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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, July 08, 1910, Image 2

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THE FARMER : JUhYJi, jyiu
Main
and
Golden
Hill St
VII ! I ill IHIHKIIIll lM1M1IWllTll IIIIMIH I gl'MI m IW H. Ill I ll'JUi Hil' ITTI I III -ti
Main
and
Golden
Hill St.
attiuiipdlaiy
BEST OF QUALITY
LOWEST OP PRICES
Best Bread Flour
18 Bbl Sack
Mohican Famous Teas I lb pkgs 10c
Best Macaroni or Spaghetti pk2gs 13c
Our Best Cocoa 1-2 lb tin 15c
Best Balling Chocolate lb cake 15c
Quaker Cleanser (lge can) 5c
Best Salt Cod-Fish
National 'Rolled' Oats
Fancy Assfd Cakes
Best Oyster Crackers
Regular 9c kind 6c lb, 5 lbs
Texas Head Rice 6c lb 5 lbs
Best Black Pepper lb
Elbow Macaroni 9c lb 3 lbs
Tflnhiann AmmnnSa Of Dnf (H
iuuiui.au niuuiviua, yi. uui,
Reg. 15c quality, This Sale
lb 9c
pkg 7c
lb 10c
25c
15c
25c
lb 12c
lb 10c
lb 8c
Legs ot Lamb
Loins of Lamb
Forequarters of Lamb
Rib Roasts ot Beef lb 12 and 14c
Pot Roasts of Beef lb TO and 12c
Pork Loins - - lb 16c
ONE HOUR SALE
From 9 O'clock A. M. Until 10 A. M.
Porterhouse, Round
or Sirloin Sfoak
1
c
J
ONE JHIOUJIR SALE
From 8 A. M. Until 9 O'clock A. M.
FAHGY ALASKA
SALMON
4 cans
Soar Mixed, Soar Gherkins ir
Chow Chow Pickles Pint
Mohican Toraalo Catsup
Ohio Blue Tip Matches :
Lake Shore No. 1 Mackerel lb
Best Table Salt Sack
Santa Clara Prunes 7c lb 4 lb
Pt. bots each
6 boxes 19c
4c
25 c
Our Famous Bread
lea Biscuit
Finest Layer Cakes
Assorted Cookie?
iOur Sandwich Bread
Per Loaf 5 aim til
i Coffee Rings
loaf
15c
8c
S qpt lOc each
Per Dozen
each
er Dozen
2 lb 61c
2 1b 29c
2 doz 40c
lb 17c
Elgin Creamery Butter
Pure Lard
Guaranteed Eggs
Full Cream Cheese
ohican Special Creamery Butter pound 33
A Full Line of Imp. and Domestic Cheese
at Lowest Possible Prises,
Sherwood Rye, Golden Wedding, ft n p
Paul Jor.es, Garrlck Club, Whiskies vO
Old Raven
Royal Glub -Old
Blahe - -fori
or Sherry Wine
Teach or Grange Wine
Wild Cherry Wine
Grape Juice
Cream Ale, Evans Ale, Bass Ale,
Beer 24 bottles
bof 05c
hot 00c
- hot $1.00
23c
35c
00c
15, 25 and 50c
U
Fancy Peaches
Large Pineapples
Fancy Potatoes,
Large Cakes .
Peas 4
Large Beets
Wax Beans
Large Heads Cabbage
Large Fancy Lemons
Per Basket 15c
each 12c
Full Pecks, 23c
2 for 5c
quart baskets 1 5c
2 buuehes 5c
2 quarts 1 3c
each 5c
25c Dozen
)The hearing of the charges against
Nurse Agnes Crystal of the Tubercu
losis hospital as brought by Miss
Frances Ldd of the Visiting Nurse
.Association opened this afternoon at
the rooms of the Charities department.
PLANT NOW
Cnerry
ran
10c per doz; 75c per 100
JOHN BECK & SON
985 MAIN ST. Tel. 759-3
PALMS AND FERNS
FLORAL DESIGNS
HAWKINS
FLORIST.
99
0NUL1ENTS
ARTISTIC LASTEVa.
riant operated by pnumatl qW
tin polisnln toola
HUGHES & CHAPMAN,
SOO STRATFORD AVENUE.
Phen Connection. B 19 U
CORPORATION TAX
RECEIPT $24,000,000
"Washington. July 8. Corporation tax
receipts reported in today's treasury
statement amount to $900,000. The
total collected to date is $24,000,000 and
it is expected that the srand total will
be over W6.000.000. The penalty of
five per cent, for non-payment will
attach automatically to the amount of
corporation taxes unpaid tomorrow
nlsrht and delinmiAntx stn will fa en
quired to pay an interest charge of one
per cent, a month.
GUNS BOOM SALUTE
AT FUNERAL OF
CHIEF JUSTICE
DIED.
IXTDWIG. In this city. Thursday,
jmy Yin, 1910, warold F., beloved
son of Joseph W. and Nellie Byron
Ludwig, aged 6 months.
Friends are invid to attend
the funeral from the residence of
the parents, No. 222 Maplewood
avenue, on Saturday, July 9th, at
2:30 p. m. f
Interment at St. Michael's
cemetery. a
HARTMANX. In this city, July 7,
1910, Mrs. Johanna F. Hartmann,
daughter of the late William Kut
scher, aged 69 years, 10 months,
20 days.
Friends are invited to attend
the funeral from her late residence,
No. 1094 East Main street, on Sun
day, July 10, 1910, at 2 o'clock p.
m., and from the German Reform
ed church at 3 o'clock p. m.
Interment at Park cemetery. "
BOtriiTON. In this city, July 7,
1Q1A Un.Kir "C - B T t-.
auxv, nanj x'., tun ui o allies x .
and Mary Boulton, aged 3 years.
Friends are invited to attend
ihe funeral from the residence of
his parents. No. 141 North "Wash
ington avenue, on Saturday, July
9. at 2:30 p. m.
Interment at Mt. Grove ceme
tery. a
FRESH CROQUET
Right from the factory in Michigan. Great enter
tainer for vacation season. Price starts at $1.00,
goes to $3.00. Goods delivered without charge at
JACKSON'E BOOKSHOP, 986-988 MAIN STREET
" Chicago, July 8. Seventeen gun3
boomed a salute as the. body of Mel
ville Weston Fuller, chief justice of
the Supreme Court of the United
States, was lowered into a grave at
Graceland Cemetery. Standing with
bared heads by the open grave were
Justices White, McKenny, Lurton,
Holmes and Day and Governor Hughes
of New York, recently named by
President to be a member of the Su
preme Court.
Justice Fuller's body arrived here
at- 12:30 o'clock this afternoon and
was taken to St. James' Episcopal
church which the distinguished jurist
attended for years. A simple cere
mony followed and the procession
moved to the cemetery. The services
at the church and at the grave were
conducted by Rev. James E. Free
man. Every court in . Chicago was closed
for the day. The salute was fired by
Battery F.. Fifth Field Artillery, at
Camp Dickinson, under orders from
General Frederick Dent Grant.
WORKER FALLS AND
BREAKS LEG AT KNEE
Twinges of rheumatism in his right
leg caused Jarvls S. Williams, aged 37
of 703 Warren street to fall at his
work in the Warner Bros Co. this
noon. He broke the limb at the
knee.
. Drs. Gray and Schultz were called
to the factory to attend him. At first
Williams believed the pain grew out
of an unusually severe attack of
rheumatism to which he is subject.
When It was found that there was
a broken bone, he was removed to St,
Vincent's hospital in the ambulance.
CHILE ASKS BIDS
HERE FOR 22,000
TON BATTLESHIP
Valparaiso, July 8. Bids on a 22,
000 ton battleship for the Chilian
navy were asked from European and
American builder'
RECORD BREAKING
FLIGHTS AT RHEIMS
Rheims, July 8. Record breaking
flights were again the order of the
day at the big aviation meeting here.
Hubert Latham began the perform
ances with a new record for the hun
dred miles, making the distance In 2
hours and f minutes.
The Belgian, Olieslargers, who yes
terday broke the record for continu
ous distance flying, going 160 miles
in 2:39:39, set out today to pas this
mark. At the end of two hours and
35 minutes he had covered 125 miles.
The probability of the death of Ba
ronness La Roche somewhat dampened
the enthusiasm.
Olieslagers was forced to alight at
the end of 2 hours and 55 minutes
when he had covered 140 miles.
CHAUFFEUR WHO
KILLED LOTZKO
BOY, BLAMELESS
Though Coroner Wilson has not
yet completed his finding in the in
quest of the automobile fatality of
yesterday afternoon it is expected
that there will be no prosecution of
Chauffeur John Quinn who drove the
automobile that killed 8 years old
Albert Lotzko of 111 Bassick avenue,
yesterday afternoon. Several wit
nesses have stated that the death of
the lad was the result of an accident,
and that the car was being driven at
a moderate speed.
Little Albert and several playmates
stood near the curb at Fairfield ave
nue and State street as the car ap
proached, and when it was passing
he backed from the curb, into its
path. The car struck him, threw
him heavily, and crushed his skull.
He was dead before the ambulance
arrived.
The car is owned by H. S. Van
Dusen, 30 E. 55th street, New York.
Quinn is his chauffeur. When Van
Dusen went to Europe he placed the
car and chauffeur at the disposal of
Eric B. Dahlgren, 812 Madison ave
nue, New York, the son of Rear Ad
miral Dahlgren cf Civil War fame.
Dahlgren was being driven to Watch
Hill, where his family is prominent
in the social colony.
The little victim is the youngest
but one of the ten children of John
Lotzko, a laborer. The remains were
taken to the morgue, then turned
over to Funeral Director John Lesko,
who arranged for the funeral tomor
row. Quinn was arrested at the scene of
the accident, and released In bail of
$5,000 furnished by H. D. Miller, of
the Bridgeport Vehicle Co. Today on
the charge of manslaughter he was
remanded until tomorrow to await
the coroner's decision.
o2H
mm Eteka
TELEPHONE BASE
BALL WARMS UP
The Bridgeport team of the State
Telephone company, and the New Ha
ven district team, will play their first
game of the season tomorrow after
noon at 2:30 o'clock at the West End's
park. At the same time the Water
bury and Hartford teams will do bat
tle in the Capital City.
The two winning teams in tomor
row's contests will play at New Haven
on Saturday afternoon, July 16, and
the winner of that game will have a
go with the Executive Office team, at
Savin Rock on the afternoon of the
second Tuesday, in August, when the
annual outing of the league will be
held.
JOHN D. PLAYS GOLF
ON 71ST BIRTHDAY
Cleveland, July 8. Just to show
that he was 71 years young today In
stead of 71 years old, John D. Rocke
feller played a strenuous game of golf,
walked several miles and took a
speedy auto ride Into the country.
There were no magnificent birthday
cakes, no birthday dinners, no 1 recep
tions to celebrate the anniversary of
the Oil King's birth.
John D. today remarked that he felt
fine and reiterated his statement that
he .expected to liv tr be a hundred, j
Mrs. Forbes Cool
Witness In Poor
Debtor Proceedings
(Continued from Page One) -"Where
is that' ring now?" asked
Attorney Slade-
"I think I lost It, in fact I know
I lost it," replied Mrs. Forbes.
Mrs. Forbes stated that-she never
had anything in her own name be
cause her husband believes that wo
men should never own property, In
dependent of their husbands.
"He has very old fashioned ideas
on this subject," added Mrs. Forbes.
During the course of her remarks,
Mrs. Forbes said, "I was a poor girl
when I married him, 1 didn't have a
cent in the world. He often told that
he would never have married me if
I had money."
Questions constantly arose as to
the ownership of small trinkets and
jewels now in the possession of Mrs.
Forbes. The latter stated tnat an
the jewels in. her possession belong
to her husband. JKven tne cioines
are her back are his property.
"He owns me, when you come rlgnt
down to it," she said.
"You have a great deal of wearing
apparel?" inquired Mr.- Slade.
"I wear much clothing.
"You don't consider you own
these?"
"Indeed I don't", came back the
retort.
Mrs Forbes stated that she never
owned horses, but that her husband
did. They were purchased by him
and sold by him, the money going
to his own use. She also stated that
she never .owned, or wore, a watch
in her life.
A. Holland Forbes was called as a
witness;' for his wife. He admitted
that In all the sixteen years , of his j
married life that he had never given ,i
his wife a Christmas, or birthday
present, and that he had not given
her an engagement ring. All the
jewelry now at the Forbes home is
his property and always has Deen.
He stated that $445 would cover it
all; the stuff being valueless with the
exception or a diamond ring.
Mr. Forbes said tnat he is a puo-
lisher, with offices in the Day and
Night Bank building, at 44th St. and
5 th avenue. New York. He owns 7
acres of land In Fairfield and has a
daughter 14 years of age.
Attorney Slade brought out from
Mr. Forbes that he considered the
jewelry which his wife owns his, but
not her clothes, although he pur
chased them for her.
"When it comes to a judgment you
maks a distinction?" asked Attorney
Slade.
"I might want to use the jewelry
myself," said Mr. Forbes.
Mr. Forbes also added, "I don't be
lieve women should own property.
I'm English."
Mrs. Ida Rowley, who sued Mrs.
Forbes for alienating the affections
of her husband, Ernest Rowley, and
who obtained the judgment for $3,
750, was called as a witness. She
said that she had seen jewelry on
Mrs. Forbes on numerous occasions.
This jewelry she knew to be the
property of Mrs. Forbes as the latter
stated that her husband, Forbes, had
given them to her as presents at
Christmas and also on her birthday.
She had also seen Mrs. Forbes wear
ing a watch and chain, and a dia
mond and emerald ring, which sho
said was her engagement rinev Mr.
Rowley stated that she had received
photograph from Mrs. Forbes of
the latters two horses. They were
her horses, as she had told her so
personally.
Mr. Forbes was called to the
stand a second time. He stated that
his wife never had an engagement
ring, put naa a diamond setting
which he had let , her take, because
he considered it too flashy for a man
to wear. Mrs. Forbes on being re
called to the stand stated that she
never had a watch nor wore one in
her life.
With the hearing of the witnesses
completed, Attorney-Slade addressed
the court. He arraigned this ante
nuptial agreement "of -the Forbes in
regard to everything belonging to the
husband, as an effort to absolve Mrs.
Forbes from paying a judgment ob
tained from her. The court took a
recess till 2 o'clock, when Attorney
Banks was heard in v the argument
for the defense.
Bridgeport, Conn., The AVeatler Partly cloudy, pr
Friday, July 8, 1910. able showers tonight or tomorrow.
Store closes daily, except Saturdays, at 5 o'clock
Aid
s to cool comfort,
Greatest help to coolness and comfort is the ability
not to worry about the weather. Next to that is choosing
cool wear-things and avoiding all needless exercise.
The first requirement one must furnish one's self.
The second is the store's part. The store is ready to do
that part well and promptly. For men and for boys, for
women and for girls; for folks who spend the day at home,
for folks who are out of doors; for all the store is ready
with good service and good merchandise.
For men:
Cool underwear
Cool low shoes
Cool summer shirts
Cool outfittings
Needs for favorite sport
For women:-
Cool dresses
Cool underwear
. Thin fine hosiery
Light cool low shoes
Cool dust-shedding wraps
For home comfort:
. Hammocks
Porch blinds
Refrigerators
Oil and gas stoves
Veranda rugs
Stout summer clotkes for toys.
Just examples of boys' clothes that will stand hard
wear in wonderful manner. :
Crash and khaki suits, double-breasted coat, Knicker
trousers, look well and wear wonderfully, $1.50 and $2.
Washable trousers, linen crash or white duck or khaki
-25c to, 75c.
Washable hats to go with the suits,, 25c and 50c.
Straw hats in excellent shapes and many colors, 2oc
to $1.50. "
1 Shirts and blouses with double yoke, 15c.
Auto dusters for boys, linen color, $1 and $1.50.
Front basement.
THE HOWL AN D DRY GOODS CO
JOHNSON IMITATOR
MAKES A CELL
Jack Butler, a burly negro, as big
as Johnson, drew a pen ' knife and
brandished it wildly when things didn't
go to suit him in the Greek restaurant
in Water street near Gilbert street,
this noon.
Butler had1 the place in an uproar
when Patrolman Bray entered and ar
rested him for breach of the peace.
MOB OF 2,000 AFTER
TWENTY-FIVE ANTI
SALOON DETECTIVES
(Special from United Press.)
Newark. Ohio, July 8. Twenty-five
anti-saloon detectives, who became
involved in a fight while searching
for "Blind Tigers" here today are be
sieged in the Warden Hotel by a
mnli rf mnrf thfn 2.000 Thorn i;o a
considerable promiscuous revolver
snoring Dut no one naa Deen -injured
up to 1:30 this afternoon. At that
hour the crowd was growing and the
detectives manned the hotel doors
and windows with drawn revolvers.
One of the detectives, William
TTftwnrd of Columbus. Wfla aonsratil
from his fellows by the mob, chased
toward tne dsui paric ana snot to
GURTISS AND
BROOKINS GIVE
DOUBLE FLIGHT
(Special from United Press.)
Atlantia City, N. J., July 8. Cheer
ed by thousands crowded on the
Boardwalk, Walter Brookins, repre
senting the Wright brothers, and
Glenn H. Curtiss in his own 'biplane,
gave their first comparison aerial ex
hibition here today. Brookins mount
ed into the air shortly before noon,
and while he was maneuvering at an
altitude of a hundred feet, Curtiss
started his machine. Both perform
ed beautifully.Brookins soaring above
the beach, while Curtiss, after dash
ing up and down the beach several
times, turned out to sea.
Brookins, after making a complete
turn in a hundred foot circle, headed
south and flew over the Million Dol
lar pier. New to the action of the
air eddies from under .the piers, he
dropped suddenly, with a speed that
stilled the shouts of the spectators.
Brookins was merely determining his
control over the machine in air and
later the aviator raised the planes
and shot skyward. He went 400 feet
up, swung around in another specta
cular circle and then started down
tii beach.executine every feat known
to air navigation.
Both aviators nnaiiy xanaea mier
affording the most thrilling exhibition
the resort frequenters had ever wit
nessed.
DANBURY HATTER
DIES OF INJURIES
(Special from United Press.)
Danbury, July 8. Suffering the tor
tures of the damned, 'Joseph F. Had
dy, the hat dyer who was terribly
burned last week by ( falling into a
vat of hot dye at the factory of Meek
er Brothers & Co., died today in Dan
bury hospital. He was forty years
of age and is survived by a wife.
CONDUCTOR AND
FIREMAN KILLED ,
IN TRAIN WRECK
STEAM PIPE BURSTS
ON N. H. ROAD ENGINE,
BURNING THREE
(Special from United Press.)
Nashville, Tenn., July 8. In a wreck
on the Tennessee Central Railroad
early today. Conductor Sid Knight and
Fireman F. S. Lindsay, of a west
bound freight, were killed. Engineer
Stevens was injured. The wreck was
half a mile east of Algood 60 miles
from here, and was caused by a large
rock that had been dislodged by the
frequent trains and had fallen on the
track.
ROOSEVELT FELLS
TREES AND MAKES
TONS OF HAY TODAY
Oyster Bay, July 8. Colonel
Roosevelt entertained himself this
morning by felling a few trees and
pitching several tons of hay. So
many telegrams from all parts of the
country, requesting permission to
visit him, have come to Sagamore
Hill. The Colonel decided today to
journey to New York two days a
week hereafter instead of his cus
tomary one. He announced that he
would meet visitors on Tuesdays and
Fridays at his office in the Outlook
(Special from United Press.)
Danbury. July S. The bursting- of a
steam pipe on a New York, ?fetr Ha
ven & Hartford railroad engine nar
Hawleyville, resulted in serious burns
to Conductor John Co strove. Engine
W. F. Nelson and BraJeeman J. F.
Cummlngs, all of . Water bury. Cot
grove Jumped when the accident oc
curred and sustained an Injured tacJc
for his sains.
Nelson was the most seriously burn
ed of the trio, becaus he tuck to hit
post and in some manner shut off th
escaping steam. Cummings is ht tht
Danbury hospital but the other med
made their way home.
ARBITRATION WILL
START ON TROLLEY
DISPUTE TOMORROW
(Special from United Presa.)
New Haven, July S At 10 o'clock to
morrow In the Superior court room
will be held the first meeting of Jodg9
William S. Case, Attorney David T.
Fitzgerald, and Clarence Demingr. the
board of arbitration in the wags dis
pute between the trolleymen of thm
State and the Connecticut Company.
It has not yet been, officially announc
ed who will represent the company be
fore the board.
It is rumored that President Charles
S. Mellen is anxious to argue the caa
for the' company.
New Haven, July 8. Directors of
the New York, New Haven & Hartford
Rallrcad Company from thi vicinity
left today for New York city at at
tend the board of directors' meeting
tomorrow.
The most important business at th
meeting will be the selection of a
member for the board of directors to
succeed the late J. H. Whltemore of
Naugatuck. The name heard men
tioned often for the place is Charles
Hopkins Clark, editor of the Hartford
Courant.
mmm
m
vimm mm
Weather' Partly cloudy.
Hot Weather Com
forfs
Bath Brushes 50c to $2.00
Bath Mitts 25c per pair
Sea Salt joe per bag
Violet Ammonia, ,15c per bottle
Air Float Talcum "Powder
. . . . 10c package
Hamilton's Money Sav
ing Drug Store
Corner Main and State Streets
, Phone 832

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