OCR Interpretation


Arizona tribune. [volume] (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1958-197?, January 18, 1963, Image 5

Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84021918/1963-01-18/ed-1/seq-5/

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MISS THOMAS CELEBRATES HER
BIRTHDAY WITH MANY FRIENDS AND RELATIVES
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Family and friends gathered to wish happy birthday to a Phoenix
College coed on Sat., Jan. 12.
TTie honoree, Miss Virginia Thomas, 20, center is ready to cut
her cake.
From left are Walter Tilford, Miss Clariee Lane, Billy Morri
son, Misses Adrean Bremby, Virginia Thomas, jaKeeta Watley
and Lisa Taylor.
Also pictured are James and Phillip Lewis.
TTie party was held at the home of the honoree*s mother, Mrs.
Sweet Lorraine Bremby, 1709 E. Tamarisk.
Others attending the birthday party honoring Miss Virginia Thomas
are Emmett Washington, Thoron Washington, Miss Laura Porter,
Miss Barbara Carr, Roy Gentry and Curtis Poole.
MAURY WILLS IS
ATHLETE OF THE YEAR
Maurice (Maury)Wills, the Los
Angeles Dodgers shortstop, was
named Athlete of the Year for
1962.
He broke an unbreakable base
ball record by stealing 104 bases
last season. Four other Negroes
Joe Louis, Jesse Owens, Willie
Mays and Rafer Johnson have won
the coveted award.
The thirty year old player
polled 338 points. Sonny Liston
received only 72.
Buying
a new
appliance?
Ask your dealer about
financing at First National—
the bank where you come first!
It’s strange the way appliances seem to need replacing
at financially inconvenient times.
But your appliance dealer can help you solve this prob
lem . . . just ask him about First National’s Plan of
Financing. He’ll tell you about First National’s quick
approval service and how all costs are clearly spelled
out in advance. First National arranges terms to suit
your budget . . . at the lowest possible payment plan.
m
FIRST
NATIONAL
BANK
OF ARIZONA
CHURCHMAN SAYS GOD
IS THE ANSWER
CHICAGO - Rev. Will Camp
bell, of Nashville, executive di
rector of the National Council
of Churches department of racial
and cultural relations said reli
gion will end race problems when
men realize God rather than man
is supreme.
He advised the church to ex
tend love and redemption to the
segregationist and teach him the
Christian message.
BAHA'IS TO
HOLD WORLD DAY
The Baha’is of Phoenix will hold
their annual observance of World
Religion Day on Sunday, January
20 at 2 p.m. at the Chris Town
Auditorium reports Mr. James
Harris, chairman of the Baha’i
Assembly of Phoenix.
Dr. Dwight W. Allen, Asst.
Professor of Education at Stan
ford University will discuss the
topic *' Discovering Unity in Re
ligion.”
World Religion Day was estab
lished by the National Spiritual
Assembly of the Baha’is of the
United States in 1949 to gain pub
lic recognition of religion as the
activating force for world peace.
WORLD’S ONLY
FULLY AUTOMATIC
CLEANER
f&cttofux
FACTORY-AUTHORIZED
SALES & SERVICE
CLARENCE DAVIS
I 1815 W . Apache
253—4766
H AGLER’S
BARBER SHOP
3-6 PM TUES.-FRI,
8-7 PM SAT.
345 E. Jefferson St,
INCOME TAX—BOOKKEEP ING
NOTARY PUBLIC
I . R . JOHNSON
BR 6—5372
Johnson’s Tax Service
DEPUTY REGISTRAR
1817 EAST MOBILE
PHOENIX 34, ARIZONA
FAST SERVICE
2 DRIVEIN WINDOWS
ARIZONA TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JAN. 18, 1963,
JACKIE ROBINSON SAYS
I read several years ago that a six-year old white boy in Louisiana
died for want of blood plasma. This is a country noted for the
humanitarian gifts of life blood - both on the battlefield in defense
of noble ideas and in everyday life to combat critical disease.
Yet, this small boy’s life was in jeopardy and the great blood
banks of the American Red Cross could not be used to help him for,
in Louisiana, there is a law that "white” and "Negro blood” must
not flow together - even In life-saving blood banks.
I wonder how easy it would be to convince the parents of this dying
boy, no matter how deep their beliefs on racial Issues, that their
son’s agony was necessary to perpetuate the great stone of segre
gation. I wonder how impressed they would be, as their youngster
gasped for breath, by die argument that all our racial questions
will be settled by long, drawn-out "education.”
It is inconceivable to me how any of our fellow-countrymen can
preach the doctrine of "patience” and "education” in these days, as
a substitute for forthright action to implement all the handmade and
God-made laws regarding the brotherhood of humans and the father
hood of the Maker.
If the argument that we must wait for "education” had been applied
in organized baseball, it would have been centuries before this great
American sport became truly democratic. The true "education” which
we received in organized baseball came about through the opportunity
of sharing a relationship, colored boys with white boys; with getting
to know each other. Don’t you remember all the talk about the prob
lems which would arise if someone tried to allow white and colored
players to play, work and travel together, to use the same shower
and share the same hotels? Os course! The problems did arise and
they were dealt with beautifully. We got an education. Whites got a
chance to know Negroes. Negroes got a chance to know whites. It
was just as much an education to me to learn that when Southerners
sound out the things they had learned about Negroes weren’t true,
they turned out to be more friendly than most Northern boys. If
they had waited as others now tell us to do, they would have always
held the conviction that Negroes were different.
Today, there are certain whites in baseball who do not like certain
Negroes. But this is different. This is not prejudice. It is based on
evaluation of the individual rather than a blanket condemnation of
either race. We should want our children to discriminate, based on
certain values, but not to hate based on ignorance. To discriminate
is to select and you cannot select wisely without knowing the truth.
It is the truth that gives the young, upcoming generations of this
land a freedom the likes of which their fathers never dreamed.
They will come to know each other - - youngsters of all races and
creeds - - only through contact. They will come to judge the good
and the bad.
As far as I am concerned, white youngsters as well as colored
youngsters in the South are being deprived of their rights to full
education. For to know your own neighbors in this contracting world
is to know wisdom.
TTiis is why I believe those who preach delay are wrong. This kind
of "education,” they advocate, is taking its terrible toll in human
dignity and the kind of situation which condemns a six-year old
white boy to death for want of blood.
Since three quarters of the people of the world wear skins touched
with color, we cannot afford to mark time in our battle to free the
minds of men from the wooing of the kind of ideas which would make
us all equally enslaved.
MERDITH'S
TIRES ARE CUT
OXFORD, Miss. - The first
Negro student at the University
of Mississippi, James H. Mere
dith, returned to the campus after
a weekend in Memphis.
He found the tires on his 1952
car had been slashed. Students
had booed and jeered him earlier
in the week, but the furor stopped
Monday.
The 29 yr. old Negro refused
to say anything else about leav
ing school before the semester
end on Jan. 28.
ANNOUNCING THE ASSOCIATION OF
DR. JOHN FITT
and
DR. JAMES BAXTER
IN THE PRACTICE OF DENTISTRY
SUITE 103 VALLEY LIFE BUILDING
1140 E. Washington St.
Phoenix 34, Arizona
PHONE 252-7397
NAACP SUIT
UPHELD BY COURT
WASHINGTON - The U. S.
Supreme Court ruled a Virginia
law which the National Associa
tion for die Advancement of Col
ored People said had curbed its
participation in litigation over
racial discrimination.
The state law calls legal ac
tivities seeking to end racial
discimination unlawful. Law
yers who take such cases are
declared guilty of malpractice.
The law was passed in 1956
and NAACP officials say it was
part of the state’s massive re
sistance to integration.
P.5

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