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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, March 17, 1913, Image 2

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THE FARMER: MARCH 17, 1913
m
1.0:0
13"
a.
Easter Gifts
of '
Fancy Plant Baskets
are most appropriate
See Our Display
Branch
P. O. Arcade
Store 'phone
759-3
lijifewf If'cjX ANNOTTNOING OTJR YlIM
ffilr'ixf ' SPRING 1
llMaSr MILLINERY V
' OPENING- t yi
.'$ISf$' A. V. TDESDAT, WEDNES- J iJjJj
WmS 4 V SMKOH 18. H AND JO '"'Iwi
lr A '"Vv' 'V I Tmi an cordially in- jJ Ffj f;
yM Vj vited to attend and to- f glfe
'f vuf Vk' epect the season's ad- WfL
1155 MAIN STREET . JMC
GENTJIXE
SHAMROCKS
10 CENTS EACH
James Koran & Son
PTORISTS
DIED.
PAUL. In this city. March 16th, 1913.
Julius Paul, aged 67 years.
Friends are invited to attend the
funeral at his late home, No. 54
Maiden Lane, on Tuesday 18th inet.,
at 2:30 o'clock p. m.
Kindly omit flowers.
Burial In Mountain Grove ceme
tery. ap
HAGGERTY. In this city, March 15,
1913. Mary J., daughter of Mar
garet and the late Daniel Haggerty,
aged 22 years, months.
Friends are invited to attend the
funeral from the residence of her
mother, 14 3 Frank street, on Tues
day. March 18, at 8:30 a. m., and
from St. Patrick's church at 9 a."m.
Interment at St. Michael's ceme
tery, a
LYONS. In this city, Friday, March
14 th, 1913. James Lyons.
Friends are invited to attend the
funeral from his late residence. No.
8 8 Madison avenue, on Tuesday,
March 18th, at 8:30 a. m., and from
Eaint Augustine's church at 9
o'clock.
Interment at St. Michael's ceme
tery. - S 15 b
'I iHinii.jiMif
id!.
EASTER FLOWERS
FOR
GIFTS
John Reck & Son
FLORISTS
Branch P. O. ArcaSe
DIED.
SALMON. In this city, Saturday
March 15. 1913, William D. Salmon.
Friends are invited to attend the
funeral from the residence of his
daughter, Mrs. A. L. Porter, No. 57$
Wood avenue, on Tuesday, March
18th, at 2:30 p. m.
Burial In Putney cemetery, Strat
ford, a
JOHNSON. In Middletown, Satur
day, March 15, 1913, Winfield Scott
Johnson, aged 56 years.
Friends are invited to attend the
fimeral from the undertaking par
lors ot M. J. Gannon, 1051 Broad
street, on Tuesday, March 18, at 2
o clock p. m.
Interment at Park cemetery, a.
STTLLIVAX. In this city, Saturday,
March 15, 1913, Mary O'Brien, wid
ow of Patrick Sullivan, aged 45
years.
Friends are invited to attend the
funeral from the residence of her
sister, Mrs. George Allen, No. 621
Ogden street, on Tuesday, March
18 th, at 8:10 a .m., and from St.
Mary's church at 9 o'clock.
Interment at St. Michael's-ceme
tery, a
LOST. Signet ring, initials E. W. C.
Liberal reward if returned to 693
Myrtle Ave. ap
WANTED. 3 0 0 couples to attend
masquerade and ball given by the
Lyceum Club, at Eagles' Hall, March
22. Admission 25 cents. S 17 rp
V
SPRING
FLOWERS
HAWKINS
trrHATFXELP BCILDISQ
CgEF Monuments
ARTISTIC IiASTING
tfaat operated by pneumatic cutting
and DOlislilns tools
HUGHES & CHAPMAN
SOO STRATFORD AVENUE '
Chose. Conitxotlos . Rl tj
WANTED. First class mineral water
bottler. One who understands mix
ing syrup. Good place for right
man. Apply by letter. Address L
care of Farmer. S 17 sp
WANTED. Quickly, 2 good office
men for manufacturing concern.
Give references. Apply to P. O. Box
..No. 93, WatervlUe Station, Water
bury, Conn. S 17 ba
NOTICE.
Special meeting of Court Relna
Christina, No. 61. TJ. of C, at Varuna
Hall, this evening at 7:30, to take ac
tion on the death of Sister Mary Hag
garty. MABEL A. CLARK. Q. R.
a MARGARET M. DORSET, F.S.
CARD OF THANKS.
We desire to extend our sincere
thanks to our friends and neighbors
for kindness shown us in our late be
reavement in the loss of our beloved
wife and mother and to all for floral
offerings sent us, and especially do
we wish to thank the Dept. No. 27,
U. M. C. Co.
MR. JOHN CAMPBELL AND
ap , FAMILY.
T. J. HICKET ESTATE
James H. Hickey was appointed ad
ministrator and William Hickman and
Hon. Thomas C. Coughlin appraisers
of the estate of Thomas J. Hiekey,
late of this city, in the Probate court
today. , ... .
BABY BOOKS
IUuo for Girls, Pink for Boys. These books are Intended to keep . record of
the tittle tot from birth until they grow up. Several varieties at many prices at
JACKSON'S BOOK SHOP, 986-988 MAIN STREET
DR. HOLT'S UARK AND I'EEDINGG OF CHILDREN, recommended and
tboiuandg sold in this city
STREETS SCENE
OF BATTLE IN
MEXICAN TOWN
Laredo, Tex., March 17 Streets of
Neuvo Laredo, the Mexican town op
posite this city, were the scene of a
battle this forenoon in which 20 Car
ranziste and 15 federals were killed.
Nearly 50 soldiere were wounded.
The Carranzists retreated to the
hills south of Nuevo Laredo, where
they appeared to be preparing for a
fresh assault.
The street battle continued for an
hour and a half.
No 'harm to Americans from bul
lets flying across the border was re
ported. Col. Brewer, commanding the
14th United States cavalry, on patrol
duty here, sent word early in the day
that there must be no firing in a di
rection that would endanger border
points.
Carranzists, during the night, had
forced their way into ' the city and
occupied a, lard factory. At dawn
rifle firing awoke Americans in Lare
do. The first sight that greeted them
wae a rush of refugees across the
bridge between here and Nuevo Lare
do. Men and women carrying their chil
dren Jammed the bridge, heedless of
wagon traffic. Numerous officials of
Nuevo Laredo were among the refu
sees. The officers carried books and
records by the armful.
The Carranzists at 3 o'clock this
morning arrived within four miles of
Nuevo Laredo and opened a light rifle
fire. Under the cover of darkness
they advanced cautiously until they
were within the city limits. They
rucrhed into a lard factory, barricaded
the windows and constructed en
trenchments for skirmish lines with
the aid of outlying fences and sheds.
At 6:30 their rifles awoke the twin
cities with a sudden fusilade. This
was followed by an hour's eilence.
men ttie firing was resumed for a
few minutes, only to be succeeded by
another eilence. About 8 o'clock the
rebels fell back from the lard fac
tory under a mot federal fire, and re
treated slowly, pushed hard by gov
ernment troops.
HOWLANDS
Entrances In Main Street, Fairfield Avenue, and Cannon Street.
Bridgeport, Oonn
""Saturday, March 15, 1913.
Fair, cold tonight; fair, warmer to
morrow.
Regina cleaners.
work as b v magic.
The important question listen woman's labor.
is mat or apparel.
MAN IS FOUND
IN NUDE STATE
AND BLEEDING
Hartford, March 17. Hurriedly
called to the home of Henry M. Sperry,
12 Park terrace, at 3 o'clock this
morning, by M. Toscan Bennett, who
lives next door, on suspicion that there
were burglars in the house, the police
broke opn the door of the kitchen
and found Michael Thomas on the
floor in a nude conditionf badly eutr
about the hands and wrists and partly
conscious from loss of blood. An art
ery in the wrist had been severed. The
man was hurried to St. Francis' hos
pital in a serious condition. It was
feared this afternoon that he might
not recover. Mr. Sperry, who had
been in Scranton, Pa., returned this
noon. Miss smiivan is tne housekeeper."
The police found signs of a violent
struggle in the room. The girl was
reticent in her statements, but alleged
that Thomas attempted to assault her
and that she fought him as stubbornly
as she was able. She declared that
the hurts received by him were made
by his pushing his hands through tlxe
glass in a window in an effort to es
cape. A thorough investigation will
be made by the police.
Mr. Bennett heard the noises about
the house and telephoned to the police
and the suspicious noises were finally
located in Mr. Sperry's apartment.
Mr. Sperry said today that so far as
he can learn the man suffered an at
tack of delirium tremens.
Easter is but days away.
Spring actually arrives Fri
day. Most-important of all
the matters that claim atten
tion, is the matter of tasteful
and correct and pleasing ap
parel. Solution of all the problems
that it brings up is to be found
here. The store is just glow
ing and brilliant with answers
for women, and for men, and
for girls.
If you would know what is correct, come. If you
would find that which pleases, come. If you would be
Regina vacuum cleaner is a
device that brings a genuine
saving of woman's labor into
the home. For that reason, if
no other, it deserves a place in
every home. But there are
other reasons and principal
one is that it does a certain
sort of important work better
than any other device, does it
quicker, does it more thoroughly.
With a Regina vacuum cleaner one actually cleans
things. A broom simply stirs up the dust that accumu
lates. A carpet sweeper removes it from the surface o?
carpet or rug. But a Regina actually takes the dirt out
sure of full value for every dollar that it is planned to erful vaouum a suctLon As the Rena jg moved back
and forth over a piece of floor-covering, this vacuum
invest, come. If you would enjoy such an exhibit as the
Young folk's apparel
is notably good.
OBITUARY
St. Charles church was thronged
this morning1 with mourners who had
come to pay their last tribute of re
spect to the memory of Mary, widow
of Patrick Foley, who went to her
reward early Saturday morning. The
cortege, an unusually large one, mov
ed from the late home, 1480 East Main
street, at 8:30, andi to St. Charles'
church at 9, where Rev. Father Calla
han offered up a mass of requiem for
the repose of her soul. -At the offer
tory Joseph Clabby sang "Ave Maria'
and Lter mass "There is a Land.'
The display of floral tributes which
surrounded the casket was most Beau
tiful. The. pall -bearers were Patrick
Cuddy, Timothy O'Rourke, Edward
Lavery. William Condon, , William
Ramsey and George Coughlin. In
terment was in too ramiiy Plot at est.
Michael's cemetery.
DISPLEASED AT
IRISH DISPLAY
MOB WRECKS STORE
Red Bank, N. J-, March 17 A five
and ten cent store was nearly wreck
ed today by an angry mob that ob
jected to St. Patrick day post cards
and souvenirs displayed in the win
dows. Irish residents wbo led' tne
crowd declared that the display held
upi to ridicule things that they re
garded as sacred.
When the goods were placed on saie
last week the proprietors were asked
to remove them. They refused and
today the Catholic parish priest vis
ited the etore ana' renewed tne re
quest. Two hundred or more persons
gathered outside the store, and when
the priest reported that his mission
had failed, the mob rushed in, tore the
offending cards and images1 from the
windows and counters, and trampled
them under foot. The counters were
upset and other goods were destroy
ed, j
The owners of the store declare they
will prosecute the raiders.
ST. PATRICK'S T. A. B.
Society, Nineteenth Annnal Entertain
ment ana coaret Dance-, at
Easle' Hall
EASTER MONDAY NIGHT, MCH, 24
Maloney's KtrinjE Orcnestra.
SiritritiST by Prominent Soloists 3
TICKETS 25 CENTS A PERSON
S17 d"
3 .
Clear and true, there rings
out in the styles of this season
a note which is especially
pleaing to young folks.
The Balkan effects, different
i- -U T,-P,
otuxe iicta iicvci uciuic sccii cuiuc. j -. , - . -. . , , e ,
vulciyvo ca.j-1. aiiu iica v xci uxi (i j.i.giiu vub wj. tuc iy
rug and leaves behind it genuine cleanliness.
There have been many vacuum cleaners made. All
that have been efficient have been high-priced. That was
because they were largely experiments and were built in
mall quantities. The Regina is not an experiment. It
has passed that stage. And it is being made in such quan
tities that it can be sold at low cost.
Special exhibition of the capabilities of the Regina is
now being given in Carpet Hall. There you may see for
yourself how quickly and how thoroughly it cleanses rugs
from dirt and dust.
Four sizes are to be chosen from; each size designed
to do a certain sort anrl am mint, of worlr. "FTftnd-o-np-raf frl
rrom anytmng 01 late ana run Reginag ar in two sizes at $g.45 arid $18; electricaUy-op-
or youxn, appeal sxrongiy 10 erated Retinas are 40.50 and 110.
tucixi. xiie uxxgxxo cuB' .yv.xuu , - Yon tan have no fair of ihmr worth 511
are .... associaxeq. wixh . hp - rw Qr 1Q T,rtTO. frt c oi
styies,are especially aixraciive work.
to young lolKs. Tne entire as
sembly of spring: fashions
seems to almost have been
planned just for folks who are
young either in fact or in ideas.
Here are suits. Note their
See how they are brightened at leSS
bv bit of color. See how their
lines are those of youth. Even Printed linoleum 4 yards wide at one-third less than
when colors are quiet, They its price has been
still are youthful m line And Good hardwood and allover natterns. flvp.rv naff prn
eMpeciaiiy is una true ui txic new nice weight and quality.
j u..0 rn-hia TOiT, 1i1, i i11 J -e
"iuiai ui. 1 1 1 imcmju 10 zoyjziitiy juuu X.KJJT use i 11
rrv, n-0 cionii tri. Komfi arfi of nlain fabrics. 1UUU cases- -DUt we own up: it is oitticuit to nancUe
6-v..0. -x I J 1 , . - . y , , .
some of f ancv strines and mixtues. And the ereat maior- rilu ucuuiJies a 101 01 rooin 111 arPet lalA to properly snow
J. w I i.
1U
Third floor.
You may buy
wide linoleun
itv are enlivened and made doubly-attractive by trimming
of rich color, $15 to $32.50.
Coat, too, are as full of life and brightness.
Here are Balkan coats, and cutaways, and straight
models.
Brilliant reds are sometimes finished with green vel
vet collar. Plain bright blues have dark velvet collar.
And there are soft grays in striped patterns quiet tans,
pretty checks. But nearly every one is touched with a
contrasting color that serves to make it all the prettier,
$10 to $25.
For girls of 6 to 14, coats marked by some prettiness
Here are striped coats with belted back and with col
lar and cuffs of rich red or blue. Here are some finished
with lace on collar and cuffs. And here are others of
plain blue or tan in new shape and of unusual goodness,
$5 to $12.50.
Little girls of 2 to 6 may have "coats of similar pretti
ness and new model.
Several styles are made with collar of same material
as is the coat and above this a collar of white pique which
is easily removable. Most of these are serere but one stvle
is of diagonal and has hand-embroidered ipique collar pjggj ""g VVflV
A white serge coat has hair-lines of contrast running I ll6y 0 110111(1 u6l
tnrougn it and is hnisned with sailor collar. Another
style of coat is of blue or brown serge with collar and cuffs
cif tan. And there are Norfolks of red or blue finished
w5 th velvet collar, $5 to $7.50. -
There never has been quite such a collection any
where hereabouts
So we prefer to sell it quickly, even without profit.
It has been 75 cents a square yard. To folks who are
prompt,
50c sq yd.
Third floor.
THE HOWLAND DRY GOODS CO.
NEW HAVEN
TAKES ANOTHER
LARGE DROP
(Special to The Farmer)
New York, March 17 New Haven
railroad stock dropped 4- 1-4 this after
noon, to 114 1-2, a new low marK.
Their Increased Pay
New York, March 17 Eight thou
sand dollars has been paid out in div
idends to every J1.000 paid , out in
wages to firemen on the New York,
Proof of the Claim is Waiting and cording to testimony given today by
r.-Un lj A . -i . n vv. j. iu-;",
nc fuau uc gictu iu iiavts juu cumtj aiiu see it personalty.
Second floor.
ADVERTISE IN THE FARMER
THE HOWLAND DRY GOODS CO.
statistical expert for
the Brotherhood of Locomotive Fire
men & Enginemen, in the arbitration
procedlngs between the firemen and
64 eastern railroads. f
During the 11 years covered by these
figures, Mr. Lauek added, the New
Haven road has increased th tractive
capaoity of its locomotives by 64.5 per
cent., and the firemen have increas
ed their efficiency 28.7 per cent. Ther
was a gain in freight revenue. Jk. j
Lauck testified of lQ,a5,O00t but ..
firemen were given an Increase total
ling only I15S.000.
Mr. Lauek was akd whsthri:
was true that the road would have
to etop paying dividends shoald :'r.
increase in wages demanded by :h
firemen be gTanted. Such a sttrnn;
Chairman Chambers said, had be?
imputed to Charles S. Mellea, Presi
dent of th road.
"It may not b necaary,"
Lauck. "I do not ssy that the pr:
dent of the road would wilfully m s
state it financial condition. I w:;:
eay, bowever, that if the financial
management of the road had been en
efficient as the transportation man
agement has been, there would be rt
need to atop the oaymeat of dividends."
WELL KNOWN GERMAN
STRICKEN Oil STREET
Recognized by his brother, the un
identified man who fell from hear:
failure at the corner ot Ann and Pem
broke -streets Saturday afternoon, dy
ing before medical assistance could b
rendered, was identified as Julia
Paul. 66 years old, a resident at 54
Madlne Lane.
For many years Mr. Paul was em
ployed as foreman ln the Hubbeil h.
Curtis factory, but of late conducted
an upholstering business on his own
account. He lived with his wife and
daughter Lena J., at their home. H
is also survived by another cawrhtr.
Mrs. I,. W. Wood, of Armstrowr PJae.
nd a brother, William, living in
,' ''dgeport. Both Steuben lodge, M,
O. o. F., and Bridgeport Encamp-'.t-'nt,
22, will mourn his loss.

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