved from
a very serious accident by Scotch-
GRAPHICHART
How Controls Affected Wages And Prices
t -•
Wage and salary controls have been dropped by White House order. Prices on WHAT HAPPENED TO WAGE RAISES
most consumer items may move freely. Charts show what happened under controls. UNDER CONTROL AND DECONTROL
Why Controls How Decontrol What May Happen Possible Risk I ,r—l, ,
Are Dropped Affects Economy To Wages, Prices Os Decontrol | E ,r..°. R . s , I S BS - 69
: - - (Gross Weekly Earnings) «
Prices - H IIBI JlaßiiiHH Essisa *
! Administration feels Decontrol removes ar- Unions can now ask If Korean war should jjiztt gpEj jEZmj EpjSj gziSj
; U.S. economy is strong, tificial economic de- and try to get any spread, prices would SMS P-s 5--a SzS B-g S—s
danger of inflationary vices and reduces U.S. wages in competition be almost certain to si —is si-isl shs s— at ifi-ai S-51 af-sl
crisis is fading. Whole- interference with nor- of open market. Some Jump as they did when 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952
sale prices are down, mal economic laws. It prices may rise, others the outbreak came in -
savings are up. Food may bring a period of may fall. No economic 1950. That is why some This shows how average wee | t | y wages continued upward under j
prices are dropping, economic instability, upset is expected, want standby controls. controls. Strikes or strike threats forced most steel wage raises. |-
- ■ 11 11 11 r 1 ■ 1 • - 1
HOW CONTROLS AFFECTED CONSUMER PRICE INDEX I I H MA^ FAC ™ RIN< ?I $72 . 36 1
. - , (Gross Weekly Earnings) $64.88 |g-=n
; »>, —n ■ . ■ ■. T mwg' ■ 3
K WSSSSnSSt ►« kvmlHß ► $43.82 $^ 7 & “ HI h a
; Decontrol Starts •♦******—****** ***** H>, » _ Pi! IPI Bi fiHi Bi
225 Nov. 9,1946 [~ FISST B BHBEBEBEEHHHi fcMMrRM
... —a: llniiiiiilinl
fUtS 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 j
S t V I' 190.7 This shows how average weekly wages in manufacturing followed
V ''\ ?■' steel pay upward during the period of 1951-52 wage controls.
\sr\ /VAII/7// 1 HOW DECONTROLLED RENTS INCREASED - m
,50 - r 1 ■■
jr / -5m j|f! I i rent / _ U -S„vu««--- ■'HViaiifa iHEHESI- 4 :
139.5 I; ECONOMY 1:1 »Tm "V"kONOM¥ S(|l 145,3 45% | ’ I
, 20 \ 30% , i
( ,00 I Itllli rMn 7 ' 95 .~ l!!!2!i£i Lil . [ill Ej i i
1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 t 1951 4 ■► 4 1952 ———♦ Birmingham. Los Angeles Milwaukee J Chicago
Prices loomed after controls were dropped in 1946, due mostly to pent-up demand for goods. After Renfs f or moderate-income families went up from 30 to 45 per I
Korean war started, inflationary pressures brought controls back in January, 1951. Prices continued cen t in Uq sos 4 econ fr o > f or t h re e cities shown above,
upward, leveled off, then started falling in 1952. Rents moved slowly upward at bottom of price index. Largest increases were in dwellings renting for S3O a month.
Source: Bureau of Labor Statistics.
FOOD PRICES UNDER CONTROL AND DECONTROL .
, , , CONTROLS AND PRICE SUPPORTS
mcHmuk butter|.,i i:. . i :: i , 1
»Ver (furt gifgf ■■ ■ 25.5 c i 85—„|i?l||l£ai: wage-price controls
25 "fi-i'• t"" :"Tt-fijilDec on. ;; |M3cl .. Millions fgfi .
a wTTtlmTtTriisalgi !* 11 StMl m ”f 4 q y e/ ;
1946 '47 '4B '49 'SO 1951 1852 1916 ’47 ’4B ’49 'SB 1951 1952 t 3 tg |u Rent
m ROUND STEAK FF I r 169.6 c I CHUCK. ROAST
Per Poßttd!do 7_| B Det i ™'-IVNiH|ft3d"" 1827e 1 : "' ; , TZ 1
90• ——“-l—' — 5c » ;wp ri ■ : : : ■jjhrc Last year the Economic Stabilization Agency spent $98.4 mil
-50 1 737 kM~ il ”'j ™"" y" g22c .:=••»• I'l» on in administrative and other costs in maintaining controls.
= 1 l^^.l c .!. s 4L^ s .lsm9 g
M '47 ’4B V ’SO 1951 1952 3 ° 1946 "47 ''4B '49 '56 ;
' COFFEE |:| n c -! lEer| BREAD II I f 8159 Is Eg IB p™
Per Poona " rs -'l:vl®**- 16 IHrai* Loaf 5 $147 Ip $78.3 Is IS IB ftf *'
70 •••■■w.-- — —-rt- - '-‘■l - .. .. .. ..«a2 c ■ Dec ****.' jgrgzsj: crc-sn |tg=3 EblrzS
•■V •' ; • :y ife' t3i|f f"I c=fTT»!3ni?
f |49 7e '• I " Bv::'!;:;; 10 -T-- “L li? .
50—r|44_9c!^ C ->- 1 1— „ j,, IT H J:i :i:p ; 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952
40 33&KT797nT TtH ' ] wsTHJ fA I *0 iftiiiLxfiiwt • . : :: ~i~~
3U I Hi;r*r j !■ ] « ITI Losses far outbalance profits in U.S. farm price support program.
1946 ’47 '4B '49 *SO 1951 1952 0 1946 ’47 *4B *49 ’SO 1951 1952 Surpluses are now increasing. Exports are down, prices are
!,■ ,i I. ■ ... —— declining. U.S. may have to buy more farm products to keep
These are average food prices in Chicago. Prices varied in different localities of U.S., but up and • them off market. Now has $2.4 billion in loans and inventories. j
down trends were much the same throughout the nation. Many prices reached new peaks under controls. . | ~
, - - - - - ■■■— By Tom P. Barrett
Chicago SUN-TIMES Syndicate ♦
Economy
lite. Mr. Trowbridge was return
ing from a Safety meeting in
Globe when he rounded a curve
and noticed a red glow in the cen
ter of the road. He slid to a stop
only a few feet from the back of
a car that had been disabled by a
previous wreck. “Without Scotch
lite on the rear bumper of that
car, I would have been another
statistic myself. This highly re
flective tape is one of the finest
ARIZONA StJN
now Safety devices of the decade,
and I personally wish every car
in Arizona were stripped with it
for the safety of us all. The $1
cost is the cheapest insurance
against accidents a man can buy
today. The Union Oil Dealers in
this area should be commended
for applying this Jaycee spon
sored material as a public ser
ice.”
“LITE-A-BUMPER” for Safety
!is a nationwide Junior Chamber
I Safety Project and all profits go
| for their other civic projects. Made
!of millions of tiny red beads of
| glass, this highly reflective tape
! on a rear bumper, can be seen TO
I per cent faster than normal tail- I
| lights.
“LITE-A-BUMPER” for Safety i
i at any Union Oil Station for only |
1 $1 —do it today!!!
FRIDAY, MARCH 6; 1953
Hurry To Table!
Follow these steps to perfection
in broiling lamb chops. Arran
the chops on the broiler rack so
the top surface of the chops is
' 2 to 3 inches from the heat. When
! that side is brown (about 6 minutes
j for 1 inch chops) season, turn and
i finish cooking on the second side.
| Season, then hurry the chops to
! the table.

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