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Eureka daily sentinel. [volume] (Eureka, Nev.) 1871-1887, April 05, 1882, Image 2

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(Eureka Dailu Sentinel.
WEDNESDAY .APRIL 5, 1882.
THE MEWS VETO, ETC.
The dispatches in thi» morning s Skx
xr*EL tell a great deal that is interesting
and unp<> tant. Aa expected, the Presi
dent has vetoed the Anti-Chinese bill.
His reasons for doing so have been dis
cussed in Congress and by the press
until they are not fit to be discussed any
more. He is as pronounced an enemy of
the white workingman as though he had
said in so many words that he prefers
the Chinaman. He wants them to come
in here in hordes, to build another trans
continental railroad. How unfortunate
for a man of Arthur’s shrewdness as a
ward politician, to suggest to the people
of the United States the memory of that
gigantic fraud! To throw into their
faces the degradation they suffered when
a few thieves gobbled up millions of
their property, and added thereto the
additional dirty saving of the difference
between the wages of white inen and
Chinamen, in the construction of the
mammoth bilk! He speaks as though
halting in his sentences and uttering dead
words. He nses the muddy sophistry
of those for whom he talks. Ho makes
out of his veto a miserable apology to
the American people for still playing
underling. There is nothing plain,
straightforward, or manly in his utter
ances. He cringes as though he felt in
conscience the presence of an invisible
multitude of judges—the people—as he
penned his veto under dictation. We do
no violence to our imagination when we
picture him to ourselves with the Chinese
Envoy Plenipotentiary, and a few other
heathens of onr own color, railroad
builders, slave drivers, puffed-up aristo
crats for whom laboring men are ma
chines, standing behind him, as he sat
pen in hand, injecting their mercenary
wishes into the Executive of our great
Government, the best the sun ever shone
on. Commerce, international courtesy,
undemocratic passports, the spirit of our
fundamental law. It will not be long,
thank heaven! before we will have
ceased playing second fiddle to a nation
of pigtails; it will not be long before a
change will take place when public
servants at Washington will !>e such
inure than in the mere name. The next
Administration will be one of the people.
The signs of the times are unmistakable.
Many elections were held throughout
the United States yesterday. Head the
dispatches. The Republicans slaugh
tered everywhere. What is the matter
in that town in which the Democrats
have been under back for twenty years ?
What is moving the people in those
places in the Middle States that have
been for time out of memory solid for
Republicans ? What inspired Cleveland
Just at’ this time? Has Ohio, at last,
begun to see without the glasses through
whioh she has been looking for so many
years darkly? Have the Germans gone
mad? They are a thoughtful people.
They are in fact properly called “the
grand philosophical nation.” They train
well when they are satisfied. But they
do not propose to help build up a cen
tralized, supercilious aristocracy in
this country such as they have left be
hind them in the old. They are among
our best citizens. They know the value
of true liberty, They cannot enjoy it
under the pretentious rule of Republi
cans, and they are ranging themselves in
line with the Democrats. The tidal
wave is moving in the right direction.
There will be a new era begun in 1884.
Wo will be politically reformed then and
start in anew on wholesome principles of
government, the wishes and interests of
the people being the first and paramount
consideration of their representative
servants. _
GBASfD OPERA IN AMERICA.
While all other classes of theatri
cal amusements have prospered and
flourished amazingly in all the principal
cities of the north and west during the
past ten years the grand opera has not
made any headway. The comic opera
has made wonderful progress, and has
absorbed a prodigious amount of money
and vocal talent, while the grand opera
is fully as much of an exotic as it was a
quarter of a century ago. Our acade
mies of music have all proved failures
as nurseries of grand opera. It looks as
though the standard of musical culture or
of musical talent is not sufficiently high
among our people to appreciate the
masterpieces of*the great artists. Possi
bly our popular education in music is
not general enough to insure adequate
support to large companies. Neverthe
less another splendid and expensive
opera house is to be built in New York
City, at a cost of about a million dollars,
for the experiment of endeavoring to
naturalize grand opera in that city. New
York has never been deficient in enter
prise in the way of building opera houses,
but has uniformly failed to furnish a
permanent support to grand opera after
those houses were built.
A RAILROAD COM 91 IftCilON.
Mr. Charles Francis Adams Jr. never
condensed a greater quantity of axiomatic
truth into a few words than he has done
in the following passage from his letter
to Congressman Page, on the subject of
a National Railroad Commission :
Congress wants to provide a commis
sion with power which cannot be defined
to regulate evils which are not under
stood, in a field whioh has not been ex
plored. Such a method of legislation
seems to me bastv. Finally, it has been
argued that a mixed commission for in
quiry only is what is now needed. My
objection to this is, that in this country
and in Europe there have already been
quite enough of these roaming commis
sions picking up theories and listening to
experts. What Congress needs to guide
it, as I see the matter, is not more theo
ries, or more abstract discussion, but the
positive results of complaints actually
made and thoroughly looked into. Ad
visory com missions never deal with cases
of this sort. The surest way for Con
gress to arrive at desirable results will be
For it to provide a commission with full
power to investigate every cause of com
plaint.
TELEGRAPHIC.
THE PRESIDKHT S MESSAGE TO
THE 8ERATE.
HIS VETO Or THE CHINESE
BILL.
HIS REASONS FOR VETOINC
THE BILL.
THE CITY ELECTIONS IN THE
EAST.
THE DEMOCRACY VICTORI
OUS.
Particulars of the Killing of
Jesse James.
[SPECIAL TO THE SENTINEL. |
Washington, April 4.—The President
has sent a message to the Senate vetoing
the Chinese bill. The veto message says
that immigration should be limited or re
stricted to a reasonable period. The Presi
dent then points ont other features of the
Act, which, in his opinion, can be modi
fied to advantage. The system of per
sonal registration and passports is specifi
cally mentioned as undemocratic and hos
tile to our eonstitntion, and he alludes to
the omission of the Act to make any pro
vision for transit to China of Chinese sub
jects now settling in foreign countries, to
which subject, the President adds, his at
tention has been called by the Chinese
Minister. The message refers to the al
leged benefits to its industry derived by
the Pacific slope by the presence of the
Chinese heretofore. He expresses appre
hension of an injurious effect upon Ameri
can commerce with the Chinese if legisla
tion of the character of that proposed by
ns. In his message the President says
that Chinese labor has been of great value
in this country, and that monuments of
their industry exist. They had largely
bnilt the Pacific railroads across tbis^conti
nent, but it might wisely be considered
now whether the same estimation may be
put forth on the immigration of this la
bor, but if there lie too much of it in one
section of the country, the same labor may
be needed in another section, and the law
should consider this matter and make
such limitation as will permit this labor
. to go where it is needed. The vital objec
tion of the President is the 20 years’ sus
pension of immigration, which he con
strues as virtually prohibitory, and there
fore a violation of the spirit, if not the
letter .of the negotiations upon which the
treaty vas based, and as a breach of na
tional faith. The message calls attention
to the proposition made by the United
States Commissioners on this point a^d
the counter propositions on the part of
China, to show that this was the under
standing of the latter country of the
agreement which ultimately was made.
Municipal Elections—I.arife Demo
cratic Utlns.
Cincinnati, April 4.—Much interest is
awakened in the city election on account of
the supposed bolting of the Republican
ticket by the German Republicans, on ac
count of the passage of the Pond bill tax
ing Baloons. The reports indicate that
many Republicans will vote the Democrat
ic ticket.
Indianapolis, Ind., April 4.—The Dem
ocrats have swept the town. The Germans
bolted the Republican ticket.
Cincinnati, April 4.—With 33 precincts
heard from, the Democratic majority is
5,600. It will be increased by the pre
cincts to be heard from.
Dubuque, la., April 4.—The Democrats
carried the city, with the exception of the
Treasurer, for the first timo in twenty
years. The Council stands seven Demo
crats to three Republicans.
Keokuk, la., April 4.—The election re
sulted in the election of a Demooratio May
or and four Aldermen, a Republican As
sessor and two Aldermen. Richmond has
gone Democratic. The Republicans have
carried Shelbyvllle.
Detboit, Mich., April 4.—A large num
ber of municipal elections were held in
Michigan to-day. Louisiana went Demo
cratic on the temperance issue. Flint went
Republican, Owasse went Democratic,
Hillsdale weDt Republican, and Marshall
Democratic ; Lapeer went Republican and
Fulton Rapids Republican. Ann Harbor
elected a Democratic Mayor. Most of the
balance of the winning ticket was Republi
can. Ypsilanta went Democratic, also
Niles. Port Huron went Republican, and
Jackson also. Grand Rapids went heavy
for a combination tioket—Greenback and
Democrat.
East Saoinaw, Mioh., April 4.—The
Democrats elected the Mayor, Treasurer
and Justice of the Peace, and the Republi
cans the Recoider and a majority of the
Councilmen. In Saginaw City the Demo
crats elected the entire city tioket, and
five out of six Aldermen.
Cleveland, 0., April 4.—The Demo
crats probably elected most, and possibly
all of their ticket. The Republicans have
lost six Councilmen. The returns are not
complete.
Daxton, O., April 4.—The entire Demo
cratic tioket has been elected.
Columbus, O.. April 4.—The Democrat!
hare elected their entire city tioket.
How Jeaoe James Was Killed.
Kansas Citt (Mo.), April 4.—At 9
o'clock yesterday morning the notorious
outlaw and bandit, Jesse James, wsb shot
and instantly killed at St. Joseph by
Robert Ford of Richmond County. Jesse,
it appears, has been living in that city
since the 8th of last November, under the
name of ThomaB Howard. Robert Ford,
the slayer of Jesse, and his brother,
Charles, had been shadowing Jesse James
for many months past, following him from
plaoe to place, their purpose being to kill
him the first time an opportunity afforded,
bat they never succeeded in finding him
unarmed until yesterday morning. The
boys went to 8t. Joseph about a week ago.
Previous to this they had ingratiated them
selves into the confldenoe of James, pre
tending that they were train robbers, and
horse thieves. For once the redoubtable
Jesse was caught napping, and be seems to
have believed all that the Fords told him,
and yesterday paid with his life the pen
alty of his credulity. The Fords, imme
diately upon their arrival in St. Joseph,
went to the house at the corner of Thir
teenth and Lafayette streets, where Jesse
was living, under the name of Thomas
Howard, and remained there until the
tragedy occurred. JesBe and Ford were
talking together, and Jesse had just laid
his pistols on the table for a moment,
when Ford pulled bis pistol and shot him.
The revolver was a 45 callbre Smith A
Wesson. The ball entered Jesse's head,
behind the left ear, and passed out over
the forehead. Death was instantaneous.
A notable Tragedy Euastsd.
Omaha, April 4.—A terrible tragedy oo
ourred here yesterday, the vlotims being
Joseph Jones and his wife, Bohemians.
The former was 60 years old and the lat
ter 57. Jones shot his wife and then him
self. They were married in Outenberg 95
years ago. Two years afterwards he was
sent to prison for maliciously destroying
his brother’s grain. After serving his
term he was again sent up for unlawfully
killing game. Next, he was convicted of
killing a woman, and was sentenced to
twenty years. His wife came to Clave
land, Ohio, fire year*after be waa sent np,
and made a tiring as s midwife. After
•erring 16 years he was released, with
other prisoners, in honor of some royal
event. Following bis wife to Cleveland,
he compelled her to live with him. threat
ening to kill her if she did not. Four
years ago she left him and came to Omaha,
whither ho followed her two years sgn,
and again bv threats foroed her to live
with him. Recently she began a snit for
divorce against him, and had him arrested
for making threats. She rented her
house two weeks ago and went to live with
her daughter, while he kept forcible pos
sesaion of the house. Yesterday morning
she went to the house to get some things,
and her husband, whowaa inaide, fired one
barrel of a shotgun at her as she entered
the gate, the whole charge taking effect in
her breast. She turned and ran forty feet,
when she fell dead. A policeman, who hap
pened to be only a block away, immedi
ately ran to the house and heard another
ahot inside. Beating open the door he
fonnd Jones dead on the floor, he having
ahot himself through the heart with the
other barrel of the gnu. He had fre
quently threatened to kill his wife and
himself.
A Message from Men tenant Harber.
Washington, April 4.-Secretary Hunt
to-day received a cable message from Lieu
tenant Harber at Irknstk, as follows:
Subject to your approval and my inspec
tion, I have offered 10.000 roubles for a
paddle steamer for the entire Summer,
with a guarantee, if lost, of 40,000 paper
ronbles. If the owner accepts, may I
close ; if not, how much may I offer and
guarantee? Season advanced. Haste
necessary.
Washington, April 4.—The dispatch
from Lieutenant Harber, containing the
news of the purchase of a vessel to search
for the missing crew of the Jeannette, was
laid before the Cabinet meeting yesterday.
As a result Secretary Hunt telegraphed
Lieutenant Harber authorizing tho expen
ditnre of 10.000 roubles in getting the
most desirable vessel for the search.
~ NEW TO-DAY.
ARRIVED! ARRIVED!
MR.E.J.STOLTZ
A»foia' for the
Popular Draper & Tailor
FRIEDLANDER, of San Francisco,
HAS ARRIVED IN TOWN. HE IS Lo
cated at the Parker House, where he baa
on exhibition a larffe and select line of sam
ples of the latest styles of Baitings.
A PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED IN EVERY CASE.
•7~C*11 at once and examine his samples.
Kureka, April 4, 1882. aotf
COAL OIL!
COAL OIL!
COAL OIL!
WE ARE NOW REPRESENTING THE
Standard Oil Company at this place,
and offer their
WATER WHITE COAL OIL,
150 fire test, to the trade in 10 can lota at $4 75
per case; leas lota, $5 per case.
W. H. REMINGTON k CO.,
H. JOHNSON.
Agents Standard Oil Company.
Enreka, April 4,1882. a5 lm
A LARGE CONSIGNMENT
....07....
ROYAL 8T. JOHN’S
SEWING MACHINES
JUST RECEIVED AT
WM. JOANNES’.
WE HAVE ALSO A LARGE STOCK OF
Standard Machines,
....SUCH AS....
SINGER, DOMESTIC, NEW HOME, WHITE, ETC.
That will he sold on EASY TERMS. ▲ fine
stock of
BOOTS AND SHOES,
THAT WILL EE SOLD CHEAP FOB CASH.
mr2G tf H JI. JOANWEA.
Brown.Tassel&Co.
....DEALERS IN....
Men’s, Boys', Youths’ Ladies'
MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S
Boots, Shoes * Slippers
....ALSO, ALL KZ2fl>S 07....
Rnbber Goods, Leather and Findings.
Euet Sid. orXalu Street,
BVBBBA, NEVADA.
Eurek., March 3, 1883. mh.tf
£tONVEB8ION OP WATCHES, EITHER IN
Their Escapement, or In their
Winding Arrangement.,
Don. M hitherto, it retaonabl. charge*.
Satl.raetlon guaranteed or money
refunded.
ID. WILHBLM.
Eureka, Much 1. 1883. mhstf
COIN!_ COIN!
What Money Will Buy
....AT....
Mouth Multi Ntreet, Eureka.
lOO I be Urauulatod Sueur.313 00
■ OO Ibo 4'ruobetl Nuitar. 13 00
100 Ibo Colffer Nucor. 14 00
O Ibo Uranulated Nucor. 1 00
« Ibo Trunked Nuear. 1 OO
7 Ibo TulTee Nucor. 1 00
N Ibn Inland Klee. 1 OO
3 Ibn Farebouk I.ard. 1 00
• Ibn Horne Shoe and Star
Tobaeoo. 3 00
10 Boro Narou Soap. 1 00
4nd til klndt of OrourUt end Prorltloni, LI.
qoori iud Ci.tr. in tht tune proportion.
tW'I'oiitiidy ikiM prlcit of good, will not
be oreditod io inr on*. The coin mult ring I
mblttf B. B. KEMP.
$5 REWARD !
Lost, on the *tth or mth ult ,
one long, blonde, three-strand hair
switch. Any person finding the same will
please Bend it by express, 0. 0. D., (with the
privilege of examination) to B. P. I'pton Jr.,
Keno, Nevada, and receive the above reward
I will pay express charges both ways.
M. P. UPTON J*
Rano, April 1, JW3. a4 2t
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
N HI ejridd
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|AT HOME!
For the NEXT FORTY-FIVE DAYS I will
sell every dollars’ worth of my really fine
stock of
CLOTHING!

Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps, Blan
kets and Quilts, Trunks and Valises, and
the finest stock of FURNISHING COOD8
ever brought to this market,
STRICTLY AT COST !
Owing to my continued ill health, I am
forced to leave Eureka and the mountains
forever, and in order to dispose of my large
Interests here, I have de ermlned to sell
out AT C08T and at once. Call early, if
you want to secure bargains in clothing.
JAKE COHN,
PIONEER CLOTHIER of NEVADA
Eureka, April 1,1881. altf
^—1—
E. BELLINGER, M.E.
ASSAYER.
T1NTIL OTHER ARRANGEMENTS CVN
(J be made, my friends and patrons will
£ lease leave samples at the office of Mr. Max
(oeller, where I will attend to them promptly.
E. BELLINGER.
Eureka, March 29,1882. xnbSOtf
COAL OIL!
I WILL SELL COAL OIL FOR $5 75 PER
Oaae, with liberal disocunt to the trade.
P. N HANSEN,
flfttf North Main Street, Eureka.
HOUSE TO LET.
House with nine rooms and bath.
room, on Edwards street, to let. For*
merly occupied by J. Cohn. For further par
ticulars, apply to
MRS. J. STRAUS,
Eureka. Feb. 14,1882. f 16-tf
POLL TAX NOTICE.
POLL TAXIS FOB THE CURRENT YEAR
of 18«2 are now due and parable at my
office, In Eureka.
0. C. WALLACE, Assessor.
Eureka, March IB, 1882. . mhlOtf
LOST.
A pair or SADDLE BAGS WERE LOST
TMterdiy b.tw»u B Bbtnth.rt'. offle.
i and the Consolidated worke. Any person bar
ing found them will please leave them at li.
Khlnehart’s office at R. Sadler’a.
Eureka, March 98, 1889. mbWtf
CIRL WANTED!
WO DO GENERAL HOUSEWORK. rOR
I ; thl. oflloe,
■ mraatf |
Information Wanted.
OF THE WHEREABOUTS OF CHARLES O.
Fogg, formerly of Virginia City, Nevada,
and last beard of at Orantavllle, Nevada. Age,
43 years; bight, 6 feet 7 inches; occupation,
house and sign painter; also, a prospector and
miner. Any persona knowing hla whereabouts
will confer a favor by dropping a line to this
office al lw
Young AmericaCheese.
A FINE ARTICLEFOR FAMILY USE.
Hteam>Cooked Hootch Rnrle/ GrIU,
Htmut-CookeU White Wheat,
Hteem-Cooked White Onte,
At P. Iff. Hansen’s
Xorlh Hein HI reel. Eureka.
FORRENT.
The bank exchanoe saloon and
Lodgtag*houa«; a two atory building com
pletely f
Att
TO LET.
The Eire-proof brick stork, hit.
uated on tha cornar of Main and Clark
afreets, sad now occupied by Maher k Manlon,
will ba for rant on and attar May 1.1(33. In
quire of J. 8. WH1TTON.
Eureka. March M. 1383. mb30 la
Fruits! Notions!
Cigars and Tobacco.
Jno. Penberthy, Proprietor
Three door* below Foot office
Froala Xaimes I
K»P« Co as Usual* on Hand.
Bur aka, How. 1,1SS1. ndtl
MISCELLANEOUS ADVERTISEMENTS. '
NO MORE HIGH RENT!
The New Dry Goods Store of MA
HER & MANION will remove to that
New Brick Building on the site of the
Old Postoffice on or before the first of
May. As we do not intend to move
any of our present stock of Dry Goods,
which is one of the largest in town, La
dies and Cents, if you want anythingin
our line, come early and secure it, as the
Goods will be sold. These prices w\\\be
For the Next 30 Days Only t
Eureka, March 30, 1R89. ,
_«ah31tf
W. J. TONKIN & CO,
Wholesale Dealers in "
Wines,Liquors andCiprs
The Finest Brands of
PURE LIQUORS!
FOR FAMILY AND MEDICAL USE, CONSTANTLY ON HAND.
Home-made and Imported Cigars.
fcTTlii* laru-Ml nml l»f». *<l<<l«-il nim-k «( nnrr l.lanon nml riniw.
In EMlrrn Xfvmln Onlrnl-nim|ill} nml riirrmily fillrrt
ltTfr.nl frrf of rout.
w. J. Tonltin «b Co.,
lu-tf Main Street, two doors b*low Puton k Co’i Buik.
W. E. DAVIDSON,
j BOOKSELLER, \
Stationer a n d Newsdealer,
POSTOFFICE BUILDING^ EUREKA, NEV.
Y COMPLETE STOCK CONSTANTLY ON UAN1), EU11RACINO A FCLW LINK OF
BLA1TK BOOKS,
Cold Pens, Photograph and Autograph
Albums, Russia Leather Goods,
Fancv Papeteries, Etc.
ftTMgent for all the Knatern Mfory and Illustrated Papers and
MsgsBliien. matt
GREAT REDUCTIONS
WINTER GOODS!
M. JT. PRANiLLiN cto OO.’S
-----
Previous to Invoicing we offer the balanoe of our Win*
tor Dry Coods at a CHEAT REDUCTION
on former Prices.
MAKE A NOTE OF THIS FACT I
“A WORD TO THEWlSElS SUFFICIENT.”
Eureka, /an. 8,18M. M. J» FKAWKUX
P. STEIiEB
I'AKEB PLEAtURE IN ANNOUNCING TO HIS CUSTOMERS AND
generally that he haa secured the services of a Arst-claas Chronometer
maker, who haa had over 30 years' experience In the very largest watchmaking
llshments of P.ris. London, Geneva, and Milan. In Etirope. also four yean»
Francisco, and from tbase places he haa the very best recommendations. HJ'■PJJJJ
French, English and Italian All kinds of new Jewelry and fine diamond work uim
to order by myself, and all klnda of Jewelry neatly repaired and warranted.
ik FINE WATCH WORK®
I am prepared to do all klnda of Tin. Watch and Clock Work, and new pleeat '
flna watch*, if drained, at I have Ju.t received e new and tat aet of tool* for ini. p
poaa. All work animated to tne will be done at the abor teat poaalbl.MUM»«•
reasonable price#, and warranted for a ya.r. Batlafactlon snarantead A very 1"** ,
aortment of Flna Watcbea, Jewelry, Diamond., Silverware. Clocks, and Ovt***' “
con.tartly on hand, which I o»*r to sell at S5 par cant less than any other ace"
town. All ortlera from the country promptly attended to. P. BTKLKB.
THE LEADING JEWELER
GRAND CLEARANCE SALE!
AT TUB
SAN FRANCISCO CLOTHING STORE!
IK ORDER TO OLOSB OCT MY FALL AND WINTER STOCK TO /
for new goods, I offer to the public tnjr entire stock of line iJOftTOM-M*I
ING, of so endless variety. including Mens', Youths', Boys* and Children I
Goods. Extra sites In all goods; also, a line Hue of HOBIKBY. A Select Bex ^ I
Caps. Boots. Shoes, and the Best Blankets, Quilts, Trunks a*id Valises, andi • Kgf, 1
DUOTION8 IN PRICES. Call and examine goods. »• A
Valuable Property!
FOR SALE ON
REASONABLE TERMS.
A LARGE AND CONVENIENT HOUSE IN
a desirable locution, with fire lota, hay*
log a frontage of 135 feet by 100 feet deep,
which will be sold entire or In lota to eult
purchasers.
Famin e dealring a residence or parties
wishing to build will find this a good oppor*
tunny, aa the property la situated la the
pleaeanteat part of Eureka.
For particulars applf at the reaideooe of T.
9. MAUPIN.
Eureka. March 0,1883. mhTtf
CRIFFIN A ANDRE,
STOCK BROKERS
—ajh>—
Insurance Agents.
OFFICE IN WILIS, FARM k BO.’t BUILDING
MAIN STREET. EUREKA.
One* boon from A o clock A. M. to I *. k.
A STEM-WINDER M»
out or A
KEY-WINDING WATCH
A’iSSS. .?«*•!“sSS
wlehlng to here them rnede Into etein
P. STELER.
He will niter them for you 1» »
manner and aatlafactlon goar*11
For particular* apply to
p. eT«t««
Ranke. feb.W, 1«M. _
W. H. Stowell,
ASSAYER
NO. 3 MAIN STREET, EUREKA
Eureka, March Id, 1^* _-—^
4ss~
Beelere Meeede

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