OCR Interpretation


The Cheyenne daily leader. [volume] (Cheyenne, Wyo.) 1870-1884, July 25, 1877, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of Wyoming Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022149/1877-07-25/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

Wxt Chfufiuic Dtttlu VHtabtt.
VOL. Z.
Steam Dyeing Factory,
Seventeenth Street, near City Hall.
F. BOUMARD,
Late of the most extensive steam dyeing es
tablishment of New Orleans, have Just open
ed out on Seventeenth street, near the City
Hall, where they will be glad to receive or
ders in the line of
Dyeing, Dressing, Cleaning and Reno
vating Silks , Satins ana Velvets.
Kid Oloves and Feathers Dyed and cleaned.
Gentlemen’s Clothing Dyed, Scoured and re
paired.
We guarantee all of our work to be flrst
class. G1 ve us a call. F. BOUMARD Sc CO.
June 27-d Sm.
A RICH STRIKE
“Money Makes the Mare Go."
FOR
First-Class Livery,
A Nobby Turnout,
GO TO THE
IXL STABLE
Terry & Hunter,
They have the Best
Carriages and Stock
IN CHEYENNE.
16th STREET,
Near OTLcDanlel’a Theatre,
Horses boarded at reasonable prices and
Satisfaction quarranteed.
L R. BRESNAHEN,
Washington
Market,
lOth STREET,
(Opposite First National Bank,)
Cheyenne, W • T.
Keeps on band Constantly all the Delica
cies of the Season.
Fresh Meat, Game-Fish,
Poultry, Fresh Oysters,
And all kinds of Vegetables.
Janl-dtf
Marks 1 Myers
Wholesale and Retail Dealers tn
STAPLE and FANCY
DRY
GOODS
CLOTHING'
Gent’s Furnishing Goods,
Hats and Caps.
Laities' and Gents' Boots ami Shoes,
Also a Flue Selection of
Ckmimeree, Velvets and Tailors'
Trimmings,
In act everything found In a flrit cla*» Dry
Uoode anil Clothing Store. We alio keep
constantly on hand large aasortmenti of
Ladies' and Bents' Alexandre Kid
GLOVES,
Shawls, Dress Goods, Cloaks.
OARPETS, OIL CLOTHS,
California Blankets, Valises,
Trunks, fyc.
We are also Agents for
LEW STRAUSS A CO’S
lu huduo Mi Dwil,
HUNTING COATS, &c
H. HAAS,
Dealer lu
Schuttler
Wagons,
The Rest in the World,
Also, Agent for the Celebrated
CHAMPION MOWING MACHINES
iVhich took the flint premium at the
Centennial Exposition.
And all kinds of
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS
Blacksmithing and repairing prompt
ly done, and all work warranted.
Corner of Eighteenth and Thornes Sts.,
Cheyenne, Wyo.
mch3-tf
Nealon 8c Hecht,
Blacksmiths and
Wagon-Makers,
Agents for the
Studebaker Wagon and
Buckeye Mower.
Constantly on hand a full assortment ot
first-class
BUGGIES, &c., &c.
IRON and HARD WOOD For Sale.
All kinds of
LIGHT WAGONS AND BUGGIES
Built to Order
All Work Done at the Shortest Notice,
fg- All Work Warranted J 9
Comer of 17th and Thornes Streets,
CHEYENNE, - - Wyoming.
in23-dti
WHO
IS TO BE YOUR GROCER FOR
1877 1 IF YOU CONTEMPLATE
A CHANGE, WE WILL DO OUR
UTMOST TO PLEASE YOU,
AND WILL GUARANTEE YOU
BETTER GOODS AND LOWER
PRICES THAN ANY OTHER
HOUSE IN THE WEST.
Whipple & Hay.
C. M. Stxbbiks, New York,
W. R. BTKBBINS, Cheyenne,
Q. J. Stebbins, Denver, Col.
M. E. Post, Cheyenne.
Bahukl N. Wood, Manager.
Late Ass’t Cashier Col. Nat’l Bank, Denver
Stebbins, Wood &. Post,
BANKERS.
Deadwood, - Dakota.
Do a General Banking Business.
Buy and sell Drafts on all parts of the United
States and Europe.
Transfer Money by Telegraph. Buy and sell
Gold Dust aud Bullion, and make
advances on same, and Ores
on shipment.
Safety Deposit Boxes,
In a large burglar-proof Safe, for rent, by the
day, week or month, to miners and
others for safe keeping of Dust
and valuables.
Collections made and promptly remitted.
mayls-dly.
QLD CITY GARDEN
23 Zl. XI W 3D H. Y,
CHRISTIAN KAPP, - * Proprietor
Office atC. Kapp’s Restaurant and Saloon
•n Eddy street. a2l-tf
CHEYENNE, WYOMING, WEDNESDAY MORNING, JULY 25. 1877.
The Daily Leader.
paper of the City, County, Ter
ritory and United State..
fg Advertisers will make note of the fact
that The Leader has a larger circula
tion than any paper published in Wyo
ming. JBt
The Tea Trade-
The tea trade here during the past
year, though not altogether favorable
to the jobbing interest, has demon
strated the fact that this article can
not only be purchased from the San
Francisco market at rates which defy
the closest competition of Eastern
cities but in lots that average much
higher in quality than those imported
by Eastern jobbers, via the Suez Canal.
The imports by this route are subject
to longer test and greater variety of
changes in climate than are the car
goes of teas, passing through more
equalized temperatures, to ttiis market.
Hence the latter receive their cargoes
in much better condition and lose less
of the strength and fragrance in teas
than Eastern cargo teas subjected to
greater changes in temperature in
curred by their means of importation.
THE COLORADO VOLCANO.
Dees It Resemble tile .Mysterious Wonder
in the Florida Wilderness?
Several telegrams from Los Angeles
have announced the breaking out of a
volcano in the Colorado desert, sixty
miles from this side of Fort Yuma and
eight miles north from the Southern
Pacific Railroad. It seems to have
started on the 11th instant, at 9 a. m.,
or at least it was then observed, and
according to later reports it lias since,
at various times, emitted black smoke,
and we are told that it has thrown out
rocks; but we suspect that the shaking
of the mountain side in which the rup
ture has occurred may have caused the
loose rocks to roll down. There is no
mention of any flame, lava or mud com
ing from the volcano, nor is it said
that there was any earthquake shock,
so the eruption is probably a one-horse
affair, out of which no serious excite
ment can be. Small as it may be,
however, it deserves more attention
than it has yet received. No person
has yet visited it or given a description
of its appearance as visible from the
railroad. In fact, there is room for
suspicion that it belongs to a class of
phenomena previously observed in that
region—we mean the mud volcauoes.
These are really swamps or muddy
pools through which hot steam rises
from subterranean sources, and it is
said that sometimes black smoke ac
companies the steam. These mud vol
canoes, however, are in the plain,
whereas the outbreak of the Uth in
stant is placed on the mountain side.
| Alta California.
The Russian Vanguard.
The Russian advanced guards crossed
the Danube in boats when they cap
tured Matcliin, hut afterward were
transported to the Turkish side of the
river in barges. These barges were pro
tected at the side by huge wooden bul
warks, built up to the height of a man,
with loopholes through them. These
bulwarks would ward off a bullet, but
in the Dobrudsclm, soon after the Rus
sian vanguard entered Matcliin, went
over to its assistance with ’2,000 more
soldiers. As soon as the inhabitants
saw the heavily-laden barges coming,
the London Daily News states, they
formed into a procession and came down
to the shore with banners, liolypictures
taken from the churches, and various
other religious emblems. They were
led by three priests and some other
church dignitaries in full canonical
robes, who met the Russian troops
chanting a hymn. General Zimmer
mann took off his cap and kissed the
little wooden cross that was presented
to him, while with a bunch of green
leaves they splashed any amount of holy
water over his head, and in fact almost
drenched him. Each of those who
followed were treated with the same
copious shower-bath, and as the day
was hot and all were in a terrible pers
piration, the ordeal was by no means an
unpleasant one. The people then
greeted the troops with loud hurrahs,
and marched after them, manifesting
the most extravagant joy, especially the
boys, whose delight was as unbounded
as it was troublesome. Nevertheless,
in spite of something that was grotesque
about it all, this reception of the con
querors by the conquered, of the
invaders by the invaded, had a profound
political significance which the Turcop
hiles, if there were any present, would
have done well to ponder. These people,
instead of looking upon the Russians
as enemies and conquerors and invaders
and oppressors, hailed them with delight
and satisfaction as their deliverers from
a degrading and terrible bondage.
A HERO’S DEATH.
The Pcacefnl Close of Stonewall Jackson's
Great Career.
The death of General Jackson was
characterized in its? singularity. At
night, when the battle bad ended, just
as he had achieved what he believed to
be the most successful movement of his
career, lie, whom the enemy began to
believe both invulnerable and invinci
ble, fell at the bauds of his own people.
It is needless to repeat the painful
story of his wounding and death. At
first it was not believed liis wounds
were mortal, and the army thought, in
the language of General Lee, “Jackson
will not—he cannot die.” But it was
written. Pneumonia lent its fearful
aid to the enemy, and on Sunday after
noon he closed his eyes and smiled at
his own spoken dream —“Let us cross
over the river and rest under tho shade
of the trees. ” The dream thus spoken
is yet unbroken; and his soul went out
to heaven, unlisted by sighs and pray
ers, rising that hour from altar and
cloister, all over the South, for his re
covery.
On Friday, the 15th of May, 1803,
his body was taken for burial to bis
home in Lexington. He had not been
there since he left it, two years before,
at the beginning of the war. Only
two years, and yet how like romance is
the simple story of his growth in fame.
And now he lies buried as he directed,
“in the Valley of Virginia,” and
among the people he loved so well. It
were better so. He could not have
saved the South, and it was merciful
that he should perish first. The ten
der memory he left behind him in
the army, and the stern sense of duty
he bequeathed his soldiers, will be told
by this little incident with which I close
this unworthy sketch. The army of
Lee was on its march to Gettysburg,
and the commanding general had given
strict orders for its discipline in Penn
sylvania. An officer riding to camp
from Chambersburg, late at night, was
halted by the outposts. Having neith
er pass nor countersign, in his dilemma
lie bethought him of an old pass in Ilia
pocket-book signed by General Jackson,
whose recent death hung like a cloud
over the army. He found it and handed
it witli confidence to the sentinel. The
trusty fellow managed to read it by the
light of a match, and as lie did so lie
seemed to linger and hesitate over the
signature. And then, as the light
went out, he handed it back, and look
ing up toward the stars beyond, lie
said, sadly and firmly, “Captain,
you can go to Heaven on that, paper,
but you can’t pass this post.”
M. Lamey, a French servant, lias
started a novel theory to account for
the abnormal rise of temperature in tiie
early part of November, known here as
the Indian Summer, and in Europe as
St. Martin’s Summer. Tho phenome
non appears to be general throughout
the northern hemisphere. M. Lamey
argues that it can hardly have its ori
gin either in the sun’s or the earth’s
atmosphere, and suggests that it may
be due to meteors, which to produce
first a sudden fall of temperature by
cutting off the sun’s rays, and then an
abnormal rise resulting from the reflec
tion of the sun’s heat by the meteor
swarm. The fact that the November
meteors usually occur about the time
of St. Martin's Summer, gives some
little plausibility to the theory, but it
is not clear that the meteors actually
pass between us and the sun in such a
way as to produce any sensible effect
upon temperature.
i
As a remedy for
Fevers, Dyspepsia, Headache
* Bowel Complaint, Jaundice,
Costiveness, Liver Com
' plaints and all Bilious Difficulties
Costiveness Cured,
The late well-known Father Taylor. |
Pastor of Seamen’s Bethel, Boston, ;
Said—“lt Is a remedy worthy of a place In ! :
every family, and that Its real virtues are only
to be known to be appreciated. We should
be very unwilling to be without it. It hus
relieved me of severe attacks of Bowel Gun
plaints, Dyspepsia and Oostiveness. I would
take it with me were I going to sea, and also
were I to travel.
A Duty to the Community.
From the well-known Evangelist, Rev.
Edwin Burnham.
Newburypoet, Mass.,
GEO. PIERCE & CO.—I regard it to boa
duty I owe to you and the community, to
write a few lines in fuvor of your invaluable
medicine, called “Dr. Price's Indian Re
storative Bitters.” Without flattery, I
remark. I think it to be the best medicine of ,
the kind ever gotten up.
EDWIN BURNHAM, j
A Family Medicine over;
30 Years.
Saved from Death.
From Henry Y. Davis.
New Bedford. Mass., March 3,1877.
Messrs. GEORGE PIERCE & CO.—Your
“Indian Restorative Bitters,” of which
I have always kept, a supply in my family for
the itast thirty years, has saved me hundreds oj
dollars, and I am very certain some of i!s mem
bers hare been saved from death, which would
probably have occurred with different treat
ment. Yours truly, HENRY V. DAVIS.
Sure Preventive against Disease
EVERY MIXER OUGHT TO HAVE
IT IX IIIS CAMP.
Elder John G. Hook, the well known
Evangelist, who with Rev. G. A. Eng
land, of this city, in the winter of
1874, carried on the first revival ever
had in Wyoming Territory, says:
Concord. N. H., March 16th, 1876.
GEO. PIERCE & CO.:—Have used your “In
dian Restorative Bitters” for more than
tiventy years, and can testify personally to Its
value as a medicine. I never allow my fum
llytobe without a bottle in the house, and
Invariably carry It with me in my valise on
my Journeys.
My experience derived from its long use Is
as follows:
It is a blood purifier,— is certain to break up
a fever", will cure and regulate a disordered
stomach, and remove headache.
Will cure costiveness and liver complaint.
It Is excellent for dyspepsia or indigestion,
by taking a swallow after eating.
Let those who Are troubled in this way give
it a trial; they will And it a sure remedy in
such cases.
After indulging in a hearty boiled dinner
and suffering from an overloaded stomach, the
Bitters never fall to give relief. I know it
lias saved myself and family from serious
sickness many times.
Always used it for children’s complaints.
Know of no other medicine as good and reli
able.
I regard the “Bitters” as a remedy that
ought to be in every house in the land.
Y’ours Truly, JOHN G. HOOK.
GEO. PIERCE & CO.,
SOT.E PROPRIETORS,
Box 2637. Boston, Mass.
FOR SALE BY
HURLBUT BROS.,
Wholesale and Retail Druggists, Cheyenne.
81.00 TER BOTTLE.
Jel2deodawly
OLD PAPERS
Id Packages of 100
At 75 Cents Per Package
For sale at this office.
Hannafin & Ryan,
Wholesale ami Retail Dealers In
Wines, Liquors
AND CIGARS,
Ferguson Street, (two doors south of
Stebbins, Post & Co.’s Bank,
CHEYENNE, WYOMING.
A good supply of choice Liquors,
Cigars, Bottled Ale and Porter, con
stantly kept on band. sG-tf
1869. 1877.
E. P. S N O W,
Fire Insurance
AGENCY,
ASSETS.
iEtna Ins. Co. of Hartford. 87,037,000.00
Ins. Co. of Nortli America 0,001,880.00
Home Ins. Co. of N. Y... 0,104,650.00
Phenix Ins. Co. of N. Y.. 2,792,000.00
German American Ins. Co. 2,209,036.00
Pennsylvania Fire Ins. Co. 1,675,694.00
Western Assurance Co 2,000,000.00
Rhode Island Association. 1,002,000.00
Springfield F. M. Ins. Co.. 1,500,000.00
Amazonlns. Co 1,435,162.00
St. Paul F. M. Ins. C 0... 930,203.00
Manhattan Ins. Co. of N. Y. 850,658.00
Trader’s Ins. Co 850,000.00
Fireman’s Fund Insurance
Co., (gold) 703,621.00
American Central Ins. Co. 744,500.00
Total 837,102,404.00
Full Lines of Reliable Eastern and
Western Companies.
t&r Losses Paid Promptly.-®*
E. P. SNOW, - - Agent
| orr.cE }°^ O , “SUS , i'» B SS£!S“
raß-dte
,
Wyoming Armory.
Freund Bros.,
i Have always for Rale a large assortment of
Sharps, Winchester
And all the latest
Sporting and Military Arms, Ammunition, Etc-
Colt's and Smith & Wesson’s Pistols,
And everything in that line
At the lowest Living Prices.
J. T. O’Connor,
! Carpenter
And
Builder,
Corner Doth and Thornes Streets.,
< ifioiiMuian’N Old Lumber Ysrdt)
Cheyenne, - Wyoming .
J. K. MOORE,
General Store,
Camp Brown, Wyo. Territory,
(With a branch at Lander City)
Carries the most complete stock of
goods, in every line, north of the rail
road.
Special attention will be given during
the season to the wants of
Miners for the Big Horn,
Who will find everything
Required for a Prospecting Tour,
And at
Satisfactory Prices.
Ctn'iip Brown is the Nearest Point to
The Big Horn Country.
Will Sell to Correspond with Prices
on the Railroad.
ap29*d<ftwtf
Denver Pacific & Kansas
Pacific Railways.
i Tho line to Greeley, Evans, Boulder
; Denver, Idaho Springs, Georgetown,
Central City, Topeka, Lawrence,
Kansas City and Leavenworth.
! THRO UGH TICKETS AND BAGGAGES* i
! CHECKS TO PRINCIPAL CITIES.
I Pullman Palace Para Ran Dally from
Denver to Kanaas City.
! T. F. OAKES, D. E. CORNELL,
Genl Supt. Clan. Paas’r. Agent,
-tr Kansas City
Cheyenne
" And
Black Hills
stage co.
Coaches Leaving Every Day.
; WE ARE RUNNING
SIX-HORSE COACHES
TIIROUGII TO
DEADWOOD!
Via CUSTER,
BATTLE CREEK,
RAPID, GOLDEN,
GAYVILLE,
AND ALL MINING CAMPS IN THE HILLS.
The U. S. mail carried free. We have
first-class eating stations, and the
division agents take all pains to secure
the comfort of passengers. The route
is well protected, having three military
posts on the road, leaving only 45 miles
between military camps, insuring safety
over the entire route.
J. T. GILMER. M. T. PATRICK,
M. SALISBURY', L. VOORIIEF.S.
(marl-dawtr
SWEETWATER
Daily Stage Line.
Coaches leave Daily from
Green River to the Big
Horn Country,
Via South Pass,
Atlantic City,
Camp Stambaugh,
Miners’ Delight,
Red Canyon Mines,
Lander City,
and Camp Brown.
Nearest, Safest and Sett Route to the Hills.
S. S. Huntly & Co-
A. E. BRADBURY', Sup’t
mayls-d&\vtf
KINGSFORD’S
Oswego Pure And
Silver Gloss
STARCH
For the
L A U N DRY,
Manufactured by
T. Kingsford &. Son,
Has become a Household necessity. Its
great excellence has merited the commenda
tion of Europe for American manufacture.
Kingsford’s Pulverized
CORN STARCH.
Freparoi by T. KINOSFORD Ic SON,
Expressly for Food,
YVlien It is properly made into Puddings,
is a Desert of great excellence.
CFor sale by all first class Grocers.
may27-d6m
Geo. Cassells & Go.
Would Respectfully Announce that they
have now on hand a full line of
FIRST CLASS
Cooking Stoves
Tin Roofing and Guttering a Specialty.
Fergußon Street,
NO. 264.
PROFESSIONAL
D. MT. A UGH LIN. W. R. STEELE.
MTaUGHLIN A STEELE.
A TTORNE YS-A T-LA W.
Office in Carey Block,
CHEY'ENNE, YVYOMING.
j yßda wtf
W. CORLETT,
A TTORNE Y-A T-LA W,
Office—ln Corlett & Joslin’s Block,
16th street.
CHEY'ENNE, - - - WYO.
E. P. Johnson, U. S. attorney. C. N. PornMt
JOHNSON 4 POTTER,
AITORNE YS-A T-LA W.
Office in the Carey Block,
CHEY'ENNE, - - Wyoming.
J W. KINGMAN,
Late Associate Justice of the Supreme Court
A TTORNE Y-A T-LA W.
OFFICEB AT
Cheyenne and Laramie City.
JJ OARBAN ATI,
Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law.
Will practice in all the Courts of the Territory
EVANSTON, - - Wyo. Ter.
B. JOSEPH, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
OFFICE over the Post Office,
uoy27-tf CHEYENNE, W.T.
J. B.BOWJIAN. O. K. GORHAM.
Bowman & gorham.
Homcepathic Physicians and Surgeons.
OFFICE AND RESIDENCE Ferguson
Street, opposite Stebbins, Post & Co.’s Bank,
up stairs.
CHEYENNE, - - - Wyo.
octZMf
yyiLLIAM MILLS, JR.,
Counsellor-at-Law and Notary Public,
Room 6g, Metropolitan Block,
N. W. eor. Randolph and LaSalle Sts.,
CHICAGO.
ap6-dlm
jyTt. J, J. CROOK and DR. W. W. CROOK,
Physicians and Surgeons,
Office In
CAREY’S BLOCK, - ROOM 26.
CHEYENNE. W.T.
apl7- f
BOCK,
VETERINARY SURGEON,
FIFTH IT. 8. CAVALRY,
Jyll-d3m Fort D. A. RUSSELL.
Deuve orders at lUirlbut s Drug Store.
First National
BANK
OF
Cheyenne!
0
Authorized Capital, - - 8500,000
Paid Up Capital Stock, - - 75,000
o
DIRECTORS:
A. It. CONVERSE, F. E. WARREN,
T. M. FULTON,
J. H. NICHOLS, J. E. WILD.
o
TRANSACTS A
GENERAL BANKING B USINEBS
BUYS AND SELLS
Exchange, Com, and Gold Dust,
Government Vouchers,
Land Warrants, Etc., Etc.
o
COLLECTIONS MADE AT ALL
POINTS, WITH PROMPT
RETURNS.
•3T Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
A, R. CONVERSE,
PrtsideiU.
JOHN E. WILD,
Cashier.

xml | txt