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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, May 14, 1910, Image 6

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THE FARMER: MAY 14, 1910
THE EVENING FARMER
Published at 27 Fairfield Avenue,
Bridgeport. Conn.
THE FARMER PUBLISHING CO.
Entered in the Postoffice at Bridge
port, Conn., as second elass
matter.
ISSUED DAILY EXCEPT SUNDAY,
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
DAILY EDITION:
One year $3.00
One Month 3
One Week 06
.VEEKLY EDITION:
One Year in Adavnee. . . .$1.00
SATURDAY. MAY 14, 1910.
Addition of another month's returns
to the Connecticut total from the cor
porate income tax makes this State's
contribution $956,081. and another
month's returns are yet to come. The
total will probably reach $1,000,000, or
about l-26th of the whole country's
contribution.
Xew Jersey's Governor has found a
means whereby the heads of the Beef
Trust may evade trial in that State.
They have not. he says, "fled from
justice in New Jersey.'' This brings
The prosecution of the Beef Trust mag
nates in that State practically to a
standstill. They seem to find protec
tors wherever menaced.
Massachusetts now has a laAV pro
viding for the use of "such other
power, alone or In combination, as the
Railroad Commissioners may approve."
It is said to be intended to permit the
use of gasoHne cars on steam roads.
There is believed to be a possibility
that eventually gasoline will displace
both eteam and electricity oil roads of
short distance and frequent stops.
Speculation in land has. according to
Charles F. Steare in MdWy's Magazine,
increased from 100 to 1,000 per cent,
land values in some sections and is
driving thousands of American farm
ers to Canada, He says:
Acreage that was unsalable ten or
twelve years ago at $2 an acre is now
commanding $10 to $15. and improved
larm land has gone from $50 and $100
an acre to $200 and $350. Fruit lands
are commanding as high as $3,000 and
$4,000 an acre. It is estimated that
150.000 American farmers will, this
year, abandon the high-priced lands
of the Middle West and Northwest for
the reasonable-priced acres of the Do
minion. With production of American
staple products not much in excess of
home consumption, and the margin de
creasing, the loss of this number of
producers is of great consequence to
the United States."
The latest discovery made by the
railroads' literary bureau is that "of
all the money paid out fqr food, fuel
and clothing in one year, by the fam
ily of five, the part that can be traced
to transportation charges amounts to
$9.90, an average of less than three
cents a day." But the real Question
is not how little the average family
pays per day for transportation
charges: It is, how much of that little
goes to pay dividends on "wind and
water." Nor is the annual expendi
ture of $9.90 to be disregarded in these
days of high prices when the working
man's family must "squeeze the pen
nies" in order to "make both ends
meet."
The pith of the argument against the
plan of commission government for cit
ies, is thus given by one writer:
The cardinal weakness in the whole
idea, looking at it from the standpoint
of Republican government, lies in the
fact that it serves to take the respon
sibilities of government away from the
people and put them in the hands of
a very small number of individuals.
Its aim is not to help the people to do
for themselves, but to enable them to
have things done for them by men
who are assumed to have superior
qualifications for that work.
The writer evidently had in mind
that kind of commission plan which
vests the appointment of the commis
sioners in the State, authorities and
which is supposed to be on the pro
gramme of the local "Taxpayers'
League. It is not the real, bona fide
i-onimlssion plan which provides for
the election of commissioners by the
people, and also for the recall of either
r all of them by popular vote if they
do not fulfil expectations.
Senator Cummins of Iowa does not
hesitate to assert that corporations
dominate the regular Republican side
in Congress. Most of them, he says,
' have been brought up with the influ
ences all around them, and, therefore,
whenever a law is proposed that re
stricts, or reduces corporate power,
their first Inquiry is not, will this
measure bring help to the people, but
it recommended by the captains of
industry, the masters of high finance?"
When the railroad bill was before
the House, the Connecticut delegation
voted against an amendment designed
to prever-t competition-destroying ab
sorptions. Applying this fact to Sen
ator Cummins' statement, we find that
they acted, against restriction of cor
porate power and not in the interest
of the people.
As may be recalled. Mr. Hill did not
take the popular side in the Bridge
port harbor-Hne contest. Had he done
so. our harbor might have retained
the eleven acres presented to the rail
road company.
The appointment of Ambrose S.
Brewer as deputy sheriff at Darieu
is characterized by the Norwalk Hour
"as a sop to that district, which has
become disgruntled at the high sheriff
to some extent." It leaves Ridgefleld
without a deputy sheriff but, says the
Hour, "the argument is put up that
the Ridgefleld district has County
Commissioner Brqjshy and that will
suffice.'' And the Hour's conclusion
1: "The high sheriff is certainly play
ing a desperate gifme of politics and
some of his moves are highly interest
ing to those on the inside."
Commenting upon a Farmer article
raiaiive to the deep and profound
s n ra. M
silence of the Anti-Hawley and Pro
Hill Republicans, the South Norwalk
Sentinel says: "The Bridgeport- Far
mer mistakes a lull in the storm for a
clearing." If the legitimate inference
from this statement is true, the Far
mer regrets the injustice done the
Anti-Hawley Republicans, and accepts
the virtual statement that the storm Is
but temporarily lulled.
Assuming that increased production
has caused a 40 per cent, decline in the
value of gold, a writer in "Survey"
suggests that "we need a medium of
exchange less subject to change in
value", and that "such a medium
would be a multiple standard based
upon some such index number of the
prices of, say, a hundred staple com
modities as is now used in Brad
street's and other financial magazines. '
The advantages of this plan are cited
as follows:
A national banking system connect
ed with a system of government store
houses for the standard commodities
would tend to give the government
control over the cold storage and grain
(levator problem: it would provide an
elastic banknote system by which at
the season for moving crops the money
for moving them would come auto
matically to the right place and final
ly, the payment of wages would be
based not on the value of a money
metal, but on the value of real com
modities necessary for subsistence.
It is a decidedly novel plan, and
raises a number of questions. For
instance, how would a season or a suc
cession of seasons of poor crops affect
this "multiple standard"; what effect
would speculation in commodities
have; how would increased production
influence this standard.
We doubt very much any considera
tion of this plan by the Aldrich Mone
tary Commission.
THE PUBLIC UTILITIES AGITA
TION. (Hartford Courant.)
Thepourant has received a printed
draft w a public utilities bill as pro
posed by the Bridgeport Business
Men's Association and by that organi
zation presented yesterday to the direc
tors of tho State Association, As we
estimate it, the full document would
occupy, if reprinted, something like
twelve columns of this paper. If you
want to read it all. probably it can be
had on inquiry. It is in small type and
contains a number of typographical
errors, but so far as appears on a first
reading these are self-evident and not
really material, like omissions of "is"
and the use of "five" where "four" was
intended.
The provisions in brief are that the
Governor shall appoint five public
utility commissioners, one to go out of
office each year and the appointments
to be final in themselves; that Is. no
confirmation is required by Senate or
General Assembly. The salaries fixed
in this draft are adequate and suffi
ciently dignified $7,500. We should
regret to see men clothed with such
responsibilities paid less. The mistaken
and narrow provision of the original
commission's draft, forbididng any
commissioner to hold any stock in any
concern subject to the board, is re
peated here and is foolish. Think of
how many fit men this would disqual
ify. If. instead of selling their hold
ings, they transferred these to wife
or son or trustee, that would be com
pliance with the law. but would neith
er lessen their own interest, if that
were to count, nor add dignity to their
own positions. The fact that an honor
able man on the commission had an
interest in a concern under trial should
spur him to a higher degree of im
partiality: he would be on trial as to
his fairness as truly as the company
would be for its alleged transgressions.
The governor, who makes the ap
poinments without regard to the Gen
eral Assembly, has also the power of
removal, and this same power rests
with the judiciary in case the attorney
general calls for it on request of
twenty-five citizens. It is not clear
just why the governor should be so
fully trusted to appoint and not so
fully trusted to remove.
The commission, as proposed, is to
have control and supervision over
"every common carrier, street railroad,
railroad, gas, electric, water, express,
telephone and telegraph company
(written "companies"). It has power
to inspect their books, supervise their
way of doing business, fix their rates,
look after the health of their employes,
etc. No franchise shall be transferred
without consent of this body, nor shall
any railroad have power to buy stock
or any other road without permission
of the commission. The issue of stock
and bonds by Connecticut corporations
is similarly regulated. Any corpora
tion aggrieved by orders of the com
mission has the right of appeal to the
Superior court where the appeal shall
be privileged ha the order of trial.
All this is interesting. We venture
the guess that before the Legislature
comes together there will be a lot of
proposed bills in evidence, and that be
fore that august body adjourns there
will be some bill put into law.
INFLAMMATORY RHEUMATISM
CURED IN 3 DAYS.
Morton L. Hill, of Lebanon, Ind.,
says: "My wife had Inflammatory
Rheumatism in every muscle and
Joint; her suffering was terrible and
her body and face were swollen almost
beyond recognition: had been in bed
for six weeks and had eight physi
cians, but received no benefit until
she tried Dr. Detchon's Relief for
Rheumatism. It gave immediate re
lief and she wa3 asie t walk about
in three days. I am sure it saved her
life." Sold by Curtis Pharmacv. Drug
gist, 1149 Main St. G 2 tt
BEACH FLIESTT
LORDSHIP PARK
Not Wholly Successful, However,
and Sges Where He Can
Improve.
While half a hundred onlookers on
the southern slope of Lordship Park
cheered with enthusiasm. Stanley Y.
Beach succeeded in flying yesterday
afternoon with his monoplane. The
flight was not what Mr. Beach expect
ed, but it demonstrated to his satis
faction that his device will prove a
success, with further changes in the
propelling mechanism.
Mr. Beach had installed a 40 h. p.
engine. This sent the propeller re
volving at such speed that it pupped
his wheel-mounted aeroplane over the
fields at high speed. Several times
the device left the earth, rachlng a
foot or two in height, but the uneven
surface of the ground left the rear of
the monoplane on the ground while the
iront ascended. With a better field,
M Beach believes his machine would
make successful flights as it stands.
But the trials of yesterday convinced
him he needs a still more powerful
engine.
In Germany and Austria there are
150 cooking schools.
Expert Soda Dispenser
AT OUR FOUNTAIN
SOMETHING NEW EVER DAY
MORTON'S ICE CREAM
USED EXCLUSIVELY
The Atlantic Hotel Pharmacy
WOMEN TO AID IN
WIPING OUT NEW
HAVEN SALOONS
Will Oppose Issue of Certificates
to Law Breakers and do
Police Spotting
New Haven. May 14. By invitation.
Rev. Mr. Mossman. of the City Mis
sion, addressed the Political Equality
Club yesterday afternoon at the mis
sion house, on "The Saloons of New
Haven: What Shall We Do With
Them?" Mr. Mossman's address in
cluded the answers to three questions,
vis: (1) What, is the present situation
in Xew Haven? (2) How did we reach
this condition? (3) What can we do
about it? As a result of the presen
tation of the subject the club voted
unanimously to send to the judges of
the city court and the Court of Com
mon Pleas a respectful request to
grant no more certificates to law
breaking saloon keepers until the num
ber of licenses in New Haen have
been reduced to the legal limit of 1 to
500 of the population. This proportion
ate reduction would call for a blotting
out of nearly 200 of the existing sa
loons in this city.
The club also gave its approval of
the plan of organizing a "committee of
observation" throughout the city, so
that by dividing the four police pre
cincts into sections it can be deter
mined if the license law is being vio
lated and arrests are not made. This
committee Is not to do police or $e
tective duty themselves, but to bring
to the notice of the precinct captains,
and if necessary to the chief of police,
not only such saloon keepers, but also
police officers remiss in their duty.
Under the new law a license that is
once refused cannot be again renewed
either to the applicant or to anyone
else.
Children Cry
FOR FLETCHER'S
CASTOR! A
PUBLIC HEALTH IN TURKEY
Under the Young Turks the American
Missionaries Have Started Cam
paigns Against Typhoid and Tuber
culosis Turkish Ladies go to Lec
tuer with Negro and Eunuch At
ture With Negro and Eunuch At
By Emily Ray Gregory.Ph. D.
Professor of Biology, American Col
lege for Girls, Constantinople.
(Exclusive Service The Survey Press
Bureau.
Since the Young Turks have come
into power we have had four, hygenic
lectures, something never possible be
fore, and we feel that the public
health work so sorely needed, is now
fairly under way.
In the first place I must tell you
of some of the local difficulties to be
Surmounted. Among the old Turks,
ladies and gentlemen never attended
a public gathering, not even church,
at the same time, and it would have
created a great scandal, if any idea
should get about that our students,
among whom there are thirty Turkish
girls, should be present at a gather
ing to which gentlemen, especially
Turkish gentlemen, are invited. Al
though there is somewhat more free
dom among the young Turks, we could
run no risks of that nature. Fortun
ately, the hall we use does not be
long . directly to the college, and
though situated by our entrance gate,
is entirely separate from our build
ings, so that there is no need of any
student being seen by those attend
ing the lectures.
The lecture on the Cause and Pre
vention of Typhoid Fever, was given
by Dr. Kadri Raschid Pasha, an emi
nent young physician trained in Paris.
The audience listened intently and
appeared greatly interested. After the
lecture sets of rules to avoid ty
phoid fever were distributed.
The next lecture, to which only la
dies were Invited, was on The Hy
giene and Food of Children. At least
one hundred Turkish ladies and our
Turkish girls came, and all listened
eagerly to a long and able lecture by
the same Dr. Kadri Raschid Pasha.
Most of the ladies stayed and had tea
with us. A negro attendant and a
eunuch were characteristic additions.
The ladies wore their tcharshafs but
with raised veils.
The interest shown in the lecture
was much greater than I had dared
count on. Several thanked us before
they went away. One lady belonging
to a very high family and the mother
of one of our students, spoke of the
value and importance of such lectures
for our young women.
On March 11 we had a lecture on
Contagious Diseases of Children, by
Dr. Suleiman Nouman Pasha, a spe
cialist who studied in Germany and
France.
On March 18 we had a lecture by Dr.
Aakil Mouktar Bey on Tuberculosis
and its Prevention, and we had leaf
lets on How to Cure and Prevent
Tuberculosis distributed after the lec
ture. Dr. Aakil Mouktar Bey had
been back in Con stantinople about a
year, following extended studies chief
ly in Paris.
Next Friday we shall have a lec
ture by another prominent physician,
Dr. Aassaf Devrish, on The Education
of Girls from the Standpoint of Physi
ology and Hygiene, and another on
April 8 on The Sanitary Care of the
House, by Dr. Aakil Mouktar Bey.
Dr. Riza Teufik Bey, a prominent
Turkish statesman, and Dr. Djenab
Chehabbedin, the president of the Im
perial Health Commission, have each
promised us a lecture.
An American school in Stamboul is
now going to have a lecture on tuber
culosis and we are supplying it with
tuberculosis leaflets. Our students
tell me they think that if we can have
lectures in Stamboul and Pera even
larger numbers will attend.
All the discouraging forecasts of old
residents have been disproved. There
has not been a single moment of op
position or even of indifference. On
the contrary, the audiences have giv
en their grateful support, and the em
inent physicians whom we have ask
ed to lecture for us, although driven
by professional work and their duties
on the medical staff of the university,
have without exception, given their
time' and ability freely and thanked
us for our efforts for the people.
What more can we ask?
If there were means for a small
but competent office staff for the
necessary business and a well con
ducted exhibit, I believe the move
ment would grow here as fast as in
New York, and that it would receive
financial help. But after thirty years
of the misrule and depredations of
Abdul Hamid, the people are not in a
position to give largely, however in
terested they may be, and one can
scarcely expect the foreign population
to be very generous, though self-interest
should lead them to it. My
experience so far leads me to think
that at least for some time a general
hygiene campaign will be more effec
tive than to try to concentrate on tub
ercufosis. and it is. as you see, de
sirable. I have not yet become indifferent
to the expectorations of consumptives
on boats and cars and streets or in
different to the knowledge thaj varla
loid probably meets me every time I
go to town and that the water is in
fected with typhoid germs, nor have
I become indifferent to the possibil-
The D. M. Read Co.
Established 1857.
Body Brussels Kugs, 9 x 12,
Usual price $30.00, now $27.50.
A small collection of these, dropped patterns all,
but the group is remarkable for the unusual beauty of
coloring and design. There are dainty and delicate
Rugs for boudoirs and sleeping rooms, soft shades of
blue, gray, green, and tan, nearly all in small figures,
gray flecked with small pink or lavender figures, tan
with pink, Delft blue effects, woody browns, all of
them designs that are restful and good to look at.
And the price $27.50
Carpet Store, first floor. Not a large number.
Lawn Dresses, Ready to Wear.
The familiarly known 'Little Dresses," made in
one piece, which all women find very convenient.
Some very moderate priced ones are of polka dotted
lawn, white grounds with pinhead dots in black and
colors ; skirts with tucking and lace insertion attached
to very dainty waists with several rows of insertion,
attractive every way.
Price $2.50
Striped Lawns, white with pink, blue, or lavender,
$2.98. ,
Striped Ginghams, daintily made with lace and em
broidered chemisettes at th neck, blue and white, tan
and white, black and white.
at $3.75
Suit Booms, second floor.
The "Perfection" Shear.
Madam, have you a good pair of shears that will cut
as you would like to have them1? Perhaps you have a
favorite pair, but if not we would like you to see the
new Perfection Shear, now shown at our Notion De
partment. An expert mechanic says of these Shears,
"They are simply splendid. " The chief characteris
tic is, they cut evenly and perfectly from heel to toe.
They are ball bearing and disk bearing, and have an
automatic tension. Come and see them.
In all styles and sizes, Bankers, Tailors, Buttonhole,
Pocket and Embroidery, Shears and Scissors. Guar
anteed for two years.
At the Notion Department.
Have you noticed that Sarak Rug in the north win
dow of the Carpet Store? It is an Ardahan weave,
with softly blended colorings, the price $35.00, dimen
sions 9 x 12.
The D. M.
lHatlford B3mtth
1072 Main St. DEPARTMENT STORE. 89 Fairfield Ave.
"THE STORE TO FIND SCARCE ARTICLES."
COUPON GOOD
MONDAY, MAY 16
Six Quart Blue Dresden
Preserving Kettle
Porcelain lined
Half Price
25c
ity of danger from the garbage and
filth thrown in the streets and heap
ed on the piers near the boat .land
ings, to be passed and repassed before
it is thrown into the Bosphorus where
thousands of gulls indicate the dis
posal of the last boat load.
But this must not be interpreted
as an adverse criticism of the pres
ent government. They are struggling
bravely with tremendous problems,
weighed down with a heavy debt
which they must increase in order
to accomplish anything. In fact, they
not only "accomplished the impossi
ble" in securing a constitution, but
they must continue to do the impos
sible for a generation to come. Think
of our having to cut out all advice
to go to a hospital in How to Cure
a Consumptive, because there is no
suitable hospital to go to, and a phy
sician told me of having visited the
tuberculosis ward in one of the hos
pitals (not Turkish) here this winter,
and finding "everything" inside but
the windows all closed.
Vital political problems which are
before the empire naturally engross
the attention, but as we foreigners
see the difficulties the young Turks
have to meet on account of the na
tional prejudices of the different races
and the mediaeval attitude of the dep
uties from the interior, we cannot
but feel that to arouse interest in
such a vital problem as this is for the
empire, and one which is neither poli
tical nor religious but in which all
the nationalities must work together
for their common good, would very
quickly lessen the political friction,
and advance the common understand
ing essential to wise legislation ac
tion. The South African government em
ploys a veterinarian to study the dis
eases of ostriches.
A $20 gold piece, beaten into gold
leaf, will cover more than 16 square
yards of surface.
Feel Headachy?
It probably comes from the
bile or some sick condition of
the stomach or bowels. No
matter which, put yourself
right with
BE EC HAMS
PILLS
Sold Everywhere. In boxot 10c and 2Sc.
Read Co.
We have more
room for
Enamel and Tinware since
moving the Hardware De
partment to the Fairfield
Avenue Entrance.
We shall occasionally have
some special like this lot,but
expect to give good values
all .the time.
REV. JOEL S. IVES GIVES
CHURCH STATISTICS.
Says the Past Year Was Prosperous
For Congregationalism.
Rev. Joel S. Tves. of Hartford, sec
retary of the Missionary Society of
Connecticut, says that the past year
was a prosperous one for Connecticut
Congregationalism. During the year
one church. Plymouth of Hartford,
was added to the roll with a member
ship of 100. There are now 333 Con
gregational churches, one or more in
every town in the State with the ex
ception of Watorford end Beacon
Falls.
The additions on confession were 2,
010 and by letter 1.265. a total of 3,273.
The loss by death was 1,015, by letter
1,260, and by revision of the rolls 455,
in all 2,730. The present membership
is 68,162. Sixty-four churches gained
on confession 1,326 members and 105
gained none on confession and lost 156
by death. Forty-six churches report
ed improvements to their property of
various kinds, four reported debts
paid, five debts reduced and three an
increase of invested funds. Six new
organs were installed, five new par
sonages and three new parish houses
were built. Three new churches were
erected. The total amount of money
received, including contributions, par
ish expenses and legacies, was $1,
322.400. THE PRETTIEST FACE
end the most beautiful hands are of
ten disfigured by an unsightly wart.
It can easilj. be removed in a few days
without pain by using Cyrus Wart
Remover, for sale only at The Cyrus
Fharmacy, 253 Fairfield avenue and
1F6 Cannon St.
NOTICE.
I hereby make application to the
Honorable Board of Police Commis
sioners for appointment as a Special
Policeman.
FRANK SPITZ.
May 13, 1910. R 13 s
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION.
The liquor business formerly con
ducted at 126 Wall street by William
R. Hogan and Fritz Hartmann under
the name of Hogan & Hartmann has
been purchased by Fritz Hartmann,
who will be responsible for all in
debtedness of the firm. The business
will be conducted in the future by the
firm of Hartmann & Hartmann.
R13s FRITZ HARTMANN.
SATURDAY SPECIALS. Babbitt' 3
Best Soap, 3 cakes for 10c, 30 for
$1.00; 4 Cans Peas, 25c; 4 Cans
Tomatoes, i.5c; 4 Cans String Beans,
25c; Shoulder, 14c; Dried Peaches.
8c; Fancy Potatoes, 69c The Coe.
& White Co. R 13 b
We offer, subject to previous
sale, the following list of
Georgia Mortgages.
Ami. Appraisal. Rate Insurance.
S 600 $1,550 6ft 7 CO City
650 1,810
650 2,100 "
700 2,500 " 1.000 city
TOO 2,560 "
1,000 8.000 "
1.200 2.765 00
1,250 4,650 " 800
1,350 3 400 "
1,500 4,200 " 1,800
2,000 C.100
2,400 6,400 7
Tho above Is only a partial list of
mortgages on hand.
All mortgages are accompanied by
an appraisal made by either Dun St
Co. , cr Bradstreet's Mercantile Agen
cy. A similar line of Georgia Mort
gages can usually foe furnished. Full
information will be given to any one
desiring to invest In the same.
BURR & KNAPP
923 MAIN STREET
PATENTS
A. M. WOOSTER, Attorn ey-at-Law
Late Examiner U. S. Patent Office
1094 MAIN ST.. BRIDGEPORT. CT.
Send Postal for Booklet on Patents
CLOCKS
WATCHES & JEWELRY
HENRY C. REID
952 MAIN ST., NEAR BANK ST.
Repairing done promptly by experts
Awnings
ORDER THEM
NOW
Have the old ones re
paired and put up
F. J. Abercrombie
636 WATER ST.
SOFT SHELL GRABS
25 cts. Per Doz.
W. D. COOK & SON
Phone 3890 528 WATER ST.
L, & D. GOLDBERG
PAINTERS AND PAPER HANGERS
For Ready Mixed Paints and Wall
Papers at reasonable prices yoti
should come to our new store at
24-26 DUMBER STREET
Near the Armory S 31 tf
SIDEWALKS
Sand and Gravel
THE, 'JtWRJVS CO.
82 F AIRFIELD AVENUE
BROKEN STONE, all sizes
ROOFING
G14 a Telephone
Bachmnn's Emmenagagone Mixture
' A splendid Female Regulator n
cases of suppressed menstruation, de
lays due to colds, ill health, or other
unnatural causes. $1.78 for the whois
outfit.
THE WOMAN'S DRUG STORE
Wilma M. Pachman. Prop.
129 STATE ST.. Bridgeport. Conn.
KELLY'S CIGAR STORE
141 FAIRFIELD AVE.
The best cigar made In Imported
and domestic brands. Complete line
of smokers' supplies. Pool room ad
joining Cigar Store.
JAMES H. KELLY
i
MILES' CREAM ALE
THE FINEST MADE
Bartholomay's Rochester Lager, Soda
and Mineral Waters Bottled by
M. J. MALONEY
86 JONES AVENUE
Free Delivery Tel. 2072-3
THE NEW ELECTRIC
LIGHT MAZDA
25 Watt Damp $0.59
40 Watt Damp n.60
CO Watt Lamp o.75
100 Watt Lamp l.oo
150 Watt Lamp l.fco
These Lamps furnished only to cus
tomers connected with our service.
CHEAPER and BETTER than any
other LIGHT.
Let us give you an estimate to wire
and fit your store or office with these
Lamps.
The United Illuminating Co,
146 Joan Street
FURNITURE
MOVING AND
TRUCKING
1379 STATE STREET
Phone 652
Fred J. Elander, Prop.
F. C. Brady
PLUMBING, HEATING AND SHEET
METAL WORK
111 .TOHN STREET
Telephone 1312-S SI 4 tf
WANT ADS. CENT A WORD
AMUSEMENTS
Jacks
on s
ALL THIS WEEK
A Rill of Snprior Features
Jackson's Popular
VAUDEVILLE
AND MOTION PICTURES
FeatnrliiK
THE BREAKAWAY BARLOWS
Sensational Comedy Aerlaltsts
MGRATH AND YEOMAN
as ' Tho Lunatic and the Maid"
CHARLES OTOOLE
The SinginfcMonologlst
WALSH AN1 WALSH
Fashion Plate Dancers
3 Reels of New Motion Picture
Same Popular Utile Price
10c ADMISSION 10c
Ladles and Children at Matinees .v
grid0e'o-t Baseball Club
Games This Week at Newfteld Park
Thursday, May 12
NEW BRITAIN and BRIDGEPORT
Saturday, May 14
WATERBDRY and BRIDGEPORT
JEWELRY REPAIRING
Is a Specialty at
PARKER'S
THE JEWELER 9 P. O. ARCADE
WHO WANTS A BARGAIN
In a hundred acre farm. 10 room
house, barn, sheds, fruit trees, well,
6 cows, 2 horses. 4 calves, chickens,
gigs. On the main road between
tratford and Shelton. 4 miles from
Ftratford and - miles from 8hlton,
Price and terms to suit
JAMES FEELEY, 7 ARCADE
Open Evenings.
C. G. Schneider, O.D.S.
DENTIST
Security Building, 1115 MAIN ST.
Office open from
9 A. M. to 8:20 P. M.
Sundays by appointment
GRILL AND LUNCH
ROOMS
for Ladies and Gentlemen
Corner Broad and Cannon Sis.
Never Closed
Entertainment and Dance
given by
f. M. SMITH CO., TT. It. K. P.
Tuesday Evening, May 17
Eagles' Hall
Admission 25 Cents R14 D
1E
TAX LIST, 1909
The tax payers of the City of
Bridgeport are .hereby notified that
the taxes on the grand list of 1009 are
now due and payable.
The undersigned will be at the Col
lector's Office. City Hall, on Monday,
May 2nd, 1010, and dally thereafter,
Sundays excepted, from 9 A. M. to
4 P. M. for the purpose of receiving
said taxes. After June 1st, 19 tj.
three-quarters of one per cunt, ufll
be added to all unpaid bills and the
same on the first of each succeeding
inouth. JOHN M. DONNELLY,
U9 tf Collector.
WHY NOT SMOKE
THE COUNTRY LIFE
FIVE CENT CIGAR?
6-425
ECKLER & CO.
908 MAIN STREET 874
ADVERTISEMENT FOR PROPOS
ALS FOR DISPOSAL OF GAR
BAGE OF THE CTTY OF
BRIDG EPORT.
Sealed proposals for the disposal of
the garbage and dead animals col
lected by the city of Bridgeport will
be received by the board of health
at the mayor's office in the city hall
at Bridgeport, on Monday, May 22rd
at four o'clock p. m., at which hour
the bide will be publicly opened.
The proposals shall be for the dis
posal of said garbage and animals for
periods of three, five, ten and twenty
years and any bidder may inak.- a
proposal for the disposal of said gar
bage and animals for any one of said
terms or for all of said terms.
The proposal of each bidder must
designate the place at whivh he pro
poses to dispose of the garbage and
also describe the method which is
intends to employ.
The place designated shall be sub
ject to the approval of the board of
health and the board of health re
serves the right to reject any and all
bids for any cause and to select ' any
one of the different methods which
may be proposed or reject all of
them.
The method proposed must pro
vide for the dispoal every twenty
four hours of all garbage delivered
to the contractor and must be cap
able, at the present time, of disposing
of at least fifty tons dally, the average
daily collection now being approxi
mately thirty-five tons and the meth
od must provide for the like disposal
of all increased collections during ths
term of said contract.
Any bidder to whom the contract
mav be awarded must give a bond to
the City of Bridgeport in the sum of
$10,000, with a surety satisfactory to
the board of health, conditioned upon
the faithful performance or bis con
tract. Each proposal must be accom
panied by a certified check for $1,000,
payable to the order of the treasure!
of the City of Bridgeport and in cass
the bidder whose proposal It. accepted
does not enter into a writt-.n contsact
with the City of Bridge rort and fnr
nish a bond as above provided within
ten days after notice of the accept
ance of his bid, the check accom
panying the bid shall be retained and
kept and owned by the cfty, not as a
penalty, but as liquidated : atapea
tor the failure to execute BfcM eon
tract. THE BOARD OF HEALTH,
By G. W. K jrene Obor. Vn 9.
T5 21 9
ADVERTISE IN THE FARMER,
to:
I

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