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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, April 06, 1909, Image 5

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THE FARMER: APRIL 6, 1909.
Men's Section.
EASTER HATS FOR MEN
The one article of attire absolutely necessary
for Easter is a new Hat. If you haven't bought
yours yet, you should see the splendid collection
of the new and correct styles in our Hat Depart
ment. The new Derbies beauties in shape, with
jaunty brims in a variety of proportions black
and tans predominate. The best hats America
produces for the money at $2, $3, $4 and $5.
Soft Hats a regular color exhibit of the new
colors and combinations all the new spunky
shapes are here priced at $2 and $3. Stetson's
up to $5.
A big range of boys' and children's beadwear, including many
novelties for little folks.
Everything else men and boys wear, down to and including
good shoes.
We have a small quantity of souvenirs left, whicli will bo
All rights reserved by Meigs & Co. given out with purchases of $5 or over, while they last.
Midi
INCORPORATED
OUTFITTERS TO MEN WOMEN K CHILDREN
BRIDGEPORT, CONN.
NEW COMPANY WILL
AID THE SMALL
OYSTERCATCBERS
New York Capitalists Associated With
Connecticut Owner of Grounds Will
Furnish Coitinnss fiarket Here.
The natural oyster growthers will be
jiad to learn that another firm will
be in the nutrket for the purchase of
aeea oysters In this vicinity in the near
future. H W. Porter of Stratford;
ha formed on alliance with prominent
New York oystermen aao the result
will be a continuous market through
out the year fbr seed -taken on the
aatanl toed in this vicinity. The new
firm muumlmtm of A. F. Merrell of New
York, president of the National Oys
ter drawers' Association; A. T. Bay
lees of Oyster Bay. capitalist and a
stockholder In much valuable oyster
ground ha New York State, with Mr.
Porter who will be the Connecticut
repraeentaitive of the Ann and will do
ail the buying here. Mr. Porter has
a large section, of ground in the State.
Be owns 880 acres near the break
waiter In Stratford) and patches in
other parts of the Sound in this vicin
ity. The Connecticut grounds will be
used oasBiusively for storage. The
new company proposes to furnish a
continuous market throughout the year
for seed oysters.
Natural growth era who have been
unable to sell seed when the market
was slack will now be able to sell at
any time when the law allows the tak
ing of seed on the natural beds. The
company will control hundreds of
lieu m New York State where the
seed bought in this State will be trans
planted for development. The new
company wiH differ from those now in
existence here in that they will be de
pendent entirely upon the natural
growthers for their supply.
Mr. Porter, the Connecticut represen
tative of the company, is a well known
oyster man. Be owns a large extent
of good! oyster ground which he will
turn into the general fund of the com
pany. The oystermen working on the
Bridgeport bed have in years past lost
about as much as they have made be
cause they could not find a market for
their catch at times. In warm weath
er small set cannot live long out of
water. In very cold weather it
freezses on deck and is lost because
there are no buyers who are situated
so that they can put it immediately in
to the water. The new firm proposes
to take all the seed offered at any time
-in the year and pay a reasonable price
therefor.
LAYS DOWN THE LAW
Judges Charge to Grand Jury Anent
Reckless Auto Speeding.
New York, April 6. Judge Swann in
his charge to the April Grand Jurors
in General Sessions yesterday express
ed his opinion of automobile speeding,
which he called- "a. new method of
committing old crhnes." He said:
"Within the last month many crimes
have been committed by men possess
ed of the speed mania. They run down
women and children on our streets.
Women andl children and the infirm
and aged are entitled to the use of the
streets as much as the strong. No
man has an exclusive right to the
streets. EJven. the man who devotes
his time to speeding this modern en
gine has no more right to the public
street than the weak and infirm.
"Men who do these acts recklessly
and without regard! to the rights of
others, and who either malm or kill,
are guilty of either manslaughter or
other grades of crime, and it seems to
me that it would be a proper and fit
ting thing that, if such a case comes
before you, you should not hesitate to
indict if the evidence warrants R; and
that you should not hesitate to indict
for the crime of manslaughter if you
think that that crime has 'been com
mitted. "It is further provided by section 29
of the penal laws that a man who aids
and abets in the commission of crime
is equally guilty with the man who
commits the crime. The owner of an
automobile will sometimes take delib
erately a chauffeur who has been
known, to be reckless in his driving.
The minute that the owner of the au
tomobile puts such a chauffeur upon
his machine in the public streets the
law presumes that the owner knows
the ordinary act that the chauffeur is
going- to commit. A man is presumed
to intend the ordinary and usual re
sults of his own acts, and the owner
who puts a reckless chauffeur in an
automobile and' sends him through the
streets could be properly found by you
to be equally guilty with the chauffeur
of the crime, whatever it may be, that
may reasonably be expected to be com
mitted by that chauffeur."
IS "AWFDLLY TIRED"
Representative Clark of Florida Tired of
Following Mr. Bryan.
Washington, April 6. In the House
yesterday, Mr. Clark (Derru, Fla.,)
said :
"We do not intend, so far as I am
concerned and the people I represent,
to follow your Nebraskan Populist ic
leader any more. I think the South
ern Democracy never made a greater
mistake in its life than when it turned
its back on its Democratic friends in
the Bast, whom it has driven from the
party, and tied up with Populism out
In Nebraska. I am just a plain, old
fashioned Democrat, and when you all
get back there you will be better off.
I have followed him (Bryan) three
times, and I am awfully tired."
CIVIL WAR VETERAN
SILLS FARM BAND
New Canaan, April 6. Defending
himself, last night, against the attacks
of Wallace Spencer, a discharged farm
hand, William Lynes crushed Spen
cer's skull with a pitchfork, killing
him instantly. Lynes, who is a vet
eran of the Civil War, gave himself up
and is 'being held pending the coroner's
Inquest. Spencer was 41 years old and
had no relatives.
WHIST, PINOCHLE, '45'
Diversions at Entertainment of St
Charles' Parish.
The grand whist, pinochle tourna
ment and old fashioned forty-five
game, to be given by the ladles of St.
Charles' parish. Tuesday evening, April
13, in St. Charles' hall, is rapidly tak
ing active hold of public interest and
patrons of these pleasant games are
advised by the committee in view of
the large crowds usually attending
that tickets ought to be purchased be
forehand in order to be guaranteed a
chance to play whist, pinochle or forty
five. A. large array of fine prizes is as
sured. Fifty orizes will be awarded
the whist winners. 25 to the pinochle
and 20 to the . forty-five game. Many
parishioners have been invited to give
a prize to this event and the generous
donors are requested to send in their
cards with the offering, not later than
Monday night.
Twelve sections will be reserved for
800 whist players this department of
the event being in charge of the fol
lowing ladies: Mesdames. Swan, Hotz
Chrlnger. Turbert, Burke. Denny
Flynn. Judge, Lavery, Morin and the
Misses Russell. McKee and McCarthy.
The pinochle will be under the direc
tion of Mrs. Burns and an efficient
corps of assistants. Mrs. Fulton will
conduct the forty-five game.
Street Car Breaks
Away;
Two Killed
(Special from United Press.)
Pittsburg, April 6. Two boys were
killed and seven others were badly
hurt here early to-day in an accident
on the South Twenty-Second street In
cline. The dead are: Arthur Miller, 16
and Albert Klinger, 16. When the car
was nearly half way to the top of the
incline there was a sudden Jerk, then
the cable parted and the car with its
load of passengers, shot downward.
A tew seconds later there was a
terrific crash as the Incline car dash
ed through the gates at the bottom.
The injured were hurried to a hospital
where it is said all will recover.
"DRY" TOWNS
VOTE "WET"
Lenox, Mass., April 6. The hund-reda
of summer residents who annually
flock to the Bericshires will find more
liquor saloons doing business during
the coming summer than has been
possible in past years. Yesterday
West Stockbriige. Lee and Hinsdale,
which have heen "dry", voted to li
cense the sole of liquor.
Great Barrington. Sheffield and Dal
ton recently declared in favor of license.
Old School Actress Dies
Boston, April 6. Mrs. Martha A.
Brizse, who was an actress in some of
the most renowned companies which
ever played on the American stage, is
dead here to-day, aged 78. Under the
name of Martha A. Pennoyer she play
ed with Edwin Booth, Julia Marlowe
and Roland Reed. At one time she
was a member of the famous Boston
Theatre Stock Company. Mrs. Brizse
was born at 'St. Louis, Mo., and went
on the stage early in life. She was
three times married. She retired from
the stage 18 years ago.
Do Children (Need Alcohol ?
Ask your doctor how often be prescribes an alcoholic stimulant
for children. He will probably say. "Very, very rarely.' Ask
him how often he prescribes a tonic for them. He will probably
answer, "Vsty, very frequently." Then ask him about Ayer's
nmurnnniip masnariifa as a tnnir tnr tha usmmx y j.
" nr-TimSammmomsissjr' r ""fv tv.
In Two Stores ttoran's
Have Easter Flower Show
NTE7VHR HAS! A S BASON" PRODUCED
FINER BLOOM OR MORE
FOLIAGE.
Easter is the time of the flowers and
the florists -begin months ahead to pre
pare for the demand which always
comes at this season. James Horan
& Son, who have catered to the people
of this city for many years, are mak
ing more than ordinary preparations
this year. The spacious green houses
at 1941 Fairfield avenue are filled to
overflowing- with an unusually large
assortment and) the blossoms are ex
traordinarily fine. The big store at
the corner of Broad and State streets,
owned by the Village Store Company,
has been secured for the Easter dis
play. Banks of Easter lilies, hya
cinths, daffodils, spiris, tulips, roses;
palms and other flowering and foliage
Dlants AJ-A innlavail Tha ,1 .......
also contain an artistic display.
Aimaugn usster lilies are scarce this
spring they are unusually fine in qual
ity. All of the other plants which go
to make this brilliant display are
worthy of more than passing notice.
No one passes the store who does not
stop to take a look at the windows,
or perhaps enter to gather some of the
fragrance which permeates the whole
vicinity. The Main street store at
Bank street is also well filled with
stock.
OYSTERMEN MEET
Association Organized and
Officers Elected.
A meeting was held in New York on
Saturday, and an association formed
which is doing very important work
for the oyster industry. The member
ship of this association includes many
of the leading oyster shippers of New
York and New England. It is intend
ed to work in harmony with all other
organizations of oyster shippers and
dealers, but its special work is to rem
edy the effect of a vast quantity of
misleading advertisements which have
been circulated throughout the coun
try, in which it has been attempted to
compel the use of a patent oyster
package for shipment, by slanderous
statements against other kinds of
packages
The association of New .York and
New England Oyster Shippers have
voted to distribute throughout the
country 32,000 circulars
On Saturday the association voted' a
permanent organization and elected the
following officers:
Henry C. Rowe of New Haven, pres
ident. Oeorge M. Still of New York, vice
preside nt.
Henry C. Elsworth of New York,
treasurer.
Eugene D. McCarthy of New York,
secretary.
At the meeting was exhibited a large
number of oyster carriers and display
cases, which were furnished by the
different manufacturers for the con
sideration of the members present.
Other steps to promote the general
welfare of the industry were consider
ed, and it Is believed that the work of
the association will result in much
benefit to all engaged in the business.
The necessary funds for the prosecu
tion of the work were raised by sub
scription at the meeting.
Pardon SoDght For
Race Law Tester
(Special from United Press.
New Orleans, April 6. Lyls, Sheffield
and Friegerio, turfmen who made a
test of the anti-racetrack betting law
and were sentenced to prison, may be
pardoned. A petition Is In circulation
to-day asking pardon on the ground
that the men offered themselves up as
victims to test the law.
License Fight is On in Hartford
(Special from United Press.1)
Hartford, April 6. The battle which
has been waged for some time between
the "wet" and "dry" factions of this
city will culminate to-day when the
citizens will decide their preference by
the ballot. The annual election of of
ficers, which is also being held, has at
tracted comparatively little attention
and the principal question discusssed
is "License" or "No-license."
An exceptionally large vote is being
polled.
Sportsman Claims Heavy
Damages For Injuries
iSpecial from United Press.)
San Francisco, April 6. Walter S.
Hebard. sportsman and prominent
clubman, is to-day defendant in a dam
age suit filed against him by Frank J.
Kaiser who was struck by Hebard's
automobile on April 7, 1908. Kaiser
demands $26,758.
"Buff" tioes West
(Special from United Press.)
Cincinnati, April 6. "Buff" Bhman,
one of the pitching string taken south
by the Red Sox management, will
leave to-day for Sacramento to Join
the club of that city. The transfer
was made last "L"ht.
The D. M. Read Co.
Established 185J.
P. N. Special Corset Sale.
Tomorrow morning we shall place on sale a P. N.
Special Corset at a price, which will be well worth
considering. The corset is made after a $2.00 model,
in the up to date shape, new long back with hose sup
porters front and sides. In sizes 18 to 30 inclusive.
See. the display in a Main street window.
The price of this Corset for the sale will be $1.00.
Gloves for Easter
Have just received a new shipment of Kid Gloves
for Easter, among which is a special in Tans, Grays
and Modes with embroidered backs, and a black glove
white embroidered.
Also a complete assortment of the Trefousse gloves
in all colors at $1.50 a pair.
Chamois gloves for women and children in natural
colors and white, a suitable glove for street wear as
they will wash nicely. Ladies' gloves $1.00 and $1.50,
children's at $1.00.
Floor Wax
This is the best finish for hard wood floors, as it will
not scratch like varnish, and is not soft or sticky, yet
is transparent preserving the natural color, leaving
the beautv of the wood visible. Easily applied. We
carry the three most popular makes, "Old English,
"Johnson's" and "Butcher's.77 Prices from 45c lb. up
In one and two pound cans.
The "Busy Bee" Washing Compound enables
clothes to be washed without rubbing. Does not in
jure the material, as it contains no acid, and is per
fectly harmless to the hands. For fine shirt waists,
lace curtains and other articles you do not want rub
bed threadbare on a board, it has no equal. 10 cents a
cake. Housefurnishing department.
Remember the sale of Smyrna Rugs at $1.95, regu
lar price $2.25.
The D. M. Read Co.
1072 Main St. DEPARTMENT STORE, 89 Fairfield At.
"THE STORE TO FIND SCARCE ARTICLES"
COUPON GOOD
Wednesday, April 7
Men's Black Mercerised
Lisle Thread Socks
Seconds of our 25c goods
With Coupon
- 12c
HALF PRICE FOR THESE
SPLENDID
STOCKINGS
MEANS TWO PAIRS FOR
TWENTY-FIVE CENTS
INSTEAD OF ONE.
FAMILY WASH BO CENTS
Bridgeport Wet Wash Laundry Co., v
145 LINEN AV. Tel. 2375. Branch, 470 BKOOHXAWN AT. Tel. 1043-9
H IB tf
Mastrolanni, Prop.
OPEN EVENINGS THIS WEEK
Women's Easter
and
Choose from over 300
Sample Suits handsome
Spring models every one
a masterpiece of the tail
or's craft and these
Prices will attract Easter
buyers.
$12.90, $15, $18, $25 up to
$45
Beautiful Silks Satins
and Messalines in the new
styles and shades.
$8.90 to $25
Every woman can easily
find a Hat to her liking
from our complete display
$2.98 to $35
A broad showing of
Misses' and Children's
Coats and Hats for Easter
wear.
$1.50 to $5
We Loan Money
To Housekeepers
$10 and Upwards
If you are interested we will be glad to tell you all about It
without charge. The average person does not realize what a
benefit an institution of this kind really is. Suppose you have
four or five petty bills which r,n Ml ft
you are trying to pay. It wr"e m BMOe J
takes all you can make to xm fit sfl tf 9 Y1 I A98I
t-av them and keep vour sVIUCl Itdll XjUrfUg
credit good, each one wants something each week
and by paying them it keeps you continually short.
Would it not be a great deal nicer if you came to
ns ana obtained enougn ready casn to pay tnem ail
up and not have them dragging on yon for so long
a timer Loorieoas ana oonging employees.
32
ML 000.000)
ASSOCIATION,
Over Evening Farmer,
29 Fairfield Ave..
BRIDGEPORT. - CONN.
STATE STREET PRICES
MAKE SHOPPING ON MAIN STREET AN EX
TRAVAGANCE BUY WHERE MONEY GOES
FAR BUY FROM GREAT STOCKS
Quality, Design, Durability and Satisfactory Price
enter into every piece of Furniture, Rug, Lace Cur
tains, Couch Covers, etc. Don't be misled. Com
pare our prices with those elsewhere.
THE NEW GO-CARTS ARE IN NOW
Hundreds of beautiful Parlor Rockers and Chairs
have been placed on sale the last few days. We
furnish the Prettiest Home.
N. BUCKINGHAM & CO., Inc.
Est. 1842 , 177 STATE STREET
THE PEOPLE'S DAIRY
28c mm "tr rar md je mm 28c
TELEPHONE 589 130 STATE ST.
GEO. A. ROBERTSON
11
AND
In all Its branches by practical workmen who thoroughly understand their
business and with the best lead, oil, turpentine and other painting materials
you can feel perfectly sure of getting what you want a first class Job one
that will last, cost a trifle more, but lasts so much longer that It to not only
cheaper in the end but you have bad the pleasure of seeing your work done
as It should be. Call us on the 'phone or write for estimates.
We have a beautiful line of new wan papers to select from, the largest
assortment in the city; also sample books of same, the best and latest idea
in wall decorations.
THE JOSEPH P. COUGHLIN CO.
Practical Painters and Decorators' Manufacturers of Picture Frames
THONK 11B1-3 777-783 f.ASl' MAIM SITtKKT
CIGARS'
Fine Job
At
Printing
This Office
THAT SATISFY
In Quality and Priea
No matter what you pay for cigars at D. D. Smith's
you are certain of getting greater value than else
where. Goods are always fresh, as stock is moved
quickly. Biggest line in the city and prices the most
reasonable. Box trade a specialty.
Fine line of Pipes, Cigar Solders, Tobaccos in Tins and all Smoker
Accesoriea.
D. D. SMITH,
Opp Poli's Theatre,
Fairfield Avenue
FINE Wines and Liquors
BRIDGEPORT DISTRIBUTING CO.,
102 STATE STREET, NEAR PUBLIC MARKET
California Port or Sherry, 75 cents per gallon.
Port, Sherry, Tokay, Muscatel, Rhine Wine, etc.
Full quart Sherwood Rye Whiskey, $1.00.
Cooking Brandy, Liquors, Cordials, Ale and
Free Delivery. Telephone 264-3
WHERE TO GO
THIS SUMMER
Not a bit too early for yon to begin casting about for a place to
go this summer. Summer's not so very far away.
You'll get the pick of the cottages the most desirable rooms St
the hotel or boarding cottage you look about now.
Cape Cod's to be the vogue this summer. Yon really ought to
know about it.
Then there's Buzzard's Bay; there's Marthas Vineyard and Nan
tucket; there's Narragansett; there's Newport; there's Watch HIM and
there's the beautiful shore line of Connecticut.
No other summering places can offer you greater or more varied
attractions.
For information as to routes, train service, etc., write
A. B. SMITH, General Passenger Agent, New Haven,
Conn.
NEW YORK, NEW HAVEN & HARTFORD RAILROAD
LOS ANGELES
NEXT SUMMER
With the B. P. 0. E
LOW RATES VIA
UNION PACIFIC
Unequalled Service, Finest Equipment, Fast Time
THREE DAYS FROM CHICAGO
FOUR DAYS FROM NEW ENGLAND
For advertising matter, information, etc., address
W. MASSKY. N. E. F. & P. A.,
176. Washington St.,
H 17 "tf Boston,
Want Ads. Cent a Word.

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