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Eureka daily sentinel. [volume] (Eureka, Nev.) 1871-1887, July 23, 1880, Image 3

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(Eureka IPaUij Sentinel.
ED.
»crtptli>n», l» ,tme. All person* In En
XC"r^.-r'— Wi“ rD*k' P‘y’
ment to him
POSTWFFICF- HOURS.
„ . on week daya from 8
o,^kor«.‘ W »• *nd <rom * 10
" ^J^Md* Money Order business closes s«
*B.* ro.dmsll. close st 8J0P.«.
ON SUNDAYS
The office linpen from 13 m. to 1 e. u.
F11IDAY. : : : : « » . * ""
TBHIiBDAr* STOCK SALES.
S»u Fmuclnco Stock E*«h«n*e.
MOBltlSO BOABD.
140 Ophir—7 7H
85 Mexican—7 H ,
370 Gould A Curry -2\ 26oc 270c
105 Bent A Belcher -7 «
185 California—2 .
500 Savage—1H
460 Cbollar—205c
80 Potoai—1*4 „ n
GO Hale A Norcroaa—28jc 290c
100 Crown Point—120c
855 Yellow Jacket—405c 4
GOO Alpha—440c
210 Belcher—165c 1 <«c
485 Sierra Nevada—10 a iu*
30 Utah—8 *
280 Bullion—165c 170lw0 170c
10 Seg. Belclier—6
100 Overman—120c
20 Justice—65c
110 Union—20 H
2»0 J ulia—85c 40c
150' Silver Hill—25c
200 New York—30c
50 Andes—70c
235 Scorpion—115c 140c
3A) Benton—80c
100 Mnckev—10o
150 Quinn—370c 3M
Leviathan—Asa’d 15c
EVEKINQ BOABD.
100 Belmont—20c
100 N. Bello—11 It
100 General Thomas—25c
30 Metallic—40c
185 Otaml Prize—115c 110c
140 Argent*—40c 45c
150 Navajo—60c 05o
000 Belle Isle—75c 70c 80c
300 Day—45c 40c
300 Paradise—35c
200 Albion—40c
25 Wales Con.—320c
35 Mt. Diablo—(Pi
300 N. Belle Isle—40c
50 E. Mt. Diablo— 40c
300 Behling—65c
100 Bodie—5 51)10
100 Bechtel—105c 1
100 Tioga—80c
100 Summit—lhi
100 Syndicate—70c 65c
570 Goodshanr—120c
50 Concordia -70c
50 ISelvidere—2*4
50 Champion -55c
370 Black Hawk—80c 35c
300 Booker -35c 30c
110 Mono —185c
10 Con. Pacific—1
50 University—30c
530 Jupiter—140c 130c 1 'i
100 Queen Bee—25c
30 Noonday—3
180 N. Noonday—3‘4
330 D. Standard—60c 7(le 75c
60 Boiton —1 05c 90c
25 Oro— 160c
570 Ms- -in White 65c 60c GOslO
100 Til top—7
115 8. King—5H 5(4
STREETS 4:25 P. H.
Belcher, 2a 2b; Grown Point, ltiflb 1H a
180b; Goodahaw. 115b 120a; Imperial,
20b 201% a; Yellow Jacket. 4'» b; Mexican,
8b 81* a 8a; Belcher, 215a 215b; Exchequer,
mb IGOa ms; Savage. 140b; Gould A
' Curry, 3b; Overman, 140b l'va 140a; Ad
denda, 110b; P.est A Belclier, 8>ab; Yellow
Jacket, 435h 435a; Ophir, 7Hb 7Sa 7Sk;
Crown Point, 180a 180a; Jupiter, 130b
140a; Potoai, 155b; Cbollar. 21>; Bullion,
170b 180a: Caledonia. 40b: Crqwn Point,
Ilia mb 180a; Belcher, 220a; Quinn,370b
300a; Mexican, HSa; Andes. 75b; Sierra
Nevada. lOHblO’.a 10*a; Con. Virginia,
2901) 295a; Potoai, 160b; Yellow Jacket,
440b 4laft; Bullion, mb; Utah, 8>th 9a;
Beat A Belcher. 8(4a; Union, 21b 2m«;
Crown Point, 170a 160h 170a; Belcher,
210b 215a; Goodahaw, 120a: Scorpion, mb;
Hale A Norcroea, 3b.
ARMiVAUt ARM MEPAStTEHER.
bt xax auaaax us falisadi bailboad
Departures YMlertlay,
B Blackman Mr* HMpp
W U I.effintngwell A McKay
— Brennan
Arrival* l,a«l Alalit.
J Watson C D Walcott
Arnold Hague J P Iddlug*
Hotel Arrlvnla.
Parker House— P. E. Reynolds, city; J.
Vi. Devin, Cortez.
International Hotel—R. Wirt*, Tybo;
L. S. McAskill, Pine Station.
Matrimonial.
Mr. George K. Bailey, the well-known
market man, and Miss Katie Dees were
quietly married on Tuesday, so quietly
that their most intimate friends hardly
knew of the affair. They had cosily set
tled down to housekeeping before any one
realized what had transpired. George al
ways was a sly coon, and he managed this
matrimonial matter strictly on that basis.
Miss Dees is a niece of Mr. Allisou, of
Allison's ranch, and is lately from Tennes
see. The Sentinel joins with the numer
ous friends of the happy couple in wishing
them a long life of wedded bliss and pros
perity.
Itciluellon «it Prices.
The Haveriy Widow Bodott Company
have reduced their prices of admission for
this and to-morrow oveniug as follows:
Reserved seats, $1; all others, 50 cents.
The matinee pricea will he 75 and 50 cents;
children, 25 cents. To-morrow evening
will be the last performance, and no one
should fail to see the old "Widow’" botore
she takes her departure. The play is one
of the finest put upon the boards, and
should draw crowded houses.
Dlstlngnlsheil Arrival.
Professor Arnold Hauge, Geologist to
Professor Clarence King’s Geological Sur
vey, arrived from the West by last night's
train. The Professor is direct from China,
having jus", completed a trip around the
world. Professor Arnold Hauge is a
brother of Professor J. D. Hauge, the
mining expert and engineer, who lias paid
occasional visits to Eureka in the years
past. During his stay here Professor
Hauge will be the guest of Mr. Fred \
Clark.
Funeral or Vivian.
The Miners' Union and Masonic and
Odd Fellows’ sooieties turned out in large
numbers yesterday afternoon to attend the
UV* Jo9®ph vui*n, of Ruby
Hill. The remains were taken from m/
•onto Hall to the Masonlo cemetery The
funeral was under the auspices of Eureka
Lodge No, i(j P. 4 A M The a*"™”
loan * arg° ° r° 6 01 ,rlend“ to mourn his
Re on Time.
The train for Mineral Station excursion
and ball this eveuiug will leave the depot
at 5 o'olook, and will leave Mineral Station
the next morning at 4 o’clock. Tickets
oJjT* Forll‘®^
rLDi hist.
•crap* from the Note-bool* of the
ftentlners Reporter.
The moonlight excursion to-night.
The District Court will adjourn to-mor
row.
Yesterday was one of the warmest days
of the season.
The “Tamers” lead off with their ball
next Monday evening.
T. R. Hntchinson <fc Co. yesterday re
ceived a tine line of choice groceries.
The Union Guard are making extensive
preparations for their picnic at the Italian
ranch.
The Joss House in Chinatown is being
thoroughly overhauled and renovated by
the Mongolian worshippers.
Mr. E. J. Butler, Secretary of the Eu
reka Tunnel Company, has removed his
office to the Sentinel building.
There is a young man in this town who
has become partly demented by bis vain
efforts to raise a moustache.
A married lady, who was rather uproar
ious on Main street yesterday afternoon,
was locked up in the calaboose.
Quite a number of gentlemen and ladies
are making preparation to attend the
party at Miucral Station to-night.
The agent for the “Sunny South Dra
matic Company,” which numbers eighteen
people, is daily expected to arrive here.
“A man may smash a stove and things,
And black a fond wife’s eye;
And she may pound him with a club,
But true love cannot die.”
Those who attended the previous ball at
Mineral Station spoke in the highest terms
of all the arrangements. McFall has
everything in good shape this time.
Call and see the new firm at the Mer
chants’ Exchange. Julius and Abe are
clever young gentlemen, and have our
best wishes for their success in business.
Mr. Al. Titus is having a substantial
stone wall built in front of his residence
on Spring street, which will add to the ap
pearance of his property, and keep oft' the
dirty water and mud when the floods come.
When ladles meet
They always greet
With kisses heard arrows the afreet ;
But men, more mild,
Dou't get rO Wild ;
They meet and part when both have “smiled.’’
A Nuianiiee.
Editor Sentinel—I once beard a negro
minstrel say that it was true that “ a man
and wife are one, but,” he remarked, that
“if a person were to pass when my wife
and I were quarreling, they would think
there were a dozen of us at least.” But if
a person were to pass a certain house on a
certain street in Eureka, almost any night
»rom 7 to 12 o’clock, he would think there
was at least a score of drunken Indians
gathered there for a fandango. And yet
for most of the time a woman and two
children only are there; but the woman
has been on a • jum” the most of the time
since the 4th of July, and 1 think that if
an officer should pass the door some night
he might find a good subject for Jim Ash
ley’s lodging house. There is no ch&ccc
to sleep in the vicinity, generally, before 1
o’clock, and it is a great annoyance to the
neighbors who have to work for a living.
If the tiling is not stopped before long, the
name of the party will be exposed.
A Neighbor.
Throning Mad.
Editor Sentinel: —Oh no ! don’t throw
rand ! The radical papers are saying that
since Hancock was 1G years old he has
never eaten a meal, worn a suit of clothes,
or mounted a horse that the government
did not pav for. No, no, don’t throw
mud ! If no better mnd than eating,
wearing clothes, and riding at the expense
of the government can be found, you had
better return to the mud you threw the
same day Hancock was nominated—the
Surratt murder business—or is it, that
boomerang-like, it returns to slay the one
who throws it ? Who throws uiud ? “ Lay
on Macduff, and damned be he who first
cries hold, tuough ! ” R.
Somebody Klee** f uneral.
Editor Sentinel—Yes, the Democratic
party has been fasting for a longer time
than forty days. The Republicans reported
them nigh unto death ; in fact, they were
talking of a burial; but they have had a
healthy though weak pulse, aDd have
shown signs of getting on their pegs sev
eral times. They now have not only a
strong and healthy pulse, but are stirring
round, and force the acknowledgment that
the race will be close and hotly contested.
It looks like somebody else’s funeral this
time. _ X.
Mining: Expert* and ftport*.
The Austin Reveille says : This morn
ing, as a gentleman took his seat on the
Grantsville stage, some one on the side
walk asked: “Who is that man?” An
other bystander said, “He is either a min
ing expert or a sport. I don’t know which,
for they look so much alike now-a days as
two peas in a pod.” We are at a loss to
know which is elevated or which is de
graded by the comparison, or whether the
occupations of the two are not so near
alike that the whole lot of experts might
not just as wfll be set down &s gamblers or
professional sports.
Depart* Till* Marnlug.
Mr. George Emmett, the well-known
foundryman of Gold Hill, departs this
morning for his home on the Comstock.
Mr. Emmett, during his brief stay in Eu
reka, met hosts of old acquaintances and
friends, who vied with each other to make
his visit a pleasant one. He returns to
the Comstock favorably impressed with the
outlook of the Rase liauge.
Upturned from Austin.
Mr. Dave Steindler and Mr. D. Nathan
returned yesterday from Austin. Dave is
In eeataeiea over the royal treatment he re
ceived at the hands of the people of Lan
der's capital and the beauties and attrac
tions of that mountain paradise. Austin
is a steady going place and its people all
seem satisfied with their aurrouudiugs.
Eureka** (treat Flood.
On Saturday next, if our memory serve*
us correctly, the flag! of Eureka will be
placed at half mast in commemoration of
the great flood which visited that town in
1874 and by which twenty-four lives were
lost.—| Reveille.
You are right neighbor on the date, but
only fourteen Uvea were lost.
“Widow Bedott.**
The performance of Haverlv’a Comedy
Company was repeated last night to an
appreciative audience. To meet the dull
ness of the times the management have
determined on a still further reduction in
prices for to-nlglit and Saturday.
Train Belayed.
The passenger train of the E. A P. Rail
road was over two hours behind time last
night. The delay was caused by a break
in the engine at Mineral Station. Another
engine was sent up from Paliaade when th6
train came on as usual.
-- \
Til* Prllolmrd Trial,
The second trial of John T. Prltohard,
for the killing of Officer Symouds, at Gold
Hill, has commenced at Carson, It seems
difficult to get a jury. Attorney Soderbevg,
formerly of Eureka, is conducting the
defense.
-<►
Kmig-ned.
Mr. J. D. West has resigned nis position
as Presiililnt of the Mary lard Mining Com
pany, and Dr. E. B. D«*J^t Matyr has been
elected to fill hie plaee.
CANDELARIA.
What a Returned EnrekAi Dajw
About IhAt Section.
A Sentoel reporter last evening had a
conversation with Mr. L. Banner, jnst
returned from Candelaria. Mr. Banner
spent five months in that section. He
regards it as a splendid mining country,
with a future second to no other place in
Nevada. The mineral bearing belt seems
to be from eight to fifteen miles long.
There are a half dozen leading mines in an
advanced state of development, and all
looking well. The Northern Belle works
1C5 men in the mine, and runs two mills.
The Victor, Mt. Diablo and other prop
erties have plenty of ore in sight, but are
short of milling facilities. The Mt. Diablo
is controlled by the Shaw brothers, for
merly of the Eureka Consolidated. A
scarcity of water is one of the greatest
drawbacks to the prosperity of the section.
All of the water used at Candelaria is
hauled from Columbus, a distance of eight
miles. It sells for five cents a gallon, and
a bath costs $2 50. The colored man who
keeps the bath house saves the water from
his tubs and sells it over again for street
sprinkling purposes. In the barber shops
are posted notices to the effect that $1 per
week will be charged for the privilege of
washing one’s face and hands, which is
considered a fair and reasonable price. A
project is on foot to bring in water in
pipes. The enterprise, it is estimated, will
involve the outlay of $300,000. The town
of Candelaria is growing rapidly, and busi
ness has been and is still quite brisk. The
population of the immediate section is
estimated at about 1,500. It is thought
that great impetus will be given to mining
matters by the extension of thft Virginia
& Truckeo Railroad, which will come suffi
ciently near to the Candelaria section to
stimulate all branches of business. On
the whole, Mr. Banner is sanguine that
Candelaria will be a booming camp in the
near future.
HIM1XU REFORM.
Pruning Down the Expennen.
For aorae mouths past the San Francisco
newspapers have been earnestly engaged in
offering suggestions for lessening the ex
penses of working mines. The Bulletin is
glad to know that the pruning knife has
been applied in some cases,'with good re
sults to the stockholders. It cites the Bel- j
mont, in which a reformation has been in
augurated, and as there are doubtless
Belmont stockholders in this city, the fol
lowing from the Bulletin, will provie inter- j
esting reading :
Some time ago certain large stockholders
in the Beltuont became restive under the
monotony of assessments, and began cast
ing about for relief without sacrificing
their stock. 'I lie mine had produced
$1,000,000 in bullion and taken in $600,000
iu assessments from stockholders. During
the height of the producing ptriod $200,
000 was taken out in sixty days. Nothing
was ever given in return. Investigation
showed that the money was largely ab
sorbed in extravagant expenses, and the
work of economy was introduced. As soon
as sufficient stock was secured to effect the
reforms desired, it was a comparatively
easy matter to cut down expenses very ma
terially, and place the workings of the
mine on business-like principles. The sal
ary pf the President was reduced from
$150 to $50, and the Secretary from $200
to $75. The attorney at $100 per month
was dispensed with altogether. The fee of
$5 to each Trustee for attendance at meet
ings was dropped. The expenses at the
mine were al»o reduced. There was a
Superintendent, with day foreman and
night foreman, to work eight miners, and
a watchman to look after the Monitor-Bel
mont mill, a half interest in which had i
cost the company $76,000. Here is a case i
of genuine reform, that counts for some- j
thing iu dollars and cents. At the recent
annual meeting of the company, the Sec
retary reported about $88,000 received dur
ing the year, embracing $40,000 from as
sessments, including $4,400 from the one
now in process of collection. The sale of
stock for account of this assessment is ad
vertised for July 26th. There are those
who still have faith in the Belmont mine,
though the stock has dropped to very low
figures. Some of the stock, bought seven
years ago, st&uds to holcers at $20 to $25
per share, exclusive of the long array of
assessments since collected. This is prob
ably not an isolated case. So many old
time holders in once producing mines have
been made rich by their pertinacity that it
encourages others to retain their grip long
after the majority have abandoned all
hopes and their stock.
UNIVERSITY LANDS.
The Price Fixed by the Board of
KeteiiU.
The Board of Regents of the Nevada
University held a meeting in Carbon on
Wednesday. The object of the meeting
was to fix the price per acre of timber
lands belonging to the University Fund.
The annexed resolutions were adopted :
Resolved, That the price of State timber
land containing nut-pine, cedar, juniper
or mountain mahogany be fixed at $1.25
per acre, and that land containing other
pine, fir, tamarack or other timber suitable
for manufacturing into lumber or timbers,
be fixed at $2.50 per acre, aud that there
shall not be sold a less quantity than 160
acres of timber land in one body. Said
body of land shall be selected in compact
form iu conformity with the rules and reg
ulations in the sale of lands by the United
States Government.
Resolved, That the Land Register is
hereby authorized to ascertain the true
character of timber lauds applied for, by
requiring the applicant to make affidavit
and produce the affidavits of two disinter
ested witnesses as to whether any part of
said lands contain timber cabable of being
manufactured into lumber, and make such
other rules and regulations as will protect
the best interests of the State. Such affi
davits may be made before the Clerk of
the District Court, or any person author
ized by law to administer oaths, having a
heal. T. N. Stone,
President Board of Regents.
Jno. S. Mayhcgh, 8eo’y Pro Tem.
Our Doar Abe.
This afternoon, says the Carson Appeal,
Clem Berry caught a rat in a wire cage,
and getting out in the street called for all
the dogs to come and try their teeth on
the rat. Inside of five minutes half a doz
en dogs were on the ground, in a state
bordering on insanity. Most of the solid
citizens of Carson also gathered about
Clem, and the utmost excitement pre
vailed. While bets were dying freely
about the crowd, and everybody was cry
ing. “Turn ’em loose,” “Give the dogs a
show,” etc., our office dog Abe, a thorough
bred English bull dog, stalked leisurely
into |tke ring. Presently his eye fell on
the rat in the cage, and not noticing the
gauzy wires, he sprang toward it. When
his teeth encountered the cage he saw he
had made a mistake, but determining to
carry the thing through, he gave a few
crunches, the wires closed in about the
rat, aud then he swallowed rat, cage and
all. A howl of disappointment went up
from the crowd, aud the dog sauutered
methodically back to the office, looking as
quiet as if ho had simply swallowed a mut
ton chop.
The Entertainment Lnst Evening.
The Gerraauia Club l&st evening gave
the moat select and pleasant entertainment
ever given in Eureka, which consisted of
vocal music and dancing. The singing by
the Club was excellent. Between each
piece the audience joined in a dance. The
attendance was large, and the whole affair
was conducted in a splendid manner. The
Club intends giving two of these entertain
ments a month until winter, when they
propose to give one each week.
JOHN JENKINS’ PISTOL.
An Apparently Tnprovoked At
tempt to Kill Frederick Ward.
[From the Virginia Chronicle, June 20. |
The pop of the pistol is heard on the
Comstock rather too frequently in these
days, and the worst of it is that men who
shoot at each other in Virginia are not
sufficiently skillful with the weapon to in
sure the safety of other people who take no
interest in the game. Ooe of these days
poor marksmen may get hurt by an indig
nant community. Last night, between 10
and 11 o'clock, John Jenkins stepped into
his front yard, between A and Howard
streets, on the Divide, and called across
the fence to his next-door neighbor, Fred
erick Ward, asking if he was there. Mr.
Ward, who was silting on his porch Bmok
ing a pipe, replied that he was there, and
Mr. Jenkins, being thus assured, turned
loose his pistol, supposing that he was aim
ing at Mr. Ward. The latter jumped into
the cellar after the second shot, and called
to Jenkins not to shoot any more, as he
was not armed. Jenkins was just fixing
his pistol for a third shot at his neighbor,
when Mrs. Ward stepped between them
and two men caught hold of him. Jenk
ins was arrested on a charge of assault
with intent to kill, and the examination
began before Justice Moses to-day. All
the witnesses examined on the part of the
State testify to the circumstances as given
above, and some of them further state that
the bullets from Jenkins’ pistol went so
wide of their marks as to strike a house
adjoining Ward's. Ward save he does not
know why Jenkins should try to kill him,
as they bad no quarrel since the settlement
of a law suit about three years ago. The
examination was continued until to-mor
row, when witnesses for the defense will be
examined. Meanwhile Jenkins is in jail.
IHXTSMA.VS HOTEL.
A Handsome Ntruetnre, and a Con
venience to Overland Passengers.
{From the Reno Gazette, July 20.]
On the ashes of the Capital Hotel at
Battle Mountain, L. D. Huntsman, the
proprietor, has erected a new and much
finer building, which is now being fur
nished, and is already open to the public.
A wide platform fills the space between the
house and the rail. A handsome fountain
and reservoir, filled with gold and cat
fish, are located in the center. A lot of
young trees are fenced in and are growing
nicely. The building is gray, with dark
trimmings, 150 feet along the track by 40
deep. Its height is 33 feet. The first
story is 12 feet, the second nine and the
attic eight. The house is hard finished.
The first floor is divided into a parlor, re
ception room, dining room, bar room,
kitchen, railroad offices, etc. The second
floor has three rows of bed rooms and two
halls. The inside row of rooms is dark,
which is an accommodation to railroad
men on night runs, who want to sleep in
the daytime. There will be over fifty bed
rooms. A wide veranda will run the whole
length of the building in front, with doors
from the second story, and a shingle roof.
The house will be lighted by gas. It is a
great addition to Battle Mountain. The
overland east eats dinner there.
SALT LAKE ITEMS.
[From the Tribune of the 20th.]
A queer kind of yellow stuff, made into
a dress, that looks like a wrapper on one
side, a night gown in the rear, and a duster
all around, is the latest summer dress for
the ladies.
It is the general impression that lead
ores will command a good price this fall
and winter; therefore miners should net let
up on account of the present low prices.
« The census of Utah is now complete and
shows a population of 143 690—one-fifth of
whom are white and free, while the other
four-fifths are slaves of the Mormon
Church.
California Through Death Valley, is one
of the finest plays ever put on the boards,
and should draw an immense crowd to
night at the Liberal Institute.
Bathing in the Jordan is indulged in by
the boys, who are utterly regardless of the
latent fashion in bathing suits, even dis
carding paper collars.
The Mormon priests would like to see
the brethern take a forty days’ fast. It
would swell the tithing fund and enrich
the old frauds immensely.
From an OAHcIhI Visit.
Assessor Hank Knight returned yester
day afternoon from an official visit to the
western side of the county. He is doing a
good business in the way of scooping in
revenue from the outlying precincts.
Secretory fteburz Coiniiiff
Secretary Schurz is expected to arrive
in Nevada the early part of the coming
week. He will switch off at Wadsworth
and visit the Pyramid Indian Reservation.
Powder.
Go to W. H. Remington A Co.’s for
Hercules Powder. The best high explo
sive in use. *
Blasting Powder of all grades at Rem
ngton A Co’s. *
SPECIAL NOTICES'
Good WatfliHork.
MR. P. STELER takes pleasure in announcing
to his customers that he has secured the ser
vices of the very best watchmaker on the Coast
—one who has hud 25 years’experience in the
finest watchmakers’ es ahlishments of Europe
and America, and la prepared to d > all kinds of
fine watch work and clock repairing on the
shortest possible notice, and sutisfaction guar
anteed. All watch and clock work warranted
for one year. N. B.—All kiud* of fine Jewelry
and diamond work made to order, and jewelry
neatly repaired. _
REMOVAL.
THOMAS MURPHY has removed his Boot
shop three doors south of the new brick build
ing on Main street, where he is prepared to
make the beat French 0 If Boots to order from
$12 to $lfl. Repairing neatly done. A large as
sortment of Boota of my own manufacture, at
reduced prices. ^
Watches, Clocks. and Jewelry Re
paired.
If you want to have your watches, clocks,
and iewelry repaired in a workmanlike man- I
iif r go to P. BTELKR’9 J-welry Store, Main
street. All work warranted.
Wauled,
Active employment by Morris H. Joseph, late
of the Golden Rule Store. Address, Postcfflce
box 29M, _Junl3 tf
F. J. SCHNEIDER,
g DRUGGIST, g
EAST SIDE MAIN STREET, THIRD DOOR
SOUTH OF CLARK.
PHYSICIANS’ PRESCRIPTIONS,
-ACCURATELY PREPARED
At all hours or the day or night.
Orderi for
Drugs and Medicines,
—Promptly ettended to—
1 have ala© a Full Line of
Perfumery, Toilet Articles,
Hnlr IlniHtiee, Tooth Brnelin, Null
null Bath Brnshee, Ktc..
And In feet everything ueuelly found In a flret
cleas Drug Store. F j, SCIINETDER,
Proprietor.
Kuwka. Juan 14,1880. JobWU
FOB BALE AND TO LET.
For Sale, or To Let.
The building formerly occupied
by the New York Store, will be let In part
! or altogether, including thi* fire proof store
honae.
Any person wishing to purchase the entire
property, can do so at moderate figures.
Apply to BLABER, up stairs.
Eureka, July 3,1880. jy4-tf
For Sale at a Bargain.
OWING TO THE II.I. HEALTH OF THE
Proprietor, an old established Restaurant
doing a large business In one of the beat local,
itleain the city, will be aold cheap for caah,
alao the building and furniture complete. To
any one desiring a good paying Dual ness thla
la an opening seldom offered. Apply to
JOHN 8. CAPRON.
Eureka, June 11,1880. JunlS tf
TO RENT^ CHEAP.
TO RESPONSIBLE PARTIES, ONE OF THE
best residences on Nob Hill. For partic
ulars, inquire on the premises, next door to
Mr. Rube Eggleston’s residence
Eureka, June 5, 1*80. juntt-tf
Furnished Booms to Let.
SEVERAL NICELY FURNISHED BOOMS
to let, at half the prices usually charged
by other lodging houses. The rooms are large
and very comfortable, and most of them are
furnished with stoves.
MRS. DENNI8,
At the large brick house, North Buel street.
Eureka, January 17,1880. janl8 tf
Rooms to Rent.
IjlOCR ROOM8. SUITABLE FOR OFFICES
1 or sleeping apartments, now occupied by
Dr. De La Matyr, over the Restaurant, are for
rent by CHARLES H. FISKE.
Eureka, April 24,1880. a25 tf
FOR RENT.
11HE LARGE HALL ON BUEL 8TREET,
now occupied as the Academy of Music,
will be rented on reasonable terms to a perma
nent tenant. For particulars apply in tne rear
of the building.
Eureka, May 1,1880. may2 tf
FOR S-A-EE.
I HAVE SEVERAL PAIRS OF 8EC0ND
hand sash doors, and also two writing
deals, which I will sell cheap for cash. Apply
at the wholesale liquor store of
jun2-lm M. B. BARTLETT.
NOTICE
IS HEREBY GIVEN
-THAT
ORION HALL!
(UPPER HURDY-HOUSE, NEXT TO EUREKA HALL)
IS NOW OPEN FOR SINGING, DAN
CING AND GENERAL
AMUSEMENT.
OPEN NIGHT AND DAY.
TAKE IT I3ST!
LATIMER, GREGORY k MORRIS,
Proprietors.
Eureka. July 19,1830. jy20-tf
C. SCHWAMB,
FEW GDOBS SOUTH OF SENTINEL OFFICE.
Dealer in and Repairer of
FURNITURE!
U also prepared to do
UNDERTAKING!
Ilia a fine assortment of
METALIC. ROSEWOOD CASKETS AND COFFIN
TRIMMINGS.
fJUWERAL* ATTENDED TO PROMPTLY,
and nil nrrangemeuts made with care and
attention.
fjT [Hiring the absence of Mr. Rchwamb, a
competent workman baa been employed to at
tend to the business.
Eureka. May 21, 1890. my22 tf
JAMES T. VALENTINE.
INSURANCE BROKER
OFFICE WITH WELLS. FARGO & CO.
(SUCCESSOR TO SAMUEL COOPER.)
I>TOM r ATTENTION GIVEN TO THE
v'h< ins of risk** in aubatautial Companies
at ib i-.weat ratea of insurance.
-Agent for
J. A. BRUMSEY'S COMPANIES
—or—
VIRGINIA CITI, SEVADA.
Eur.’iiu. July 1», 1880. JyHO.tf
$-3=0 BEWABD.
STRAY l.D FROM HAMILTON. WHITE
Pine county, Nevada, about April 1st, 1880.
One bay mare, white left hind toot.
On*- brown mare, white spot ou face; both
hind i*ft write. Both the Hbove mares are
branded and vented thus: n on the lef* thigh
ami ED ou 'eft shoulder.
Also one black horse mule branded thus: ^
ou left thigh hud vented on shoulder V
A Is one black mare mule branded JN on left
ai e Ml neck, and thus: y on left thigh.
Fori v dollars reward *“* will bo paid for the
deliv* rv of ttie above animals at Hildreth's
Stable. Hamilton, or $10 each._
JOHN GIRADELLI.
Hiiiui.'.ton, Nev., July 14, 1880. jyl6-2w
AUCTION SALE.
W- II I. be SOLD TO THE HIGHEST BID
d.-r fur .-.ah *t 1 o'olock r. a . on the
pr-ml- - 'lie 9th dir of August. (If not aold at
privat ..tlebefere that time) the house and
lot ben •! the corner lot No. 8, McCoy Survey,
Eureka uown as the White Properly, oppo
site ini . ■ in.i., and next north from the ltuby
and ■ u i irh. rg Con office, fronting on Main
atre. f ... pounded by Main, Mineral and Mon
roi M ,.j. A D. ROCK, Agent.
I m. July 10.18*0. For *• J- Whit*.
Jyii'J_
Trustees Meeting.
A MEETING OF THE EUREKA SOHOOL
TriiHt.-ea will be held ai the office of the
tocr< tary. on Saturday. July 94th, at 3 o'clock
r JI for Iho purpose oi appoluUng teacher*
f.i-|tv . laiitug term, and for the transaction
of Hi,.-:, other builneaa a» may come before the
mwuA 8KILLMAN, Secretary.
Emekt. July 19, 1880._Jy00-»«*
FOU SALE.
A number of good horses and
Mhlea for sale, or will be exchanged for
wood or Charcoal. ^
Fashion Stable. Eureka.
Eureka, July IT, 1880. Jyl8 3w
tv. oTICE.
rrtHF. HOLDER OF CERTIFICATE NUM
1 lier COt. thirty shares Overman, is re
quested to call at our office. ^
Eureka. July 30,1880. Iy31-1*
FANCY AND STAPLE DBY GOODS. _____
tQQKQUTt
LOOK OUT LOOK OUT LOOK OUT
-fob
MORRIS & LEVY’S
New Advertisement 1
-ON THE
FIRST OF A.TTQ-TTST.
Eureka, July 17,1880,_lyl»-t<»
FARMING IMPLEMENTS, GROCERIES, ETC.
A. HAWKE8, _ _ ®- J- BORNS.
HAWSES & CO.,
-Agents BAKER * HAMILTON
FARMING IMPLEMENTS
RAKES, REAPERS, PLOWS, MOWERS,
HAY ROPE, SACKS, AND TWINE.
ra. Extra Parts for Machines Supplijd at the Shortest Notice."**
—Sacramento Prices.—*
OPPOSITE E. k 0. LUMBER YARD, MAIN STREET, EUREKA, NEVADA.
-ALSO
GROCERS and GENERAL MERCHANTS,
-WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Eureka. June 28, 1880. _ je29’lm
FRANKLIN'S PROCLAMATION._
Always in the Lead!
M. J. FRANKLIN & CO.,
The Heaviest Importers
-OF
DRY GOODS AND CARPETS !
In Eastern Nevada.
Tie Acliilefliefl Leaders of Fashioa.
WE HAVE AN IMMENSE ASSORTMENT
of everything in our line, and receive
new goods dally by express.
Carpets.
OUB MILLINERY DEPARTMENT IS !
teeming with novelties.
•^Quality the Best !
Give Us a Gall
AN ELEGANT LOT OF ENGLISH BRCS
aels, Three-plys, Haudlooms, Ingrains.
Oilcloths, Mattings, Etc.
Carpets.
LADIES' AND CHILDREN'S SHOES AND
Slippers, in endless variety.
Prices the Lowest ?"**
5TWe Can Suit You.
M. J. FRANKLIN & CO.,
Agents for Eureks for Mine. Demorest’s Reliable Patterns. JeW tf
____ -
SPRING AND SUMMER CLOTHING.
Ike “WHITE HOUSE!”
Largest Clothing House
-X KT
Eastern Nevada!
JUST RECEIVED AND CONSTANTLY ON HAND, A FULL LINK OF THE LATEST STY I.Eh
of Spring and Hummer Clotliiiiir, Furnishing Goods, Hata, Capa, Boot*. Shot-a,
Trunks ana Vallsea, Ltc„ fctc.
•y Before purchaaing elsewhere, call and examine our stock and prices.
M. DAVIDSON,
Eureka, Nevada, April 30, 1880. **
CLOTHING AND GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS.__
SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE!
II. KAY8ER,
BEGS LEAVE TO INFORM HIS PATRONS AND THE PUBLIC THAT HE HAS JUST Bit
celved a large atock of
SPRING AND SUMMER CLOTHING!
FURNISHING OOODS, HATS, CAPS, BOOTH. SHOES, TRUNKS. VALISES Ti. . >T<
All of the La teat Stylea. I call eapeclal attention to my elegant atock of white amt Colored
Underwear conViatlng of the beat qnalltle. of O.ahmere. Liale Thread, Balbrlgg-n. Her'no.
andFUnSel Myl.te.ta.yl.. of Scar fa and Tic, Fancy and White Hosiery. Soft and
Brimmed Felt Hate, White and Colored Shirta
AND FINE BOYS’ CLOTHlIV’Ce
A Full a.anrtruent of Extra Slxe Clothing and Cuderwcr Give me • jell and , IUJ <ur,
will be auited in Price and Quality. **• ***ai»KK,
South Main 8treet, next to Ohaa. LauteuachUger'a
Agent for the Celebrated STANDARD Shirta.
Tjureka. May 8.1880. _____U
ALP HAB.R.IS,
-DEALER IS
Gents’ Furnishing Goods,
H»t«, Cap*. Shirt*, Underwear, Hosiery, Trunk*, Valise*, Etc,
GENTS’ NECK-WEAR A SPECIALTV,
FINEST INI) MOST COMPLETE STOCK IN EIIREK1,
Full Lines of Extra Size Underwear.
ALF HARRIS,
Two down uwU& of dock Pnrry'n Snioom

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