OCR Interpretation


Daily press and Dakotaian. [volume] (Yankton, Dakota Territory [S.D.]) 1875-1880, October 28, 1879, Image 2

Image and text provided by South Dakota State Historical Society – State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022144/1879-10-28/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

tbe fails
SS.5
IP
SJtt
W-
YANKTON
Tuesday
KIi.
t.
m.
3
k~
i-
The aucoess of Special Agent Adams ib
bis negotiations with the Ute Indians sug
gests tbe conclusion tbst a peace* will be
patched up without punishment to the red
Jtnuitferers who have been rioting on tbe
^frontier. of Colorado. The blood was hard'
If drjrwthe gaping wounds of tbe slaugh
tered Meeker Bnd Thornburg and their fol
lowers when tbe interior department began
its efforts to conciliate tbe foe. Merritt wss
ready with a well appointed force to move
lorward and bestow upon these Indians the
whipping they so richly deserved, and had
even begtu his operations when orders re
sent from Washington for the column ito
halt and await the action of tbe peace com
missioners—men sent out to implore the
murderers to cease their murdering snd
come back Into tbe government fold and be
fed snd clothed and forgiven. Within al
most striking distance of tbe enemy, com
petent to deal them out a lesson full of effi
cacy, Geoeral Merritt suspended operations
and from bis camp awaited tbe progress of
tbe humiliating farce. The secretary of the
interior is half. delirious with joy
over what he terms the success
of Adams' mission, and he bestows upon
that gentleman unstinted praise for his
..courage and ability in handling the business,
.An automaton could have performed the
work as ably and with the same result. The
Indians had struck their blow—had mur
dered and pillaged and rioted in barbarous
,jxcesses. They, knew that the cuBtomarr
peace propositions were to follow and they
•*ere ready to receive them. They opened
the way for Adams. He walked into their
inidst. A great show of tomfoolery was
exhibited which ended in expressions of
^filial love and willingness to be forgiven
great father. The opportunity to
chastise these people has been thrown away
and the nation stands in abject humiliation
before a handful of painted savages. How
P»®ch diflerent would have been tbe result
had the war department been left to itself
in the settlement of this affair. Merritt
t°uld have had the Utes at his feet by this
time and safety to the Colorado frontier
would have been assured through a peace
dictated at the muzzles of his rifles. Every
peace negotiated with western Indians after
Uie loving-kindness idea of the interior de
partment weakens the authority of the gov
ernment and brings increased dangers to the
people who Jive along the edges of the
great reservations.
The still hunters of the democn
a
nejithi
stTot mat tatty
political affection for Mr. Valentine, but
that they discover the opportunity to use
him in behalf of the more democratic inde
pendent, the^wdidate tediNtfeftfttoniey,
£wwx«dIxlstxtas|d"\\rl™,"republican
RtpaUlcui OUtrlct Ticket.
For District Attorney, Second Judicial District,
ROBERT J. GAMBLE,
08
Republican Ciastjr Ticket.
For County Cammissioner, 3d district—
aai«Msiwwf£roi
For Probate Judge—
%,r
For'Jutlces of tlie (ieace
E. C. WALTON, 1st district.
*OHiri^»«n«ttidtttHct.
For constables—
J. E. HARDIN, 1st district
THEODORE MOMWE, Btll district
Though the season is far advanced and
winter i* liable soon to come with its frefs
ing storms, there is yet no perceptible check
in the tide of Dakota immigration. Since
early spring moving caravansaries of white
•_ topped wagons have dotted the plaina of
'f. our incomparable territory, and through
the successive seasons of seed time, growth,
harvest and the aear and yellow leaf the
resistless march of settlement haa plodded
steadily onward to the golden homes of the
new west. Still the influx continue* and
we have no indications that it has weakened
in volume. The cold months of winter
will check the flow for a time, but the warm
aun of returning spring will infuse new
life and vigor into the movement. There
will be no decided halt until Dakota is fill-
... ... .1 without conditions.
ed with a productive clam of people and He then proceded to Gen. Mreritt's
this will not occur until many years have I camp on White river, where he
passed. There is yet land enough for mil-1
any
51V? the
hard headed, inflexible democrats of Yank
ton smUe with gracious favor upon a repub
lican independent there is a motive
the display of facial1 swe^ea whfolfrUj.
not to the good of the republican party
Mr. Valentine has become a candidate for
.o^Mty eomnussioner fa opposition to the
wish ef a majority of the republican con
Tendon. The democracy of Yankton coun
ty, with no hope of electing a candidate of
their swn Ibr joomm^ioner, have up
.vthe cavseof die republican' indepiniid&it, so
far as to pin him to the tail of Solomon
"Spink, the democratic independent, aild
they are going about urging won repnbli
thg *hUe thjj^aw'votlngfor Mi *r«l
entine they may as well throw in one kn
Spink, who is a smart man and isnlt mfafih
of a democrat this year (it being the off
Th« is thercombiaa^n
the defeat of republicanism at the polls next
Tuesday and It is a combination which
should not be permitted to jtaln strength In
a4W*^.-.V-
dp*'"uk,B*-t
1
But, hto
til that the f*rtj require* of It*
members. II asks ftttnthoaewhom It bu
*ln positions ofhoaor snd inist un
rviag flllir to tM: party s«d jjjilpalstes
thsy «ball hsvtrHo psrtin llstruclltn
coilitioni with the political enemy. Ae a
parly it haa a right to expect tbla allef lance
in return for ita united aupport during the
more difllcult contetti oi tbe past. The
unity oT'tUe republican party in Yankton
county is a condition attained br slcw pro
c^iidbyn.irwiW:eff^«i^wF«»oy
MtleHeiKr Tl*»y b«v«ipa*M through
bflierWggleto toiHsin'If end have made
numerous mutual conceaslona for the "pur-'
pose of joining together tbe several factl6ns
which once ^ted. Through Ufccondi
]o£juiJ|y$tiB party bai suc£en*d in es
tablbragitsiupremacy srid in Elding an
ever ready msjority against the advances of
democracy. At this time we do not deem
it politic.to abandon all the good work of
tbe past for the aake of a sectional griev
ance. We take this aland for the good of
the republican party. We believe that all
personal considerations should be ignored
and all affiliation with the democracy
promptly rebuked.
THE PEACEFUL UTES.
Thijr Surrender the Captive Women and
Children—A Fair Prospect that
Peace Will Be Patched Up
Washington, Oct. 25.'—Secretary Shurz
at late hour to-night read a dispatch from
Special Agent Adams, dated at Camp on
White river, October 28, via Rawlins 25.
He reports that be visited the camp of the
hostiles between Grand and Gunnison
rivers and that after holding a conference
with them the captive women and children
were delivered to him
on,."ie
,. .f ... .. I He informs the secretary that after con
lions more and tbe invitation to come is I ferr|Dg with Gen. tferritt,be will return
backed by the standing offer of free homes I to the camp of the hostiles and proceed
to all who will occupy our qtiarter sections I thenceto Chief Oorky's home at Los|Pinos,
and utilise the soil.
"'Rht of the 23d.
where he expects to arrive on the 30th Inst.
with a view of accomplishing tbe other
parposes of his mission, in which he hopes
to be equally successiul. He expresses
great hopefulness that further hostilities
may be wholly averted.
Gen. Adams also reports that after leav
ing the hostile country he met Indian run
ners who reported that their lookouts had a
fight on the 20th inst., with a hunting
party from Merritt's camp, brought about
accidentallv by the scouts firing on an In
dian, in which a scout named Hume, Lieut.
Wier and two other whites and two Indians
were killed. The Indians claim they were
posted at that place merely to observe the
movements of the troops that they did not
want to fight and did not fight until Hume
killed one of their number.
In this telegram reference is made to a
dispatch sent to tbe secretary from Plateau
creek, the 21et, announcing the rescue of
the captive women and children and pro
bably furnishing the details of the confer
ence, but that dispatch has not yet been
received.
From later information from Secretary
Schurz it now appears that all the captive
women and children were delivered to Spe
cial Agent Adams without condition. They
had all been well treated by the Indians.
Secretary Schurz, immediately upon receiv
ing the welcome intelligence* conveyed it to
the president and subsequently to General
Sherman, All of them are earnest in their
commendations of the intrepidity of Gen.
Adaau. Gen. Merritt will make" no further
movement before Special Agent A dams is
again heard from.
The dispatch received to-night was start
ed from White river yesterday morning.
Secretary Schurz is very earnest and enthu
siastic in his commendation of the intrepid
ity with which Gen. Adams went among
the hostiles to rescue the captives and the
evident skill and good judgment he has
displayed in the conduction of the whole
business with which be was entrusted.
FftOM INSPECTOR POLLOCK.
The following telegram was received this
evening by the commissioner of Indian
affairs:
Um Finos, Oct. 21.—To Commissioner
Hayt: Arrived her* at 2 p.m. Every
thing quiet at present. Have had a talk
with Ouray and two couriers just arrived
from the hoetile camp, fifteen miles this
side of Grand river, abbut half way between
here and White river agencv. Mrs. Meek
er, Miss Meeker, Mrs Price and her two
children are prisoners in Johnson's camp.
A courier met Gen. Adams last night, one
day's march from the hostile camp. Ouray
believes the prisoners will be delivered to
Adams.
At the Thornburg massacre twenty-three
Indians were killed and two, wounded.
After Thornburgh's fight with the Indians
knowing Merritt's approach, they made
preparations for a great battle, and were on
the eve. of. attacking when they, received
orders from Ouraj to c6tw fighting snd re*
lire which they obeyed. Will wait here
the return of Adams, when the Indians ex-1 irioe,
[Signed] Pollock, {aspectdfe
Rawlins, Wy., Oct. 27.—A courier jut in
witb dispatches from Geo« Merritt's camp
on White river, reports that Gen. Charles
Adams, United States peace commissioner,
mom
into Merritt'soamp ot :tlia morning of
the 24th with the Price ftonillii Tke cap
tiven wan unharmed and had Hot beensub
jected to any insult or iitfary. ^ii* Indiana
daalre peace and claim to baye been forced
into the outbreak. Tenia of surrender
have been forwarded to Waabington.
Scout P. Moon came into camp on the
Mth. He had been attacked by a dozen In
dians corralled all night, escaping With
difficulty. Tbacamplsanrroandad byaaMll
bands of Indians, who an running off bora
ea and lying in wait for strigglers. The
body of theChlefof tha scouts, Hume, waa
found Hy the cayalry pn the 28d and buried.
He had been killed at tha time Lieutenant
Weir fell. The body^f Lieut. Weir will ar
rive in RawMaa about the flrst of November.
Aflght Is reported aVthe old battle ground
on Milk creek between the Utes and ranch-
No particulars yet.
A pack train with supplies reached Mer
jitiscommmdpii the 23d. com&aad
mttCb ln ffeed of all klads of sup
fe ^°}ker talk will be held with tbi
.Watanf
Mr. VtfentlM. AJ aooanty
mluloner he hu been ^itbful and In
AP Ss^iikV.
pec*'to hold a great council, the result of. consideration the naturally revengeful spirit
which cannot be foreseen. of^the Atorigines, genecally. they were.
FHOH BAWL1SS. $
ttlfewaafeV ^J
A CARD.
2 P/~te£.
-ft.*1.1. from the errors
ana isdMcvctieBs of 'yontb,-herroos weak
nest early decay, loss of manhood, Ac., I
will send a recipe that will car* yan.F&EE
Or CHARGE/ This great reMd. «M
discovered by a missionary inSotfth Ameri
•a.' Send self addressed envelope io the
Rev. Josbph T. Inman,' Station D, Nrnt
York City.
v-\\i
•any scalps.
THE LAKE
A W*nd the llwi Mr
was la CsllaiMa C«««»jr.
-. Watertown Independent.
About twenty miles northwest of Water'
town on the north road to the Jim river, In
town 118, range 56, is situated a small lake
one and one-half miles in length by one in
width, which has connected with it a histo
ry. which I think la of sufficient interest to
dMLrve_pub]ication.
lie Indian fame of thisshett of water is.
Minne-choc-ha otte, which, translated .into.
*E£gIHh" reads the Lake-of-Many-Scalpa.
Its vicinity was formerly a hunting resort
of the aborigines, and to corroborate the
statement the prairie for miUs arouad .itis
literally strewn with the bonee of the bulla?,
Id and other ariimUs which have bften slain
by these dusky hunters.
The circumstances Which I hate to re
late happened about twenty years ago as
near as I can ascertain.
It was during the.fall of the year that
small band of Sioux Indians were encamp
ed upon the eastern shore of the lake. The
braves had -been very snocessftil in the
chase and their teepes were well filled with
veniion and buffalo meat.
Several weeks subsequent to this period
there had been a temporary peace establish
ed between the Sioux and Chippewas, who,
it appears from time to time met in deadly
conflict over some dispute or other misun
derstanding, and to make this peace more
bjnding a daughter of the Chippewas was
given in marriage to the son of a Sioux
chief, and the bridal twain, as it happened,
were among the band above spoken of en
camped at Lake Choc-ha-otte.
Now, it seems, that there was among the
Chippewas an Indian youth who had set
his heart upon the fair girl who had been
thus sacrificed as a peace token to the
Sioux, and when the object of his affection
was in this manner placed beyond his
reach thereby wrecking his fond anticipa
tion^ he became sullen and downcast, and
swore vengence on the "dog of a Sioux"
who had robbed him of his choice. Soon
after he disappeared and none knew of his
whereabouts.
Some time after his disappearance tha
young Sioux brave was one'dsy hunting
wild fowl on tbe western border of tbe lake
and becoming somewhst fatigued and thirs
ty he knelt down by Its side to get afresh
draught to allay bis thirst. While in this
position the dark form of the young Chip
pewa emerged from behind an adjacent
clump of bushes, and tomahawk in hand
glided stealthily up behind him and when
within convenient distance the tomahawk
was raised, an instant more and it decended
with terrible force into the skull of the de
fenseless Sioux, he uttered one piercing
death wsil snd sank lifeless st his murder
er's feet. This wss sufficient to alarm tbe
Indians on the opposite side of tbe Iske
who quickly rescbed tbe spot snd after see
ing the condition of their comrade mount!
their ponies and started in hot pursuit after
the perpetrator of the deed. As be wss not
mounted they were not long in overtaking
bim and be was soon brought into the vll—
age securely bound. He was csst into a
teepe and strongly guarded until a council
could be-held to decide his late.
Some were for burning him to tbe stske,
but this wss argued too good for him snd it
wss finally decided that be should die by
starvation.
So tbe trunk of a stout sapling was set
firmly in the ground upon a high coteau
near by and the prisoner led forth and bound
to this in a manner which dispelled all pos
sibilities of escape. In this horrible condi
tion be was left by his merciless tnrmenters
until life was extinct heeding not his piti
ful cries for food snd water, and to make
bis sgony.more unendurable tbey brought
huge pieces of savory buffalo meat and de
voured them before tbe eyes of their slowly
dying captive then placing tbe bones
around his form tbey would fiendishly
dance about and amuse themselves by prod
ding bis quivering flesh with tbe point of
their bunting knives, and to this dav can be
seen tbe same circle of bones, now bsdly'
dtcaved but still distinguishable.
When the Chippewas eventually-learned
the fate of their brother, ignorant of tbe
cavse, they naturally inferred that the
Sioux had broken faith, consequently they
prepared themselves for war, intent on re
venging the death of their young, and pro
bably, popular companion.
Journeying southward they arrived one
dark night at the village of the Sioux, who
were still encamped on the Lake of Many
Scalps.
They being unaware of the close proxim
ity of a foe were quietly sleeping in their
teepes,- and before they could awaken to a
full realization of their danger and make
preparations of defense, the revengeful Chip
pewas were upon them.
The Chippewas greatly outnumbered the
Sioux and their fiendish labor of slaughter
and bloodshed was soon dispatched.
It only remains to be said that tbe mas
sacre was complete. Men, women and
children alike shared the same horrible fate.
Their scalps were torn from their heads and
thsirmangled bodice were left upon the
prairies as food for wolves and other ani
mals.
No knowledge has been given whether or
not their lives were revenged or their bo
dies decently buried by others of their
tribe, bat suffice it to say, that, taking into
dui
sumce it to say, t.
From that day to the present time the
placeJShiA was this scene of this horrible
and steihefBig 'Sacrifice of human lives has
beea known as thi Lake of Many Scalps,
and well may it claim the title.
"Siah."
Nora: The author of this sketch re
ceived his information from the Indians
who formerly roamed over these beautiful
pnuriak unrestrained, and-who still cherish
with the fondest remembrances these old
legends connected with the lives of their
forefathers.
What is the use of gummimg it when Dr.
Dix, at his office in Sawyer's block is in
serting the Best Quality of artificial teeth
•X fifteen dolUrtptr ut, reports to the contra
ry notwithstanding.
Free Lunch every morning at Fred
Larclrt Brewery Hall, Third Stnet, between
Cedarand Broadway.
300 barrels choice apples and 50 barrels
Michigan Cider.
J. E. Brcce & Co.
J* if i"
If'yba want any Turkeys, Chickens,
Butter, Eggs or Oats, addraas
Suino & Stbattman,
St. Helena, Neb.
3*"'
TASK NOTICE.
Fresh Baltimore Oysters received every
parlors have Wen
BMived to a location one door north of Ed
mund's and Wvnn's bank.
AHNOimCINBHT.
To IhO Voton ot IMklrS
I have been argently requested by
large numl^ oftax^ayWs in this city, and
the county *tlaw, iojMfeqm^.* candidate
for re-election, and alter considering the
unfair manner in which the nomination
was conducted in the late republican coun
ty convention, I feel justified in doing so.
1 therefore announce myself as an indepeml
ant candidate for County Commissioner at
the coming election.
1
Respectfully,
W«L-B.-VaUotiu«.
Yankton, D. T., Oct. 11,187#.
11*
ft.U i-»n
ANNOUNCBflKNT. Vi
TJBI.TKVING TIIAT the District Attonleyshlp
ought to be unconnected'with politics, I on
er myself as an Independent candidate for that
poSHIon, promising that It "elected. I will per
form the duties ot the office according to the
best ot my skill and ability.
MIssMii*Elver TransptrUlira C*
1879. OLD RELIABLE 1879.
C0ULS0N INE
S. B. COOUON,
I.
MeVAY.
General Manager
Oon'l Freight Att
PLYING BETWEEN
Yankton and Fort Benton
and all points on the Yellowstone river.
The only Line carrying the
United States GoverMeat Freights
Comprising the following
FIRST CLASS STEAMERS,
built expressly for the Missouri river, and hi
charge of careful and experienced officers:
SUamtrt.
MONTANA
ROSE BUD
BIG HORN
DAKOTA
KEY WEST
JOSEPHINE...
FAR WEST
WESTERN
BLACK HILLS...
.........Maratta
r?\
niv
NOTICE.
Anybody who can give me Information
when I can find a double barrelled, breech
loading ahot gun, bore No. 10. which was
obtained from me under false pretences
Wednesdsy, October 15th, 1879, by one M.
Carson, will be suitably rewarded.
George Waonkr,
Gunsmith,
Mailers.
...Buesen
Todd
.............
Goui^D
...............Todd
Anderson
........... COULSON
Bkyan
.Burleigh
••••ooeeeooeeA
Connecting at
pi
BISMARCK for St. Paul and all points east.
FORT BENTON for all points in Montana
YANKTON with the Dakota Southern Railroad
for Sioux City,
in the east.
Chicago, St. Louis,
and all points
For information, rates, etc., apply at the Com
pany's office in First National Bank, Yankton
or at Bramble. Miner & Co.
GROCERIES.
Blatt & Buerdorf
Wholesale and Retail
DI4T.MI 111
STAPLE AND FANCY
O E I E S
BROADWAY,
YANKTON. DAKOTjL
MUSICAL ART SCHOOL
Cor. Doaglu Ave., and Ith St.
MBS. 8. L. WHITNEY Principal
Piano, Organ, Voeal and Harmony
lessons
oiyur.
Instrumental and Voeal, each, per quarter, *1*.
Harmony,.... ....... 920.
A quarter consists of ten weeks, two lessons
each week. Pupils desiring to take one lesson
each week can make arraBgemeuts to that
effect Fall term to commence Sept. ttd. No
deduction for absence except In caseaof pro
tracted illness. Those desiring to take lessons
will please commence promptly with opening of
term.
8. N. FOLYER,
-DKUIB IN—
WOOD and COAL
HARD AND SOFT WOOD.
Alio Sawed Unnwad Wood
OMee flntDssr Weet sf P*sU«m.
PBussma's
OooMSMf* skoAd lasM aaaa ssslaa
•aiSsismiswt*abehat
sar krsod
:s- j* .r
sr W
sv
&£&.*,-«.
a*
Van Cott, Clark A Co.
WATCHMAKEK8 AND JEWELEK8,
vankton
,,
8. 1a, 8a INK.
Dakota.
CLIMAX RESTAURANT
THIRD STRBBT,
YANKTON, DAKOTA.
J.
C.
A
McHAFFEE, Pr«|K
lint class restaurant supplying the best of
rerythlqe afforded in the market. Terms for
*y board, #5.00 per week.
id
at
evei
da
ileals furnished at all hours.
James Clark
1
MANUFACTURBR
FLOUR,
CORN HEAL,
-»u
DEALER IN
STAPLE and FANCY
GROCERIES,
FRUITS CONFECTIONERY
TOBACCO,
CIGARS, PIPES, &C.
Third St., Pewcrs & Dewey's Block
FLOUR AND FEED.
Incorporated lan'y I, 1875.
D. T. BKAMBLK, Prest. WM. MINRK, 8up.
K. L. VAN TAH8KL, Sec'y.
Excelsior Mill Co
BRAN,
8HORT8
And Dealers In all kinds of Feed. Casbpaldln
Wheat, Corn, Oats, &c.
Flour delivered in all parts of the city tree of
charge. Call and see us. Our flour speaks for
tseif. ......
rt
CAPITAL STRBBT,
Yankton Dakota
WINES AND LIQUORS.
THE OLDEST LIOUOR HOUSE
I1T THM NOBTHWtBTt
Adler & Ohlman
WHOLESALE
•!'i •'••I:
YANKTON, DAKOTA.
Keep constantly on hand the following btiuida
liquors:
MoBrayer*s, Taylor's, ^hawhan, Andsrsoa
County, Monoek and Castle Rock
Kentucky *WMskies!
—Also, Oar Favorite—
MIXiMB, ,u GOLD OPBUro,
BlaUX OBA8B, BOTO. *o., *o.
Which we are selling at very low prleee.
a^iui stock of
Imported Wines and Liquors.
Ae largest stock ot
I A S
•vav Mum to the Territory, ftlrtsnhsrr's
Key Watt a speelaltr. Bete agents for^
Scfilitz's Milwaukee Beer
By Us brsal
Xstelsss
aar q«aatl
ADLBR OHLMAN
"s4 -v* -w &*r
*«*£T* I 1
1t3«:i
Minn TO LOAN
IN SMALL AMOUNTS ON
SHORT TIMB.
WITH FIRST-CLASS SEOUR.
J. S. GRABLE.
AUCTION «Mfp(jqpMMlS.
r„..,
.iiiMi BRQKBH.
-e
NBARLir OPP. POSTOFFICB.
8IQNQF ten HAftmar.
YANKTON. D. T.
nkllt!
W. a. klcVAY. CASHUB.
Mid
STAPLE AND FANCY
GBOCERIES,
Crockery and Glassware
THIRD STRBBT,
iYJAUi?v.
YANKTON. ... DAKOTA
MEAT MARKET.
Family Market
Broadway, Yankton, D.T.,/
PATRICK BRENNAlii
vol
«i
?U!t)W
THE FIRST NATIONAL
Bank of Yankton
Cisaadsl Agaat of the United State*
Approved Depositary for Disbursing
f^} omeers.
JAMBS O. MoVAY, President
'V-c-Ti .rr
.^ratta and sold. OoUeetiens made
and promptly remitted for.
A N O N A N
EDMUNDS 4 WYNN. Bankers.
Yankton, D4kott
ooAosuran^L
Banking, CoUection 4 Loan Business
The same as National Banks,
Buy
sell exchange on the principal cities
of the Unlted States and Kurope. Special at
tlo paid to collections and remitted nr
Invariably on Day of Payment.
Will loan money/pay taxes and sell real estate
•i2£
n5S."rSfldS,,t8'
on
property on
favorable terms. Agents
Cgnipsnles, and Insure
term*
favorable.
GROCERIES.
O A E
NAUR
svmr
Freeh Heats,
BaltMeate,
st,i iTish and
Game
TO OBOBB.
A Full Use of Vegetshlee in Seaeoe
Always on hand.
SYLVESTER &BARBER
fuel Dealers,
Corner of Third and Malberrr Streets
LOWER YANKTON.
Orders Disced, on bur slate In the Auction store
of J. 8. Qrable will receive prompt attention
WOOD. COAL, COKE
ICB UWDCW
Delivered wherever requited In town.
BLANK B00K$!
UU,. Made to ordafe sod kept'in sMek.
LEDGERS, JOURNALS, DAY BOOKS
OOV1VTT UfjOOpa,
Or any style of Blank Beeord jBioph made to
order at the
PRESS & DAKOTAIAN OFFICE
NBWS BY TjBLBQRAPH
*rom the Daily Vine aad Dakotaian
U&i't
f: tti*+
li At,7. KUM OW
.i
n:i: 'jthi
STATIONERY
Pirn, OTECOPCS,
lsk,lftwlkfsi' Pstai) PmBold
rti
iaui
in
jQunivQ
umi
at tni
PRESS ARB IUNAIU •PPICK
Ksil'ia'

xml | txt