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Douglas Island news. [volume] (Douglas City, Alaska) 1898-1921, February 03, 1904, Image 1

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The Douglas Island News.
VOL. 6. DOUGLAS CITY AND TKBADWELL, ALASKA, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 3,1991. NO. 12
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4 Exceptional Ta^eT ||
i I f TI SEASON PRICES WITH MONTHS OF f
f m aid : i
T 1. j U7T; * i
J For the new and pretty conceits in Laaies, misses j
I and Children's hats, NEW TURBANS, zibeline S
J crown with velvet facing and edged with fancy braid, J
J some finished with- pompons and fancy wings, dainty, 5
jj stylish millinery, made by cur most experienced millin- J:
i ers, that are good values at $4 50 and $5 00 ?
OUR SPECIAL jpr* Sr EA PU |
| HOLIDAY PRICE Ik> CALO ||
J Misses Hats: A good assortment in ready to wear 5
5 styles in black, blue, brown, red and tan, that were *
J $1.50 and $2.00, now $1.25 EACH J
! B. M. BUS' EMPORIUM !
,S JUNEAU, - - - - ALASKA Jj
^Subscribe!
X FOR ALL { \ J
: I ^newspapers Magazines |jj
THROUGH THK J [ *
i| DOUGLAS NEWS DEPOT, | j
NEWS AGENTS ? <> <
< > n \i
II DOUGLAS, - - - ALASKA <> I <
( IHIIIIIHVWU>OM?M ? ! <
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~BEACH STORE '
& LODGING HOUSE
GENERAL MERCHANDISE J
j u
SHOES OF ALL KINDS j /
MINERS' SHOES A SPECIALTY | /
J
Fine Line of Tobaccos !
IN STOCK AT ALL TIMES
ROOMS By the Day, Week or Month
I
ED. EHRLICH
Successor to Alex. Smallwood.
i
' '
Cold Weather j
TJTJ Makes a good stove an absolute necessity ?
WW t
n Complete One of tbe Best Stoves made I
ALL SIZES AND ALL PRICES >
C.W.YOUNG, Juneau t
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? FINE BOWLING ALLEYS BILLIARDS AND POOL W
% W
I The GLORY MOLE I
? $
|> TRY ^ #
I "Cunningham" |
Jordan $ Bean * Propriefors |
LODGE DIRECTORY, j'
* ^ o r
I. u. u. r.
\N Alaska Lo<lce, No. 1. j
^meet? at Odd Fellows'
_ _ . t- O I
all, Douglas, on Wednesday evenings m <j
o'clock.
Visiting: brothers are cordially invited to I
attend. JOHN DIAMOND, X. G. !
JAMES RAMSAY, Secretary.
Aurora Encampment No. i
meets at Odd Fellows' hall first and third
Saturdays, at S p. m.
Brothers of the Royal Purple ure cordially
Invited.
CHAS. FENSTER. C. P.
HUGH MCRAK. Scribe.
Northern Light Rebekah Lodge No. i ;
meets at Odd Fellows' hall second and fourth
Saturdays.
Visitors are cordially invited.
MRS. LEOTA MACK IE, N. G.
MRS. GERTRUDE LA UGH LIN, Sec'y
K. of P.
The North Star Lo'ljre, No. 2, ?
^K. of P., meets every
J THURSDAY EVENING
at 8 o'clock,
? in Odd Fellows Hull
M. C. Howkll, C. C.
Chas. A. How, K.or k.ocs>.
Visiting Knights arc cordially invited to at
tend.
Douglas Aerie, No. H7? F. 0. E.
Meets every Saturday at Oilman's Hal]
at 8 o'clock p. m.
All visiting Brothers invited to attend.
CLAUDE ERICSSON, W. P.
Z. R. CHENEY, Worthy Sec y.
ARCTIC BROTHERHOOD
Camp Treadwell No. 14
.Meets every second and fourth Friday of j
each month at Odd Fellows Hall at 8 o'clock |
p. m. Visiting Brothers cordially welcomed.
Jab. Cbristob, A. R. R. J. Willis, A. C.
:
Gastineaux Lodge No. 124
F. & A. M.
Regular Communications first
ui.d thirti Tuesdays of the
month at 3:30 p. ra.
Sojourning: Brothers corainu.v
invited. John H. Duckwobth, W. M.
Henby Watson, Secretury.,
PROFESSIONAL.
DR. W. L. HARRISON,
DENTIST
Hunter Block, between Front
and 2nd Sts. Douglas City
____? j
H. R. GARNER, M.D.
Physician and Surgeon, i
OFFICE ON D. St., BETWEEN 2d & Sd.
RESIDENCE Cor. 3d and E Streets.
Z. R. CHENEY
Attorney at Law and Notary Pnblic
Admitted to practice in all Courts,
Collections made, Titles examined
and Conweyanoinff neatly done.
Orrica in Court House, - Third Stbxxt. ,
DOUGLAS. ALASKA.
I I CHARICK
\ I ^AtataA,T'cWHe^CO- I
I m k lak W DIAMONDS
ll\/ #^^and JEWELRY
JUNEAU - - ALASKA j
;
The Northland
The Latest News, from Reliable
Sources, Concerning the Great
North, Condensed.
___
?* * ?
Information for Everybody.
Swiftwater Bill is back in Dawson.
Seven-eighths ol' the gold mined in
Alaska is placer.
Joseph Plant is wanted by his mother j
at Los Angeles, Calif.
Ketchikan will invest in a fire bell
and a chemical engine.
A soldier shot up the town of Skag
way last week and fled.
The Metropolitan Methodists of Ju
neau, will build a church.
The value of the gold output of Al- j
aska for 1902 was $8,343,800.
?J fl ,.t.f
Stream tin ana peiroieum ?ojc
exported from Alaska in 1903.
The "largest saw mill iu Alaska" is
?eariug completion at Ketchikan.
The Skagway public school reopened
Jan. 25th, and will continue until June
1st.
There is some talk of an assistaut
Alaskan world's fair commissioner, to
help Brady.
Air. G. A. Singer, the new superin
tendent at the Olympic Alines, should
make thiDgs hum.
Thomas E. Briggs, an engineer on
the W. P. R. R., died on Jan. 25th, of
typhoid pneumonia.
The sloop Vernia, a seven-ton nsnmg
craft, has been wrecked oil Kitten is
land, at the mouth of Fuuter bay.
The stone industry is represented in
Alaska by one marble quarry, near the
north end of Prince of Wales island.
A tire in Dawson on Jan. 21st destroy
ed property to the value of $105,000. It
was caused by a defective flue. The
Joseph Ladue Co. and the Ames Co.
were the losers.
All but two of Nome's saloon keep
ers have presented their checks for
$1,500 to the clerk of the district court
and have been given the right to do
business for another year.
An 8-vear old Skagway lad climbed
the side of a mountain and fell 50 feet
breaking his leg. From his perilous
position on the mountain side he was
rescued by his father and several
friends.
The Fairbanks district on the Tan
ana, the Good Hope district in the
northwestern part of the Seward Pen
insula, and the Koybuk district oom
prise the most important placer dis
coveries in Alaska during 1903.
News from Dawson just before the
last cold spell, says that sluicing in open
air in mid-winter was in progress on 10
below on Bonanza. The dirt was
thrown directly in the sluice boxes be
fore it had had time to freeze. The
water is kept warm through the sluice
boxes.
A census taken in Nome shows that
more people are there than during any
previous winter. The enumeration
reached the 3,000 mark. There are more
families and children in Nome than
ever before.
Secretary of the State Hay ha9 de
termined to ask the Canadian govern
ment to join in a conference looking to
the establishment of international fish
hatcheries on the Frazier river, in
British Columbia, for the propagation
of salmon.
I There is being formed a new 011 com-1
pany in Seattle to bo kuowu as the
! Majestic Oil Co., with properties at j
I Cape Suckling, Kayak district, Alaska.!
' The following are the incorporators: G.
1 H. Connel, L. S. Thompson, F. C. Bren- j
| el, L. D. Boatty and Thomas Lyrer.
Grant Jennings was stricken with
! paralysis while cutting wood near Stew- !
j art. He had lain helpless in the snow
| for several hours, suffering physical
! pain and meutal torture in fear of freez
; ing to death. By mere chance he was
' found by another woodchopper and
j taken to camp.
? ^ t _ _1 l.U
Government employees in moc-iur* ? >
office in the Nome district and in many
couutry offices are forced to discount
I their salaries. The government pays
up promptly but the checks are below
par value in Nome. When presented
at the bank since the close of naviga- ;
: tion they are subject to an 8 per cent 1
discount.
Says the Pacific Coast Miner: A big
strike has been made on Portland canal,'
1 Southern Alaska, that is now attract
ing the attention of the prominent min
? ing men of the coast. It is galena, 100-1
feet in width, carrying gold and silver
; values of from $100 to $1000 a ton, out- j
: cropping on salt water, easy of access
! to the largest ships.
"The Coal Resources of the Yukon"
is the subject of Bulletin No. 218 of the
United States Geological Survey, which
has been published for gratuitous dis
tribution. The author is Mr Arthur J.
Collier, who with two assistants, spent |
j the summer of 1902 in examining the
! coal deposits along the Yukon river in i
? Alaska.
I
I
H. E. Porter one of the pioneer
] prospectors of the Yukon country, re
! ports having discovered a natural flow
ing petroleum well on the left limit of
Bullion creek, about 1200 feet from the
creek, opposite 40 below. The oil is in
its crude state, but after being render
ed out will burn with the same brillian-1
cy as refined coal oil.
James H. Churchill, owns a salmon
cannery on Wales island, which became
Canadian territory under the terms of
the Alaska boundary award. Be has
asked the president and the state de
partment to devise some means of re
lief for him, so that bis business may
! not be damaged as a result of its sudden
i transfer through no fault of the owner
from American to British soil. No spe
j cific proposition has been made as to
j the method of accomplishing this re
I suit. Mr. Churchill's salmon hatchery
j is on the mainland and therefore re
{ mains in American territory.
Fourth Assistant Postmaster General
Bristow is reported to have said that i i
C. N. Crary would probably be reap- ,:
pointed postmaster at Valdez, Alaska. ?
Valdez has recently been advanced to '
the presidential class, and it becomes '
necessary therefore to appoint a post
master. Two or three other applicants ,
had appeared for the place.
The festive mosquito is sharpening!
up his bill and getting ready for next
summer's campaign. All who aregoing
to Bullion creek should take along a
little "radium," a pound of which, the
scientists tell us, could destroy the;
earth. A thimble full ought to be enough :
to destroy all the "pests" in Alaska,;
and this iucludes other than mosqui- j
toes.?Guide.
- - ? - ? ? ^ J i
John Uarson, or saiem, uregun, ?uu j
a member of the Alaska Copper com- j
pany, which was recently victorious in !
the big Valdez contest over the Copper j
River Copper properties, says that tho i
Havemeyers will certainly furnish the !
money for the building of the Valdez, i
Copper River & Yukon railroad next!
year, and will operate in conjunction j
with the railroad a steamship line to !
Seattle.
A Washington, D. C. dispatch of Jan.
20th, states that Judge Charles S.
.Johnson, one of the Alaska delegates
to the Republican national '??.vention,
called on the president today. He re
minded Mr. Roosevelt that Alaska had
the honor of electing the first delegate
to the convention and told him that
I the delegation would have voted for j
Roosevelt even if it had not been in
! structed to do so.
W. G. Whorf of Port Graham, at the {
extreme end of Kenia peninsula, Alas- ;
! ka, has just returned to Seattle. Mr. j
Whorf is the discoverer of the old Rus-:
sian Penal coal mines, which have been j
abandoned for the past 70 years. He ;
found the remains of the old prison in j
which were collected a great number
of old fashioned mining tools, such as
I axes, picks, shovels and nailB, which ,
were all haDd made. Mr. Whorf will!
spend a couple of weeks in Seattle.? <
Ex.
'
?* ? * i. 1._: - t. j i^ ? I
I TUougn somewnat resincceu iu mvui
ed localities by nature, tin was known
to the ancients in the time of Moses,
j The "Tin islands" mentioned by Hero
. dotus are now generally regarded as
; Cornwall, though some authoritiesj
! place them off the Spanish coast. These,
I mine9 of Cornwall are said to be the
! oldest known, the enterprising Phoeni
cians having first made them known to
the world: later the Greeks and then
the Romans profited by the bidden
treasure. MacAuley says: "In 1685 the
tin of Cornwall, which had, more than
2,000 years before, attracted the Tyrian
sails beyond the pillars of Hercules,
was still one of the most valuable sub
terranean productions of the island.
The quantity annually extracted from
the earth was found to be, some years
later, 1,600, probably about a third
what it now is." Geologically the
country is ancient, and the most profit
able mines are near the junctions of
granite and clay-slate, which predomin
ates.?Ex.
A Washington dispatch of the 2Cth
ult. says: The government is prepar
ing to establish a coaling station on
Kiska island, at a cost of $2000,000.
The mines of Nome yielded more
than $6,000,000 this season and through
increased facilities they are expected
to double this production the coming
year. It is estimated that the canals,
flumes, dredges, etc., now under con
tract and construction in this district
will cost not less than $2,000,000 and
will be available for the next ten to
twenty years.
Fred Myers, manager of the Arctic
Trading Company at Council City, load
ed $20,000 in gold dust on a cayuse re
cently and started for Nome, says a
Rampart dispatch to the Dawson News.
Myers took the trail, thinking the
cayuse was following him, but he was
wrong. The animal ran away, resist
ing all attempts to catch him, and also
dodged numerous bullets. lie was
finally caught after scattering consid
erable dust around the country.
"It the government wishes to protect
deer, they should place a bounty on
wolves, for wolves destroy more deer
than all the huuters that could be
turned loose," says Mr. Knyg. "If they
wish to protect fish, they should offer
a bounty ou loons, for that bird is the
fishes deadly enemy, and destroys more
than fishermen that understand their
business, and if those who are sent
hore understand their business, thoy
would see it."
The review of mining in Alaska by
such a geologist and explorer as Mr.
Alfred H. Brooks is sure to prove ser
viceable to the progress in the Par
North. We are glad to publish a map
with the article, for, after all, a good
map is as necessary to the understand
ing of the description of a wide area
as it is to the comprehension of a mil
itary campaign; many books and nu
merous excellent descriptive accouuts
of new regions are rendered obscure
merely through the want of such an
aid to understanding. The photograph
of a railroad is also added, just to em
phasize the fact that this great indus
trial adjunct is beiug extended over
the tundra and into the wilderness of a
region only lately reclaimed to modern
exploitation. Such railroads as Alaska
has are doing very well, which is
indicative of the largo amount of ex
ploratory work under way and of the
discrimination of the orgauizers of
such enterprises. Already Arctic Amer
ica is no longer considered a refrig
erator, but a home of thousands of the
sturdy men and women of our race,
and as the actual climate becomes
known and proper preparations are
made to endure it in comfort, there
will be a continued increase in the
permanent population of the region.
Man can mitigate cold more readily
than heat. A winter in the snow is
better than a snmmer in the jungle,
and we shall be surprised therefore if,
even with an equality of mineral re
sources, the mining regions bordering
the Arctic circle do not progress faster
than those which lie next to the equa
torial line.?N. Y. Engineering and
Mining Journal.

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