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Arizona tribune. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1958-197?, January 19, 1962, Image 1

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84021918/1962-01-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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| Phoenix, Ariz.
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FOURTH YEAR, NO. 26, FRIDAY, JANUARY 19. 1962
ALICIA DELUXE APARTMENTS TO
BE BUILT AT 24TH AND E. PUEBLO STREETS
Mtm**** ' V
I ? * l~ sf -
IPH V •
ALICIA DELUXE APARTMENTS will be built on this site at
24th and East Pueblo. Groundbreaking ceremonies were held Thurs
day, Jan, 11.
Pictured above are Messrs. Travis Williams, D. W. Williams,
Virgil Berry, and Clyde Webb.
Williams and Jones Construction Company will erect 5 four
plex, 2 bedroom deluxe apartments which will be ready for oc
cupancy within sixty days.
The apartments are being built for Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Webb,
of 2127 E. Parkway.
Webb, Williams and Berry real estate and insurance brokers
will have charge of rentals and leases.
All apartments will have full bath, dining and living room area,
central heating and cooling and carport facilities.
VALLEY COUPLE CELEBRATES
GOLDEN WEDDING ANNIVERSARY
■ i i ■
* ■ H
FIFTIETH WEDDING ANNIVERSARY recalled in a special
program held at Willow Grove Baptist Church last Saturday night.
Valleyites celebrated the golden anniversary of Rev. and Mrs. W.
M. Hardison, 3402 So. 36 St. The couple was married at McNary,
Louisiana on Jan. 8, 1912.
They moved to McNary, Arizona in 1924 and five years later
moved to Phoenix.
Rev. -Hardison has been pastor at Willow Grove Baptist Church
for the past 31 years.
They have one daughter, Mrs. Ruby Mclntosh of Phoenix.
Pictured above are Rev. Jessie Wheeler, Mrs.G.Venerable, Mesa,
Mrs. Hardison, Rev. Hardison, and Mr. G, Venerable, Mesa.
TWO SECTIONS
THIS WEEK
READ THE STORY OF
Arizona's soth year
OF STATEHOOD
PICTURES GALORE,,,,
ARIZONA TRIBUNE
SPECIAL
MAN GETS
SENTENCE FOR
CHECK CHARGE
Osborne Mitchell, 50, of 1122
E. Washington, was sentenced in
Superior Court to 2 to 4 years
in prison after he pleaded guilty
to passing a SSO bad check.
Pictorial Weekly
SHE'S FIRST TWICE
■ ■
DOUBLE FIRST FOR *62 -
Eight-month-old Sheila Magda
lene Cason, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Frederick Cason of Kan
sas City, Mo., received the
NAACP’s first junior life mem
bership officially processed dur
ing 1962. She is also the Asso
ciation’s first junior life mem
ber in Kansas City.
NAACP juhior life member
ships, such as Sheila’s cost only
SIOO.OO, payable quarterly. All
youngsters 12 and under are eli
gible.
WOMMAN SHOOTS
MAN IN FRACAS
Welton Sumpter, 24, of 1734
E. Jefferson, was shot in the chest
by his common-law wife, Mary
Rose, 35, at their home.
Sumpter was taken to Good
Samaritan Hospital, where au
thorities said his condition was
critical.
Miss Rose told police she shot
Sumpter through a window of
their home with a .22 caliber
rifle when he tried to force
entry.
She told police she had ’’cut
him with a butcher knife’’Thurs
day, and she feared he was seek
ing revenge.
Police held the woman for in
vestigation of assault with a dead
ly weapon.
NEGROES HAVE HIGH
PERCENT OF U. S.
GOVERNMENT JOBS
WASHINGTON - A census of
Federal employes shows that the
percentage of Negroes in govern
ment compares favorably with the
Negro population ratio.
The Negro Federal employes,
however, are concentrated in the
lowest third of the salary grades.
The census totals also conceal
the spottiness of Federal job
opportunity. One agency, uniden
tified by name or size, had until
recently no Negro employes.
In Federal establishments in
some Southern cities the percen
tage of Negro employes is ex
tremely low. In some Northern
cities their Federal employment
rate far exceeds the average.
The census was conducted by
the President’s Committee on
Equal Employment Opportunity.
POOLS TO
BE INTEGRATED
SALISBURY, Southern Rhode
sia - The High Court has issued
an order restraining the Salis
bury City Council from restrict-
PHOENIX 40, ARIZONA
MEET A SCHOOL SECRETARY
MRS. WILLIAM. C. SMITH, JR., (Valdia), 1831 E. Broadway
Rd„ enjoys her work. Avidly interested in the business field
during high school and college, she is the secretary at Dunbar
Elementary School.
A native of the state, she was bom in Yuma, and moved to Phoenix
in 1941. She attended Arizona State Teachers College, Flagstaff,
Arizona State University and Phoenix College.
Mrs. Smith keeps a full schedule. She and her husbnad William,
a teacher at Washington School in Mesa, are the parents of three
children, Yvonne, 16, Annette and William, 14.
She is active in church and community affairs. She is a member
of the First Institutional Baptist Church, Les Femmes d’Art, Ari
zona Educational Secretary Assn., and local educational secretaries
assn.
Her hobbies are sewing and coin collecting.
Mrs. Smith feels that school secretaries need to be jacks of
all trades, since they are often asked to perform first aid duties,
art critic and chief bottlewasher. She attributes much of enjoy
ment of her job to the interest and assistance given to her by her
principal, Mr. A. H, Shaw. Photo-Bobby Heard
AFRICAN ART AT
HEARD MUSEUM
The art of Africa is the sub
ject of a new permanent exhibit
recently opened at the Heard
Museum, 22 E, Monte Vista.
Thomas Cain, museum cura
tor, said the new exhibit covers
the entire continent of Africa.
It was put together with do
nations and loans in addition
to the museum’s own collection.
Many of the displays in the
exhibit reflect African Negro art
which has had much influence
on modern European and Ameri
can art, said Cain.
"Yet for years (African Negro
art) remained unrecognized,col
lected only as curios,” he added.
The African art exhibit can be
seen during the regular museum
hours from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and
from 1 to 5 p.m. on Sundays.
ing municipal swimming pools
to the use of whites.
In effect, the ruling means
that pools must be opened to
persons of all races. It was
hailed as a victory for oppon
ents of the color bar.
BR. 6-2301 TEN CENTS
GIRL SAYS RUSSIAN
SCHOOLS BETTER
Russian schools are far su
perior to American, said a 14-
year-old Newark girl who has
been studying in Moscow for three
months.
The girl Huldah Clark, spent
the holidays with her parents,
Mr. and Mrs. William Clark,
and their five younger children.
Huldah, siad while she would
have been in the ninth grade at
home, she was so far behind
Russian boys and girls of her
age she was placed in the sixth
grade there last September. She
had been attending the Essex
County Vocational School for
Girls.
Mr. Clark, a Negro laborer,
renewed the declaration he had
made at the time of his daugh
ter’s departure last September—
that he was sending her "away
from Jim Crowism and lynch
ing.” Huldah echoed her fath
er’s criticisms of the United
States.

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