OCR Interpretation


Douglas Island news. [volume] (Douglas City, Alaska) 1898-1921, January 13, 1904, Image 2

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84021930/1904-01-13/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The Douglas Island News.
B n to red at Douglas Post-office as Second
Class Mail Matter.
CHARLES A. HOPP
Editor and Proprietor.
PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY
TERMS:?In Advance.
One Year - - - - $3.00 J
Six Months - - - - - - -1.50
Three Months 75
Siutfle Copies ------ 10
?
I
'PHONE NO. 01.
I
!
Wednesday, Jan. 13, 1901.
j
Misconception of Alaska.
The annual excursions of the Pacific
Coast Steamship Compauy, stray con-:
gre9smen, senators and touring com-'
mittees from house and senate, who j
have made vacation trips into the coun
try; returning argonauts attaches ofj
northern corporations, have done much j
to disabuse the orthodox idea that the
shores of Alaska are ice-bound and
that the country is covered with eter-1
nal snow. Put the old misconception
that prevailed at the time of the trans
fer yet maintains throughout tho world
to too great an extent. Pictures of ice
covered craft,icebergs, glacial pinacles,
snow fields, sledding scenes and deni
zens clad iu fur, parkas and mucluks '
tend to foster this very unjust belief
in the forbidding frigidity of Alaska.
There has been too much written of
"the vast white silence" aud noteuough i
about the pleasant realities that make
Alaska the delightful country that it is. I
It is strange that it is not yet gener- j
ally conceived that a vast country?a j
third the size of the Uuitcd States?
can have within its boundaries a varie- j
ty of climates.
Oue of the great lessons that should
be taught the world by the Alaskan ex
hibit at the Louisiana Purchase Expo-1
sition is, that there are portions of AI-1
aska where vegetation grows with al- j
most tropical luxuriance. That there j
is a vast empire in Alaska where the
mercury does not fall below zero, where !
native grasses grow taller than a mau's
height aud cattle and horses cau win-!
ter without care or shelter. That the i
climate of the Southeastern Alaskan
coast is more equable than that of any
northern states east of the Rocky
mountains. Let summer scenes hang !
upon the walls of Alaska's show build
ing?pictures of fat Aleutian cattle,
the rank vegetation of gardens, the
dense foliage of yellow cedar forests
and their towering irecs. Aud a few
Fourth of July picnic scenes portray
ing ladies in gauzy garments and men
with straw hats might hint at the idea
that should be conveyed.?Skagway Al
askan.
Cable for Douglas.
Oil the last AI-Ki, the Electric Light
company received two large cables that
they have been expecting for the past
four months. The reason for the delay
was that the cables had to be made
especially for the company. The two
large spools, weighing in the neighbor- j
hood of 7 tons each, were loaded on a
scow and towed up to the crossing
above Gold creek, to await a favorable
time when tide aud wind would permit j
the cable being laid.
Mr. Margrie, with a large force of,
men, pulled the scow across the chan-1
nel, paying out the cable as they went, j
In three hours, the cable, that had cost j
thousands of dollars, was laying across
the bottom of Gastineaux Channel,
ready to be connected to the mains on J
either side. This will eliminate one i
source of trouble from the many that I
are encountered in running lights in
Alaska, for, should an iceberg or other i
object injure one of the cables, it.
could be cut out until it was repaired, j
and the lights would burn as usual, on i
the uninjured cables. It is not likely (
that all four cables crossing the chan- '
nel would be injured at one time. We/
are informed that this spring another 11
large dynamo will be installed in the [
new addition to the power house, and a <
new pipe liue put down. This will
practically duplicate the plant now
running, and incidentally, guarantee
good service.
I
Advertised Letters.
Letters remaining unclaimed in the
postoffice at Douglas, Alaska, on Jan.
9nd, 1903. Persons wishing any of them j
should call for "Advertised Letters"
R. R. Hubbard, P. M.
Coprvica, Lazar
Gurasevich, Laca
McDonald, Angus
Sand berg, Frank
Irwine, Thos.B. '?
Founndry, Salley
Lakovich, Jovan S.
Ohman, Albert
Willet, Hary
Williams, Mrs. Mary ,
| h y^laska Qteam ^aundry |
' jj Is turning out the whitest, cleanest and best laundry work jj
? in Southeastern Alaska. Men's suits and women's dress- 3
J es dyed cleaned and pressed. Lace curtains, blankets and S
' ? /.itiMAtp r*\r>~L^nA Leave orders with John Henson, Front Street, Douglas, or ?
I |j? carpets cieaneu. 'piione Siain 15.
'
| Douglas City 11 eat ilarket|
?| L. H. Keist, Proprietor ,(1TT j |
I lUcfils of Kin $ I
i ? i
* FISH AND GAME IN SEASON |
i D STREET DOUGLAS, ALASKA |
?" ??? I
_
The Seattle Daily ]:
?? i
and Sunday Times
Occupies Its Own Building
Cor. Union St. and Second Ave.
7 Days a Week==50 Cents a Month
By Mail or Carrier
The Times Printing Company, publishers of the aforesaid news papers,are the
sole owners of the following news franchises for publication in the City of
Seattle:
The Associated Press day service, furnished by leased wire terminating in
The Times building.
The Publishers' Press, exclusively for The Sundav Times and in every way as
full and thorough as the Associated Press.
The Hearst Syndicate, which is a special service of a unique character both in
contents and illustrations.
Special Service from the National Capital, New York, Chicago, The Twin Cities
and the Pacific Northwest, ranging from 1,000 to 6,000 words daily.
The Sunday Times is admittedly the grandest newspaper published west of
Chicago, having no peer on the Pacific Coast. The circulation of The Sun
day Times has now reached 34,000. The Sunday Times runs from 44 to 56
pages every issue.
The Dally Times, ranging from 14 to 28 pages, now exceeds 31,500 in circula
tion and is the best evening newspaper published in the United Stutes, with ,
the exception of The Chicago News.
The Weekly Times, issued every Wednesday, consists of 16 pages, and is the
greatest weekly for the money published in this field.
The Sunday Times costs $2.23 per annum, or 20 cents a month.
The Daily Times costs $6.00 per annum, or 50 c;nts u month.
The Weekly Times costs $1.00 per annum.
It requires 75,000 pounds of white paper to publish the various editions of The
Times each week. It took 3,300,000 pounds to publish those editions for
the 12 months ending Feb. 1,1903.
It nctually takes 40 per cent of all the white paper consumed by all the Daily
newspapers published In Washington to publish the various editions of The
Times. . .
If you want the Best, the Largest, and yet the Cheapest for actual cash, paid
subscribe for one of these editions.
THE TIMES PRINTING CO. Seattle Wa sh.
? ?? 1 ? .i 1 1
n. .WT. II? ? ??!
Cured Lumbago.
A. B. Cauman, Chicago, writes March
4, 1903: "Having been troubled with
Lumbago at different times and tried
one physician after another; then dif
ferent oiutments and liniments, gave 1
it up altogether. So I tried once more,!
and got a bottle of Ballard's Snow
Liniment, which gave me almost
instant relief. I can cheerfully recom
mend it, and will add my name to your 1
list of former sufferers." 25c, 50c and i
$1, at J. Heubner's drug store.
i
iiiiiiiiiiMMmwe>w?t
19 $
ii Campbell Bros.*
??? *
| Carpenters and | i
!! Contractors I
11 9
] j BOAT AND SCOW BUILDING # j
I > JOBBING AND REPAIRING |
II O
J SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
j South Front St. Douglas I
j Near Hotel Northern S j
I
I
Douglas iron Ulorks
N. A. UREJI, Pkoi*.
Plumbing T inning
STEAM FITTING, ENGINEERING
AND MACHINE WORK.
flachinery of all kinds Repaired and Set Up
WALL KINDS OF METAL WORK
CHURCH DIRECTORY.
METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH?Ser- j
vices every Sunday evening at 8:00. Sunday i
school at 12 o'clock a. in.
Kev. L. H. Pedersen, Pastor.
EPISCOPAL CHURCH Services held at the
Church every Sunday evening at 7:45 o'clock ;
Communion Service at 9 a. in. on the first
Sunday of each month.
Rev. Christian A. Roth, Pastor, j
FRIENDS CHURCH-Regular services attho
Church every Sunday at 8 p. m. Sunday
School at 10 a. m. Christian Endeavor Socie- !
ty, Friday at 8 p. m. Prayer Meeting, Wed- j
nesday at 8 p. m. S. A. Jackson, Pustor.
CATHOLIC CHURCH;
Mass with Sermon ... 10;00 A. M
Sunday School - - - - 8:00 P. M
Rosary, Lecture and Benediction 7;00 P. M
Priest, Rev. Father P. C. Bougis. S. J j
*
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH-Rev. Thos.
Coyle, pastor. Regular services every Sun-!
day evening at 7:45 o'clock. Sunday School j
in the afternoon at 2 o'clock. Prayer meet- j
ing every Wednesday evening at 8 p, m.
Notice of Forfeiture.
To George Harkrnder and Stefano Albasino,
and to each of their heirs and assigns:
You, and each of you, are hereby notified
that the undersigned, your co-owner, has I
expended .$100.00 on labor and improvements
during each of the years 1898. 1899, 1900, 1901,
1902 and 1903, upon that certain lode mining i
claim, known and recorded as the TyeeLodo
Mining Claim, situated on Douglas Island,
about two and one half miles up on the |
right hand of Nevada Creek, in the Harris !
Mining District, District of Alaska, the no
tice of location of whigh said claim is found j
of record in Book 9 of Lodes, on page 354 of !
the records of the Juneau Recording Dis
trict, District of Alaska, and in which claim
you each claim an undivided one-third in
terest.
Said labor and improvements were per
formed and made upon said claim, for each i
of said years, for uud as the annual assess- |
meat work and representation upon and of
said claim as is required by section 2324, of '
the Revised Statutes of the United States, i
and the amendments thereto, concerning i
annual labor and improvements upon mining
claims. j
You, and each of you, are further notified ,
that unless within 90 days after the personal
service of this notice upon you, or within 90
days after publication thereof, you contrib
ute your share or portion of such expendi
tures as fco-owners of said claim, your in
terest in the said claim will be forfeited to
the undersigned, your co-owner, who has
mnde such exjienditures, and performed said
labor, and will become his property in the
manner provided by law.
Alex. Thompson*
First publication Dec. 23, 1903.
Last publication March 23,1904.
sswfwwwwnfirnTfwrwwwwtTfvrwww^fwntfwwwf^
11 ts fecial 0earance ?ale ^ 11
p THE BALANCE OF OUR WINTER HATS |
^ TO GO AT ]
I $ 1.00 EACH I
?: ALSO our lines of Ribbons, Laces, Flannelettes, Silk 3
gS Skirts and Waists, Wrappers, Children's ^
Dresses, Ladies' Dresses, Waists and Jackets at 3
| LESS THAN ACTUAL COST ?
^ These are all desirable' goods, and it will pay ^
^ you to look them over. ^
Sir. v. ?
| FRONT STREET DOUGLAS |
} NORTHERN HOTEL AND BAR t
KADOVICH & LKPETICH - - - Pbophietobs. ^
;j ?ftoOB? fey tk i?Y, Ifeck. qp ]%atfr,? ?
^ THE FINEST OF WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS S
J FINE WINES FOR THE FAMILY TRADE y
jj FRONT STREET - DOUGLAS, ALASKA \
Douglas Apera House
VVWWVWWV % y WWV^ W V 88 ? "WWW w
RUDOLPH TROLL, Proprietor.
> * OPEN ALL NIGHT + * I
SHOW EVERY EVENING
Claret Wine, Bottled Beer, Bottled
Porter. All Kinds of the Best Do
mestic and Imported Liquors
Always in Stock.
Hot and Mixed Drinks
a Specialty.^
The Douglas Opera House |
\ 1
At P. H. POX'S New Store
i - : V
\ Great After=Christmas Clearance Sale l
^ As our Ladies' and Misses Cloaks and Jackets were 5
H 3 months on the road, and we do not want to carry them k
^ over, for the next 15 days we will close out the entire ?
$5 stock at actual cost. V
7L - V
C/I tb
^ Also, for the next 15 days we will make a special ^
vj discount of 15 per cent on all our Men's and Boys' Suits y
^ and Overcoats, consisting of Oxford Grays, Serges, *
Worsteds, Cheviots and Cassimers. y
I P. H. FOX
| GENERAL MERCHANDISE |

xml | txt