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Eureka daily sentinel. [volume] (Eureka, Nev.) 1871-1887, August 15, 1880, Image 2

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(gutfka HJailg Sentinel.
aCTDAT. ':i^^LPQPBT 15.T880
RATIONAL DEMOCRATIC TICKET.
FOB PBENIDENT,
WINFIELD SCOn HANCOCK,
OF PENNSYLVANIA.
FOB VICB PRESIDENT,
WILLIAM H. ENCLISH,
OF INDIANA.
DEMOCRATIC 8TATE TICKET.
FOR PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS,
w. E. F. DEAL.STOREY
JOHN H. DENNIS.ELKO
J o. McTARNAHAN.ESMERALDA
FOB MEMBER OF 0ONORE8S.
GEORGE W. CASSIDY,
OF EUREKA.
FOB SUPREME FUDGE,
CHARLES H. BELKNAP,
OF STOREY.
EUREKA I* THE UOI.D.
Eureka is the second connty in the
State, and its population is steadily in
creasing. But Eureka was not suffi
ciently important to claim any special
consideration from the hands of the Re
publican State Convention lately in ses
sion at Carson. In the slang of the
times, Eureka "got left.” The Great
West wanted everything, and having
the power, took everything. The dele
gation from this county was not accorded
even the courtesy of naming one of the
Presidential Electors, after making one
of the most gallant fights in the political
history of the State. Conkling lost
Grant and got Arthur. Eureka lost
Sabin and got nothing. The Republi
cans of Eastern Nevada may be content
with being left out in the cold, but we
hardly believe it.
-—- . .... . —•
It is very amusing to witness the
straits to which the Republican journals
are driven since the nomination of Han
cock. Charges too contemptible for
grown men to indulge in are paraded be
fore the country. “He can’t speak” is
the last, that is, he can’t make a speech.
All right, gentlemen; he can fight and be
loyal to the country and the old flag. He
can stand before rebels North and South,
and risk his life’s blood in the defence of
his country. He knows nothing, it is
true, about negotiating for Credit Mobil
ier stock, Union Pacific bonds or De Gol
yer contracts. In these graces ho is a
novice; for such we refer our Republican
friends to James A. Garfield, the Repub
lican nominee for President. He is the
man who thoroughly understands manip
ulating questions of this character.
Hon. Samuel J. Randall, in his
speeoh at the reoent Democratic ratifica
tion meeting in New York, said: "Every
promise and profession of the Republican
party is falsified by its public record.
While it proclaims Civil Service Reform,
its candidate for President repudiates the
utteranoes of his party’s platform on the
subject in his letter of acceptance, and
its candidate for Vice President was dis
missed from office by Mr. Hayes’ admin
istration because of his conspicuous in
efficiency and questionable, if not worse,
public official acts.”
The Republicans, says the Boston Post,
do mot know what they are talking about
when they say that General Hancock is
not a statesman. How do they know he
isn’t ? Statesman are not manufactured;
they are born, and General Hancock has
given the strongest presumptive evidence
that he possesses the qualities that dis
tinguish them. On the contrary, Gar
field’s fiteen years of service have proved
that he is only a politician.
The letter of General Hancock to Gen
eral Sherman, which the Republican
press charged was disloyal and particu
larly damaging to its author prior to its
publication, is to be published by the
Democratic National Committee as a cam
paign document.
A Connecticut printer will try to fast
three weeks and work at the case ten
hours every day during that time. Of
course he must be locked up every night,
and kept away from pi. If he actually
fasts his form will Bhow proof of but lit
tle fat matter at the end of the take.
One hundbed Republican speakers will
invade the State of Maine, and many
of the inhabitants will promise to vote
for Garfield rather than be talked to
death.
Ton Fitch, the silver tongued, is
■tumping in Maine for the Republican
ticket.
•T. LOUIS STOCK BOA1D.
A Circular Explanatory of the Ob
ject* or the Organisation.
The SurrisiL has received from the
Secretary, Mr. T. W. Heman, a circular
regarding' the nsw Stock Board lately
launched in St. Louis. It if as follows :
St. Lows, Mo., July 31st, 1880.
The growing importance of mining and
•took interests of this country, and the
intimate relation of St. Louis and St.
Louis capital to it, are among the reasons
that have led to the formation of this
Board at this centre of trade. The St.
Louis Mining and Stock Exchange is a
stock company organised under the laws
of the State of Missouri, and tbs stock is
all owned by St. Louis men. The organi
sation was recently completed by the elec
tion of the following Board of Directors:
G. W. Ohadbourne, Ohas. F. Orthwein,
frank T. Iglehart, J. W. Paramore, J. W.
Nobls. D. P, Rowland, Thomas Rioheson,
X. 8. Chester, T. W. Heman. W. R. Allen,
D. X. Franoi., Jams* Baker, Jno. E. Ennis.
Ths character and business standing of
these gentlemen, it U believed, will oom
mend any enterprise with which they con
nect their names and influence,
a .Frl“, ‘barged mining companies
<“r listing their stocks on this board is
•*°h- All reliable companies are
invited to forward applications.
Tkt true and proper wi of ike military power
keeidee defending Ike national honor against for.
tign nations, it I, uphold Ike lews and eioil
fnenment and It Heart to every person residing
taunt m He enjoyment of Uf,. liberty emd
grsfWV—WlaAeid BseMXanoeck.
A SMARTCENSUS ENUMERATOR
False and Fictitious Returns.
- - --
A FINE AND IMPRISONMENT*
Death #f General Byrne.
SUCCESS Of GENERAL GRIERSON.
RIFLE MATCH AT CRF.F.DMOOR.
A Powder Explosion.
[By Telegraph to the Sentinel.]
New York, August 14.—John J. Mur
phy, of 156 Prince street, and one of the
United States Census Enumerators, was
held for examination to-day by United
States Commissioner Shields, on a charge
of making out false and ficticious census
returns, in violation of the United States
Statutes. As residents of 119H Green
street, a house of ill fame, he had entered
James A. Garfield, of Ohio, bookkeeper;
Chester A. Arthur, of New Y'ork, Collector;
Edward Cooper, of New York, glue maker;
James Conkling, of New York, notion
storekeeper; Kohn Fox, of New York,
liquor store proprietor; James G. Blaine,
of Maine, stock broker; Samuel Tilden, of
New York, money broker, and Lewis San
ford, of New Yorl, rook. The prisoner,
says he was given these names by the people
of the house, but the residents there say
they gave him their proper names, and
that Murphy must have altered them.
The penalty for the offense is $5,000, and
two years impri-onmeut.
Qrieraon Mini the Imllaus.
Santa Fe, Angnst 14.—General Byrne,
of Fort Worth, Texas, who was wounded
by Indians in the recent attack on the
mail coach between Quittman and Eagle
Springs, died on Thursday night. The
Indians are on the Mexican side of the
river, but are demoralized, and have lost
considerable men, their supply camp, 20
head of cattle and a good many head of
horses by the fight on the 9th in the Sierra
Diablo mountains. They have made no
other stand since the fight on Rattlesnake
canyon. The bulk of Gen. Grierson’s
command is now at Sulphur Springs.
Part of the command under Capt. Nolan
has already arrived at Quittman. General
Grierson has been very successful in en
countering and heading off Victorio, and
driving him back into Mexico. It is be
lieved that the United States troops will
cross the river and follow Yictorio’s trail.
Killed by »n Explosion.
Denver, August 14.—At Bed Hill, a
small station on the South Park Railroad,
last night about 12 o’clock, a fire broke
out in the depot, and caused an explosion
of about 1,000 pounds of powder, which
blew the depot aud everything in the place
to atoms. The agent, F. E. Colyer, was
badly injured by burns and cuts, and is
not expected to live. His assistant, Char
ley Hilton, was killed, and two other men
were badly injured.
Eon IT Range Rifle Bfateli.
New York, August 14.—The long range
rifle match, between Canadaand the United
States, took place to-day at Creedmoor.
The weather and wind favoring. The
shooting began at 10:15. The firing was
rapid, and in an hour each side had fin
ished work. At the 800 yards range the
following is the score: Americans, 439;
Canadians, 427. At the 900 yards the
score was: Americans, 416; Canadians,
407.
Victoria's Warriors.
San Antonio, Texas, August 14.—Vic
torio has with him about 350 warriors, all
armed and mounted, and abont 500 extra
horseB, stolen from the Governor of Coa
huilla, Mexico, and others. Grierson’s
force is only about 200. Newell is posted
in San Andreas mountains. New Mexico,
awaiting Victorio.
Tennessee Republicans—Conkllng’s
Intentions.
Washixotox, August 14.—Returns from
the elections of county officers in eastern
Tennessee, held last week, have been re
ceived here, and they show very satisfac
tory Republican gains. The officers voted
for were Sheriffs and county trustees, and
as a general thing, strict party lines were
observed in the nominations and canvass.
The twelve counties which compose the
Congressional District now represented by
Houk (Rep.), shows very satisfactory gains
over both 1876 and 1870.
Ex-Senator Dorsey, Secretary of the Na
tional Republican Committee, arrived here
to-day. He says Conklingwill do brilliant
work in the doubtful States, and particu
larly in New York, Indiana and Ohio. Be
ing asked about tbe South, Dorsey replied
that all the Southern States will either vote
or be counted Democratic.
House, of Tennessee, says the split in
the Democratic party will gain one, and
possibly two Republican Congressmen in
that State.
Another Bender Story.
Dxsxoixxs, August 14.—A letter to the
State Register, from a responsible citizen
of this State, Mr. S. A. James, of Sigour
ney, gives information, on the authority
of an eye-witness, also a responsible man,
that the notorious Bender family, four in
number, were captured soon after the dis
covery of the murder of Colonel York’s
brother. He says the four were stood up
in a row, facing nine riflemen, and were
told their fate; that Kate was plucky to
the last, and called upon the captors to
shoot and be d—d, and that the four bodies
were buried at the corner of the four
counties of Labette, Wilson, Neoshoe and
Montgomery.
Boa* Coukltng to Tube the Stamp.
Nxw Yobx, August 14.—The Republican
journals announce that Conkling will be*
gin campaign work in the canvass on Sep
tember 2d or 3d, in Delaware. He will
speak at a public meeting in this city, and
then go to Ohio and make speeches, and
then go to Indiana. Later he will return
to this State and continue his labors here.
The Kalght Templars.
Chicago, August 14.—Preparations for
the reception of the Knight Templars are
going rapidly forward. Tbe banks will
close on Tuesday next, on which day the
procession will take place. The Board of
Trade has decided to adjourn the same
day, and the city and county offices will
close both Monday and Tuesday. Many
business houses are being lavishly decor
ated with banners, evergreens and appro
priate designs. The principal places of
business will dose during the more import
ant parts of the celebration, and tbe city
will make general holidays of Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday. An entertain
ment will probably be provided for all
comers' and the fears that trouble wilj be
caused by the attempt to feed and lodge
the vast multitude of visitors are not jus
tified.
Killed on tbe Spot.
Cleveland, August 11.—Yesterday John
McDonald appeared In Nilea, a small town
near here looking for work. To-dav, at
noon, on going home, Darias Parks found
McDonald in tha house with Mrs. Parks.
McDonald was or Jersd out, but instead of
going undertook to put Parks out, where
upon the latter seized a gun and lodged 11
snot in McDonald's head, whiob oaused
Instant death. Parks gave himself up to
the authorities, and is held on the charge
of murder till the mystery of the affair can
be solved.
The Georgia Muddle.
Atlanta, August 11—The Democratic
bolters have nominated ex-Senator Nor
wood for Governor against Colquitt. Ben
ator Hill will lead the opposition, and the
Aghk will be a bitter one.
OVER THE WATER.
The Fever Stricken Dlstrlets—The
Arrest of Prechasha and His
Agent, Charged with Felony—An
Important Dlspatch-The Trial
of Sergeant Marshman-Eaperl
menta with the Submarine Cable.
fBy TeleRrtph to the Sentinel.1
London, August 14.—In the House of
Commons last night O'Connor Power
called attention to the medical reports in
regard to the condition of the fever
stricken districts in Mayo and other parts
of the west of Ireland, and moved a resolu
tion that it was essential that effective san
itary arrangements be immediately made.
Thomas Sexton, the liberal Home Rule
member for Sligo, seconded the resolution.
Forster, Chief Secretary for Ireland, said
the distress had been much exaggerated,
that the government had sent an efficient
medical staff. He would be willing to
have a resolution placed on record to the
effect that, in the opinion of the House,
the present condition of the agricultural
population of Mayo, Sligo and other parts
of the West, demanded the immediate at
tention of the government. Forster in
cidentally spoke of the contributions made
by Irish-Ainericans to relieve the distress
in Ireland, and said the English laborers
would probably not have done as much for
their own people under similar circum
stances. Power accepted Forster’s resolu
tion, which was then agreed to.
Vienna, August U.—General Prochaska
and his agent, recently arrested here on
the charge of felony, have been acquitted.
They were charged with obtaining 120,000
francs and the promise of 28,000 more
from the Paris speculators, by means of a
forged concession for casino gaming tables
from the Republic of San Marino. Gen.
Prochaska obtained the concession from
the Chief of Police of San Marino, which
was absolutely worthless, but in October
he submitted to four Parisian financiers a
concession purporting to be signed by two
Secretaries of State, for which the finan
ciers gave him the sum of 120,000 francs,
on account of which sum he gave the Chief
of Police 50,000 francs ami 20,000 to his
agent, and tried to get the bill for 28,000
discounted; but before the money was
paid the concession was discovered to be a
forgery by the Chief of Police, and Gen.
Prochaska was charged with being acces
sory thereto. On being interrogated, he
maintained that the Chief of Police, who
had absconded to escape prosecution, had
imposed upon him. Ho acknowledged his
financial troubles, and that the erection of
gaming tables was not an act of high mor
ality on the part of a retired soldier and
bearer of several decorations, who had
served creditably in the campaign from
1849 to 18C6, but he represented Himself as
the dupe of the Chief of Police.
Lonbon, August 14.—The following is
a verbal copy of a dispatch received by ihe
Daily News from its correspondent at St.
Petereburg last night: I have grave reason
to believe that Ayoob Khan has been acting
in concert with, and been assisted by Ab
durrahman, and that the worst suspicions
are not without some foundations. I would
assuredly not send such disconcerting in
telligence except on the most serious
grounds.
The trial by court-martial of Sergeant
Marshman, for false marking at Wimble
don, began at Gospert yesterday. The
charges include offenses committed in 1878,
and 1879. On the opening of the court,
to-day, the prosecutor stated that one of
his principal witnesses had been knocked
down and kicked by a person who had
profited by Marshman’s practices.
Pabis, August 14.—Experiments with
the submarine cable from Brest to Pen
seance were made yesterday in the presence
qf a director of the French cable and
others. A new system, invented by Dr.
Herz, was very successful. The Bell and
PUelp’s system governed the experiments.
Edison’s system failed.
PACIFIC COAST INTELLIGENCE.
CALIFORNIA.
The Slew Commercial Privileges to
be Granted Chinese Subjects—
S. C. Duncan Set at Liberty
Sentence or Clemetshaw.
[ By Telegraph to the Sentinel.)
San Francisco, August 14.—At the Chi
nese Consulate in this city there is a dis
position shown to discredit the full tenor
of the expressions of the Chinese Minister,
as given in the New York dispatches, re
garding the new commercial privileges to be
granted Chinese subjects by their Govern
ment. The Consul states that the whole
amount of the matter is this: The Chinese
steamer, Ho Chung, has been running to
Honolulu, carrying Chinese laborers for
the Hawaiian plantations. Being in need
of repairs, she comes to this port with a
cargo of Hawaiian produoe, and while here
she will probably go on the dry dock and
undergo a thorough overhauling. On her
return trip she is expected to take a num
ber of Chinese passengers, especially the
old, decripid and otherwise helpless or
needy individuals. As to the report that
any new departure is intended on the part
of the Chinese Government, the
Consul avers that there is a great mis
understanding, that any restrictions on
Chinese commerce were removed years
ago; that extra duties and tonnage fees
imposed by the United States on
Chinese vessels only exist at present,
because there has never been a Chinese ar
rival here before to call for their removal;
but that in anticipation of the arrival of
the Ho Chung, as requested, such removal
has been made and will be granted. China
having long ago removed her restrictions,
entitled her own commercial marine to the
same concession when asked for; that, in
short, all talk of China entering actively
under new commercial regulations into the
trade of the world is exaggerated nonsense.
J. 0. Duncan, the long-imprisoned de
faulting manager of the defunct Pioneer
Savings Bank, was set at liberty, he hav
ing furnished bonds to the amonnt of
$01,500. There are ten bonds filed in all,
as follows: J. S. Taylor and R. McMillan,
in the sum of $3,000; C. Smedburgh and
A. Stanton, $3,(WO; B. McMillan and J. 8.
Taylor, $3,000;' A. A. Cohen and Frank
M. Pixley, $13,500; W. L. Duncan and
G. M. Perine, $13,500; James Phelan and
Lester L. Robinson. $3,000; J. B. Randall
and J. B. Wattles, $3,000; Joseph'G. East
land and Alexander G. Abell, $3,000; A. A.
Cohen and Delos Lake, $13,500.
John H. Clemetshaw, convicted of per
jury in swearing that Chas. De Young
fired the first shot when he was killed by
youug Kalloch, waa brought into Court
to-day for sentence. The prisoner asserted
his innooence of intentional misstatement,
and said he had not been influenced by
Mayor Kalloch in giving hiB testimony. A
motion for arrest of judgment and a new
trial was denied, and Clemetshaw was sen
tenced to 14 years in the Penitentiary.
General Connor’. Mine.
The Salt Lake Tribune of late date has
the annexed: General Connor has com
pleted the new concentration work* to be
need in connection with the Great Baain
mine at Btoekton, and will set them in op
eration to-day. They have a capacity to
concentrate four tons into one, the wet
process being used. Three and a half
milee of pipe have been laid to bring the
water to the worke. The No. 6 size Alden
crusher is used. It wee delivered in July,
1879, and has been in constant service ever
•ince, doing its work well and even thor
oughly. The mine is continually improv
ing as depth is reaohed. At present there
are 3,000 tons of ore on the dump, and sev
eral thousand tona at the time.
Tse great principle* of American liberty
•till ere the lawful inheritance of this peo
ple and ever should be.—[ Wmau Soott
> Hanooci.
THE CRIME OF 1876-7.
GARFIELD AND THE ELECTORAL COMMISSION
How He Protested Against It In
Congress. Recognised the Scope
of the Inqnlrx and then Dishon
ored Himself.
[New York Sun.)
No other candidate on the Republican
side would have presented to the country
so distinctly as Mr. Garfield does the issue
of the great fraud of 1877. As one of
Grant's pack of "visiting statesmen," he
assisted at the beginning of the iniquity
by which tho vote of Louisiana was de
liberately stolen. As a member of the
Honse of Representatives lie gave the aid
of his presence and the comfort of his
counsel to tho Returning Board thieves in
all the stages of their work. He signed
the lying report of John Sherman, which
was one of the steps of the conspiracy to
steal the Presidency.
When the bill creating the Electoral
Commission was before the Honse, he op
posed it in a vehement speech, January
25. 1877, upon two distinct grounds: First,
that it was a “usurpation,” and, secondly,
that it would empower tho Commission,
clothed with the authority conferred on
Congress, to review all the acts connected
with the election. But let us quote his
words:
"This is usurpation in every meaning of
the word. Though the Constitution lias
songht to keep Congress away from all the
process of making a President, the bill
create* and places in the control ox ton
gress the enginery by which Presidents
are made at the caprice of the Senate and
House. It grasps all the power, and holds
States and electors as toys in its hands.
It assumes the right of Congress to go
down into the colleges and to inquire into
all the acts and facts connected with their
work. It assumes the right of Congress
to go down into the States, to review the
acts of every oflicer, to open every ballot
box, and to pass judgment on every ballot
cast by seven millions of Americans.”
Five days after that speech was made,
Mr. Garfield was chosen a member of the
Commission to represent the Republicans
of the House of Representatives. We
shall Bee how ho carried out his declara
tions against the bill. The Florida case
was the first presented, and may be said to
have been the turning point of the contro
versy. It was strong in every respect, and
was fortified by judicial proceedings that
peculiarly appealed to the fairness and
good faith of the five Justices of the Sn
premo Couit who were sitting as members
of the Commission.
The frauds of Florida had been con
cocted and concerted with those of Louis
iana, aB the cipher dispatches which passed
between the Republican managers in the
two States, before the returns were finally
completed, made clear. They threw out
ail the Democratic votes necessary to leave
an ostensible Republican majority, and
then declared Stearns elected Governor
and Hayes’ electors chosen. This outrage
was so glaring that Drew, the Democratic
candidate for Governor, got a mandamus
from the Supreme Court to compel the
Board of Canvassers to restore the pre
cincts that had been cast aside by fraud.
Under that order the votes were honestly
counted, and Drew became the legal Gov
ernor, as he was choson by a majority of
people.
Before the pretended Hayes electors
voted on December 6, the Tilden electors
began proceedings in the Circuit Court of
Florida, claiming that they had been law
fully chosen, and that the others were
usurpers. Here is the judgment of the
Court:
“And it is further considered and ad
judged that the s«id relators, Robert Bul
lock, Robert B. Hilton. Wilkinson Call
and James E. Yonge (the Tilden electors),
all and singular, were at said election duly
elected, chosen and appointed electors of
President and Vicp-President of the United
States, and were on the said 6th day of
Deoembcr, 1876, entitled to he declared
elected, chosen and appointed as such,
electors, and to have and receive certifi
cates thereof,"
Now turn to the action of the Legisla
ture. Two laws were passed. The first
was “to provide for a canvasB according to
the laws of the State of Florida, as inter
preted by the Supreme Court, of the votes
for electors of President and Vice-Presi
dent cast at the election held November 7,
1876.” They did recanvass in pursuance
thereof, and certified the election of the
Tilden electors. The second act declared :
“Whereas, the late Governor, Maroellus
L. Stearns, by reason of said illegal action
and erroneous and illegal canvass of the
said Board of State Canvassers, did erro
neously cause to be made and certified
lists of the names of electors of this State,
containing the names of Charles H. Pearce,
Frederick C. Humphreys, William H.
Holden and Thomas Long (the Hayes
electors), and did deliver such lists to
said persons, when, in fact, the said per
sons had not received the highest camber
of votes, and in acanvass conducted accord
ing to the rules perseribed and adjudged
as legal by the Supreme Conrt, were not
appointed as electors or entitled to receive
such lists from the Govenor, bat Robert
Bullock, Robert B. Hilton, Wilkinson Call
and James E. Yonge (the Tilden electors),
were duly appointed electors, and were en
titled to have their names compose the
lists made and certified by the Governor,
and to have such lists delivered to them.”
Thus the courts and the Legislature and
the legal Governor all united in denounc
ing the fraud which had been perpetrated
after Z&ch Chandler's order to organize
the conspiracy had been issued. Three
sets of certificates were sent to the Presi
dent of the Senate, viz: No. 1, made by
the Hayea electors and certified by Stearns;
No. 2, made by the Tilden electors, with
out the certificate of Stearns, but with the
certificate of the Attorney-Oeneral, the
dissenting member of the Board of State
Canvassers; No. 3, containing the action
of the State authorities and the laws re
citing the election of the Tilden electors
and ordering new certificates to be issued
in their name.
All this testimony was before the Com
mission, with the records of the courts,
backed by a tender of oral evidence. How
was it treated? Hr. Justice Miller moved,
February 7, 1877, as follows :
“Ordered, That no evidence will be re
ceived or considered by the Commission
whioh was not submitted to the joint con
vention of the two Honses by the Presi
dent of the Senate with the different
certificates, except snob as relates to the
eligibility of F. C. Humphreys, one of the
electors.'*
This was the crucial test of the Com
mission, which was virtually to decide the
Presidential election. The real question
behind the words of the order was whether
proof of the frauds that had been commit
ted in Florida, South Carolina and Louis
iana should be admitted. The vote stood :
Yess—Messrs. Bradley, Edmunds, Fer
linghusen, Garfield, Hoar, Miller, Morton
and Strong—8. Nays—Messrs. Abbott, Bay
ard, Clifford, Field, Hun ton, Payne and
Thurman—7.
Garfield repreaenta the Great Fraud.
He was one of the ohief instruments by
which the conspiracy was completed.
HAB1IBP. |
In Carton City, August 7—Boswell Hunt to
Catherine Mclvor, of Gold Hill.
BOMM.
Buby Hill, August 7—To the wife of Mr. Henry
Werry, a daughter.
Buby Hill, August 10—To the wife of Mr. Frank
Rich, a daughter.
At Silver Creek, August I—To thi wlfs of Gso.
Watt, a sou.
In Aurora, August 4—Ts tha wlfs of W. 0.
Lawrence, a daughter.
DIED.
Ruby Hill, Nevada, August 8—Flora, only
daughter of F. H. and Dora Hease, aged 1
. year, 10 months and 17 days.
Eureka, August 10—Wm. Harrison, a native of.
Zanesville, Ohio, aged M years.
(St. Louis sad lows papers please oopy.J
NEW TO-DAY.
List of Unclaimed Letters
t>emainino in the postoffice at
XL Eureka, Nevada, on the 7th day of August
1880. Persons calling for any of these
letters, will please say, ** Advertised August
15, 1880.”
Ijutles' List:
Dsyton Anns Nay Mrs Louisa
Dexter Oeorgle Nay Louisa A
Eddy Mrs Nanny Owene Miss
Elliot Annie Parker Mrs
Foley Hsnnsh Queredo Mary
Hannan Mrs Martin Ralph Annie—2
Littell Mrs Hattie Riley Lizzie
Lanuiug Miss Claude Russel Jennie
Mau Mrs Maggie Sanderson Mis
Morgan Mrs D Stone Miss Netty
McCuaig Mrs—3 Stenstroui F
McMillan Mrs P A
Gentleiuen's List:
Beckman Wm
Bassett L
Burgess John
Brooks W T
Brown A G
Burgess G P
Borlugdon B J
Browu Walter
Bones tell W T
Chrysler J F
Carroll John
Carroll Frank
Cameron C D
Caffuey James
Chesser A H
Carter J M
Clute J R
Clough G F
Currie John T—A
Cohen A M
Cole H .
Daugherty J—2
Dewey W L
Douglas Oscar
Dickson Thomas
Dunning Geo W
Dunlap James
Dyer W 8
Dunn James
Da tight-rty Pat
Ernst John
Evans James
Estey David
Fisher Jack
Fulton Otis
Finlayson Alex
Fried Adolph
Farthing Dudley
Farrow J W
Farrow W
Gall Wm
Gall James
Ge row Pnil
Oaughan Michael
Grenier J P
Gordon Tbos
Griswold E H
Gillespie B E-2
Groeling A
Gray James li
Grcas R D
Green J 8
Gill Thos
Gratton Jos
Hash Win
Hall Edward C
Hayes James
Hayworth Wm 8
Hayes G W
Huntington Ezekiel
Uyams Louis
Hughes Mat
King J
Kingston Ceorge
Kern Ge**
Knight J W
Leon Sr Jesus
Lockmsn Bill
Lallie Byron
Meek John A
Martin T J
Mathews Wm
Mathews J E
Matamorss M A 8 Co
Mosses* Kobt
Martin Jas M
Myers Chas
McGugin Jas E
McDermot Owen
McChsries
McCullough Alex
McCarthney James
McGrew J A
McLean Malcolm
Nay O B
North J W
O'Neill Timothy
Ott Frank
Olson J P
Ogslrie Wm
Ondertlouk N
Orr J M
Ott Frank
O'Brine Dennis
Pearson Jsa
Parker Joa
Paynes Thos
Quest James
Reynolds P E
Rarnols Narciaco
Reynolds John
Roach John
Robinson Harry
Roxburgh J A
Rusllnk Wm
Rice Mr
Rodriguez Jesus
Sherman Fred
Sloam Chas W
8atnpsou J W
Smith Patrick
Smith Wm
St Cane John
Surface W H—2
Spencer J
St ran berg J W
Thompson H A
Tingley Bedford
Treevoorrow Will
Thacker Robt
Tyrrell James
Thiele E
▼era Anthony
Vance John
Valdez Sr Jose
Walsh K F
Wblttemore W H
Walch E F
Walsh E F
Walch Frank
Williams W W
Williams Thos H
Wylie Ceorge
€ l»li»o*o List:
Yop Loy Quoug Lung
Tack Sho Tong k Co Lung Kan Kow
Foreiirii LIni:
Persons calling for any of these letters will
please say, •' Foreign, Advertised.’'
Winnan J H McLeod Kenneth
Welhanks Philip McAuley Dan
Whittemore N H Lee John
Walsh Miss M Keough Patrick
Tingley Belford Hunter A H
Tippet Amos Hamlyn W P
Sullivan Wesley—-2 Gordou Thos
Stowell 0 J Daugherty James
King Chas A Currie John T
Rath Thos Calderwood Geo
Olson Anders Chapman Joshua
McQueen D J Auchernachie Geo
augl5-lt WM. J. SMITH. P. M.
A. O-A-IRID.
WE WOULD ASK FOR INFORMATION,
why, during the late fire at Schneider's
Stable, on North Main Street, owned by F. I.
Bremenkampf, the water waa turned off soon
after the fire commenced ? Will the Water
Company, or any of the Fire Companies, be
kind enough to anawer the above question, and
much oblige
BREMENKAMPF k REGLI.
Eureka, August 14, 1880, aulS It
NOTICE,
ON AND AFTER SEPTEMBER FIRST WE
shall charge TWENTY-FIVE CENTS each
for all checks issued by tia on San Francisco.
PAXTON k CO.
WHITE PINE COUNTY BANK,
Per WM. £a&dy, Cashier.
Eureka, Auguat 14, 1880. aulMm
F. J. SCHNEIDER,
g DRUGGIST, g
EAST SIDE MAIM STREET, THIRD DOOR
SOUTH OF CLARK.
PHYSICIANS' PRESCRIPTIONS,
-ACCURATELY PREPARED
AT ALL HOURS Of THE DAY OR NIGHT.
Order* for
Drugs and Medicines,
—Promptly attended to—
I have also a roll Ida# of
Perfumery, Toilet Articles,
Hair Brtuhea, Tooth Brnahea, Mall
and Bath Brnahea, Eta..
And tn faot everything nenally found In a llrat
claaa Drag Store.
P. J. SCHNEIDER.
Proprietor.
Eureka, June 14, 1880. JunlS tf
To the Ladies!
AM. T. k J. ASBERRY,
• General Aitenta for
the State of Nevada for the
ninax Patent Nklrt
Nuppertlnft and Mia*
tea* Shoulder Brace
Coraeta, made to order,
which we guarantee will
straighten themoatatooped
shouldered girl you have.
We can do more with it
than any Shoulder Brace
that haa ever been made.
We defy competition, and
also for the Adjustable
Hip Combination and
Self Supporting Ahdom
cMm*i
Inal uoraets They are not kept by mer
chauts, but are told only by ageuta. We guar
antee a perfect lit. Any of tbe ladles that I
may skip In my canvass, will And me until 9 a.
m. and after 6 v ac. at Mrs. D. E. Daily's. Tbe
Agent will call upon the ladies of Ruby Bill
this week. You will have the opportunity of
getting them until the 15th of September.
Then I shall leave here. J. A8BERRY.
Eureka, August 10,1680. augll wedfcaunSw
THE CHOICEST
STOCK of LIQUORS
In Town :
Old Kentnekjr Bine Oran,
Old Kentnekjr Bourbon,
Old Kentnekjr Kjre, and
Old Virginia Never-Tlre,
Old Loudon Book Broad/,
Fine Frenek fkerrj,
Old Port Wine,
Extra Holland Ola.
Old Jamaica Bam,
And all kinds or cask liquoks fob
. Ml., by tb. bottle or gallon, et
KEMP'S,
South Mein etreet. Eureka. el tf 1/
NOTICE,
ALL PERSONS HAVING BILLS AOA1N8T
tbe firm of doll k Money will plMa.
prevent them on or before tbe 20th of Auguet
next. dOLL k MONET.
Eureka, July M. USD. jykO-M
FANCY AND BTAPLE DRY GOODS.
GRAND CLEARANCE
-AND SWEEPING
REDUCTION SALE!!
-FOB THE NEXT
THIRTY DAYS FOR CASH ONLY!
OF THE ENTIRE MAGNIFICENT AND WELL ASSORTED STOfW
and Fancy Dry Goods now ou exhibition by the firm of * OF ST4Hl
MORRIS & LEVI.
Having concluded that with present pro.pecta, aud the Immense Fall Stock i .
chase It la neceaaary to make w/oi for its reception Therefore, reiiardleee of.!",, 4 <" par
Ing such, the people of F.nreka and vicinity will bud that oora is nJt an advertii.*».Co,‘
motive, but au actual neemant without
REDTTGTIOK
In Every Department. We do not pretend to aell for leaa than cost or for cost
we eonld not live, but we do intend to sell for the lowo.t possible living profit ' » 10
pretend to lead the fashions or the trade, but we positively assert that neither *®*,Ao*a
other will fall behind stour hands, as our long experience on the Coast and am t on* 07 U>a
our command to purckaee such stocks, taken with the experience of our abort ai. M
Bl*y here, |||
CUARANTEE TO THE PEOPLE OP EUREKA
Of a future revolution to the benefit of Consumers, such aa never h&a h***
this vicinity. r naa nee* wltamw,! ltt
MORRIS & LEVY.
Eureka, July 31,1880.
__ "Witt
SUMMER CLEARANCE!
DRY GOODS and CARPETS
--A.T —
M. J. FRANKLIN A. CO.’S
ss™* as ss css
each auceeedlug aeaaon aa email a portion of our goode aa poeaible. aud tble aeaaon v!^L?I!>
themne1‘x'?thlr^d*a?If m0r* *h“ ln tonan lnTm‘ To «"• w. ahall o£S %
THIS SEASON’S GOODS AT NET COST.
«£»“"..
Eureka, Nerada, July 27,1880. JyM
CLOTHING AND OENTS' FUBNISHING GOODS.
SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE!
II. KAY8ER,
Begs leave to inform his patrons and the public that be has just be
celved m large itock of
SPRING ANO SUMMER CLOTHING!
?2?V8, ®AT8’ CAPA' boots, shoes, trunis, valises. I TO., Eta
f.11.®* Latest Styles. I call especial attention to my elegant atock of white and colored
coS.,,,.t,I“g of qualltlra of Oaebmere, Lille Thread, Balbrigean, Merino
and Flannel My latent atylca of Scarfe end Ttee, Fancy and White Hoelery, Soft and log
Brimmed Felt Hate, White and Colored Shirts
AND FINE BOYS’ CLOTHINC.
A Full Araortment of Extra Site Clothing and Underwear. Olre me a call and I am nreror
will be tutted In Price and Quality. H. KATIES,
South Main Street, ueat to Chea. LauUuackltgw'r,
Agent for the Celebrated STANDARD Shtrta.
Eureka, May S, 1HS0. tf
ALF HARRIS,
-DEALER IX
Gents’ Furnishing Goods,
Hats, Caps, Shirts, Underwear, Hosiery, Tranks, Valises, Btc.
SHIRTS MADE TO ORDER A SPECIALITY.
FINEST AND MOST COMPLETE STOCK IN EIIKEKi.
Pull Line* of Extra Size Underwear.
ALF HARRIS,
Two Soon north of Jock httr'*
HIRAM JOHNSON, |
VTholttaU »ud Retell b**l«r in
*TA M,i; AND fANC lT
GROCERIES
—AWl>—
PROVISIONS!
Chicago Hams and Breakfast Bacon,
Huger eared, elweje on bead.
NEW BUILDING—OLD 8TAND,
Mela afreet, Nottb of Clerk, Eure kg, Sereda.
mjStf
COIN TALKS!
....FOB.,..
GROCERIES IT KEMP'S
Extra Hr) Cruebed and Granulated
augur, bar the barrel, 16 1-8 rent*
per pound.
White I'ette Sugar, bp the barrel,
or half barrel, 16 eeuta per poundi
• 1-8 pounds Ibr 61.00.
English Ere ah tost Tea, TS ets.i M.
* M. Tea, 60 eta.
A LL CLOSE BUYERS, AMD PERSONS WHO
pay tb»lr bills prompt—to ausb, I trill
HU tksm OruoorlM ud Prorlsloas In quauti
tlaa to rnlt, tad deliver them free of charge,
for leet rnone) than an) other Hooaa to town.
H. R. KEMP,
Heutla Main street.
Eureka, June 16,16H0. Jrl7 3p If
TOM PBIMT1MG, OF ALL DE
U aorlptlona, executed with neatnaae ted
dee patch >t tk SntnMw
ST. MARY'S ACADEMY,
SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH.
The academy is under the ceabos
of the Blatera of the Hoi, Croaa It <•
altuated lu a eecluded health, location Am
ple ground, are attached for eicrclae.
The bulldlhg la epecloua and provided will
modern Improvement,. It afford, ample ac
commodation for a large number of boerdeie,
beatdea the day eihool.
The Mualcal and Art Department, me eoe
ducted on the plan of Bt. Mar,‘a Notre Deme,
Indiana. .
The Couree of Study cornpr ace ell «•
brancbea of a thorough, eolld aud polite
tlon; and la auch aa to render the puplle leui
Ugent, uaeful and accompllahed mem here m
eoctety.
Whle St. Mary'e poaaeaaea all the adrahtegee
of a Bret-claaa educational lnatltutloa,
chargee are moderate. . ....
French and German being Included la <»•
Eagllah courae, form no extra charge.
Pupil, of all denomination, received, end**
Interference with their religion, teller
Attached to the Academy Ta a aeparete bu'U
Ing for little boya, boarder, and da, pupi'm
They receive the care and teaching which Jane
tender aga and the confiding true* of jaea
par ante expect. Mo apeoial uniform tequlree
For olrculara, etc,, eddreaa Slater »up»rl ■
aa above.
QOOD PASTURE.
i 1 HAVE A LARUE TIUOT of
meadow l.uil li .pk..
ijuet bean mowed, which !■ ep»
Mid grazing for home.. There
dance of water on the range. ,
Stock featured by the week or mon". *
taken ontand retnrned at any
-SsssssWaS® use?
Flak Greek Manch, Auguat». IMP. _
NSW BARBER SHOP
rtA-NT JMSJSJID®,
dark St., next door to Chrle ^5,^
loon. Hawing opened a new and neat
am now prepared to do
HAIACUTTIM, SHAYIM AH#
In Ibc beat manner and at reaaonabl P
knreka, July HP. IMP.

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