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Douglas Island news. [volume] (Douglas City, Alaska) 1898-1921, July 10, 1907, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84021930/1907-07-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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la proving itself to be one of the best fitting and most stylish shirt
waists that have ever been introduced to the Alaska trade. As stated
before, these goods were made expressly for us, and we fully guaranteo
them to give satisfaction.
"THE BE H RENDS" in fine Mercerized
Liugerie Lawu, with fine Valenciennes
Insertion
"THE BEHRENDS" in white India lawn
with lace aud tucks,
and only
"THE BEHREND5" in fiue Mull,
a very faucy embroidered front
at
with
"THE BEHRENDS" in very fine whito
Mull with tine lace medallious,
a perfect dream
$2.00
$I.5<>
2.25
$5.00
4
JUNEAU
INCORPORATED
ALASKA
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TO OUR DOUGLAS ISLAND CUSTOMERS buying a 85.00
UBEH RENDS" or over we will give ferry tickets to and from Juneau.
B.M.BEHRENDSCO.
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LODGE DIRECTORY.
I. O. O. F.
Alaska Lodge, No. 1,
meets at Odd Fellows'
Hall, Douglas, on Wednesday evenings &t $
o'clock.
Visiting: brothers are cordially invited to |
attend. ALEX NELSON, N. G.
ALFRED JOHNSON. Secretary.
Aurora Encampment No. 1
meets at Odd Fellows' hall first and third
Saturdays, at S p. m.
Brothers of the Royal Purple are cordially
I nvited.
OLIVER DRANGE. C. P.
HUGH MCRAE. Scribe.
Northern Light Rebekah Lodge No. i
aieetsat Odd Fellows' hall second and fourth
Saturdays.
Visitors are cordially invited.
MRS. ANNA BARQUIST. N.G.
MRS. GERTRUDE L-U76HLIN. Sec'v
K. of P.
The North Star Lodge, No. 2,
K. of P., meets every
THURSDAY EVENING
at 8 o'clock,
in Odd Fellows Hall
_ J. A. NORRIS.C. C.
N.G.JOHNSON, K. of R. & S.
Visiting: Knights are cordially invited to at
tend.
Douglas Aerie, No. 117* F? O- E.
31eet9, 2d and ith Sundays
at 1:30 p. in.
at Covins' Hall.
All visiting Brothers invited to attend.
ELMER E. SMITH, W. P.
JOHN STOFT. Secretary.
PROFESSIONAL.
DR. A. BYRON GEHO
Physician and Surgeon
'Phone 4 Office Hours a to 4 p. m.
OFFICE OVER ELLIOTT & SMITH'S DRUG !
STORE, FRONT STREET
DR. F. L. GODDARD
Physician and Surgeon
TELEPHONE NO. 3
DOUGLAS - - ALASKA
DR. C. M. HARRISON
DENTIST
Hunter Block, between Front
and 2nd Sts. Douglas City
'Phone, Douglas 3-8.
I.J.Sharick
WATCHES. DIAMONDS,
JEWELRY
JUNEAU ALASKA
i he Northland
The Latest News, from Reliable
Sources, Concerning the Great
North, Condensed.
Information for Everybody.
Old fashioned strawberry "festivals"
are held at VVhitehorse.
The Ketchikan Miner advocates the
whipping post far whiskey peddlers.
Eighteen longshoremen 'employed at
Whitehorse struck for higher pay on
June 28th.
Wraugell is to have water works. The
supply will come from Graveyard
creek.
Twelve saloons will minister to the
"spiritual" wants of Ketchikan for the
comiug year.
Hoggatt says the Alaska Fair means
millious, but he doesu't say who will
get them. ? Nome Nugget.
A Spruce creek, Atlin, miner, looking
for kiudling, picked up a gold nugget
weighing fifty-seven ounces.
At a place near Rampart called Hot
! Springs, forty men were engaged this
: spring in cleariug, plowing, planting
and other purely agricultural pursuits.
| The steamer Koyukuk asceuded the
Chandlar to a point fifteen miles below
Caro. There, on the left limit of the
river, the Northern Commercial trading
post i9 being established.
Dr. G. Madore, the aged physician
aud surgeon of the Royal N. W. M. P.,
who was stationed at Selkirk for sever
al years previous to last fall, died about
three weeks ago at Prince Albert.
The people of Discovery, B. C., cele
brated the Fourth of July, and the At
lin Claim winds up an announcement
of the event by saying: ''God Save The
King," and don't make any other-dates."
A heavy rain fell Suuday night, the
first for eight months, since which time
the weather has been intermitently
juicy. But the work of hauling ore
continues in mud the same as in dust.
? Whitehorse Star.
Charles L. Erickson, chemist for the
Alaska Smelting & Refining Co., at Had
ley, fell from a coke chute on an ele
vated train into the coke bins, a dis
tance of 100 feet, and was taken out a
mass of cuts aud bruises, but alive.
The Fairbanks News says: It's hard
to say which is the greatest scourge of
the camp just now, the mosquito pest,
the Innoka fever or the deadly strike
germ. Between the three, the creeks
i look like a camp which has seeu its
best days.
It must have been another than the
editor in chief who wrote the following
item in the Ketchikan Miner: "All the
same, there are not enough flowers
bloomiug in all the gardens of south
eastern Alaska to impart a bloom of
youth or beauty to the average female
tourist who affects the special tourist
1 ships that touch these shores."
WE ARE V#>
DOUGLAS AGENTS I
t?>
FOR ft
?
P. -I., Examiner, Chronicle, Star, ?>
Times and Oregonian $?
1 |
$ We also carry the ^
?A r>
| Leading Periodicals S Magazines *
| For NICE TABLETS and
? FINE WRITING PAPER
J WE ARE IT! {?>
I Our line uf ^
* ?
$ Cigars and Tobaccos J
Is the most complete in Alaska
4? rf
j Our Candies are Always Fresh! ?
j We carry a full line of Fruit! $
*? , , rfr
4i (During the fruit season)
+: ?
$ ?
J All the LATEST 81.50 BOOKS! ?
5 2
4* Crepe, Tissue and Shelf Paper
C;
J f|f]j|PJ Hn uriifn nrnnT *
[IS DEPOT I
Hvvvvvvvv\\v\v\vvvvvvvv\vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvwvwvmvi?
Qpecial Wall Paper Rale ''
33 Vs Per Cent Discount
For 30 days on our entire stock of Wall Paper
and Mouldings. Our stock is the largest and
most complete in Southeastern Alaska, and this
is an opportunity you cannot afford to miss.
! c. w. young co. \
* *
/
I The
\ only
I place
I on
j earth
I t0
I Buy
OF
1
Men's Goods
w
$
G-ew0?aeQfi>9oe?o$o?GG
oee?e#eett<?6?w??c o e ?? 9?
?j
John H. Bruck, of the signal service,
? has been transferred from Valdez to
Juneau.
The body of Engineer Teller, who
! was drowned last fall in Bering lake,
has been recovered.
i
I
| Alfred Doring was iujured by a pro
mature blast at Knight islaDd and died
at the Valdez hospital.
! All indictments against Editor Hen
1 rv have been dismissed. This is the
|
man who was "chained to the deck."
I
; Lee Van Slyke, of Vaughn, Wash.,
has been appointed U. S. Commission
er at Cordova, vice John Burton, re
signed.
It is probable that the road to Bear
river from Seward will be constructed
this summer by the Alaska road com
mission.
The Arctic Brotherhood, an order
composed of men who have been in Al
aska and the Yukon, will erect a hand
some building at the Alaska-Yukon
Pacifio Exposition and install an inter
esting exhibit.
The Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul
Railroad will be running trains into Se
attle by the time the Alaska- Yukou-Pa
cilic Exposition opens, June 1, 1900.
With the other transcontinental and
local roads, facilities for handling the
j crowds will be excellent.
The reported sale of the Ellamar
mine to H. C. Elliott is said to be only
an advertising scheme. Elliott has an
option on the mine for $1,000,000 and
$200,000 in stock of a company he pro
posos to organize. He is now in New
York tryiug to finance a company to
I buy the Ellamar and other properties.
A plan is on foot by Easterners to
construct a fleet of houseboats on Lake
Washington, upon the shores of which
the Alaska-Yukou-Pacittc Exposition
is situated, for the use of visitors in
1909. Eastern and Middle Western peo- 1
pie are expected to take kindly to the
innovation. They may spend the en
tire summer in tho open at little ex
pense.
The deal for the sale of the Beatsou
mine on Latouche island fell through
because the proposed purchasers want
ed to pay only 10 per cent down aud
the remainder on easy installments, :
practically making it a long time op
tion which would have enabled the new
I owners to take all but the first pay
ment out of the mine and to drop the
property at any time they might be so j
disposed. The price agreed upon was ?
$7,500,000 instead of $5,000,000 as it was ;
formerly reported.
There are some misguided people
who have had the temerity and the au
dacity to poke fun at the city of Vic
toria, B. CM saying that the place was
slow aud the people half asleep. Just
read the following and be persuaded
otherwise: "Victoria, B. C., has a pecu
liar municipal franchise. Each person
paying a two dollar dog tax is entitled
to vote. Six enterprising- ladies voted
on the strength of a single dog. One
ingenious lady, unable to get a real dog
in time to qualify, took out a license
for a china dog ou her mantel piece." ?
Glasgow Herald and Weekly Dispatch.
Ground breaking ceremonies for the
Alaska- Yukon-Pacific Exposition were
held June 1, just two years bel'ore the ?
fair will open.
The prize of 8500, offered for the of
ficial design for the Alaska- Yukon-Pa
cific Exposition was awarded to Miss
Adelaide lianscom, a Seattle artist.
The Administration building for the
Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition will
be finished August 35. Tho executive
offices of the fair will probably be 1
moved to the grounds about September
I
An emergency hospital will be one of
the first buildings erected at the Alas- ,
ka-Yukon-Paciflc Exposition. While
tho construction work is going on work
men who are injured or taken sick will
be cared for, and during the Exposition
it will be used to take care of visitors 1
who become ill or are hurt.
i
Tho official flag of the Alaska-Yukon- j
Pacific Exposition has been selected.
The color scheme is red, white and blue.
Five stars on a blue field stand for the
United States, Russia, France, England I
and Spain, the five countries which
first explored tho territory included in
the scope of tho Exposition. Mrs.
Henry E. Reed, wife of Director of Ex
ploitation Reed, designed tho Hag. Mrs. ,
Reed also arranged the official flag for
the Lewis and Clark Exposition.
According to the reports of some of
the Koowuk natives, says the Point
Hope correspondent of the. Nome Nug
get, lyux are very fond of hawks, and
have their own methods of capturing
those birds. They dig a hole in the
snow and then crouch down in it, leav
ing only a small portion of their tail
exposed. The small stump of a tail is
then vigorously shaken. The hawk's
atteution is attracted, and, thinking it
has discovered a ptarmigan, it swoops
down and captures the tail. The lynx
then springs up and captures the hawk
before it has time to escape.
The report that all work had stopped
on the Alaska Central R. R., seems to
be disputed by the following from a re
cent issue of the Seward Gateway:
Watson &, Snow will soon complete the
120-foot truss across Placer river on the
railroad loop. This will be the second
Howe truss to be completed this spring
though it is the third on the line, being
on the backward turn of the loop. The
second on the line lies farther down j
the river. It will be a 90-foot span.
Tracklaying has been delayed a few
days by a gravel slide in the deep cut
on mile 50, but will begin about next
Monday.
-v Late reports from the Innoka are j
that nothing has been found so far
other than bar diggings. Some good
pans have been taken out, and the gen
eral appearauce of the country is good
from a prospector's standpoint. The
actual diggings are well into the moun
tains where rimrock shows and where
it is from 7 to 12 feet to bedrock. Nug- j
gets have been taken out weighing as !
high us 81G0, but the average pannings
do not show anything better than a :
little better than wages. The whole !
country is staked. Crowds of people I
have rushed there from surroundicg
camps and from Nome.
Extensive coal mines will be operat
ed on Kachemak bay next year if pres
ent developments are continued and
the plans for handling a heavy output
are carried out. An output of 3,000 to
^,000 tons a day next year is promised
by George W. Ross, head of the syndi
cate which has acquired a largo area of
coal lands along the bay. Hunkers will
be erected at Homer sutticient to load
a daily output of several thousand tons
besides storing enormous stocks. Mr.
Koss expects to find hie chief market
in San Francisco. Ho says coal can be
hauled on barges to San Francisco for
?1.50 a ton. The syndicate which is
working at Homer is composed of
Michigan coal men. This syndicate
has purchased all the property of the
old Cook Inlet Coal Company, which
opened mines in 1S99 and built a nar
row guage railroad about eight miles
long from Homer up the sands pit. The
company went into bankruptcy and its
property was sold under an order of
the United States district court of
West Virginia, in which state the com
pany was incorporated. From the pur
chaser at the bankrupt sale the proper
ty passed to James H. Caldwell, of
Pennsylvania, and from him to the
Koss syndicate. The property owned
by the old company included coal
lands, the railroad, rolling stock, ma
chinery and the towusite of Homer.
The coal at Homer is of a good quality.
It id taid to be of better grade than the
average coal mined in the state of
Washington. It is flrst-class heating
coal and in burning leaver few clinkers.
Jack Hines, a former member of the
Nome Nugget's staff, has written that
paper some letters from New York
about people aud events iu the easteru
metropolis interesting to far northern -
ers ou account of their relation to mat
ters in Alaska. Here is an incident, re
lated in one of the letters that will
make good wi*h any hard-luck story of
the year:
"A few days ago Denny Blakely,
Harry Walters, George Borchsenins aud
myself were summoned to appear be
lore the stockholders of the old Alaska
Goid Mining Company. You remember
it ? Ed Waggaman'8 proposition. We
sat on one side and the capitali.-ta on
the oihei ? the old colonel iu the mid
dle. He started off this way:
"Gentlemen, I've asked you to come
hero aud speak before these gentlemen
the men who put up the money for my
exploiting in Alaska, and who say I
robbed them and did not at any time
act in good faith. Now, I've not very
many years to live, and I waut this one
thing squared up before 1 die.'
"They had au attorney who quizzed
us each, separately, auent our knowl
edge of the old Alaska Gold Mining
Company's ground, which comprised
all of the beach lines back of Nome.
We all told conservatively of the value
of that property, and when asked to
ballot an estimate of the possible cash
value the average of four guesses was -
seventy-three million dollars. Well,
sir, the old sports just wept to think
that a few thousands more would have
given them the bulk of this fortune.
"The capitalists showed in many ways
their humiliation and only wanted some '
things to prove to the colonel that they
were ready to make good and back him
tor any amount."

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