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The Bismarck tribune. [volume] (Bismarck, D.T. [N.D.]) 1873-1875, November 03, 1875, Image 2

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Bismarck, D.
THE TRI-WXXKLT TRIBUKE.
Arr^nj^nients htvo been completed
truich will make the Tri-Weekly TBI
SVSB
a success so far as the certainty
df Its publication is conWhed. J.Thfe
IfeWeikly, wiU appear Ncj^naber I$t$,
a^d will be published ...on Mondays,
Wednesdays and r» Fridaysi and the
Weekly thereafter on Saturday, thus
gifing'a full synopsis df the "associated
preys' dispaWbw^pur^ya *n tjb? w^ek
—almost as good as $ daily. -L jThe TRI*
BUNK, Tri-Weekly and Weekly, will go
to press about 2 p. m. and v?ili contain
the news published 'in tfifc Ohidago and
St. Paul papers the same morning.
ror
two
not, the' TBIBCNE will do its part
in (jo'od faith and furnish the Tri-Week­
ly at the rate of two months in advance
dollars, or six months in advance
live dollars. Until Nov. 15th full tele­
graphic tiews will be published in the
W6ekW. This issue lis a faitf sample.
SHOULD
This fall we haVe a "Rich" party,
called the People's, J. H. Richards, be­
ing the principal candidate the Winston
party, called the Citizen's, E. T. Winston
being the opponent of Richards for the
only office worth having
and
Ash sheriff.'*
If they jmt'U]
rTJii
is expensive business for the TRIBUNE
and ^t remains to be seen if the ©0t®F*
prise will be appreciated. Whether it
is
OR-
REPUBLICANS
OANIZfi?
The inost of those now at Bismarck
have prised through three or more po­
litical ampaigns of the character pecu­
liar liismarck, and if the majority
are nv Jisgusted with them we overrate
thqir intelligence and the question
arises shouid not Republicans organize,
and hereafter let the struggle be for
principles, Or for party supremacy if
like, rather than for personal advance­
ment.
Two years ago the war cry was "law
aiuf.ojrder," but it meant nothing and
was only used as a dodge to piace in
power one setof candidates to the ex-,
elusion of another. Last fall no one
dated peep for Republicanism because a,
shrewd game vis on foot to gain Dem­
ocratic votes, through claiined devotion
to local interests, for the principal Re­
publican candidates,"while the Demo
jr»U Were allowed to walk off with the
local- offices. That is, principles and
unimportant offices were bartered for
rotes and the Republican delegate to
Congress received one hundred majority
where the local Democratic ticket had
sioyenty-Gve majority.
the "kick­
ers," party, called" ttoe Pioneer's.
The call for the ''People's Caucus"
emanated from the friends of Richards
and its pbject seemed to be to elect Richr
ards,*Stoyell and Dunn for the positions
for which they were named.
iPhe call for the Citizen's Caucus eru
aoated from tlie friends of Winston
and its object was his election together
with other good men who were not sup­
posed to bfrbpund up in any ring.
Tt)? call for.r the Pioneer's Caucus
emanated from-those who'felt that they
had been counted oiit' in the former,
caucuses and its object was to-teach the
nogs that it ^as »o^s&fc Hp ignore the
people in the primary ineetings and elect
a
tickets noiMndle^
'b/J&oti* kfic
P|PRWr* andAcitKfe^ fiaucifses wtei-fe (in?:
oxaep^on/^, aqL U\aV ofrthjb 'Peop3e/w
in»lhb !a«in'6f ?ajn$ j^tacto*£V«t
mer on ii at re no in at
the main because of their availability,
it was a ebmbinfcffibh briHhe yWtickle
me'and-'Fll tickle 'you principle to
catch rb tea to ,^lect Richards, Stoyel,l
arid^punn.
1
Neither in this nor in the other,cases
was? r.^he. public good regarded. The
issues Were wholly persohal. The resuVt
is ^qt6delsewbete-.
It.1^ to do away with personal poli­
tics- that-we advocate the organization
of^^atties. Let us organize and then
wh&ty/the primaries are Over the per­
sonal struggle will end.
XhtOUgh the .Republicans arc in the
minority they can hold a' balance of
power
fua'toh
that can be wielded for the pub­
lic good. If the Democrat* put up can?
didates from among their best men
them with
a
ticket full.
as
good.
so
for
TRIBUNE will abandon its present posi­
tion and give its hearty support to the
cause. It will do this if t^iera. jtfer apt
to exceed & 4fl&6n i4*o Mill glaM vwitn
it—will do it if it has tokiirgo one good
^man for all of^the offices.,, Anl
such time( as parties are organized,
unless public interest*are involved, the
TRIBUNE will alio# local polities to'boil
afad bubble as they, will without its in­
terference, while in national or territo­
rial politics it will endeavor to sfreak
the truth in relation to men or m^as
arbs unbia^ed by party ties,' cUjming
to be, perhaps, as it.really is, ao jnde
pendent Republican, newspaper.
i^Of the tu&tts in the field this fall it
matters but little wW is clected.
Whether Dunn ot Dodge is commission­
er the public internets will notibe sac­
rificed, for both afi honest and qualified.
Richards is in every sense qualified
for Register and is popular among his
associates and appears to bei esteemed
by all whokr?ow hitn weli.^ has a
brilliant war record and rose to uthe
rank of Lieut. Colonel in the Union ar*
my and has filled the office for the past
two years, his friends CTaim witn'^ark^
ed fidelity and ability, and* there are
none who dispute this claim. But Win"
ston and Jennings, the opposing candiJ
dates, areas well qualified, and are just1
as popular among their associates, and
those who are intimate with them in
the absence of party discipline, have the
same right to support them for person­
al reasons that the friends
of
Richards
have to support him.
Stoyell is as well qualified for district'
attorney as Delamater^ Ash as well
qualified for sheriff as McKenzie, Mc
Artbur as good a man for county treas*j
urer as Bowen. Williams would be all
right for Judge of Probate were he not
personally interested through his land
contest. Geo. PeoplesUis a good '1man
for assessor, and the writer knows no
ill of Corey. Req,rdon.Qr Slaughter
would make an VbonorabJe record'1 as
coroner. We doulit if 'Joy' believes'
himself competent for superintendent
of schools, while there is no doubt as
to Mrs,,Slaughter's fitness for that po-i
sition.
All of the candidates for constable,
justices and surveyors, are well fitted
for the positions for which they were
named, but because the TRIBUNE declined
to champion one of these tickets,
and oppose the others, it has bt-en de­
nounced, threats to kill the proposed
Tri-Weekly made, an indignation meet­
ing talked of, &c., &c. So we have a
personal interest in seeing parties or­
ganized and we dare say the conduct of
the campaign just closed will' convince
others that they "also havi' a like inter­
est. •.„
OUR ADVANTAGES.
Wheat has ranged in this^mark^t at
from 60 to 82 cents for the .j^ast week:
There is only about three cents differ*
encc between the price paid in this city
and at Sioux City.—Elk Point {Dako­
ta) Courier Oct, 20th.
Wheat in this: market ranges'ffoin.
$1.02 to $1.05 while .the prices paid in
Minnesota, except at Minneapolis, is
from 85 to 90 cents.—Fargo
Wheat $
1.0r—Moorne*d Oct1
28d. a
Cqnsideration of the 'fabt& ^suggested
ofjinlerest.
n,
4r??4,.'V'
in jfcjc' paragraphs, above. quoted- wjyJ^e»
rf
^WPeiiit'.i* in-$ho 'Missouri" rivdrt
*8jIdifitWehty ^hiie ^iles above Sioux
City. Sibhx feity Vas, ri^{ road[
coqamar\icationwith $t.fL^ois^QbicigO
and via St. Paul -with'lHilnthj^artd y&C
all points on the N(/P. R. R., an^Vbich^
are only accessible }o the one ^mr^t
at Dulutbf afford much better Wheat
market than this 'specially "favoted lo­
cality—better by at least 25 per ceiit^
AndUhat js not? aJI. The.'^or^er^l
Pacific wheat rates almost uniformly'at
No 1 this year, while Iowa, Kansas',
Nebraska, and Southern Dakota, which
has been specially favored^ this season
with big crops and a successful harvest,
runs largely on the grades 2VJJ, and re­
jected. So the Northern ^aqific fai
mers realize,nearly,jtwice as much for
their whea£ crop asf their more soiith*
ern neighbors.
Comparisons only a little less favora­
ble may,also, be made with points itr min-
nneapolis
reach of her mi
Lake Superior
!, affording a
ji
ours.
And this advantage will always re
mychMge/mi® r*" y**r-
wheafc
twheat
fris
riWhest tt Pulnth is—as near Lifer
pool
by wa^T, a^wibeat at Milwaukee
.^refers it eosts no ihor^ to get it tO
market frbm Duluth'thlt frttte Milwau­
kee and, were the grades the Sa^ae, tWe
price wonld be the jsame at .both cities,
but Duluth wheat rates from five to ten
cents per bushel higher in the eastern
market than Mil#aak^e wheat, as Mil
wdakefii wheat rates some four c?nts
pe^ bushel hjg^ier ,thao Chicago, be*
cause the
ised in, the marC
northern lattitudefris heavier, in pounds
to the bushel, and makes more and bet­
ter flour, and is a brighter color, while
grown, or. rejected wheat is rarely known
in (he Duluth: market and when found
the' cause can be0 traced directly to
carelessness onthe part of the producer..
If it costs ^ten, cents per bushel to
gptjwheat fron^-points on .the N. P. to
Dulutb,, and thirty cents from points
in Minnesota^' Iowa and Southern Da
kota, to Milwaukee, as it,'does, in that
fact a difference of twenty cents per
bushel in favor of the Northern Pacific
is explained and in the grades the re
maipderof the difference is' accounted
for. t,
The yield per acre in the several lo­
calities mentioned is about the same,
running from twelve to thirty bushels
per acre. Xhe farmer who sows with
care and reaps in season will rarely
ever fail to realize twenty bushels to
ti\e acret
aQd'is
liable to get from twen­
ty to thirty, while heavier yields than
thirty are frequent.
The cost of pfodnction per acre is ho
greater on 'the N. P. than elsewhere,
nor
is, the cost of living, while land on
the N. P., (rail road land,) can be had
through the purchase of the bonds or
stock of the company and 'their ex­
change forland, at jinore favorable
.prices than any.ot.her wheat land in
the United* States—cheaper and with
less trouble than Government land can
'be obtained even at private sale,'wlnle
itjis/actually wOrth more than the
wheat lands of Iowa except where,lo­
cated in the vicinity of thriving towns.
Proximity to marke fe is what deter
mines the value of land.
Every ten cents per bushel added to
the price of wheat through opening
new markets, adds" twenty dollars per
acre to the value of land. Presuming
the land will yield twenty bushels to
the acre, the price being' enhanced in
value ten cents pier bushel, or the pro­
duct two dollars per acre Two dol
lars is ten per cent on twenty dollars.
Land is worth as uiUCh per acre as it
will yield ten per cent on over and
above ail expeuses. It will take some
time for the land to appreciate in value
in. the estimation of buyer and seller,
because of this fact, but that.result,is'
just as certain,to be attained as water
is certain to reach us level and the
cultivated wheat lands o5 the Northern
PftAtfic are just as certain to be rated
at IRpom^ thirty to fifty dollars per acre
Within the next ten.yea^J1
The Northern, Pacific region affords
better market „to 4ay than any por
(jio«tof Iowa, 8outhern
ksi^rlf^ansas, Wtofcrmai%et ^thVri
4io^t of MinnesotaJ and a good as four
Qfihs of |Ilinoi8,and half jof,Wisconsin,
while it produces a better grade of:
than any of these localities.
^?he Northerii^f^cificr'Vigi(Jp affords
a better^ marker^ fort produce of all kinds
than Sourhern Michigan offorded tweti*
ty-five years1 ago, .aiiid*cyet the wheat
lands that twenty years, ago sold at ten
dollars per acae in that state, yields a
handsome revenue now on seventy-five
dollars per acre of at least sell readily
't that.
The indiscriminate purchase of wild
land is bad policy, but he who purchas­
es land, and through cultivation by.him­
self or another, makes it pay its taxes
and light interest on the origional in
vestment, is just as certain to become
wealthy through an investment of a
few hundred dollars in Northern Pacific
land§,'nS:tHe siif^ is Certain to rist? and
sei.
Thisbas been true of,all investments
ma^ein Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, IUi
nois, Iow^, 'Kansas and Nebraska lands
and is none the less certain in Northern
PaciSc lands.
granted before he goes to Washington
the last of this month, he will-give the
jpattpr his.^ers(^l.at^&ntj(mr. He also
My^tiiaUp^itn4i(Mft4£e ^Krision of
Hie Territwj should be plaued'"befOYtr
ritory should,
gig^^Kp^ition.
Cl»
W
t^^prfpoifd UK
prairie fire in
renders him
$500 nor
in the
If one wilfully
Dakota the Territ
liable to a fine not1
less than |50. and
coujxdf^H* notjxiore
da^6r be'th^ii the
^^jted ba^elessljr^' the pexii^ is
s^ecV to'i fine not exceeding $1Q& nor
l|p ||ii^ $10, and liable fur "nam
|a fire
upon hi£ owtt fbr^ifibk protec­
tion of his own property is %blev for
dama^^one to others.
Months
It is reported"by Cnicago papers that
Gen, John T. Averill, of Mranesota, will
succeed Rev. K. P. Smith as commisa
sioner of Indian affairs. This is good.
No better mid for the 5 place could be
found. Gen. Ayerill is honest, practi*
cal and 'fejur}e8& He will, dare to do
right though the Heavens fall, and no
amount of newspaper howling will af­
fect his serenity.
BIS11MK TKHE (JK.
N ewsp aper
AN»
Job Printers,
BISMARCK, D. T.
Col. JOHN tfc. STEVJtNS l'realdent
Col.
C.
A. LOUNSBHRRY...Secretory and Manager
!, i'
CAPITAL STOCK, $10,000
PAID in*1 (JAPITAl.
The' fUsiunrck Tribonn Office is supplied with a
Taylor Cylinder Newspaper Press,..
Quarter Medium Gordon Jobber,
PAPER AND CARD GUTTERS
and an extecsire "f
Dismay and Job Type
together with labor saving material of all kinds.
Its managers are thorough newspaper men, while
its mechanical department is in the hacdrf ofm« ef
the best workmen in the Northwest.
THE BISMAEOK TEIBDHE
is the HViPlieet and uewaest, and has the largest eir
icqlation of any on the line ol the Northerp Pacific
and Is the'only bne on the line, excepting the Diiluth
Tribune, printed entirely at home.
Terms- Tri»Weekly $19.00 Weekly $2.00 per annum
in advance All jearly subscribers are entitled to
a J9x26 portrait, being a fine
'j
any dilater
1 1
..
t.-l
Clironio of G'eii. Custor,
5 .j'
J)akbta, Nebras-
the i^putar "Aii^dashirtg Cavalry Conima.-^jJi*, which
aloJwfi3-iroBtklh» price of subscription.
J-nis
THE BISMABCK TMBUNjS
4
-AfidH
15 PVBLI8QKD
j1
Btaok1
Hills
(.
Seventy-Five Miles Nearer the!
fGold
Discoveries than
vNewspapei\
arid gives
more Reliable Information concern
S
ing, th^m thai? any otber.
Persons looking for homes in tiie West especially
in the Red River and Missouri valleys,' or at any
point-id the Northern Pacific, country, will find more
interesting and at the fame time valuable informa­
tion in. the Bismarck Trilmne than in any other
newspaper.
All persons interested in the Northern Pacific
should be among its subscribers.
Bismarck is situated at the present terminus of the
'Northern Pacific, on the Missouri river, in a. prairie
region haying a deep rich soil, well adapted to agri­
cultural purposes. Three lines of steRtners ply 'on
Missouri in connection .with the Northern Pacific) to
Carroll, 800 miles 'above Bismarck, and to I'brt Ren-,
,ton, 1300 miles above, while the Yeliowstohe rxVfir 13''
navigable for 300 miles, giving Bismarck 1600nuilek
of navigable rivers above it, directly.tributary, to it,
aa well as a largo-extent of country beloT" ii. ..
It is located seventy five uiiles nearer the Black
Hills than any other raal road towuy\ and uOords the
best outlet and 'inlet to the X£w tfldorrfdo—nn.t- i,rily
the shortest but th*. safest und t»est rnut«.
irki
1
I
Arrangement

INGER
TRAINS
o*
WISCONSIN
AND
Chicago and florth-Westeni
-BsfcXLWAYS.
f) ThroiiKli Express Trains
rfn^dDjfLY BAOH WAY.
I^AVING ST. PAUli
1--'
AE FOLLOWS:
AH P«r BqireM. .-...i'.
4
.•
..10:10 a. n.
(Daily except Sunday.)
Arriving in CHICAGO,.. ...T:15 a. m,
CHICAGO Night SxpreM,. 7:30 p. nr
(JCN4hr ezoept Saturday.)
Arriving in C^KfAGO^... ..^4:00 p. n.
This the OUfcX LINI raaalpg the celebrated
^Pullman
A|fD NIGHT COACHES
snwwtx
St Paul and Chicago.
Atoo the ONLY LINg using the
S WESTItfGHO USE AIR BRAKE
jBBTWaiJI
vSt.Paul
and Chicago*
MilWtTaimi Platform*.
Miller'1* Patemt Ckwplert,
Westingbouss Air Brake, dSc.
All combined for safety. make this the BBST reutet
MADISON, BBLOIT, CHICAGO,
AND ALL POINTS
EAST and SOUTH.
Frst'Class Eating Houses at BAU CLAIM, KL
ROT, DEVIL'S LAKE and HARVARD, and
A3SYLK
TIME ALLOWED FOR MEALS.
GET YOUR TICKETS OF
JOHN DAVIDSON,
Ticket Agent, Bismarck.
G. K. BARNES, F. B. CLARKE,
Gen. Tkt. Agfc Gen. Past. Agt.
Sltf
EAILWA.HT.
THE GREAT THBOUUH LINE BKTWKRN
Chicago,
Mew York*
New England,
The Canada*,
And all Kasteru and Southern Points, and
The Great Northwest!
Connecting in Chicago with ail Eastern and Sout^.
era Lines.
Two Through Express Daily
each way, leaving St. Paul as follows: Chicago Day
Express 10:10 a. m. (Daily except Sunday.) Arriv-e
in Chicago 7:15 a. m.
Chicago Night Express 7:30 p. in. (Daily except
Saturday.) Arriving in Chicago at 4:00 p. m.
THE ONLY THROUGH LINE BETWEEN
CHICAGO, MILWAUKBB, S1PAUL
AXI» JIIMEAI'OLIS.
It traverses a finer country, with grander scenery
and passes through ftiore business centers and pleas
ure resorts, than any other Northwestern Line. And
the only Railway Line traversing the valley of the
upper Mississippi river, aad along the shore of Lake
Pepin. Also via Madison, Prairie du Chien, Mc
Gregor, Austin and Owatonna.
Through Palace Coaches and Sleeping Cars
Of tlie Best and Track Perfect.
|2gr*Connecting at Sfr. Paul and Minneapolis with
.the several lines centering at those points.
ST. PAUL DEPOT—Cor. of Jackson and Levee*
CITT OFRICK—118 Kasfr Jackson St., corner Thir.l
Street.
A* ¥. H. CARPENTER,
»tf Geri. Pas^. anct Ticket Agent, Milwaukee.
Get your Tickets of JOHN DAVID80N,
Ticket Agent, Bismarck.
SA
BIGFOB^A PASSMOEE, Agents,
'MNHBSOTA, DAKOTA' AHD
No.' 46, iacltsin ML,' St'Wul, Minn
[v3no32tf.l
M. FUtLHR.—Commisaion Merchant, 'Whole
AvX* sale and Retail dealer in Floqr, feed, Butter
Eggs, .ftc.i &o. -Hio*thern' Pacific dealers will
find.it to tneir interest to communicate with fhi*
house beTore purchasihg elsewhere.
GLARK HOUSE—Corner Fourth Street and Hen­
nepin AVe., two Blocks from the Academy of
Masic. Only first class' Two Dollar- House, New
elegantly furnished, and situated in tlie fiaest
tion of the City.
IINTON.
& Co.—Commission nnd Storage* Whole-
J*siile an# Retail dealers in Grain, Flour, Peed,
Lime and ^Cement". No. 1) Washington Avenur
^ojth.
-4tr-
TEWtiJbh UAUUISOX.—Wholesale Grooers.
OS WALD, Wholesale dealer in Bourbon and
live Whiskies, Brandies. Gins, Wines and Ci
Washington Av*tnvt, Minneapolis, Minn.
•. St. Paul BiisittM Hirwtory.
if^AlG LAIUC1N'—Importers and dealers in
rocry'
Fror»ch China, Glassware, Lamps
booking.Glasses, »n»TIfoitse'FurnisJii^trGoods 6«s
TWra f5^rt*ts Pii\i, Mini

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