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Idaho semi-weekly world. [volume] (Idaho City, Idaho Territory) 1875-1908, November 10, 1893, Image 1

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VOL. 18.
IDAHO CITY, FRIDAY. NOVEMBER IO» 1893.
NO 31.
».Weekly World.
Publish»*
frm db I*rldn yrm
-Bl
and OHAEL £. JONES,
JONES. mrsixaw MaHAO**.
ce Cor. Mai« Ä Commercial Sts.
(Brice Ultumko.)
cwrt.r. |] 00 iw «Barter.
«■ of *■«■•»»»**•■»
, .8 00 | Thr»»Mo«th».. .#1 SO
Ü' ........J 00 1 Single Cop to«..... 1«
DF SUMBMPTIM TO ffflUT W00L0
grofrMlooxl
J'ORNE Y AND COUNSELOR
AT LAW.
|auo City, Jan. 2,1891.
*NB. HASTINQ8,
IL AND MINING ENGINEER,
BOISE CITY, IDAHO.
I S. Deputy Mineral Surveyor. Office
Boise City National Bank, or at
ence, Regan's cottage, S. coiner ol
and Fort Sts.
iril 3, '91. tf.
"tTj. JO is es,
Lawyer,
practice in all Courte and Ü. 8. Land
Bceovcr Shainwald's store, Boise City,
^ Sept. l-m2.
ks Baxter, Charles F. Baxter
BSAY OFFICE
B025 Mam St., between 10th and 11th
BoUe City, Idaho.
hues Baxter & Son,
alytical work and assaying of ores,
s, waters, etc. Results guaranteed;
;es moderate List of charges for all
of work furnished upon application,
ise City, Dec. 11, I891-tf.
Geo. .Ainslie,
TORNEY - AT-LAW,
c second floor Perrault builtling, cor.
ain and Seventh streets, Boise City.
COUNTY AND STATE.
Silver was 70f cents on tbe 8tb.
The Nugget tellB miners seeking
ployment not to go to DeLnmar;
there are too many there now
Sting for employment.
IeLamar Nugget: Matt Marz,
village cordwainer, has a neat
bouse and shop nearly ready for
upancy, next to James Pascoe's
Idence. We are glad to know
It he is prospering.
, S. Haskins, Mining Inspector,
S. Gundaker, Boiler Inspector,
jived here yesterday and went on
jthe other side of the Basin. They
SI return today. Both the gentle
in msde a call on the World.
us
his
50
to
of
J. D. Willson, of the Edna
|mng company, passed through
vn last Weduesday on his way to
|ise. Mr. Willson has been out to
I Edna mine. The tunnel running
the Edna ledge, he says, is now
^hin about seventy feet of the
»ft.
liiere is some talk of a new and
Bxhaustible industry in store for
alio—that of shipping lava blocks
eastern cities for building pur
It is proven to be the best
e-proof material in existence. The
|aho World's Fair building has
»rted an investigation in the mat
l Ketchüm Keystone: The Solace
lining company is making arrange
lents to operate through tbe winter
|ttb ten to twelve men. For up
trds of a year past they have been
»nning a cross-cut tunnel and struck
»e vein 1300 feet from the tunnel's
pouth at a depth on the vein of over
1 feet and about 300 feet below
he deepest workings. This tunnel
ot °n>y develops the mine as indi
»ted but facilitates drainage, water
paving been a serious obstacle to for
Ber workings from the surface. Pur
lhasing and hauling of supplies are
Being contracted for oil the strength
pf developments on the vein since it
*as struck, which are said to more
phan sustain the former high reputa
|ton of the mine. Ore has been mar
keted in car lots that ran upwards of
r'OOO ozs. silver per ton.
ON THÏ PIVKR AT LAST.
The Floar Col.i Having Mnrhlne will
La in Opérai.ou iu a Few Days.
C*'. Db »II 1 ribusw.
The wondeiful flour gold saving
machine which baa so long been pa
tiently waited for is at last on the
banks of Snake river at Lannon'a
Spar, sixteen miles from Caldwell, on
ground belonging to County Com
missioner, G. W. Paul. Mr. Raber,
President of the Portland Amalga
mating and Mining company was in
Caldwell last Murtdsy and informed
us that be was here to stay. One of
his machines would be in full opera
tion by the 10th inst., and said he,
"if there is any gold in the sands of
Snake river our machine will save it."
"We do not want to make any blow
about the business," he said. " We
have come here to demonstrate that
the fine gold along the banks of the
river can be saved at a cost that will
pay to work it even if there is only
50 cents to the ton. According to
Mr. Raber the average yield of gold
to the ton of gravel is about one dol
lar and at that rate one of his ma
chines will net the operator $100 per
day. We will not enter into any de
tailed account of the business at this
time. On the 10th of November one
of those machines will be engaged in
practical work and there does not
seem to be the slightest question
but that it will fulfill every expecta
tion. Mr. Raber said that he hoped
that many people would not come to
see the machine until that time, be
cause it would be annoying to have a
great number about while the plant
was being erected. As the machine
will be in constant operation all win
ter there is no occasion for a rush.
Wait until the tenth; then go down
to Lannon's Spar and see the whole
process. Mr. Raber has been at work
on his machine for thirteen years and
has spent $40,000 in its perfection.
He says that all the efforts heretofore
made were on a mistaken idea about
rusty gold. The Snake river gold,
he says, is not rusty. Gold does not
oxidize except by mechanical appli
cation. He says that his process will
instantaneously amalgamate anything
from gold as fine as to be impercepti
ble to a miner's greased pick. If
this machine proves anything like as
successful as is predicted, a revolu
tion will sweep over this country in
the next sixty days. Snake river
will be lined for hundreds of miles
with gold saving machines and mill
ions upon millions of dollars will be
wrenched from the earth. But peo
ple should not he unduly excited.
Wait until the machine demonstrates
its ability to do just what is claimed
for it and then go in as fast as you
can and enjoy some of the benefits.
Whv did not the Idaho World
give us an account of the scrap in
which Barney McGill and his partner
took a hand? Barney is well known
here and plenty of the boys would
have furnished a chunk of raw beef
for his discolored optic.—DeLamar
Nugget.
The World did not mention that
little scrap for the reason that Barney
did not want his old friends in Owy
hee to know that he had become fa
mous as a pugilist, being content to
wear the laurels simply as being one
of the discoverers of the best gold
mine in Boise county, but as they
have heard of it there will be no barm
now to say that he came out of the
scrap unscathed, unscratched and
unbruised. The story of the discol
son
save
ton,
that
agogue
sonal
less
with
The
every
tions
for
dacy
Ruin
quence
would
their
who
Fair.
by
were
from
ple
Carter
some
was
those
enters
and
nition
not
that
that
her
gave
cago
Is
ly
and
who
their
main
To
one
is
tbe
by
a
and
is
the
it
of
ored eye was all a myth—an 'optical
, , . „ _ __high
delusiou." The world requests tbe ]
Nugget to correct that little eye-tem.
Dave Coughanour, one of the
members of the Gold Hill company,
of Quartzburg, will hereafter pursue
bis way on life's trail through the
narrow vale "that lies between the
cold, barren peaks of two eternities,'
by the clear light of a sparkling dia
mond of the Kohinoor kind which be
recently bought, while east, for
$5,000. The poor silver miner can
in
ed
wear nothing finer than a base metal
"shiner," and bluish-bued overalls
with rivets of copper; but the delver
for gold is not left in the cold; he's
right in the fold, and as he is able 'lis
all right and proper, to wear a big
diamoud— a Kohinoor whopper.
America» Union and Eldredge
sewing machines will lie sold by this
office for $35 and $37 respectively.
Each has seven drawers. Agents
charge no less than $60 for these
same machines. They are brand
Call aud see them. * *
sume
new
* SMKAT CHAtkWK.
Six monts ago, when Carter Ham
son was a candidate for Mayor of
Chicago every newspaper in that city,
save the one he owned, was of opin
ton, or at leaat expressed the opinion,
that he was a dangerous man; a dem
agogue devoted entirely to hie per
sonal interests and ambitions; reck
less of the public welfare; identified
with the worst elements of society.
The palpite of Chicago of almost
every church, echoed tbe denuncia
tions of the prens. No man ever ran
for office in this country whose candi
dacy provoked so much vituperation.
Ruin was predicted as a sure conse
quence of bis election. Chicago
would be given op to tbe control of
gambling dens, rum shops and the
brothels and decent men would hide
their heads in shame of the millions
who were coming to see the World's
Fair. Nevertheless, he was elected
by an ovei whelming majority. If the
statements of the papers and pulpits
were true, the inevitable conclusion
from his success must be that the peo
ple of Chicago were hopelessly de
moralized, by voting for snch a man.
Carter Harrison was installed in office
some weeks before the World's Fair
was opened. He organized his gov
ernment, reorganized tbe police and
performed bis duties as Mayor, and
those who met him failed to discover
him the monster who had been
described. On the very eve of the
closing of the fair a crazy assassin
enters bis house, calls him to the door
and kills liim. The whole city now
mourns bis loss in unanimous recog
nition of tho great loss which the
community bas suffered. There is
not a word said now, except in Carter
Harrison's praise. It is recalled now
that he was elected Mayor four times
before, that his administrations were
always eminently successful and sat
isfactory, that he raised the credit of
that great city* to the highest, filled
her treasury, repaired her streets,
gave her a good police, and left Chi
cago respected by the whole world.
Is this not a great change? Certain
ly it is an object lesson which may be
pondered profitably by those whose
business it is to comment on the acts
and characters of public men. All men
who seek the people's suffrages bave
their faults as well as men who re
main iu the obscurity of private life.
To assail any candidate as he was as
sailed is inexcusable, but to thus assail
one whom the people had repeatedly
trusted and honored is follr. His
opponents expected him to abolish
crime, he was content to do all he
could to minimize it, because he was
satisfied that a reformer cannot strive
after the impossible, for such reformer
is intolerant of those who cannot be
reformed. There are standards for
tbe measurement of men which the
reformers of society do not always
appreciate. These are the standards
by which the common people measure
a man like Harrison was. In its way
and in its uses the popular standard
is safer than that of the professional
reformer. Bv this standard Harrison
was broader than any of his critics,
and hence the people of the great
city, iu spite of the vituperation
heaped upon him, joined heartily in
the universal honors paid to his
memory.
Rev. W. J. A. Hendrickx.
Idaho City, Nov. 8, 1893.
Boise Democrat: George Sur
fleet, récorder, says that about sixty
claims have been taken up on the
... i ■
grade placers on More creek in
] ^ K e 0 _ lt ____
the vicinity of the Halfway House
He predicts that one thousand men
will be at work in that district early
in the spring. A town will be found
ed and a lively season or a series of
seasons will be the result. All of the
old time miners of Boise basin are
flocking down and getting claims.
The gravel is from two to six feet in
ing
in
tbe
let
on
he
of
to
depth and pitches back. In places the
washed gravel is sixty feet above the
ttlÄTL arftTJÎ
channel gives promise 0 f r i c h returns,
Appolntmenta or Hev. ilendrtrkx
Sunday, Nov. 12.—Granite Creek ;
sermon on Moral Freedom
Sunday, Nov. 19.—Idaho City; ser
mon ou the Institution of tbe Priest
hood.
Sunday, Nov. 2ti—Granite Creek;
sermon on l'ruo Civilization.
Several claims have been locatea
about a mile north of town and all
* o» rr . v Re
in
OVV U WHOLE cloth.
The Ntsrj or the ■heeties et heel •
■sot.
in
of
the
are
in
The reported shooting in Neel dis
trict was a hoax.
This fact developed Sunday even
ing when Fred Page Tuatin arrived
in the oity, bale and hearty, and as
sured hi* friend* that ha was still in
tbe land of tbe living and that no bul
let bed plowed its way into his anat
omy.
Mr. Tustin was seen Monday by a
reporter. He said there bad been no
trouble whatever at the mine. He
was probably the most surprised man
on earth when his wife arrived poet«
haste at the mine Sunday morning
and informed him of the story that
had been circulated in this city. Mr.
Tnstin was decidedly wroth and was
hunting for the party who brought in
the report, but without success.
The motives of the miserable
wretch may forever remain a mys
tery. The only effect of the report
was to cause Mrs. Tnstin, almost fren
zied at the thought of her buaband
being injured, perhaps dying, to
make the long trip to Neal daring
that dark, rainy night.
Tbe fiend who spread the story did
his work well. At each place where
he inquired the way to tbe residence
of Mr. Tnstin he took particular pains
to state there bad been a serious
shooting scrape at Neal. Reaching
the Tustin place he did not go in,
but standing at the door told Mrs.
Tustin of the affair. He then struck
out for a doctor, as he said. He
asked several parties to direct him to
the residence of a well known phy
sician, being careful not to forget bis
story, which he told each time with a
great show of excitement, failing,
however, to state who was injured.
When Mrs. Tustin hastily departed
for Neal it was generally supposed
Mr. Tustin had been shot. This
caused his friends much anxiety and
they were greatly relieved to find the
whole story a ridiculous fabrication.
The identity of the man who caused
all the excitement is as yet unknown,
and it would no doubt be the wisest
act of his life if he remains "dark"
for an indefinite period. It is impos
sible to get anything like an accurate
description of the fellow. It was
very dark when he was peddling the
lying report around and those with
whom he conversed were unable to
get a plain view of his features.
Little Cilate Creek Plaerra.
Idaho County Free Prew.
During the present season repre
sentatives of a California syndicate
of large capital have located a large
area of placer ground on Miller creek
and Little Slate creek, in the Flor
ence basin. Among the locators are
commissioners Josh S. Fockler, C. B.
Wood, Chas. Phillips, Mike Green,
Dave Lewis, Harry W. and Chas.
Cone, W. C. Newburn, W. C. Cran
dall, Peter Turnbull and others.
There are in atl 30 claims, embracing
about 680 acres, which takes in all
the upper meadows above the old
Van Buren ranch on Little Slate
creek, together with many tributary
gulches which are known to be rich
aud have been worked for several
years by Peter Turnbull, Victor
Chandemanche, J. S. Fockler, Bob
Royal, Cap. Wilson and others.
There is unlimited water power and
dump, and several miles of small
ditches to cover the side gulches are
already built and in constant use.
These locations comprise as promis
ing an area of placer operations as
can be found in the State. It was
alwars profitable, even when worked
in the hasty manner aud with the
crude methods of pioneer days. The
top dirt is light and shallow, and the
main creek and all the tributary
gulches have fall enough to carry off
any quantity of tailings. Big results
or
laat
safe
to
the
bed
ing
to
all
he
muv be looked for from that section |
the when the ground is properly exploit
the ea - rhe task of consolidating the
, s -—. « r * . i ""
one concrete block is now in proceas,
and when consummated the project
i org w j|| speedily arrange the financial
; p #r t of the undertaking,
ser
all
Moke rain yesterday. The ground
is now thoroughly soaked, which fact
will insure a long «ater season next
year if we have the usual amount of
snow the coming winter.
"The fool never changes his mind"
for the reason, it is presumed, that
be baa none lo change.
as
the
off
Jake Riebold baa been h«r« a weak
or more to reosiva tbe new hoisting
machinery that will be pat on tbe
Little Giant, and start it ooL Tba
whole outfit arrived from Denver
laat Friday end was loaded on four
wagons. Tbe Walker boy* have
contracted to deliver the machinery
safe in Warrens, for wbiob they are
to receive $750. Tbe boiler ia some
what unwieldy, but tbe boy* think
they can put it through without up
setting. If tbe outfit la not put into
the camp this fall the boys only get
$650, therefore they are anxious for
bed weather to hold off and not catch
them in tbe mountains, ae that would
force them to ley over until neat
summer.
Salt Lake Tribune: Our morn
ing contemporary does not like to
have ns say that "an inscrutable
Providence raised Grover Cleveland
to a pedestal for which be was never
intended," and thinks that is a para
dox. It ia quite mistaken. Provi
dence waa napping or had a spite
against the world when that raise was
msde, and wbat we meant by "never
intended" was not to raally impeach
Divine Providence, but merely to
state a fact, which is, that Grover
Cleveland is not qualified either by
native intellect or by training or by
association to sit as a final jadge on
matters which concern the welfare of
all tbe people of this great Republic.
After he was elected President tbe
first time he confessed that he knew
nothing of tbe tariff question. He
has never put bis pen to paper in re
gard to tbe currency question that
he has not shown that he knows noth
ing aboat it, except what he has been
stuffed with by New York National
bankers. If be could have made an
honest living practicing law in the
city of Buffalo he would still have
been in the business. He could not
and so ran for a little office, and since
then bis life has been a demonstra
tion of such luck, at the expense of
the country, as was never exhibited
before and such as no nation ever be
fore suffered.
nor,
both
the
last
tain
the
is
a
est
ly
The Washington correspondent of
tbe New York Press 6ays of Idaho's
junior Senator: "Iu the midst of all
this loss of dignity, one of the young
est members of tbe Senate has given
to his older colleagues, who are sup
posed to conserve both the 'dignity'
and the 'courtesy' of that body, a
most distinguished example. The
bearing of Mr. Dubois, of Idaho, the
scholarly and honorably ambitious
Yale graduate to whom bas been in
trusted the leadership of tbe Repub
lican silver forces in the Senate, baa
combined, during all this long battle,
aggressive firmness with the most
elaborate courtesy. Provoked as he
has been at times by tbe malignant
assaults of administration Senators,
at war as he has been with a majori
ty of the Republican side of the
chamber, subject to criticism as he
has been by Mr. Voorhees and other
veteran Senators on account of his
youth and inexperience, Mr. Dubois
has acquitted himself with an energy
and tact which have both surprised
and gratified his loyal followers. Mr.
Dubois is not only one of the most
popular, but one of the most highly
respected members of the Senate
among his colleagues, despite bis
youth aud aggressiveness.
State Election».
The elections last Tuesday showed
great Republican gains. McKinley
was re-elected Governor of Ohio by
a plurality of from 60,000 to 70,000.
Two-thirds of the Legislature will be
Republican.
The Democrats carried Virginia by
about 25,000. O'Farrell, Democratic
candidate for Governor, ran several
thousand behind his ticket. The
| Democrats will have 35 out of 40 in '
the Senate and 85 out of 100 members
the
""
fact
next
of
that
of the House. The Prohibition ticket
got the largest vote ever received in
the State.
The Republicans made gains in
Maryland.
The Republicans of New York
elected their State ticket by from
20,000 to 25,000. Judge Isaac H.
Maynard, Democrat, was defeated by
Bartlett, for Judge of tile Court of
Appeals, by about 50,000. The
Tammany ticket in New York city
was elected by majorities ranging
from 67,000 to 68,000.
The vote in Kansas was light.
Republicani msde gains sll over tbe
State.
Tbe Republicans carried every
thing in Massachusetts. For Gover
nor, Rassell defeated Greenhslge by
about 30,000.
The Republicans bava captured
both houses of the Legislature in
New Jersey, having one majority in
the Senate against elevsn Democratic
last year. The new House will con
tain 97 Rapublicans and 23 Demo
crats. Tbe Democratic majority last
year waa 18.
Republicani have made gsioe in
Sooth Dakota, and the Popnliita
gained iu Nebraska.
meet BtMUa
The rapid shifting by the winds of
beds of sands, often destroying or
menacing human works, is a pbeoom
enon well known in different parts of
the world. But the slow accumula
tion of the finer particles—the atmos
pheric dust—has attracted attention
only in recent years. Most ruins of
ancient cities are buried, and it has
now been learned that tbe covering
is not wholly ibe debris of decayed
buildings and other work», bot that
much of it is atmospheric dust. Tbe
layer that becomes visible today on
a polished surface, if undisturbed,
may grow into a deep stratum iu the
course of centaries. Tbe winds that
have beaten against some of the lofti
est of the Mexican mountains have
been laden with fine dust from the
plains, and this bas been thrown
down in deposits that now range from
100 to more than 300 feet in thick
ness. Tbe dust cloud from the
Krakatos eruption traveled complete
ly around the globe, and must have
settled in a thin layer over a very
large portion of tbe earth's surface.
Clothes cleaned and repaired.
Comforters cleaned and re-covered by
Mrs. J. W. Reel. m3.
B.
and
Xulu (• Tuaajen.
Notice is hereby given that taxes
are now due and payable at this of
fice and will become delinquent on
the second Monday of December,
1893, and if not paid prior to that
date ten per cent will be added there
to.
C. Baird,
Assessor and Tax Collector.
Oct. 9, 1893. _
Treasurer's notice.
The following warrants will be paid
upon presentation at my office :
ROAD FEND.
No. 72, registered Jan. 16, 1891.
"73,
COUNTY GENERAL FUND.
All warrants registered prior to August
6, 1891. E. W. Barrt,
Nov. 9, 1893. Co. Treasurer.
PATENTS:
Caveats»and Trade-Marks obtained, and all Pat
ent business conducted for Moocratc ran.
Ouw omet I« oewonirc u. OFFicc
end we can secure patent in less urne than those
remote from Washington. ... . i
Send model, drawing or photo., with descrip
tion. We advise, if patentable or not, tree of
charge. Our fee not âue till patent is secured.
A pAafiNLCTt "How to Obtain Patenta,' with
C. A. SNOW A,CO.
O.e F.TtMT Omet, wa»mi.«to., D. C.
Treasurer's Notice.
The tollowing warrants will be paid
upon presentation at my office
COUNTY GENERAL FUND.
No. 284, registered July 18, 1391; No.
285, registered July 18, 1891.
HOSPITAL FUND.
No 429. registered Oct. 16, 1889.
ROAD FUND.
No. 543, registered Ocl 15, 1990 ; No.
348, registered Oct 15, 1890.
F F. CHURCH. Treasurer.
By E. W Barry, Deputy.
Au« H, k**-m3
The New Drug Store
in '
in
in
H.
by
of
______ ,,, I
DRUG CO.."Lmi td.
7 '
Is note open and ready for business . 1
" J
Oui prescription department will re- ]
ceive special attention from Wm. H Nye
and W. Galbraith, both Pharmacists of
long experience.
Orders by mail or telephone promptly
attended to.
Our many friends m Boise Basin will,
we hope, give us a share of their value«
orders. Address,
Wye Oalbraith Drug Co.,
Odd Fellows Block,
June 10, 9&-tfj Boise City. Idaho
B. T. DAVIS. tL tL DA VIA
(Successors to Cave A Daria)
Dealers ia
M tarin ail PniMm
CLOTHING.
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS,
BOOTS AND SHOES OF ALL
KINDS, LADIES AMD
CHILDRENS SHOES,
HARRWÂRE, Ml RM «Tftt,
TINWARE, HAHDWOOD, GRAIN, Aw
All geode A femesI rates.
Our motto is, " Cheap far Cash." Call
and get our prices and be coarlaced.
DAVIS BKOTHEJBA
JFTÄT
DBY GOODS,
ÿ G
ods
Lilia' UitoiarT
gents' Fusmsarae
GOODS.
AdolpM Ballo t,
nuufxm
Yatckiater ai Jeidtr,
a
BOISE CITY, IDAHO
I.F.W P BLOCK.
-Dealer In
WATCHES, CLOCKS, JEWELRY, SU.
VERWARE, SPECTACLES, EYE
BUSSES.
Jexeelry repaired and ii ode lo order ;
also, diamonds and other donee set
and reset only first-dans.
Letter cutting, engraving in all stylea
and monograms made by a first class ea
graver, and in the highest style of tbe
art
Old Gold Jewelry Taken at ita
Value.
Watch and clock work done in all its
branches.
Fine and difficult watch repairing »
specialty
Mail and express orders given
prompt attention.
Treasurer'* notice.
The following warrants will be paid on
presentation at my office:
ROAD FUND.
No. 538, reeistered Oct 18, 1890.
" 349, " " 20, 1890.
" 71, " Jan 16, 1891.
HOSPITAL FUND.
No. 426. registered Oct 16. 1889.
180, " Jan. 16. 1890.
COCBTY GENERAL FUND.
Warrants registered July 18,1881.
" " 20, 1891.
No 218, " "21, 1891.
" 226, " " 81,1891.
E. W. Barry, Co. Trees.
Oct «, 1893.
Xffotiee to Creditors.
[Estate of James *milb. deceased.
■ Notice is hereby given by the under
signed, administrator of the estate of
James Smith, deceased, to the creditors of,
and all persons having claims against the
said deceased, to exhibit them, with the
necessary vouchers, within four months
after the first publication of this notice,
to the said administrator, at the Boise
County Bank, the same being the place
for I he transaction of the business of the
said estate, in Idaho City, Boise count;.
Idaho E. W Barry.
■ Public Administrator of the estate of
James Smith, deceased
■ Dated at Idaho City, Idaho, Sept. 15. *93.
notice of Forfeiture.
To William Sweet: *
I You are hereby notified that I bave ex
pended One Hundred Dollars in labor
and improvement on the Mountain Queen
. 1 quartz mining daim situated in Placer.
ville mining district, near the Placerville
re- ] lu j Garden valley wagon road, in Boise
county. Idaho, in order to hold said claim
of under the provisions of Section 2324, Be
vised Statutes of the United States, for tbe
year 1892. That the proportion of said
expenoiture due by you on your undi
vided one-fourth interest in »aid claim is
rweuty-Five ($25) Dollars, lawful money
of the United States, and if withic ninety
davs after the legal publication of this no
tice you fail or refuse to contribute your
proportion of said expenditure, and with
legal cost of this publication, the said
inTerest will become'the property of the
undersigned under Section 2324.
Edwin Surra.
Placerville, Idaho, Oct. 28, 1891

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