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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, January 30, 1912, Image 5

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I
THE FARMER: JANUARY 30, 1912
MEN'S SECTION
Buy Boys' Ctoihes NOW.
Suits and Overcoats Very low
Now that we've entered on the "Home stretch" of the season, we've
reassorted many incomplete lines of boys' clothes, and sweetened up the
values to such an extent that you'll be astonished to find how much good
clothes a little money w ill buy now.
. See the suits we are selling at $2.90, $3.90 and $4.90 fancy gray and
brown mixtures from o ur lines that were up to $7,50. Sizes for boys up to
17 years.
And the Overcoats now $2.90, $3.90 and $4.90, for bovS up to 10, and
fancy school coats for b oys up to 17, that have been up to $8.50.
Boys' pants are 39c and 69c -good values and all sizes. And boys'
blouses are 59c and 79c.
MES'S
sraTs and
OVERCOATS
REDUCED
News f Fairfield Couety Towns
Fairfield
VAIRTTEtD FIREMEN
THANK. TAXPAYERS
FOR AITO-CHEMICAL.
Eire Fighting Apparatus Has Pre
vented Several Serious Con.
flagratlons.
rspecial to The Farmer.)
Fairfield. Jan. 30. At a recent
meeting of the local firemen it was
voted that the company extena,
through the newspapers, their thanks
to the taxpayers and business men or
the town who have contributed to
ward the upkeep of the auto chemi
cal which has done such good service
during the past year. The boys of
the company have been working hard
to keep the fire fighting apparatus .n
a first class condition. Four hundred
' feet of new hose has been purchased
and the floors of the engine house
have been repaired All this work
with the regular expense, lights, ana
janitor, has been paid for and the
company is still in a prosperous con
dition. Those in the town who have
generously contributed to help tno
boys along are: Miss Anna B. Jen
nings, DeVer H. Warner. Judge El
more S. Banks. Selectman Charles S.
Fox, Mrs. Henry S. Glover. C: W.
; t t? a a H Edward
Rowland. Town Clerk Joh I. Flint, .
H. I. Flint, George n. nni, "
Boyle, A. Hollard Forbes, Samuel H
Wheeler, P. S. Hargrove, James
Everly, Byron Eddy, Eastern Under
wear company. C. A: Kimball, Mat
thew C ark, J. Klllian. Thomas For
syth. William H. Gould, John H.
Cobb, John Dalllng, Benjamin Betts.
Mrs. Henry S. Burr, Daniel Rock.
Mrs. M. H. Hinckley, Mrs. H. S.
Hewitt, Dr. V. Havard. Bacon Wake
man, George Albert Bicker George
Jennings, James Schmidt, Mrs. Mary
Jills. Frances H. Perry. Frank S.
Saum. M. T. Farley Hans Slerup.
Michael McCaffrey. Amory E. Row
land, Samuel E. Row'and. Maas
Mickelson, Terrence Gernty, Jese
Hayes, Simeon Bradley. Mr J. A.
Kelly W. M. Bulkley, Edward Os
born.'H. O. Sturges, E. B. Morehouse.
David A. Burr, Charles A. Rowe, F.
A. Burr. S. A. Backwith, N. S. Gould
en. Mrs. Finette B. O. Nichols, John
Drew, Simeon Pease, Fairfield Rub
ber Company, John McGarry Thomas
Noon, Charles B. Jennings. U.S. Burr,
William O. Burr, Mrs. David Burr.
Mrs. Samuel Glover, Oliver Turney,
Mrs. John Thomas. Mrs. Green. Mat
thew Patterson, and Andrew Miller.
A chimney fire in the home of
Wash Vepka, in the lane off Ceme
tery avenue did about $25 damage
last night. The fire which was dis
covered about 8:30. burned a hole
through the roof near the chimney.
An alarm was sounded from this
whistle at the Fairfield Rubber works.
Chauffeur McGarry drove the auto
chemical to the. fire and assisted in
extinguishing the blaze.
Miss Amy Jennings tendered a lin
en ehower to Miss Louise Everitts, at
her home on Miller avenue, Saturday
afternoon. The afternoon was pleas
antly spent. Those present were the
Misses Sadie Deyo. Helen Forsyth.
Sarah Rockwell. Eva Downs. May
Downs. Louise Foray the. Frances
Pease, Amy Child. Ruth Child, Cath
erine Burr. Helen Hayes. Dorothy
Smith, Rachael Pickett, and Mabel
Ferris. .Refreshments were served
and a fine time reported.
St. Thomas Church Notes.
A collection was taken Sunday
morning for the St. Agnes building
lund of Hartford.
Requiem high mass was said yes
terday morning for the late Lucy
Callan, of Southport.
Friday will be the Feast of Puri
fication. Candles will be blessed for
the year at the 8 o'clock mass.
Friday, being the first Friday of
the month, communion will be held
at the 5 and 8 o'clock masses.
Saturday, Feast of St. Blase, fol
lowed by the usual custom of bless
ing of throats at the 8 o'clock mass.
The law regarding individual drink
ing cups in various public places has
taken a strong hold in this town.
.Before many weeks all the schools in
' the town will be supplied with in
dividual drinking cup.-s for each child.
The idea has been taken up with thi
emnlcyes of the Fairfield Rubber
Company. ...
Selectman Charles Fox is seriously
ill at bis home in Spring street with
quincy sore throat. His many friends
wish him a rapid recovery.
Saturday evening a large number of
young peop'e gathered at the home of
Mrs. Aetna L. Bulkley to partake in
a linen shower which was tendered
Miss Agnes McLeavy, of Bridgeport.
The evening was spent with music
and games. Refreshments were serv-
THE SOUTHPORT
SAVIXGS BANK
One Hundred and Fifteenth
Semi-Annual Dividend
This Bank has declared a dividend
of Two per cent., payable January 1st.
1912, on all deposits made prior to
July 6th, 1911, and of One per cent,
on all deposits made after July 5th
and prior to October 6tn, 1911.
Hereafter deposits made with The
Son tli port Savings Bank, on or before
the first of any month will draw In
erest from the first of that month,
erxeept that deposits made between the
first and flftli of January or July will
draw Interert from the Irst.
HENRY H. PERKY, Treasurer,
goutbport. Conn.
December 20th, 1911. T21 tt
INCORPORATED
OUTFITTERS TO MEN WOMEN Sc CHILDREN
BRIDGEPORT. CONN.
ed. Those present were Mr. and Mrs.
Arthur Bulkley. Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Jennings, Miss Biuby Jennings, Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel T. Bulkley, Mr. and
Mrs. Elmer T. Bulkley. Deputy Sher
iff H. PL Elwood. Clayton El wood,
Willam S. Fallon, William Meeker,
and William P. Bulkley.
A leap year dance is planned by the
members of the .Greenfield Hill Coun
try Club. The dance will be held in
the clubhouse on the evening of Febv
7. The entertainment Is In charge
of Howard N. Wakeman. Music will
be engaged from Bridgeport and the
good time that always prevails will
be in order.
Miss Olive Pease has accepted a po
sition as stenographer at the Fair
field Realty Company.
The trolleys were running off sched
ule yesterday because of the stormy
weather.
Invitations are out for a house
dance which will be given at the home
of Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Burr on
Greenfield HI'l, Feb. 1.
John E. Boyle spent yesterday In
Boston.
Members of the Greenfle'd Grange
are planning to go to New Canaan to
morrow evening to attend the instal
lation of officers by the Pomona
Grange of that town.
William McKenny and W. Afcbott of
Pittsfleld, Mass.. both former students
at the Hargrove school, were visitors
at the s?hool yesterday.
Miss Ru'h Child is receiving con
gratulations for so' os which she re
cently gave at a musical held in New
Haven.
IvEAP YEAH PARTY.
The Greenfield Hill Country Club
will give a leap year party Feb. 8
Members desiring friends to - be In
vited will send in their names to the
secretary not later than Feb. I.
STEPNEY
The funeral of Mrs. Sylvina Joyce,
wife of John Joyce, was held at their
home last Thursday afternoon. The
pall bearers were her sons, Elmer,
Herbert, Carleton and Allen Joyce.
Rev. Alfred Boutwell of Bridgeport
officiated, artd the music was furnish
ed by the choir of the First Presby
terian church, Bridgeport. Interment
was In the village cemetery.
Mrs. Stephen French was In Hart
ford last week as the guest of Mrs.
Sophia Beardsley.
The Board of Relief, Lemuel O. Os
borne and William C. Nichols, will
meet at the town hall, Monroe, on
Thursday, Feb. 1.
Rev. F. H. Sawyer preached at the
Hattertown school house on Sunday
afternoon, for the first ltme in several
weeks.
The Burdick brothers, who are
boarding at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
L. V. Slade, had the misfortune to
lost a. valuable team horse last week.
Several in this place have been In
vited to a college whist to be given
In the Monroe town hall, on Wednes
day evening, Jan. 31.
Edwin Toucey was taken by his
grandfather, Ade"bert Hubbell, to
Bridgeport, last week, where he had
an operation performed which remov
ed his tonsils, also several adenoids
from the nose. The toy is sretting
along nicely and remained in Bridge
port at the home of Mrs. Augustus
Eddy.
Mrs. Eliza Winton left on Thursday
for Danbury, where she will remain
for the rest of the winter.
E. N. Sipperly has finished drilling
an artesian well for Miss Emily See
ley, and has moved his drll'ing ma
chine tq the home of Ernest W. Sher
man in Lonff Hill.
Miss SoDhia Booth has returned af
ter spending a few days with her
brother. Edward Booth.
Zelmon Purdy, who for about 20
years has been sexton of the Baptist
church, has resigned.
Elam horning of Bridgeport, is
spending some time with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Corning.
Mrs. Milon Hawley is at the present
time confined to the house with one
of the prevailing clds, and Is under
the care of Dr. Wales.
Mrs. C. E. Osborne, Jr., entertained
the Juvenile cire'e of King's Daugh
ters, at her home on Saturday after
noon. Church Attached
For Coal Bill
(Special from United Press.)
Manchester, Jan. 30. Because the
Wapping Methodist Church has neg
lected to pay a 36 bill now six years
old, Wesley Hollieter, prominent coal
dealer, had an attachment served on
the church property. The case is re
turnable Feb. 17, and. in the mean
time, the church services will be held
as usual.
Child Labor Taken
Up By Women's Clubs
(Special from United Press.)
New Haven, Jan. 30. With child
labor the topic of its first session, the
New England Conference of Federat
ed Women's Clubs opened its annual
meeting, this afternoon. Representa
tives from women's clubs all over
New England were in attendance.
New York If you would live in
Happy Valley, avoid politics, is the
message ex-Governor "Bob!" Taylor,
of Tennessee, bore to the members
of the Tennessee Society, of New
York.
MEJTS
FUR AND
PTR-LUfED COATS
REDUCED
Stratford
WOMAN SUFFRAGE WAKES
AFTER 50 YEARS SLEEP.
Stratford, Centre of Movement Before
the war Welcomes Speakers In
Enthusiastic Meeting,
(Special to the Farmer)
Stratford, Jan. 30 After sleeping
over fifty years the woman suffrage
movement awoke in this town last
night with a whoop and bounded into
immediate popularity. In spite of the
bad weather and the fact that there
were other attractions In the town
last night, every seat In the town hall
was filled and many stood through
the meeiing which opened the cam
paign of the suffragists in this town.
Over half of the audience were men
and they evinced as much Interest as
the ladies. Mrs. William T. Hincks,
of Bridgeport, president of the Con
necticut Association opened the meet
ing and presided during the evening.
She made a stirring address and was
received with enthusiasm. She first
Introduced Edward Porrltt, an Eng
lishman who has devoted his life to
suffrage for women. He told of the
causes which were back of the mili
tant suffragette movement in Eng
land and the results already obtained.
He was listened to with interest. Mrs.
Porritt. his wife, followed with an elu
cidating talk on the aims and objects
of the suffragists in this country and
their- methods. Miss Emily Pierson
took the tovn audience by storm. She
was applauded frequently through her
address and when she finished every
one in the hall was sorry. Miss Pier
son, besides having an attractive per
sonality and a ready command of lan
guage. Is apt and witty and she was
frequently interrupted with enthusias
tic applause. Before the close of the
meeting over fifty signatures were af
fixed to the roll of those who favor
votes for women In this town.
Strange to say over half of this num
ber were men.
Those who came to the meeting ex
pecting to see the regulation suffrage
speakers as pictured in the humorous
prints, found a company of handsome,
gracious and elaborately dressed wom
en in dead earnest. There were no
rasters clad in bloomers ready to
bury their claws in the hair of the
horrid men. The speakers immediate
ly gained' the. confidence and respect
of the audience and retained it
throughout the meeting.
The Chairman, Mrs. Hincks. read a
letter from Senator Stiles Judson who
is now In the Bermudas, regrettingJ
his Inability to be present at the
opening meeting in this town and
promising to speak for the ladies at
any future meetings which he' is able
to attend.
This meeting was part of the trolley
campaign which has been Inaugurated
and which covers Fairfleld. New Hav
en and Hartford counties. Later a
league will be formed In this town
as enough names have already been
signed to warrant such a move, ine
town of Stratford was one of the first
to take up the movement half a cen
tury ago, but the Civil war and the
questions which it involved crowded
he women's movement into the shade. .
The hearty response which the town
has made to the effort to revive it
has gratified the promoters very
much and the people here will have
an opportunity to hear the best speak
ers that the country affords In the
future. Had there been no other at
tractions billed ahead of the suffrage
meeting the hall would have been too
small to hold the crowd which would
have been present.
The patronesses were Mrs Arthur
DeForest Wheeler. Miss Fannie Rus
sell, Miss Myra Curtis, Mrs. D. T.
Winton.
The hall was handsomely decorated
with American flags and the colors of
the suffragists which are purple, white
and green.
Afew days ago the Farmer called
attention to the condi'ion of the Mc
Namara building on Main street and
suggested that the health officer
might find a Job there. The condition
of the building is before the fire mar
shal and he will make an Inspection
of the stairways and other places
where a fire might prove dangerous
to life. It is expected that this in.
spection will take place next week af
ter the matter has been reported to
Chief of the State Police Eagan at
Hartford. Chief Judson said last
night that he had not yet been order
ed to make an inspection but that h
would undoubtedly do so in the near
future.
M'ss Sarah MeEwen is ill at her
l.t.me on King street.
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Bardsley in
writing from St. Mary's, Fla.. where
they are passing the winter, take oc
casion to say that they are enjoying
summer weather there.
The entertainment given by the
grades of the Centre school will be
repeated this evening for the benefit
of the parents of the performers.
Gregory Dwyer, a blind musician
occupied the attention of the pupils
of the seventh and eighth grades yes
terday from noon until 12:45. which
was really preliminary to the main
object of his visit which was to' take
a collection for the benefit of his
school. The talk was interesting and
was illustrated with cards used by the
blind in their schools. In the morning
Ion of the time usually devoted
to study was occupied by Rev. W. i
Chapman of New Haven, who talked (
to tne gino un me ueeu -'i. wuv
tion. The Masonic building association
mill nlav whist tonieht In Odd Fel
lows hall for the benefit of the fund. ;
Refreshments will De served ana ev
eryone is lnvtted.
Alan Wilson has been appointed dep
uty registrar of voters by the Repub
lican registrar. Louis E. Peck.
Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Hosbach
have removed to 90 Courtland treet,
Bridgeport, where they will begin
housekeeping.
With all the Impressive aboriginal
ceremonies of the order, George A.
Kalrchild was raised to the office
of Great Mashonee of the Redmen at
the meeting of Okenuck tribe last
night. There was a large attendance
of braves. There ceremonies were
conducted by Great Sachem Edward
Buckingham and Great Chief of Rec
ords W. Saunders of Bridgeport. Mr.
Fairchild was elected to this impor
tant office last June. His duties will
include the supervision of all the pub
lic ceremonies of the order in the
state.
Tax Collector John C. Wilcoxson
has completed his list of delinquents
on the personal tax of 1910 and haa
turned it over to the selectmen for
abatements. When these are com
pleted five names will be drawn from
a box containing the whole number
and these will be turned over to-Pros-ecutor
Ivan Morehouse for prosecu
tion. The costs in each case will be
about' 97.76. Those delinquents who
wish to save this unnecessary expense
will do well to settle before their
names are drawn. The prosecutions
will be made in batches of five which
will be drawn after the preceding
names are disposed of. This will give
everyone an opportunity to settle and
save the costs.
On Thursday night the Ramblers
will meet the Atlas five of New Ha
ven. On the same evening the High
school boys will play the Arrows of
Bridgeport. There will be music and
dancing after the games.
EASTON
(Miss Mary S. Ferriss led the meet
ing of the B. U. C. E. at the Baptist
church Sunday evening. The young
people voted to purchase a piano to
be- placed in the hall to be used when
they have sociables.
Mr. Joshua Kent of Sport Hill is
to peddle milk again, beginning the
first of the month. Mr. Kent has been
employed at the Union and Pacific
Tea Company in Bridgeport.
Mr. DeWitt Candee and Bister, Miss
Achsah Candee was entertained on
Sunday at the home of their uncle
and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Bradley in
Weston.
Invitations have been received by
several in this place to a select dance
to be given at Eastwood's hall in Step
ney on Friday evening next.
Mrs. John H. Candee who has been
very ill and confined to her home for
several weeks, is now improving.
Miss Dorothy Mallette was over
Sunday guest of her mother, Mrs. Geo.
Mallette in Tashua.
Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Andrews were
recent guests of Mrs. Andrews sister,
Mrs, Charles Morehouse in Redding.
Mrs. Morehouse has been very ill but
is now slowly Improving.
Miss Ruth Smith of Sport Hill is
spending several days with her aunt,
Mrs. Sylvanus Mallette at "Sweet
Brier" who is confined to her home
with the grippe.
The assessors, Charles Nichols and
Wakeman Wheeler, met at Mr. Chas.
F. SlUiman's on Monday afternoon.
Mr. Frank Canfleld is quite ill at
the home of Miss Mary reefs in Long
Hill with rheumatism.
Mr. Howard Edwards celebrated his
twenty-fourth birthday with a party
at bis home on Saturday evening.
During the evening refreshments were
served; among them was s handsome
birthday cake. Those present were.
Mrs. Ida Gilbert. Miss Eva Gilbert.
Miss Grace Haller, Bessie Davis. Wal
lace Davis. Robert Davis and Mrs.
Tingley.
Mrs. Dwight Sharp and dauehter,,
Doris of Bridgeport, are spending a
few days with Mrs. Sharp's parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Edwards.
NEWTOWN
The opening Of the dancing and de
portment classes. Saturday, resulted
in a very gratifying success for both
teachers and pupils.
Miss Hazel Egan has returned to
Bridgeport, after two weeks visit
with her grandmother, Mrs. Andrew
Egan. Palestine.
Miss Sarah E. Falrman was a guest
in Bridgeport, Saturday.
Samuel A. Gardner of New Haven,
agent for the State Humane Society,
wss in town. Friday.
Miss Frances Egan. daughter of Coal
Merchant William Egan has success
fully passed the preliminary training
for the Danbury hospital training
school for nurses and haa been ac
cepted to enter the school for a two
year's course.
Congregational Notes Miss Olive
Gibson gave an address on the Mis
sionary work, etc., in New Mexico
Miss Gibson is a very interesting and
attractive speaker and was heard
with pleasure in the morning as well
as at the Y. P. S. C. E. meeting in
the evening. The ladies sewing socle
ty will meet at the home of Mrs. C.
B Taylor on Tuesday afternoon at
2-30 p. m. The ladles missionary had
an entertaining sslon on Saturday
afternoon. Miss Olive Gibson address
ed the ladies on her interesting work.
Sovereign
Powdered
B
For Medicinal, Toilet and Laundry purposes
PACKAGE 10c. 1 Check
The Union Pacific Tea Company,
1058 MAIN STREET 701 EAST MAIN STREET
Telepr-one Connections
TRY SPRAGUE'S Extra High Grade
LEHIGH COAL
Sprague Ice & Coal Co.
Eart End East Washington Avrnne Bridge. Tel. 71 0
ICE
COAL
WOOD
IRA GREGORY & CO.
Branch OfiQce ovog Main Office
Main Street
ABSOLUTELY
CLEAN
COAL
GUARANTEED
Screened by Special Machine
QUALITY UNSURPAS3ED
WHEELER
944 Main Street East
3 FO
Extra Stamps
with Tea
20 Stamps with 1 lb.
Tea 3So
2 5 Stamps with 1 lb.
Tea 40c
50 Stamps with 1 lb.
Tea 50c
80 Stamps with 1
Tea 60c
20 Stamps Free
with i can A&P
COCOA, 20C
15 Stamps Free
with i bottle A&P
OLIVE OIL 22c
25 Stamps Free
with i bottle A&P
EXTRACT 25C
ALL
The Particular
People Are
WARD'S
Using New York Springfield
A social hour was enjoyed with' re
freshments. Trinity Notes Rev. J. H. George
tok his text from Acts 9 chap, lo
verse, the subject being "Bt. Paul
and Foreign Missions." The men of
the parish will serve one of their fin
est suppers on Wednesday evening.
The tickets will be' 35 cents. The
Woman's Auxiliary will meet at the
rectory, Thursday afternoon at 2:30.
Friday will be, "The Feast of the
Purification." The Knights of King
Arthur will go to New MHford. next
Friday night to attend the meeting
of Iona Castle at that place. Holy
Communion next Sunday at 11 o clock.
Rev. J. H- George officiated at the
Sunday afternoon services at Hawley
ville chapel. Edith Lillian Dow. in
fant daughter of Arthur E. and Lil
lian May Daly was baptised Friday
by Rev. J. H. George. -
St. Rose's Notes Confessions Thurs
day afternoon and evening. Friday
the first in the month and the feast
of the Purification, masses will be
celebrated at 5:30 and 8' a. m., when
the candles used throughout the year
will be blessed. Saturday the Feast
o fSt. Blase the blessing of throats
will take place. Mass will be cele
brated at 8 o'clock. A month's mind
mass will he celebrated Saturday
morning at 9 o'clock for the repose
of thes oul of Michael' McNamara.
Pronunciation In Ireland.
Many persons seem to see, or to hear
rather something, to be amused at in
the soft Irish brogue. As a matter of
fact, most of the words of the Irish
"dialect" are not Irish at all. but tHe
purest of English English a trile an
tiquated, it Is true, but nevertheless
the real thing. The ears of Milton,
Dryden, Spenser and Chaucer would
not have been surprised to hear an
Irishman speak of "a rouh say" or "a
clane shirt." At the court of good
Queen Bess the cultered Englishman
carefu'fy garnished his conversation
with "goolde" rings and brave
"swoordes" and bored his fr'ends with
accounts of the smart savings of the
"childre" at "hom." This was the
English originally imported lno Ire
land by the cultured Irish, and the
Irish have found it good enough to
preserve. Chicago Tribune.
New York The freighter Arnold
Amsinck is carrying to Liberia a car
go of silk hats, drums and dolls, to
be used in trafficking with the na
tives. They will be exchanged for
Ivory and gold.
ORAX
stratford Ave.
o-
& HOWES
End Congress Street Brilge
R 25 CENT
3 cans A&P Condensed Milk for
3 pkgs. Grandmother's Oats for -
3 cans 1912 Brand Peas for
3 pounds Layer Raisins, for
3 cans Iona Lima Jeans for
3 cans Jersey Pears for .
3 cans Marie Elizabeth Sardines for
3 cans A&P Pumpkin for
3 cans A&P Metal Polish for
3 cans A&P Table Syrup for
3 tumblers Jelly for
3 pkgs. Seeded Raisins for '
3 cans Iona Tomatoes for
1 0c .
Packages Crackers
B. C. 3 packages for
DEXTER'S
OR
H83
Main St.
Phone 4328
707
E. Main St
Phone
2388-5
EMM
IF YOU VALUE THE
POWER OF MONEY
UY NOW
JANUARY PRICES WILL
NO TIME TO LOSE
20 Per Cent
WW
s
1- ., :I. .
N. Buckingham & Co. Inc
Furniture and Upholstery
Est. 1842 1T7 STATE STREET
Connecting with Large Warerooms on Court Street
VALENTINES
' OTJR ASSORTMENT OF "Y ATEN TTXE yoVETTITES, POST CARDS AXT
VALENTINE LETTERS SURPASS AiX. riuiviuLs sji5u.
POST OFFICE NEWS STORE 11 ARCADE
Quick Loans
HOUSEKEEPERS AND WUKKiAUinM
IE YOD SEED SUMS FROM
HO Op)
we will guarantee your note and mate It possible for yon to obtain the
mnnn on tlie da ol application. Call, "phone" or write oa
liHoKsohold Guarantos
ROOM SO. 14, CITIZENS' BTJTXMXG
1025 MAIN
Ww"f Rc and 10 Store
BERKSHIRE MILL CO.
Flour, Crab, Ihy, Goal anJ VIqoJ
Tel. 397
BRANCH OFFICE 1091 BROAD STREET
i OPPOSITE
SCREENED LEHIGH C0A
THE NAUGATTJCK
DowTitovm OITIce: Telephone
154 KAIRFTEM AVENTE
tWANT ADVERTISEMENTS ONE CENT A 70RD
SAL
25c
25c
25c
25 C
25c.
25 C
25c
25 C
25c
. -25c
25c
25c
25c
Extra Stamps
with CoIIee
10 Stamps with 1 lb.
S" O'clock Coffee . -25c
20 Stamps with 1 lb.
Sultana Coffee. 30c
2 5 Stamps with 1 lb.
Amuosa Co flee . ,S2
30 Stamps with 1 lb.
EIRyad CofTee, . . . S5c
15 Stamps Free
with 2 cans
SALMON 25C
20 Stamps Free
with i bottle
Queen Olives 25c
25 Stamps Free
with i-a lb. packet
Golden Tipped
Ceylon TEA 25c
25c
k WE have it
J fresh every
' morning.
10 STAMPS FREE WITH
2. Cans Sultana Tomatoes, each, ; . 12 l-2c
2 boxes A&P Stove Polish, each, 5c
2 cans 'Spinach, each, 12 l-2c
x can Shrimp 12c
x can Raspberries or Cherries, 15 C
3 boxes Birds-Eye Matches, each, gc
SOON BE MEMORIES f
COME AT ONCE
OH On Furniture
with few exceptions.
10 PER CENT. OFF
on Eugs, Lace Curtains,
Couch Covers, Portieres,
Upholstery Goods, etc.
Bargains are made won
derful by comparison. We
invite inspection. "We urge
comparison for here is where
hesitation ends.
i
Guaranteed
and Indorsonisn! G3a
KT1UJ!.X
"Phone"
POST OEFICE
VALLEY ICE CO.
TTptown Office:
421 HOtTSATOXIC ATKNTB

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