OCR Interpretation


Douglas Island news. [volume] (Douglas City, Alaska) 1898-1921, October 19, 1910, Image 4

Image and text provided by Alaska State Library Historical Collections

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84021930/1910-10-19/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

SPEAKING OF
ENAMELED WARE
We have just received a very large
line of the best Blue and White
Ware, triple plated acid proof
AT POPULAR PRICES
BEFORE YOU GO OUT HUNTING
CALL AND SEE OUR LINE OF
Amunition and
Sporting Goods
It is the best to be had and we have lots of it
T read we
1
tt S
| .8
5 BEST GLASS OF 1
fit ??
0 M
zi tt
Rainier Beer on Douglas Island
ft ft
1 g
j"l T
A I
# O
Douglas Opera House *
# S
f w
? ? ? ? ? 8
8 s
wines -:- liquors -:- cigars ?
$ ?
*> 8
# S
STEALERS FOR
?tl?
?*?y
Victoria, Vancouver, Aaacortcs, Bellinghan
Everett, Olympia, Fori Town?ond^ South
Bclliixgham, Eureka, Santa Barbara, Mexico
San Francisco, Los Ange'es, San Diego
G. \V. ANDREWS. G. A. P. D. C. D. DL'NANN, G. P. A.
I \3 Jaaies St., Seai'ie I 1 2 Market St., San Francisco j
Rlgbc reserved to charter thte Schedule
NEXT SAiLi&GS W3LL EE
City
of Seattle
North b6und? October 19th and 30th
Southbound? October 20th and 31st
Northbound ? November 5$ 18, 29-, and December 8
wCnctlC? Southbound ? November 3, 19, 30, and December 9
For information r swarding: passenger and freight rates, apply to
R. R. HUBBARD, Agent.
TUN CO.
LOUIS G. THOMAS, - - Manages
I Manufactnres ^fgf*H|ffft*/% and
| all kinds of.. J Hi lilllli v Caskets
^99999999 OUT OF YELLOW CEDAR *99999999$
Special Articles cf Furniture Made and Guaranteed.
WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS
AGTS fob Olympia Brewing Company
...Alaska flyers...
???
Between Seattle, Ketchikan, Doug
las, Juneau and Skagway.
Due to arrive at Douglas :
Jefferson
Sept. 7, 18, 30, Oct 11, 22
Dolphin
Sept. 13, 24, Oct. 5, 16, 28
I
Steamers and sailing dates subject to j
change without notice. This is the
only line of steamers calling reeru
? arly at Douglas both North and
South hound
Elmer E. Smith, Ages*, Douglas, Alaska
I I
The CITY BAKERY
GEO. RIEDI & SON, Props.
We have the reputation of pro
ducing the best bread in Douglas
Sanitary Bakery Methods
FREE DELIVERY
Parties supplied with made-to
order dainties.
Your Patronage Solicited
JUNEAU FESRY AND NAVIGATION CO
KERRY TIME CARD
LEAVE JUNEAU
For Douglas and Treadwell :
8:00 a. m.
9:00 a. m.
11:00 a. m.
1 :00 p. m .
5:00 p. ra.
4:30 p. in.
6:80 p. m.
8:00 p. m.
Stmdays only 9:00 p. m.
LEAVE DOUGLAS
For Treadwell:
8:15 a. m.
9:16 a. m
11:15 a. tn..
1:15 p. m.
3-:16 p. m
4:45 p. in.
3:46 p. m.
8:15 p.m.
9:15 p, m.
Slindhys
For Juneau:
8:30 a. is.
10:45 a. in.
1*2:05 a. m.
1:45 p. m.
3s30 p. m.
5:05*p. m.
7:05 p. in.
8:80 p. m.
9:80 pk m.
LEAVE treadwell
For Douglas and Juneau:
8:25 a. m.
10:35 a. m.
12'. 00 a. m
1:40 p.?m.
8:25 p. m.
4:55^p. m.
6;55 p."m,
8:25 p. m.
9:25 p. m. Sundays
Sundays 8:00Ja. m. trips omitted"
Extra trips will be made as follows until
further notice:
Leaves Juneau? 10:00 p. m. and 11:00 p. id.
" Tread well? 10:30 p. m. and 11:80 p. m.
14 Douglas? 10>85 p. m. and 11:35 p. m.
The Sunday schedule will remahi unchanged
MINING CONDITIONS IN j
ALASKA
Alfred H. Brooks, geologist in charge
of the Alaskan work of the U. S. Geo
logical Survey, has just returned to
Washington from his annual awing
around the cirtle in the big Territory.
He visited the coastal region of Central
Alaska and spent some time in the j
Mantanaska coal field. The most ac- j
cessible part of this important field has '
been the subject of a detailed survey
by G. O. Martin, during the present
season. Previous work in the region
had outlined t.he general boundaries of
the Mautnnuska field, described in
Survey Bulletin No. 327, and the coal is
known to be high-grade, with a large
percentage of good coking coal. The
production of cheap coke is a matter
of great importance to the metallurgy i
cal industry, present and prospective,
of the entire Pacific seaboard. Mr. I
Martin's investigations will add much
information in regard to this important
district. The working out of the sever- ;
al problems of the coal field and the
preparation of his report will, however,
require the entire winter. It will be
similar in scope to the bulletin already
published ? No. 335 ? on the Beriug river
field, which is the one other source of
Alaskan high-grade coal.
COAL DEVELOPMENT NEEDED
Mr. brooks has recently summarized
the coal situation in Alaska in Survey
Bulletin 442, pointing out the import- !
ance of making these high-grade fuels ;
available for the use of both Alaska and ]
the Pacific coast states. While the coal
is of first importance to Alaskans who
are attempting to develop the various i
great resources of the Territory, it is of
scarcely less natioual importance,
inasmuch as those fields can furuish
fuel to the industries of the Pacific
coast states aud to the Pacific fleet.
The development of these fields will
conserve the coals of the eastern part
of the United States, which are of most
value to the nation because they are
nearest the ceuter of population.
The manufacture of iron on the west
coabf,for which there is abundant raw
material,, utilizing Alaskau coal, will
not only cheapen the product by over
coming the long railroad haul or the
trip around the Horn, but it will dim
inish the drain on the eastern iron aud
coal fields. Every shipload of coal car
ried around the Horn consumes about
one fifth of its own cargo, while the
hauling of iron and coal over the Rocky
Mouutaius results in a still greater
fuel waste.
Mr. Brooks found that in the regions
visited the greatest need was for cheap
fuel, all industries being directly or in
directly dependent upon it. This, it
may be added, applies to aiuch of the
Territory. At preseut practically all
the coal used in Alaska, and which is
not of particularly high grade, is im
ported from British Columbia? a little
comes from Japan? costing the con
sumer iu the Prince William Souud
region from $11 to 811 a ton. With
these tiguiea iu mind it can readily be
seen that our present magnificent in- j
dubtiial advancement in the Eastern
States could not exist if manufacturers,
mines and railroads had to meet such
fuel bills, iustead of paying ?1.25 or
?2.00 a ton for coal, as is actually the
case. If, then, the Alaskan industries
are not making a progress commensu
rate with the resources of the Territory |
there is sulllcieut reason for it iu this
lack of cheap fuel. Aud wite good coal
uuder their very feet,, but not a ton of
which cau be used,, what wonder that
the meu who are attempting lo develop
M. S. HUDSON ALEX T. NELSON j
THE DOUGLAS HOTEL
HUDSON & NELSON, PropTs
DOUGLAS, ALASKA
Rooms by the Day, Week or Month
Steam. Heat. Electric Lights
Bar in Connection
?SPECIAL BRANDS
Seal of Kentucky Bonded Whiskey.
Barclay '76. Maryland Rye.
Careful attention given to all orders
this northern territory should feel dis
couraged? M
GOLD MINING FAIRLY PROSPEROUS
Mr. .Brooks saw but little of the gold
fields; but he states that on the whole
the gold-mining Industry seems to have
been fairly prosperous. Survey parties
during the season visited the scene of
the new discoveries in both the Idita
rod and Kobuk regions, but these have ^
not yet returned and later statements
may be expected regarding the condi
tions. From the information available
it appears that the placer gold produc
tion of some of the older camps has
fallen off this year. On the other hand,
much has been accomplished in the
way of inaugurating large placer-min
ing enterprises, notably the installation
of dredges on the Seward peninsula.
These enterprises, designed to exploit
the lower-grade deposits, will assure a
continuation of mining in the older
camps, where the richest placers have
been worked by pioneer methods.
Extensive mining developments have
been continued throughout the year in
the gold lodes of the Juneau district,
where a largo output has 1 esulted. Con
siderable advancement has also been
made iu prospecting gold lodes in vari
ous tields. Prospect work has been
continued in the Fairbanks district*^
where encouraging results are reported,
while on Prince William Sound a gold
quartz mine has been put on a produc
tive basis and many prospects found
and opened up. A number of promis
ing prospects have also been developed
on the Kenai peninsula.
ACTIVITY IN COPPER MINING
In spite of the low price of copper,
there has been much activity, Mr.
Brooks states, iu prospecting for this
mineral, and seven or eight mines in ^
three districts have continued to make
an output. The inland copper districts
can- only bo developed by the construc
tion of railroads, and those depend for
their success on the securiug ot' cheap
coal.
SURVEYS OF AGRICULTURAL LANDS
In addition to the dozen parties en
gaged in investigating mineral resour
ces, the Geological Survey has this
year begun n system of subdivisiooal
land surveys, intended to cover the
most promising agricultural districts.
As completed, t hese surveys will enable
homesteaders to take up land as they
do iu the States. At the preseut time,
with no surveys iu Alaska, each home
steader is forced to bear the expense
of surveying his claim, and with private
surveyors charging from $15 to 825 a
day, this is generally prohibitive. Three
parties have been at woik ou these
land surveys, uear Fairbanks in the
great Tauana valley, and will continue v 4
uutil about the middle of October. Ifc
is hoped to continue these laud surveys
until the large areas of agricultural
laud in various parts of the Territory
have been fully covered, thus opening
the way for Alaska to produce as much
of her own food supply as possible.
Fresh Juneau cream, and cream from
the Sound on every Jefferson, at the
Douglas Candy Kitchen. Orders takeu
for flowers ? carnations and roses.
The "VULCAN"
Gas Engine
L. K. Halvorson, Agent
A HEAVY DUTY, 4-CYCLE ENGINE? A LAR
GER BORE AND STROKE THAN ANY EN
GINE ON THE MARKET.
The Following: Second-Hand Engines In Stock
A 2--hp. Buffalo, A 2 l=2=!ip. Tattle
and an 8-hp. Cushman
For Further Information call at the 49-Store or
the Douglas Island News Office.
Juneau Steamship ?o.
U. S. MAIL STEAM ERJ
Georgia
Electric Lighted Steam Heated
Juneau=Sitka Route
Leaves Juneau for Funter, Hoouah, Gyp
sum, Tenakee, Killisnoo, Chatham, Sitka
October 17, 23, 29, Novembor 4, 10, 16, 22,
28, December 4, 10, 16, 22, 28, January 3,
9, 15, 21, 27? February 2, 8, 14, 20, 26,
March 4, 10, 16, 22, 28
For Tyee and Baranof: Nov. 10, Dec. 10,
Jan. 9, Feb. 8, March 10
For Sanitarium (Sitka Hot Springs):
Oct. 17, Nor. 4, 16, Dec. 4, 16, Jan. 3, 15,
Feb. 2, 14, March 1, 16
Juneau - Skagway Route
Leaves Juneau for Pearl Harbor, Eagle
River, Yankee Cove, Comet, Sentinel
Light Station, Eldred Rock Light Station
Haines and Skagway, Oct, 21, 27, Nov.
8, 14, 20, 26, Dec. 2, 8, 14, X 26, Jan. 1,
7, 13, 19, 25, 31, Feb. 6, 12, 18, 24, March 2, 8
Returning leaves Skagway following day
WILLIS E. N0WELL, Mgr.

xml | txt