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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, July 08, 1910, Image 1

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CENT A WORD
For Wants, To Kent. Fer Sale. Etc.,
WEATHER FORECAST )
Partly cloudy, probable (1
yon Kt the BEST AKD MOST RE
TURNS fiom THE "FARMER."
snowers tonight or tomorrow ;
VOL. 46. NO. 160
BRIDGEPORT, CONN., FRIDAY, JULY 8, 1910
PRICE ONE CENT
MAYOR GAYNOR SAYS
HE LACKS POWER TO
STOP FIGHT PICTURES
(Special from United Press.)
Boston, July 8 A statement from
Mayor W. J. Gaynor of New York city,
showing his sympathy for the move
rr,ent to stop the exhibition of pic
tures of the Johnson-Jeffries prize
fight, is today in the hands of "Wil
liam Shaw, general secretary of the
United Society of Christian Endeavor,
who 4s heading1 the nation-wide cru
sade for their suppression. The state
ment from Mayor Gaynor is as fol
lows: "It Is quite impossible for me to un
derstand how it can enter into any
mind that we are in any danger of
race riots in the city of New York
between blacks and whites. I may also
remind you that the government of the
city f New York is a government of
laws and not of men. and that I have
no right at my mere will to prohibit
anything. Unless a thing be prohib
ited by law there is no way to pro
hibit it. It is well for all to remem
ber that ours is a government of laws
and not a government of men. I
shall very carefully consider what you
cay and see what cower (here is in
any official to do what you suggest.
If there Is not such rower conferred
by law I give my solemn assurance
that it shall not be exercised. I see
no reason to get excited at all. The
people most excited seem to be those
who read every line of the newspaper
and are eager to read more. If I had
the power of my own will to do what
you suggest I would do it quick
enough. ' Very truly yours, (Signed)
W. J. Gaynor."
FIGHT FILMS REACH NEW
YORK; MAT SOON- BE SHOWN.
New York. July 8 The films of the
Jeffries-Johnson fight at Reno arrived
In New York today in charge of Pres
ident William T. Rock of the American
Vltagraph Company and J. Stuart
Blackton. an official of the company.
They were rushed to the plant of the
Vitagraph Company in Brooklyn,
where a large force of experts were
waiting to develop and retouch the
films for immediate production. The
forces will work in relays and it Is
expected that the pictures will be on
exhibition in New York tomorrow, un
less Mayor Gaynor takes some action
to prevent them.
The films, a dozen sets in all. taken
.from various portions of the fight
arena, were brought here on a special
car.
, BIG RECEPTION ARRANGING'
FOR JOHNSON IN NEW YORK.
j New York. July 8 If the police grant
the necessary permits. Jack Johnson
will be given a reception when he
reaches New York Monday euch as
has never ben accorded-A" prize fight
er in this city.
Baron Wllkins. a negro saloon keep
er and close friend of Johnson, is in
charge of the arrangements. He said
today it was planned to meet Johnson
.-with two brass bands and 100 auto-j
: mobiles and taxicabs and drive him
through the main streets following '
.with a reception in Wilkins' saloon. '
"We all won a whole lot of money
on Johnson and besides we like him
I a whole lot," said Wilkins today, "so
'we want to do him proud."
Asked how much he won on the
Cght himself Wilkins replied: "Well, I
i-won several thousand dollars. I
,would have won a lot more but the
detectives can't find the other stake-
WIFE OF FIDDLER
KOIISTAHCE TELLS
IT TO DELANEY
Delinquent Husband Must Pay Queen
ly California Woman and Her
Child $5 Weekly.
Mrs. W. A. onstance, a tall queen
ly typical California girl, disclosed in
the city court today a -sensational
story of playing the detective upon
her husband when he was out at night
playing in parks and for dances.
Claiming she knew fte was furnishing
the clothing for other women while.
he neglected lus own wife, Mrs. Kon
stances asked that he be forced to
pay a regular stipend to the support
of herself and her pretty 4 years old
daughter.
Mrs. Konstance declared she had seen
her husband, playing at Stadler's park,
on finishing his work, stroll through
the woods with a woman, while she
secreted herself and kept the pair un
der surveillance.
"He's the leader of all the women
in Bridgeport, it seems", said she,
"waxing angry as her wrongs forced
themselves uppermost in her
thoughts."
Konstance was not on trial. He and
his wife happened in the court room
by agreement between Attorney T. M.
Cullinan representing Konstance, and
Prosecutor Delaney to whom Mrs.
Konstance has made many com
plaints. Judge Wilder and the two lawyers
talked the matter 'over informally,
and let the man and wife tell their
stories.
Mrs. Konstance wed her musical
husband in California Just after he
left the navy. He is now employed
In a silver shop, playing violin in
orchestras at night. Judge Wilder
told Konstance he must pay his wife
$5 a week, the only alternative being
arrest for non-support. Mrs. Kon
stance separated from her husband
after an alleged assault. She is now
living in Kossuth St.
SMALL FIXE OF $10
FIGHTING DECK HAND.
Failing to prove the charges that
James Seeley had attacked with an
Iron bar, Cecil Paris, a fellow em
ploye on the steamer Naugatuck,
Prosecutor DeLaney was satisfied
when Seeley escaped with a $10 fine
lor the part he played in the furious
battle between the two blacks on the
steamer. Paris' shoulder was crush
ed in, and he declared the injury re
sulted from being struck by an iron
bar In Seeley's grasp. Seeley main
tained that Paris climbed a platform
on which he was carving a chicken,
planning to attack him from the
rear.and that as Seeley turned quick
ly with his carving knife, Paris, in
his haste, fell from the platform
against a crate.
Paris is a student in Harvard Med
ical school through which he is
working his way.
holder."
The films were not delivered to the
developing plant of the American Vita
graph Company until the chauffeur of
the automobile carrving the pictur
from Jersey City to Flatbush had been
arrested for speeding.
CUBAN GOVERNMENT
WON'T ALLOW PICTURES.
Havana. July 8 The Cuban govern
ment, which permits bull-fighting, has
drawn the li.ne on the Jeffries-Johnson
fight pictures and it was announced
today that the pictures would not be
exhibited in any city of the island.
LITTLE AFTER JOHNSON
. ' FOR $30,000 OFFER.
Chicago, July 8. George Little, for
mer manager of Jack Johnson, will
arrive in Chicago tomorrow when he
will confer with his attorney, AJolph
Marks. regarding the ougilist's accu
sation that Little offered him $50,000
if the negro would- "throw" his fight
with Jim Jeffries. Attorney Marks
said today that he had not received
any instructions from Little regarding
the matter and that he did not know
whether he intended to start an ac
tion for slander.
TROUBLE, EXPECTED BETWEEN
CORBETT AND BLACK FELLOW.
San Francisco. July 8 Sporting men
of San Francisco are today laying odds
there will be trouble on board the
Twentieth Century Limited. Sunday,
when Jim Corbett and Jack Johnson
meet for the first time since the Jeff
ries-Johnson fight. Corbett. who was
one or Jeffries, trainers and seconds, is
racing to Chicago to connect with the
limited, on which Johnson has engag
ed accommodations. Both men are
due to open theatrical engagements in
New York. Monday. Corbett at the
American Music Hall, and Johnson at
Hajnmerstein's.
Bed feeling has existed between the
men for a long time and it was in
creased by the taunting remarks they
made to each other during the Reno
fight. Corbett is especialy bitter over
the defeat of Jeffries by the negro. .
NO EFFORT WILL BE MADE
TO SHOW FILMS
WHERE FORBIDDEN.
Chicago. July 8 Representatives of
the American Vltagraph Company,
owners of the Jeffries-Johnson fight
pictures, left Chicago for New York
today where a meeting of the board
of governors of their company will be
held tomorrow in an attempt to come
to some decision relative to the ban
which has been placed on the films in
tnanv States end flro-r off-ios . -
Stirred by the "growing sentiment
against their right to exhibit the films.
George Kleine William Selig and
George A. Spoor, representatives of
the syndicate, issued the following
statement:
"No efforts will be made to show the
pictures in any city or town where
adverse legislation has taken place.
It will not be necessary to get out in
junctions for this syndicate does not
intend to buck the law in any city or
State. We don't think the pictures
are any different from those which
have been displayed of the Johnson
Burns and Johnson-Ketchel fights, but
if we find popular sentiment' is against
them we wi lay the films on the shelf
and not show them at all."
It was given out that the fight films
have to date cost the syndicate $500,
000. OUTRAGEOUS TO
SHOW NEGRO AS
HE BEATS WHITE
MAYOR B. F. MAHAN TELLS WHY
FIGHT PICTURES SHOULDN'T
BE SEEN IF HE HAD
POWER.
Mayor B. F. Mahan, was asked this
morning, while in this city, what he
thought of the proposition to stop the
exhibition of the pictures of the Jeffries-Johnson
fight. He said "It is
outrageous to think of presenting the
spectacle of a white man being bat
tered about by a negro. If I had my
way I would say they could not show.
But as I understand it there is no
legal way that the showing of the pic
tures can be stopped."
YOUTHFUL BRONCO
BUSTERS BROKEN
TO COOL CELLS
That irrepressible longing of every
youth to emulate the stunts of the
broncho busters of the Wild West to
day, brought to grief James Powell
and John Collins, neither over 18, both
living in the West End.
The pair with several other youths
of the vicinity have been playing hav
oc with the bronchos brought here for
sale under the skilful management of
Doc Elwood. He keeps the kickers
in the circus grounds in the; West
End until such time as he prepares
to mount the soap box and deliver his
customary speech exploiting the mer
its of the animals.
Powell, Collins and others went
there last night with lasso and start
ed to rope the fiery animals. One of
them was painfully hurt, and today
Elwood made complaint against Pow
ell who lives in Railroad avenue and
Collins who lives in Organ street. Bi
cycle Policeman Fox overtook them
and charging them with breach of the
peace locked them up In the Third
Precinct.
HAWAII WILL SOON
ASK FOR STATEHOOD
(Special from United Press.
Los Angeles. July 8 Hawaii is soon
to ask for Statehood In the United
States, according to Prince Johan
Kalanlanaole. Hawaiian delegate to
the Federal Congress who reached here
today from Washington.
"I shall soon introduce the bill to
make the Hawaiian Islands an inde
pendent State of the Federal Union
with all the rights of Statehood." he
said, "and the marvelous showing I
shall make for the islands ought to
gala our, renW
NOTED WOMAN AVIATOR FALLS
249
MAY HEAD
WALL STREET
GRAFT INQUIRY
M. LINN BRUCE,
Formerly Lieutenant Governor of
New York and Supreme Court
Justice..
SCRIPTURES FURNISH
KENNY WITH REPLY
FOR J0HNF. BRADY
Who Asks For Bread Shall Get a
Stone and All Requests For
' Oil Produce Water
Director of Public Works M. A.
Kenny said this morning that, the
board of apportionment made a mis
take "in appropriating $27,000 for
street sprinkling with water and:$4,
000 for road oil. Everybody is ask
ing for oiL He believes that the
larger appropriation should have
been for oil. While he was telling
this to the reporters John F. Brady
of the board of education approached
the director and asked him if he was
going to oil Wheeler avenue, "Whom
soever asks for bread we give a
stone and whomsoever asks for oil
we give water," was the reply of the
director.
STRIKE OF WOMEN
GARMENT WORKERS
MAY BE SETTLED
(Special from United Press.)
New York, July 8. Whether or not
there is to be a speedy settlement of
the strike of the , New York garment
workers, which involves 50,000 men and
women, was expected to be determined
at this afternoon's conference of the
manufacturers. .
The employers are badly divided.
Many want to settle the strike on the
best terms available because they fear
great loss on rush orders now on hand.
Others, and they are for the most part
the makers of the poorer grades, are
opposed to this, saying that if they
grant the demands of their employes
they will be forced into bankruptcy.
This Is the biggest general strike, so
far as numbers is concerned, that this
city has had since the big tie-up of
the building trades several years ago.
More than twice as many are out as
were concerned in the recent a shirt
waist strike and the officials of the
union issued a statement today stat
ing that when all the union employes
and their sympathizers are out there
will be more tan 70,000 affected.
M. Rubinger, head of the Cloak, Suit
& Skirt Manufacturers Asscoiation,
said today:
"We expect to arbitrate this strike.
It would never have' occurred had the
manufacturers been organized but I
am hopeful that the trouble will be
settled before the end of next week.
This is our busy season and we are
anxious to be fair with our employes
although many sf their demands are
extravagant."
DECREE FOR TAYLOR.
Foster Hose Supporter Company
Thereupon Appeals , the Case,
A final decree in accordance with
a recent memorandum of Judge
James P. Piatt was entered in the
circuit court of the United States yes
terday, in favor of the defendant in
the suit of the Foster Hose Supporter
Company of New York against Thom
as P. Taylor of Bridgeport and then
the complainant perfected an appeal
to the United States' circuit court of
appeals. The question involved is
whether Mr. Taylor has the right to
continue, under license, the manufac
ture of a - combined abdominal pad
p.nd hose supporter. The Foster Hose
Supporter Company claims to have
revoked the license.
BRINDLE BULL DOG
LHtES STRATFORD BEST.
A Stratford citizen telephoned to
City Clerk Boucher, this morning,
that a fine looking brindle and white
bull dog had camped on his front
porch for two days. The license tag
on the dog's collar was 6,449. The
city clerk will notify David Hjovet,
160 Morehouse street, who owns the
dog. I
PREPARING TO BUILD
TROLLEY TO STRATFORD.
Mayor Bryan F. Mahan of New
London, who has the contract for con
structing the extension of the trolley
line in Barnum avenue to Stratford,
and the rebuilding of the Ferry Road
in Stratford, was in this city, this
morning, making- preliminary arrange
ments. He expects to begin work
next week.
FEET WITH HER AEROPLANE
Baroness De La Roche Un
conscious in Hospital As
Result of Injuries With
No Hope of Recovery
Accident Caused by Pursuit
of Two Other Aviators,
Who Interferred With
Her Machine
Long List of Airship Fatal
ities Since Lieut. Selfridge
Was Killed at Fort Myer,
Sept. 17, 1908
(Special from United Press.)
Rheims, July 8 Baronness De La
Roche, the most noted woman aviator
of France, is dying today as the result
of the fall of her aerorlane at Beth
any Plains. Her machine, a Voisin
biplane, fell, a distance of 240 feet.
Both arms and both legs of the' Baron
ness were broken and she suffered se
vere Internal Injuries. She was rush
ed to the hospital but the physicians
offer no hope for her recovery.
Shortly after being taken to the
hospital- the Barronness regained con
sciousness long enough to ask whether
the aviators who interfered with her
flight had been arrested, then she
lapsed into unconsciousness. There
are numerous bad cuts on her body.
It is feared that she sustained a frac
ture of the s-ull.
The aeroplane was demolished. The
accident resulted from the pursuit of
the- Baronness', machine by two other
aviators. She had been flying for ten
minutes in the aerodrome when two
other, machines whirled along either
sfde of the Baronness biplane. She
became confused and tried to alight.
She pulled the wrong lever, however,
and the aeroplane overturned- and
dashed to the ground.' Owing to the
popularity of the Baronness the ac
cident occasioned intense excitement.
A score of persons rushed to her aid
and drew her unconscious from the
wreckage.
The Baronness was a noted sport wo
man and achieved fame as an automo
bile driver, motor cyclist and a horse
woman before taking up with aviation
last October. She drove a powerful
automobile from Berlin to Madrid in a
nerve-racking race and finished with
high honors. Last January on the
very day that Leon Delagrange was
killed: while flying at Bordeaux, the
Barronness was injured in a flight at
Mourmelon. . She received the news of
Delajrrange's death a short time before
she descended and suffered 'a nervous
collapse while in the air from think
ing of her friend's tragic end.
The Baronness made a flight at
Heliopolis, Cairo. Egypt, last year.
AEROPLANE FATALITIES.
September 37, 1908, Lieutenant Self
ridge, U. S. A., killed by fall of Wright
aeroplane driven by Orville Wright at
Fort Myer, Washington. ,
September 7, 1909, Eugene Lefbvre,
in Wright aeroplane, killed at Juvisy
Sur-Orge.
September 7. 1909, Ena Rosi. Italian,
killed in Rome in machine of his own
invention:
September 22. 1909. Captain Louis
Ferdinand Ferbe, of French army, fly
ing under name of M. De Rue, killed
in Voisin biplane at Boulogne, France.
December 6, 1909, Antonio Fernan
dez, Spaniard, killed at Nice. France,
by fall of 1,000 feet. Motor exploded,
January 4, 1910. Leon Delagrange,
using too heavy motor in light Bleriot
monoplane, killed at Bordeaux, France.
April e 2, 1910, Herbert Le Blon,
Frenchman, fell on rocks at San Sebas
tian, Spain, and instantly killed.
May 3, 1910. Chauvetto Michelin, in
Antoinette monoplane. hit derrick
near Paris, and instantly killed.
June 2, 1910, Zosily. a Hungarian,
killed at Budapest while making flight,
June 3, 1910,' M. Pohoff, instructor of
aviation In Russian army, killed at
Gatchina, Russia in Wright machine.
June 15, 1910. at the Worcester, Eng.,
agricultural fair. Aviator Dartigan
lost control of machine and dashed
into crowd, killing one woman and in
juring many.
June 19. 1910, Herr Frye. a German
aviator, dashed into crowd at Buda
pest, fatally injuring two women.
June 16, 1910, Jean Speyer, 18 year old
boy. killed at San Francisco in a
glider.
June 23, 1910. Kerr Robe, in Farman
biplane, fell 200 feet and was killed at
Stettin, Germany.
July 3. 1910, Charles Whachter, in
Antoinette monopla.e fell and was
killed at Rheims. Wife and child wit
nessed accident.
One of the first aeroplane accidents
on record occurred fifteen years ago
when John J. Montgomery of the
Jesuitical Institution at Santa Clara,
Cal., sent a man named Maloney up
into the air 3,000 feet in a balloon, out
of which he was to jump to test a
glider. Maloney was dashed to bits.
SUFFRAGETTES OUT
WITH HAMMERS TO
KNOCK DR. SNYDER
(Special from United Press.)
Denver, Col., July 8. Hammers are
swinging in Colorado today, thexwield
ers being the suffragettes of the state
and the object, Dr. Z. X. Synder, of
the Colorado Normal school. The
reason is that the doctor dared to
make the race for the presidency of
the National Education association
against a woman, Mrs. Ella Flagg
Young, superintendent of the Chicago
public schools.
' Mrs. Helen Crenf elt, former super
intendent of public instruction in Col
orado, and one of the foremost suf
fragettes in the . state, expressed the
general sentiment today when she
said:
"I don't see how Dr. Snyder could
do such a . thing. This was the first
time a woman has ever asked any
thing from the N. E. A., and to think
that a Colorado man, above all others,
would oppose her. It is a burning
shame."
DOZEN STOLEN BICYCLES
RECOVERED IN GOOD ORDER.
Stocked with a dozen bicycles re
covered from Norwalk, South Nor
walk and Stamford, on the confession
of Mangione Joseppe, the bicycle thief
captured at Main street and Fairfield
avenue, a room at police headquarters
today was visited by many of the vic
tims of Joseppe's gang. Several of the
bicycles were identified and return
ed to their owners. All of them are
00? "Hwpe.
MRS. GOULD TO
MARRY RALPH THOMAS
fi j
mm : Y'J
New York, July 6. Mrs. Helen
Kelly Gould, divorced wife of Frank
Gould, will be married to Ralph
Thomas, nephew of the head of the
sugar trust, July IB, according to
the reports from Mrs. Gould's clos
est friends. Ml Thomas received
$1,102,982 from his father, Joseph B.
Thomas, who was a director of the
sugar trust. . " Mrs. Gould is worth
many millions in her own name and
receives $40,000 a year alimony from
her former husband, who is, now liv
ing in Paris. Mr. Thomas is said to
have engaged passage for Europe,
and-the couple will spend their hon
eymoon in a year's tour of the world.
HEAT PROSTRATES
CLITUS H. KING
AGED WOMAN DROPS AT "MAIN
AND GOLD STREETS AND IS
TAKEN HOME IN THE
AMBULANCE.
.Intense humidity and summer heat
combined nide the weather condi
tions of today as intolerable as any
of the summer, and several Bridge-
porters were stricken with heat pros
tration.
Attorney Clitus H. King was over
come at Police headquarters shortly
after 9 o'clock. He boarded a car
for his home in Fairfield, and reach
ed there seriously ill. Mrs. Ellen
Fraher, an aged resident of 56 Madi
son avenue, was prostrated at Main
and Gold streets, while marketing at
10 o'clock. She was taken home in
the ambulance, after treatment by
Dr. Krause at the emergency hos
pital.
By noon the mercury had reached
83, and the humidity had not abat
ed. While not the hottest day of the
summer, the unusual heat was so ac
centuated by the humidity that there
was fear of many prostrations before
night.
RAILROAD RIPRAPS
ITS WATER FRONT
For several days the railroad com
pany has been riprapping its property
on the water front from the Stratford
avenue bridge to Congress street. The
riprap slants from the shore line in
to the water. The property is un
doubtedly next to the most valuable
for wharf ing purposes in the city. "But
after it has been - riprapped it will
never be a place where merchandise;
carried here in competition to the rail
road can be unloaded. , -
LAKE STAYS WITH
BOSTON NATIONALS
- (Special from United Press.)
Pittsburg, July 8 Fred Lake is not
to be ousted as manager of the Boston
Nationals, according to John Harris,
of Pittsburg; vice president of ' the Bos
ton club, here today. He also declar
ed there was no friction between Lake
and President Dovey.
According to Vice President Harris,
Herzog, who is reported to be anxious
for Lake's job, has caused the club
considerable trouble this season and
he was recently benched by President
Dovey . with permission of Manager
i-aKe. .President Dovey comes here
tomorrow to confer with Vice Presi
dent Harris but the conference relates
only to the team and not to Lake.
BALL PLAYER DEVLIN
HELD FOR ASSAULT
(Special , from United Press.)
New York, July 8. After waiting
two. hours for Arthur Devlin, the
Giants third baseman, to appear for a
hearing on a charge of assault made
against him by Bernard J. Roesler,
Jr., Magistrate Naumer in Brooklyn
today held Devlin for special session
in $00 bail. Devlin was represented
by Lawyer Boyle of Manhattan, who
said the ball player had promised to
be on hand.
TWO AUTO LICENSES
SUSPENDED.
Secretary of the State Matthew H.
Rogers has suspended the chauffeur's
license of George W. Tomlinson of
New Haven for the remainder of its
term. In his finding, the secretary
states that he has taken into consid
eration that Tomlinson did not ap
pear at the hearing on July 5 to
which he was summoned, that he
had taken the automobile of Louis
Sagal of New Haven without permis
sion, and that he was operating it
in an intoxicated condition at such a
speed as to endanger persons on the
highway.
The license of Thomas Nelson of
:Cew Canaan has been temDorarilv
suspended pending an investigation of
nis case. xseison ran over ITarrv
Carp in Stamford and was fined $150
and costs in the police court.
MRS. FORBES
WITNESS
DEBTOR
UNSHAKEN BY SHARP EXAMINATION OF MRS.
ROWLEY'S ATTORNEY, SHE TELLS COURT
SHE OWNS NOTH INGr WHATEVER
Explains that Husband Has Old Fashioned Ideas Rela
tive to the Ownership of Property By Women
Today before . Judge Scott in the
Common Pleas court, civil side, Jes
sil Livingston Forbes, wife of A. Hol
land Forbes of Fairfield, swore that
she has no property in the world in
excess of $17, which she fcan call
her own, and that she is entitled to
take the poor debtor's oath, which was
allowed her by Justice Wakeman in
Fairfield on June 18. The hearing to
day was a question of law, raised by
counsel for Ida Rowley, who obtained
a judgment against Mrs. Forbes for
53,750 and costs amounting to $55, to
review . a writ of error. : .
The first question put to Mrs. Forbes
by her counsel, Judge Elmore S.
Banks, was "Have you property ', In
excess of $17 which is exempt from
execution, and did you ever have?"
"I have not and never bad." was
the reply.
"You occupy a very large estate
in Fairfield?", asked Attorney Slade.
"I live, with my husband and my
daughter In Fairfield."
In the Forbes home are three ser
vants, while they also have an auto
mobile and a chauffeur. They have
been married for the past 16 or 17
years,, in that time living in New
York and, for the pant seven summer
in Fairfield. Mr. Forbes purchased
the Fairfield property two years
Mrs. Forbes stated that . at one time
she had an account in v the Plaza
Bank, in New York. The money there
was given her by her husband to pay
household expenses and other incidentals.-
"Where Is that bank book now?"
asked Counsel Slade.
"I haven't the faintest idea," replied
Mrs. Forbes.
Mrs. Forbes admitted that she knew
Mrs. Ida Rowley, who, she said had
worked for her at odd times. Ernest
(UNCLASSIFIED.)
PRTME ROAST BEEF served free at
Baldwin's, 31 Cannon St., Satur
day, July 9th from 4 p. m. Fine
free lunch every day. a P
i.'jK RENT. Small . ?mce, main sireei
u . fflonfrtWr' Building. ' .vn-
tiuire of W. G. Lineburgh. & fctcn,
livuu ' -'
Room 1, Sanford Building.
ap
EXPERIENCED HELL WANTED.
Crown Paper Box Co., No. 183
John St. ,' ' . aP
WANTED. Immediately one good
square piano, for shore cottage. M.
Steinert & Sons Co., 915 Main
street. P 8 bo
201 MEIGS BLDG. is the home of
Dr. Mansfield, the foot specialist.
He can cure your corns without
pain. a
WANTED. A young lady for ofllce
attendant. Good salary. First
, class position. Aaaress Aavnnte
ment, care of Farmer.
P 8 bpo
FOR SALE. Restaurant in South
Norwalk, doing big business. Good
location. Will stand investigation.
Address Restaurant care of Far
mer. P 8bp
WANTED. A position by a neat ap
pearing man, 35 years old, at any
thing. Cash security if required.
Address B. D., General Delivery.
P 8 d p
FOR SAL Ev One runabout, cost
$125, can be bought for $50; 2
pneumatic tires 36x2 4 and one 34
t2 -ii one computing scale and one
butter knife. W. B. Meyer, 5ial
East Main St. Market. P 8 sf3
SEALS. Notary Public,' Lodge", and
rrornoration. and Waif Seals, Rubber
Stamps, Ink Pads. Daters made to
order at short notice, and prices are
right. : The Schwerdtle Stamp Co,
41 Cannon St. P 8 d
WANTED. The people to know that
the Woodlawn has been opened un
der new management this season, -
so those anticipating going to the
shore will find everything at the
Woodlawn to their satisfaction.
Rates reasonable. Address Wood
lawn, Walnut Beach, Milford.Conn.
P 8 S o
; 1
SITUATION WANTED. By a first
class metal worker. Warm air fur
naces, heating and ventilating. B.
R. -Walterhouse, 21 School street,
Norwalk, Conn. P 7 sp
PRICES have gone up and will go
higher, cover your boiler and pipes
now. J- F. Welsh, 114 Kossuth
street. H 18 tf o 5 3 1
PRATT'S CAFE, 137 Fairfield Ave., is
...ii-ck n Vi n vf what vou want in a 1p
wines and liquors. Do not forget the
fine free hot roast beef to-morrow.
G2135o
WHEN YOU WANT a good Derby or
SOtt ns.1. set; lum a.i s uasi. MdJlI
street. You know who. Thomas
Meath. D 14 tf o 1 3 5
GUINEA HENS. ducks, roasting
.viificens. oroiiers. iowi. nver nud-
ding. sausage meat, bologna. Bom
moe & Biltz.
G 15 1 3 5 o
SAFES. New and second hand house
safes $zo. .Business sates or every
description in stock for quick de
livery. Combinations changed and
adjusted. Walter E. Marsn, 192
Fairfield Ave. S 16 5 1 3 5 o
NEW YORK BOLOGNA and frank.
furters, home made meat loaf, fresh
daily. Peter Hrpn, 1216 Stratford
Ave. U 28 tf 3 5 o
WE DO THE RIGHT kind of picture
framing at lowest prices, standard
Art Store. 1219 Main St.. Stratfield
building. I 30 3 5
ALBERT TISKA, 1263 Stratford Ave.,
opposite Lincoln school, shaving,
haircutting, massaging, etc. Chil
dren's haircutting a specialty. "As
you like It." P 16 tf 5 o
HOT ROAST I5EEF for Saturday
night at O'Connor's, East Main and
Walter Sts. All welcome. Lager
jajxd ales the finest. tf. 6 o
C
00L
IN POOR
PROCEEDINGS
Rowley at one time chauffeur for
Mrs. Forbes, is the husband of Mrs. 1
Ida Rowley.
Mrs. Forbes stated that her father
died in Fiskill, N. Y in 1M8, but that
he did not leave any . property, having
been supported by her brothers. "Pri
or to the execution being served, you
had considerable jewelry?" asked At
torney Slade.
"I wore Jewelry at odd timea
Mrs. Forbes stated that she had
three rfngs, one set with a diamond
and an emerald, one set with rubys
and pearls, and another set with em
eralds and pearls. Also a pearl col
lar, a string of pearls and a sold
bracelet studded with sapKrea.
"Have you any of that weJry on
you now?"
"I never wear Jewelry in the day'
time."
"Did you own horses. during lttf V
"I had no horses."
Attorney Slade then produced soma
newspaper pictures asking Mrs. For- ;
bes if she ever owned a horse called
"Lady Bell" and another called "Dan
dy" and when she replied that sh
had not, he asked if she had ever
taken steps to refute the statements
made that they were her property.
Attorney Slade had a number of let
ters which spoke of gifts of money
and rings to various persons by Mrs.
Forbes, and also rings received by
! VT.-r. PA.k.n A 4-4- ... . Tl 1 1 . -
ed to the reading of the letters Jn
the whole, but was wiljing to have
those parts read which had any bear
ing on the case. Attorney Slade In
formed the court that at his sugges
tion the letters were given to Judge
Curtis in the Superior court , during
the suit for the alienation of the af
fections of Mr. Rowley so that the
public could not have access to what
was written in them. One letter re
ferred to a ring gien to Mrs. Forbes.
(Continued on Pairs 2.)
HOUSEKEEPER WANTED by a
widower. Call evenings after sevn.
66 William St. - ap
FOR SALE.
for $125,
Ave.
-y
-$300 new upright pian.,
Violin $3. 84 4 NobJ
LOST. July, 7 in vicinity of Wash
ington Park, gold chain with hart.
Return to Room 202 Meigs BIdtr.
Reward. P8 bp
WANT TO RENT part of an office
for desk room and safe. Address
A. C. this office. P 7 bpo
WANTED. First class nickle plater.
Weld Mfg. & Supply Co., Oak and
George Sts. p 7 bo
WANTED First class die setter.
Weld Mfg. Co., Oak and George
Sts. P 7 b o
HOT ROAST BEEF and potato salad
servide at 4:30 o'clock every day
free at Hartmann's, 126 Wall
6treet. RWtfo
A GIRL of experience to do general
housework. Apply 100 Uncowa
Hill. R 9 tf. o
CALL ON DIAL & LEE MUSIC CO., i
84 Cannen St., when you are think- J
ing of purchasing a plan. Terms V
very reasonable and no 'stereet )
charged. ?2 tf . o I
WANTED. Hose supporter stMehers j
and stringers. Also sewing machine '
operators on waists. Apply to The I
Warner Brothers Company, Main
Office, cor. Lafayette and Athuitlc ;
Sts. P 2 d o '
WANTED. Sewing machine opera '
tors on coreets, also flossers. Small j
girls for hand werk. .Apply to The
Warner Brothers Company, Main ,
Office, cor. Lafayette and Atlantic -Sts.'
P 2 do
WILLIAM J .MEAD, Rents. Real Es
tate and Insurance. Room 310 New
field Building. S 12 tf o
CARLOAD OF HORSES. Just arriv
ed at Cannon & Fergusons barn,
Commerce street, New Haven, Ct.
Workers, drivers and business
horses. R 28 g op
TYPEWRITING Mimeographing,
Notary Public Sears. IDS Meigs Hid.
P 17 t?o
TO RENT. Desk room with roll top
desk. 416 Warner Building.
I 2 tf o
GOOD SECOND HAND National Cash
Register for sale cheap. Addre?3
P. O. Box 16, City. S 2 tf.o
I LntE Caeca Laxine Tablets best for
constipation, don't you? B3o
AROUND the corner of Fairfield av.
and Water St. McPadden's Cafe. F.
& M. Schaefer N. Y. Old German
Brew, Weiner Beer, M. McPadden.
agent. Fine lunch all day, Prime
Roast of Beef Saturdav. 4:30.
U23tfo
WANTED. A sober and reliable
Protestant man to care for lawns
and garden on gentleman's place,
and to be useful around bouse.
Permanent position to suitable per
son. Address R. J., care of Far
mer. P 7 spo
DO YOU KNOW, we absolutely guar
antee, honest material and work
manship. No tricks or schemes, but
honest dealings. The largest Ptock
of wall paper in the city to select
from. Pardee & Co., 1230 Pem
broke St. Phone 3569.
R 28 a 31 j5 o
WANTED. Experienced girl3 on the
following branches of paper box
making; machine operators, ilk
lining makers, and silk cas mak
ers. Also small girls on turning in.
No experience needed. ITisrhest
wages. Apply to Paper Box Dept.,
The Warner Brothers Company,
Warren St. P 2 do
NOTICE.
I hereby give notice that on July
S." 1910, 1 made application to th
Board of Police Commissioners of th
City of Bridgeport for appointment
as a special police officer.
P8 PETER J. FARRELL, f
i

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