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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, February 23, 1912, Image 10

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THE FARMER: FEBRUARY 23, 1912
NEWS OF INTEREST TO OUR FEMININE READERS
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1186 Main Street
Newfield Building
Largest Selection
in the city
New Spring
Arrivals
MRS.H06UE SUNCHCOHB
10
TIE
DOM
YOUTH AND
. "The happiness of young people has ever been the
chief pleasure of mv life. It will warm my heart to wit
ness the happiness of those
' roof." Pickwick Papers.
Surely there is no happiness half so perfect as that of
Toung people. Why, then, do so many parents drive their
children to the homes of others for their pleasures?
One woman I know sends her little child out to play,
because' she makes the house
If that child learns of the world's evil when but a
baby, the mother will wonder how it could have happened
to her child.
One mother of a young
, "always knew where Bobby
on the streets hours at a time and would only return in
response to long and vociferous calls.
Who was he with, and what was he learning?
Every child has the right to a protected childhood.
Mothers and fathers neglect the greatest duty of life when
they allow children to grow up finding greater pleasure in
some other home than their own.
What if they do mar the furniture and wear the rugs
out ? Is a rug or a fine bit of mahogany to be compared to
the happiness and .ioy of your child? If so, send it to the
garret until the child shall be older, and replace with sim
pler stuff. '
, Make a child's friends welcome in your home. In no
other way will you get so keen an insight into its heart.
Enter into the games and play. Be young with the
youns-est and try not to forget your own youth.
: When your boy walks a few blocks out of the way to
carry some pretty girl's books home from, school, it is not a
subject for unseemly jests.
When your young daughter blushes over her first real
florist's bouquet from a boy, try not to forget what a thril
ling moment it is.
Be young with your children, and keep their happi
ness very close to your own roof tree, for truly it "will
make your heart warm."
TROLLEY CAMPAIGNERS
STORM SMALL TOWNS
liss Plerson' Xadlne Crusade For
- Woman Snffrage Tells of Results
Obtained.
The trolley campaign leaders in the
woman suffrag-e movement, who are
temporarily living at the Y. W. C. A.
In Merita, held a meeting In the
Town hac at Berlin Wiesday even
ing. Rev. Samuel Fisk, a strong
Bympathizer in the movement, presid
ed. i Miss Emily Pierson, state organizer
' and daughter of A. N. Pierson of
Oromwe'l, who conducts perhaps the
largest floral business in the state,
spoke very enthusiastically yesterday
morning- over the results that are be
ing obtained .and what has been ac
complished in waging this campaign.
"We are putting all our efforts in the
small towns at present," she said "as
the system of legis'ature representa
", tiori- is" proportionately large. The
conditions of labor have made it im
perative. There are fifty thousand wo
men in Connecticut working outside
the home. The hours of labor of
these women and their conditions of
worK, both moral and sanitary, de
pend upon the laws, and yet the wom
en have no voice in making the laws.
'During the past hundred years
there has been a complete revolution
in industrial and socia' conditions. As
women's work has gone out of the
home into the factory many women
have been forced to follow their work
into-the factory yet their needs and
protection are unknown to the men
who make the laws. Legislation is
pushed through which covers men's
difficulties but the men who make
the laws are ignorant of woman's
needs,
"There is one class which particular
ly needs the vote,'" Miss Pierson said,
"and that is tho aristocratic set the
people whose on'y ambition in life Is
to attain a high sociai standing. The
ballot right would stimulate a desire
in them to take s more active interest
in the betterment of conditions."
When -asked if the woman conld not
be instructed in producing the desired
results by the exertion of influence
over the stronger sex Instead of wag
ing' this war for'the-ballot, M'ss Pier
eon said, "Many women are ignorant
as to how to remedy present condi
tions. Besides, why use the indirect
method? Women who can influence
men intel'Igently should be allowed to
register their intelligence in the bal
lot boxes.
"The suffrage association has grown
to phenomenal proportions and we are
making' a big headway," ' she said.
"Some of the most prominent men in
the country are now advocates of suf
frage, they beiievinar that it is the re
sponsibility that belongs to woman."
The campaign leaders wi'l hold a
meeting in Wallingford, Mondav even
ing with Miss May Marfaret Egan of
Bryn Mawr college as prinrioal speak
er. This evening they wi'l hold a
meeting in Meriden in the Auditorium
instead of Colonial hall as was first
announced.
WOMA?f HIT BY AITO
JiOW IX THE HOSPITAL.
Greenwich. Feb. 23. Mrs. John
Wright of this place is in the local
hospital with a bruised body and cut
head .received- when an automobile
driven', by Anton Jensen skidded, the
rear of . the machine ftriking Mrs.
Wright, knocking her down. Jensen
turned his machine sharply to one
Bide to prevent going through a pud
d'e of water and splashing Mrs.
Wright and in doing so the. auto skid
ded, turning completely around, the
rear striking Mra Wright, knocking
her into the puddle Jensen was try
mgte 'elSar. The accident happened
irr 'front of the Greenwich hospital,
into which .place she was carried by
..Jensen.
Inventory Will Be Taken
at Radford B. Smith's. Wednesday
next. At the sale Saturday many odd
lots and remnants will be seld at re-
dlulous prices to close out- and save
baokkeepingc: r plenty of regular goods
M well and the usual
(OOdJL
sale domestic i
HAPPINESS
dearest to me under my own
untidy.
boy boasted to me that she
was." And yet Bobby played
MRS. SARAH HULL WILL
DISCUSS "WHITE SLAVERY"
Wife of Prominent Bristol Socialist to
Speak. Here Next Sunday.
"White Slavery" will be the sub
ject discussed by Mrs. Sarah W. Hull
of Bristol, at Socialist hall, Park
Theatre building, Sunday evening.
Admission free and the meeting
will be one of thousands held, all over
the country in commemoration of Wo
man's Day in the 'Socia 1st party.
Mrs. Hull is an interesting speaker.
She is the wife ' of the las Socialist
candidate for Mayor of Bristol, who
was defeated by only 11 votesi. She
has taken an active interest In wo
men's' work in and outside of the So
cialist party, of which she is the Wo
man's State correspondent for Con
necticut. Another speaker who is scheduled
on the pYogram is Rev. Albert C.
Thompson of the Immanuel Baptist
church. There will be music, vocal
and instrumental.
The meeting is held under the aus
pices of the women of the Socialist
party in Bridgeport. The following is
the committee. that has it In charge:
Miss Vida Sterns, Mrs. Stephen
Quinn, Miss Mary Taylor, M'ss Minnie
Bender, Miss Lea Berger, Miss Flor
ence Berger, Mrs. James Fitzgerald,
Mrs. George Bowen, Miss Etta Man
vi'le, Mrs. John Rainey and Mrs.
Charles Hoffman. Mrs. Quinn will be
chairman of the meeting.
MARY SILUMAN CHAPTER
HOLDS PATRIOTIC BANQUET
Mary Silliman chapter. Daughters
of the American Revolution held its
celebration of Washington's birthday
yesterday at The Stratfield where a
luncheon was served for 1:30. The
dining room was handsomely decorated
for the occasion, the decorations be.
ing of a patriotic nature, flags and
bunting and pictures of Washington
being used effectively. The series of
toasts were in the nature of brief
sketches of men contemporaneous
with Washington.
SOCIAL AND PERSONAL
The fair sex 'showed their ability as
entertainers by entertaining their gen
tleman friends at a leap year dance
given last Tuesday evening in Varuna
Hall. The affair proved to be a suc
cess and "a most delightful evening"
was the verdict of all the boys who
were lucky 'enough to receive an in
vitation. The girls filled all programs,
did all the introducing and during the
intermission took their partners to
near by durg stores and treated them
to liquid refreshments and cigars.
Some of the girls also escorted their
friends home. A group of six started
home in a taxi but the machine went
on a strike upon Stratford avenue so
the party were obliged to walk the rest
of the way. One of the party reports
that the mornins air was most invig
orating. The boys in this party reach
ed their homes in time to see the sun
rise. Woodhull's orchestra rendered
excellent music.
The following ladies were patron
esses for this function: Mrs. C. F.
Braitling, Mrs. J. Hurliman, Mrs. H.
E. Hill, Mrs. A. Nordbeck, Mrs. H.
Woodhull. Mrs. J. Scully. Mrs. D. G.
Fitzroy, Mrs. J. P. Langevine ana Mrs.
W. G. Dunham. The girls deserve
much credit for making this affair
such a successful one.
Miss Mary V. McXamara of Pe-
quonnock street, is spending: the week
end at Water town.
"VOTES FOR WOMEV."
Paris, Feb. 23. Deputy Godard has
p-iven a formal promise to a group of
25 French suffra e-ettes. who invaded
the Chamber of Deputie", that as soon
as the question of .electoral reform
again comes up before the Chamber,
he will champion the cause of "Vote
f t- Wompn TVTme TVTnririirite T) II -
rand, the famous French "woman's
fightser" headed the delegation.
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Dancing Frock for a Toung Girl
Very girlish and dainty is this pretty frock which is suitable foi" a
boarding school miss not yet "out" in society, yet who likes to take part
in' evening affairs of the younger set. Bordered white taffeta is the
material used for this frock, the border being arranged effectively atong
the edge of the tunic and surplice bodice. The crushed belt is of the
material, and closes under two pink silk roses that match the roses in
the border. Xn the V shaped decolletage is a high necked yoke ot lace.
Oxalic Acid In
Milk Has Killed
Eight Children
(Special from United Press.)
New York, Feb. 23 Until the re
Dort of the chemist examining the
contents of the stomachs of the chil
dren who died under mysterious cir
cumstances in the Brooklyn Nursery
and Infants' hospital, is complete
which was expected to be late today,
the authorities will take no further
steps in the matter. While convinced
that the eight children who have died
there since Sunday were poisoned and
that oxalic acid mixed with the milk
they were fed was the cause, the fact
that the suggestion has been made
that meningitis might have been the
actual cause resulted in orders being
given for the chemical examination.
Coroner's Physician Wuest insisted
today, that there was no question but
that ooison caused the deaths. He
pointed out that if it had been menin
gitis every child in the home and the
hospital would nave Deen in, wnereas.
those killed and those still ill were in
mates of the hospital.
While at first the detectives who
are working on the case were inclin
ed to believe that some person with &
homicidal mania had tried to kill all
of the children in the hospital, they
were inclined, today, to believe that
if it is finally proven that oxalic acid
caused the deaths, it got into the milk
by accident and through carelessness
on the part of some of the employes
of the institution.
A woman employe, who was ques
tioned, told the detectives that she
purchased oxalic acid on Saturday and
that she made a solution with it. part
of which was used by her to clean
the operating table in the hospital. It
was suggested that some of this so
lution might have been left where it
could have gotten into the milk sup
ply by accident.
The hospital and nursery of the in
stitution are separate buildings. There
are 100 infants in the nursery but
none of them have been ill. This fact,
and the knowledge that the oxalic
acid was used, Saturday, and the chil
dren taken ill, Sunday, seems to
prove, the police say, that this ac
tually was the case.
MUSICALE AT Y. W. C. A.
The musicales given at the East
Side branch are always good. Tues
day evening the choir from Trinity
M. E. church will give four selections
by the quartette and three solos. Miss
Elsie Smith, a- violinist of much tal
ent, will appear and also Mrs. Glad
den Beers. There will be readings by
Miss Violet Marsh.
FOIXD DEAD IX BED.
Roekville, Feb. 23. Mrs. Augusta
Bissell Hammond, widow of A. Park
Hammond, a former well-known man
ufacturer here, was found dead in bed
at the home of a step-son, with whom
sne had been living, yesterday. When
she did not appear for breakfast in
the morning the son went to her
room to call her. It wa5 then her
death was discovered. She was a
former state president of the Wo
man's Relief corps, the auxiliary lo
the Grand Army of the Republic.
MISSIXG WATERRVRY GTRI;
IS FOUND IX NEW YORK.
Waterbury, Feb. 23. Marie Well.
the 15-year-old adopted daughter of
John Wells of this city, who disap
peared on Feb. 10. is in New York,
according to a letter received at the
W--!s home yesterday from the girl.
She does not give her address but
says she is in the employ of a rich
fami'y in New York and is well sat
isfied to remain where she is. Her
reason for leaving the Welti home,
she says, was fear that she might be
returned to the orphan asylum.
No matte, what you wtitit try tbe
Farmer Want Column.
WOMEN'S RELIEF CORPS
EULOGIZES WASHINGTON
The Women's Relief Corps, auxiliary
to Ellas Howe, Jr.. Post, G. A. R-,
held ajpropi.ate exercises in observ
ance of Washington's Birthday, yes
terday. Following the business meet
ing there was a short entertainment.
At 4 o'clock a number of representa
tive members of Ellas Howe, Jr.,
Post, G. A.- R-, entered and were es
corted to seats.
Arrangements for the program were
in the hands of the patriotic instruc
tor of the W. R. ? Reminiscences
of Washington, Instructive, patriotic,
and laughable, were read by members
of the corps. The chairman then
ca'led uipon the patriotic instructor of
Elias Howe, Jr., Post, G. A. R., for
a short address appropriate to the
dn y.
Refreshments were then served and
a most delightful social hour follow
ed.
HIGH SCHOOL NEWS
The basketball team with, a squad
of rooters will Journey to Ansonia,
this evening. There will be no game
tomorrow afternoon.
The members of the afternoon
classes have been asked to help keep
the school clean. All ought to take
pride in the appearance of the build-
ins. . .
Several of the fellows of Room 10
have organized as the "Invincible
Quartet", and are rehearsing and
practicing in order to be able to take
a prominent part in the coming min
strel show.
Miss Edith O'Hara, '13. Commercial,
lost the check book and bank book be
longing to her bookkeeping set. Mise
O'Hara would be grateful if the finder
would return the same to ner.
Themes and essays for the different
contests posted in the assembly hall
must be sent in before March 1.
Manager Maurice Sullivan of the
basketball team is arranging for a
couple of games to be played at Jer
sey City. M. J.
Miss Willa Reid will give the sec
ond of a series of socials for the Sen
ior Commercial class at her home, on
next Tuesday evening.
One of the Seniors has kindly oblig
ed us with a short poem picturing the
adventures of John Doe, Freshman, at
school for the first time:
"FRESHMAN'S FIRST DAY."
With shaky feet, he takes his seat.
He fearfully bends his head;
The teacher ca Is, he nearly falls.
But must get up instead.
When he opes his eyes, he's mulch
surprised
He's greeted like a man.
It's Mister this and Mister that.
His fear is on the wane.
Sylvia Flynn sits aside of him,
A rosy, pretty maiden;
Ilisrh School life, is not all strife.
If you are candy laden.
And good Soph Hack, the quarter
back. Consents to a little treating,
Not that he'll speak, whene'er they
meet
With more than a nod for greeting.
At home he'll say in review of the
da v
"Oh, High School life is bright.
It is so fine, no other for mine
And Sylvia Flynn's all right."
SIXTY-ONE YEARS A PACPER.
'Philadelphia, Feb. 23. Sarah Keen,
who lost her memory fo'lowirg an a
tar-k of smallpox, died at the Philadel
phia hospital where she had been ar
inmate for CI years. Her relatives are
unknown.
JUST RECEIVED
A LARGE AND ELEGANT STOCK OF
Fancy and Wash Dresses
AGES UP TO 17 YEARS
Including Ginghams, Linens, Chambray, Lawn and Net. All priced moderately
YOUR INSPECTION IS SOLICITED
MRS. SEELY WAIST SHQP
Security 1115, MAIN ST. cna Fligbt U3
Bui'din? we save you one-half at Take Elevrfor
THE UPSTAIRS WAIST SHOP 1
WAIST SPECIALS FOR SATURDAY
A small lot of 72 waists, all new Spring models comprising Chiffon over
Silk and Net, Grenadine, Crepe de Metior and Marquisette. Plain and fancy
colors, also stripes over' handsome floral and Oriental designed silk. Actual
values $5.00 to $7.50. . SATURDAY SPECIAL AT $3
BLACK AND WHITE CHINA SILK SHIRTS The new Spring man
nish shirt waist strictly tailored with soft turnover cuffs and collar and side
pocket. VERY SPECIAL AT $2.
THE SPECIALTY WAIST SHOP OF BRIDGEPORT
THE FEMALE OF THE SPECIES.
(A Study in Natural History.)
When the Himalayan peasant meets
the he-bear in his pride.
He shouts to scare the monster who
will often turn aside;
But the she-bear thus accosted rends
the peasant tooth and nail.
For the female of the species Is more
deadly than the male.
When Nag, the wayside cobra, hears
the careless foot of man.
He will sometimes . wriggle sideways
and avoid it if he can;
But his mate makes no such motion
where she camps beside the trail.
For the female of the species is more
deadly than the male.
When the early Jesuit fathers preach
ed to Hurons and Choctawsv
They prayed to be delivered from the
vengeance of the squaws
Twas the women, not the warriors
turned those stark enthusiasts pale
For the female of the species is more
deadly than the male.
Man's timid heart is bursting with
the things he must not say.
For the Woman that God gave him i
isn t his to give away:
But when hunter meets with husband
each confirms the other's tale
The female of the species is more
deadly than the male.
Man, a bear in most relations, worm
and savage otherwise-
Man propounds negotiations, Man ac
cents the compromise:
Very rarely will he squarely push the
logic of a fact
To its ultimate conclusion in unmiti
gated act.
Fear, or foolishness, impels him, ere
he lay the wicked low.
To concede some form of trial even to
his fiercest foe;
Mirth obscene diverts his anger; Doubt
and Pity oft perplex
Him in dealing with an issue to the
scandal of the Sex!
But the Woman that God gave him,
every fiber o' her frame
Proves her launched for one sole is
sue, armed and engined for the
same;
And to serve that single issue, lest
the generations fail.
The female of the species must be
deadlier than the male.
She who faces Death by torture for
each life beneath her breast
May not deal in doubt or pity must
not swerve for fact or jest.
These be purely male diversions not
in these her honour dwells
She, the Other Law we live by, is that
Law and nothing less!
She can bring no more to living than
the powers that make her great
As the Mother of the Infant and the
Mistress of the Mate:
And when Babe and Man are lacking
and she strides unclaimed to claim
Her right as femme (and baron) her
equipment is the same.
She is wedded to eonvictions in de
fault of grosser ties;
Her contentions are her children,
Heaven help him who denies!
He will meet no cool discussion, but
the instinct, white-hot, wild;
Weakened female of the species war
ring as tor spouse and child.
Unprovoked and awful charges even
so the she-bear rights;
Speech that drips, corrodes and poi
sons even so tne cobra bites;
Scientific vivisection of one nerve till
it is raw.
And the victim writhes in anguish
like the Jesuit with the squaw!
So it comes that Man, the coward,
when he gathers to confer
With his fellow-braves In council, does
not leave a place tor her.
WTiere, at war with Life and Con
science, he uplifts his erring hands
To some God of Abstract Justice
which no woman understands.
And Man knows it! Knows, moreover,
that tne Woman that God gave him
Must command but may not govern;
shall enthrall but not enslave him
And She- knows, because She warns
him and Her instincts never fail.
That the female of Her species is more
deadly than the male!
Rudyard Kipling in Ladies' Home
Journal.
l.EAl' YEAR ASSEMBLY.
. A well attended leap year assembly
was held in Miss Slocum's gymnasium
by M May Hall's, Friday evening
dancing class, last evening. The Spin
ning orchestra delighted the company
by playing the old time favorites.
These selections were heartily encor
ed by the entire assembly as well as
the Yale students. About midnight
the assemb'y said "Au Revoir."
Final Clearance Sale
of winter millinery, furs, fur coats,
long cloth coats, seal plush coats,
raincoats, shirt waists, petticoats, wil
'ow plumes and marabout boas and
muffs at merely nominal prices, at
rJ. H. Dflon & Co.'s, 1105 Main street.
They need the room for spr-'ng mer
chandise and cost is not considered in
this sale.
Saturday Will Be the Great Day
of our - - -
FINAL CLEAW-UP SMI
Before Removal to Our New Store
1116-1118 Main Street
Ladies' 50c Muslin Night Gowns. 29c
Ladies' 59c Flannelette Night Gowns. .... .C5c, 3 for $1.C0
Ladies' $1.50 Long Crepe Kimonas (all colors) . .79c
Ladies' 29c Lawn Kimonas 13c, 2 for 25c
Ladies' 59c Flannelette Dressing Sacques 3 for $1.00
Infants' 25c Flannelette Kimonas 7c
Ladies' 29c Flannelette Petticoats 19c
Children's 15c, 19c, 25c Muslin Drawers, . v. ... . . .8c pair
Ladies' 69c House Skirts 44c
Ladies' 25c Muslin Drawers .lJc
Children's and Ladies' Fleece Lined Underwear . .19c
Lot of Infants' 39c and 50c Slips .17c
Ladies' 50c Corsets .19c
Ladies' 39c Colored House "Waists 13c
Ladies' $2.93 Messaline and Taffeta Silk Waists, all
colors . .1.69
Ladies' $5.00 and $6.00 Tan Jackets S1.00
Ladies' $3.98 One-Fiece Dresses $1.69
Ladies' $1.50 Fancy Lawn and Tailored Waists 69c
Ladies' $5 & $6 Messaline & Taffeta Silk Petticoats $2.89
Ladies', Gents' and Children's Hose 8c, 11c, 13c rair
Ladies' Dress Skirts 98c, $1.50, $1.89, $2.49, $3.95
Ladies' Long Polo Coats $4.98, $7.93, $9.95
All our $12.50, $14.75 and $16.50 Suits $5.75 and $7.95
KELLER
1067 Main St
THE
PEOPLE'S
DAIRY
130 State Street
rtm S3
Lowo's Laundry
1000 SEAVIEW AVENUE
HIGH GRADE LAUNDRY
JOHN IF. WJf
REMOVED TO
610 FAIRFIELD, CORNER WEST
'Phone 74
lis f i
ill !;
AUTOMOBIUES i lk ii
ic..t.y I'lipir ji
IF IT'S Auto Junk k Tires
SELL IT TO JACOB BROS., 35 KOSSUTH STREET
o RUTTER QQ,p
FRESH FROM THE CHTTtX
Tel. GEO. A. ROBERTSON 5S9
Co.
WORK
TEL. 154-2
m m 9
1M
ENGINE LUBRICANTS
GREASES AND PACKINGS
The Best Gas Engine
Cylinder Oil Made
259 Strafford Ave,

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