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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, July 01, 1914, Image 9

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THE FARMER : JULY & 1914
SPROTT EXONERATED
BY STATE OFFICER
FOR AUT0ACCiDEI5T
Grave conflict of opinion today en
ters into the case of Radcliff E.
Eprott, held for hearing before the
superior court on a. charge of man
slaughter for running- down and Kill
ing Florence Johnson at Southport,
May 17. Three investigations have
already- been held by state and town
officers with the result that he , has
been held to :be 'both innocent and
criminally responsible.
Coroner John J. Fhelan of thia city,
-who conducted a most exhaustive ex
amination, both upon the spot and
with all the witnesses who could te
got toy the police, f ourod Sprott e
, sponsible. Justice Bacon Wakeman, of
Fairfield later released him from cus
tody not finding sufficient cause to
ibind him over to the higher court.
The papers were later reviewed by
State's Attorney Oalen Carter, wtio ob
tained, a bench warrant from Judge
Gager for his arrest upon the grounds
that the lower tribunal could not take
jurisdiction when a man was held by
a coroner, an officer of 1 the higher
court- ;
- Yesterday, following a hearing be
fore Secretary of State Albert Phillips
in Hartford to decide whether his li
cense to operate a motor vehicle
should be forfeited "becanae of the ac
cident, it was decided that h had
operaiea me c&r in a manner .wia
careful and moderate In speed.
Sprott, who is secretary , and treas
urer of the Gas Appliance Company
is socially prominent tn Bridgeport.
DeVer H. Warner has twice signed
bonds for his release. ' j
, Charles G. Roseling of this city, a
motorcyclist, yesterday had his license
revoked by the Secretary of Si:ate af
ter a hearing in which it was proven
he drove at excessive speed. .
Attorney General John H. LS.ht yes
terday ruled that noa -font th,i secre
tary of state is legally qualified to sit
in Judgment upon complaints against
drivers of automobiles wJiere licenses
may be revoked. - This decision- will
cause Secretary Albert Phillips to sit
upon a case in which heiwas a parti
cipant and In which the defendant is
Phillip Carlson of the Metropolitan
Auto & Carriage company of tills city.
The cars of Phillips and Cartoon col
lided two weeks ago at Greens Farms.
Secretary Phillips has annouwsed that
he will ask the attorney yeme.r-i.1 to sit
with him and to review the evidence
before decision is rendered.
BU1LD1IIG NOTES
OF LOCAL I11TEF1EST
Ten building permits, the argregate
cost of. the work to be $24,2SC, were
granted by the building commissioners
at their meeting last night, liie per
mits were: ' .
C. A mane, one story frame tool
house,. outh side of Ox road.
John - Redgate, ' raise roof on barn,
south eide 41 Lexington avena-s.
The Glassner , Pnrrf:ture CO-,' -bricfc
enclosing wall, -- southeast ccmer of
Stratford ' avenue.
" W. W. Boerum, one-family frame
dwelling, - south side- of Mian-ion
street. . ..." : .. '.
G. W. Paul, frame garage. (F),' north
s:ie N'o. 54 Lewis street. , ' ;
Andrew Hogg, two family frame
dwelling, west side of Marrion street.
P. IT. Shea, alterations to store front,
west side of Main street.
Anna Dzurehda, alterations t i dwell
ing, west side of Helen street. -
Givannl Dei-Regne, two "family
frame dwelling, south side of Se.bur
ban avenue.
Jacob Morris and ltfney Feiaman,
three story brick building, two stores
and four families, northeast comer of
Fairfield avenue and Hajtaon avenue.
RQTQH POIIJT WILL
JIGHT jLllNT
Norwalk, July 1 Tins action of cer-
,1ain wealthy residents and land own-
w w a ismiiLT? vtiiu nave vrotlem
suit against the management of Roton
Point Park to recover $25, 0'JO - dam
&?es for alleged "nuisances" has pro
duced, a result that must hiT j Tur
prised the men who began the agita
tion. Last night, the Norwal't Cham
ber of Commerce- unanimously en
dorsed the park, ' and its manager,
Xeville Bayley. at a well attended
meeting. " ' .
, yiti. .; Bayley was present otV invita
tionand in a short .address pointed
to the fact that no city could expect
the . increase of manufacturing; plants
without clean and decent places , of
amusement. . He cited instances when
he was connected with like enterprises
in Pittsburgh, and other large cities,
where a' public park properly con
ducted had a direct influence on the
location of new industries.
Over one hundred of the ' county
workers for . women's suffrage for
Fairfield county held their regular bi
monthly meeting at Roton Point Park
on Monday, and after enjoying, the
daintiest of luncheons in the beauti
ful Casino restaurant, passed the fol
lowing resolution:
"We the county ' workers for suf
frage in Fairfield county do heartily
endorse the present suocessf-al move
ment to make Rotcn Point a safe and
sound playground for the children and
a recreation park for the people. Wb
find here - no objectiona-ble features
and many fine ones. We should
greay deplore any action which
mlzht throw this lovelv snot Into th
hands of a management less scrulpul
oua" When the matter of granting a tem
porary -injunction comes up "before
Judge Tuttle- in the superior court In
unageporc on r T-iasuy, uuiy lutn. tnere
will surely 'be one of the largest dele
gations from this city that have' ever
attended a like hearing. A large ma
jority of them will he ready to testify
in favor of Roton Point Park, if called
as witnesses. Over 600 residents of
Rowayton. Darien, Belle Island, and
Hickory Bluff, have signed a paper
endorsing the present management of
the park, the majority of them living
much nearer to the alleged "nuis
ances" than those who are bringing
the suit.
, The wording of the complaint has
caused much resentment, as the high
est class of people from this . and
neighboring cities are regular visitors
to Roton Point Park. It does not suit
them to hear that they cond jet them
selves In "a noisy, indecent, and vio
let manner." ,
IT
I3E23
'1X2
Celebrate the Fourth Witn Thing & Company's Money
iiy Here and Get The Most Change Back
;& ; "0 LUCK"; '.SALE
1153 Main St.
1153 Main St.
j ! Nil--
rjrn
HI V.
A "Luck" showing of Fashionable Colonial Low Cuts in
dull Gun Metal and Patent Leathers, also Bat
ins; variety of Buckle designs; Cuban and Kid
ney heels. "Lucky" Sale price ................
$1.95
l's Pumps
$1.45
cy shoes of women's Pumps, Oxfords and jffk'M f f
. Formerly priced to $2.00.. "Lucky" half VJ l
White
85c
85 c
One lot exceptional! fine samples in Women's Pumps
and Oxfords. Variety or leataers, mciuamg rea
and gray. Sizes mostly four; worth up to $3.00.
"Lucky" price ............. . . .......... .
- . 1 ; i ; '"" ".
Bargain table loaded - for the ' sale with
"Lucky" shoes of women's Pumps, Oxfords and
Shoes.
price
Complete the girl's white outfit with a pair of our White
Canvas Button bnoes in tins wen Known uia
District School" line. Prices according to size.
$1.25, down to...... . . . . . .
Mifaes Kid Button Shoes, good last, medium
weight soles, $l;'and the children's sizes 8 1-2
to li, at ........ ... .
f HERE'S THE IT OF IT
For some reason or other the big
shoe centers have been flooded this
spring with extra big values, for the
ready cash buyers. THING & CO.
have secured some ' exceptionally at
tractive trades and, in turn, hand the
wonderful bargains right overdo their
thousands of customers, adding only
a reasonable profit -this liberal policy
is in keeping with the generous meth
ods always in force at the popular
Shoe House. .
The items quoted here-7 give" an ink
ling of the excellent values now on the
tables.- We would suggest that you
take advantage of this offering and
"get the most change back." A little
change, you know, will come in handy
along about Saturday.
Tours as ever,
. S. B. THING & CO., INC
"Lucky" bargains in Men's Shoes, solid If"
leather all through; famous Goodyear welt sole, 9
slightly imperfect V X Jt V
Men's Oxfords in Tan, Gun Metal and Patent leathe
A big assortment of styles to, choose, from.
eluded is a fine lot of, "Burt & Packard
pies. - They are going at ................
Here ,is a- "cool one" for these hot days.
Men's Canvas Shoes and Oxfords in drab; leath
er 'sole.'- "Lucky" sale-price; all sizes . . . . r . . .
. J. " Itlll IttltllCI . " 'J ( j
if;
11
$1.00
Outing Shoes for youngsters wearing sizes 9 to 11 1-2.
A o H -- 1 i 1 1 c cVino nHfh anft t il loaf hpr ton 9i1 ' . am A
and the boys' rubber soles Tennis Oxfords,
(snaks); all sizes. "Lucky", price W M
S.B.Thing&Co
' Boys' Satin Calf Bluchcr Shoes; broad toes
good weight soles "Lucky" shipment for the
sale; also Little Boys Shoes, sizes 9 to 13V4 &t
TTTTTrrrrrrTTrW' -
Fix S
mm
tiiiimu " i ; )
UjJL
BEA UTIFUL. FLAG PINS FREE TO OUR CU
3sa
STplffiRS TOMORROW AND FRIDAY.
STORE CLOSED SATURDAY.
... - t
BRIEF ITEMS OF
LOCAL INTEREST
Ai stone thrown by Tony Curtis, a
playmate, sent four yeans old Mary
Yaxtes , of V1,643 Main street to the
emergency hospital yesterday 1 after
noon to get treatment for a lacerated
oca 1-p. One stitch was taken.
' Nln years old James Brae of ' 294
Main street was the first representa
tive of Touag America to be treated
at rhe emergency hospital for injuries
due to the July 4 celebration. , Exam
ination of a revolver yesterday result
ed m a year-old Wank cartridge, ex
ploding, the wad embedding itself to
the index finger of James', left hand.
' The recently elected officers of the
Adelphian lodge. No. 80, J, O. O. F.,
will be Installed tonights The cere
monies attending- the installation wjll
he in charge of District Deputy Grand
Master T. R. Whitney. By special
request Judge HenrrC Stevenson, and
Grand Guardian W. T. Meyers will be
present ,
Logan Bros. store at 217 Railroad
avenue, near Warren street, was vis
ited by burglars last night and goods
valued at between $5 and $5 taken. The
stock taken included about 40 pack
ages of cigarettes, cigars and canned
goods. An attempt was made to
force, the safe, the s combination - knobs
being knocked oft" and the soewi "re
moved from the door hinges. The
work, according to the police, bears
all the earmarks of amateurs. .
Business Men's Association
' - y : To Hold Social Sleeting
At 8 o'clock tomorrow evening the
Business Men's association ,will hoH
a, meeting in tiie rooms of the Board
of Trade In the WewfieM building at
Main and Golden Hill streets. -
Rev. John K. Ssown, pastor of the
First Baptist churcSi, will give an' il
lustrated lecture on Nfew .Mexico, tell
ing of the customs of the people and
many other interesting things about
that far away state. Refreshments
and cigars will he served.
Business men. of the city are gener
ally invited.
STOCK LIST FALLS
AFTER EARLY RUSH
New Tork, July ' 1- Opening. Con
ditions abroad were probably respon
sible for the moderate setback regis
tered by the local stock market in to
day's early dealings. International is
sues ruled lower,-in London where ap
prehension regarding the situation in
Ukster" was felt. The deadlock in the
Mexican negotiations also exerted an
adverse Influence. .
Los see did not exceed fractions and
in most ' cases' recoveries speedily en
sued. "The only gains of - note were
Atlantic Coaet Line," Brooklyn Rapid
Transit and Liggitt & Meyers pre
ferred. which advanced a point. The
trading was fairly active with indica
tions- of eome investment demands.
- Nooii Quotations again receded af
ter the f irst rush of Bhort covering,
that " movement constituting- a large
par" of the first hour's Activity. The
market then drifted idly with hu sin ess
at low eb. - Expiration, of the bond
conversion privilege accounted for the
comparative strength of Brooklyn
Transit but such changes as were rec
orded ' elsewhere had no especial sig
nificance. " Gains of 1 to 2 points in
various industrial, securities of a spec
ulative character attracted little atten
tion.1 - -
'j Bonds were Irregular, Rock Island
collaterals ruling firm in the face- of
unfavorable May earnings. . T
AGED EMPEROR FRANCIS JOSEPH BOWED
IN SORROW OVER TR AGEDY, MAY NOT tJVE
EIGHTEEN DROWNED "'.
IN MONTH OF JUNE
WOMEN DISAPPOINTED
BY WILSON'S STAND. ON
SUFFRAGE QUESTION
Washington. July 1 President Wil
son's declination to acquiesce in de
mands . of women suffragists that b
use his influence for the passage by
Congress of a constitutional amend
ment granting them the right to vote
occasioned considerable comment here
today. His views on the -subject were
made known to members of the Gener
al Federation of Women's Clubs who
marched to the White House yesterday
to ' enlist his aid'in behalf. Of .women
suffrage.' To them he " announced for
the first time that the sufBrage question
was one for settlement by the ste tes
and not by the" federal government.
He r also..- reiterated his statement , to
previous delegations , that i his ' party
had - not embodied tfte' question in Its
platform. , v - , -
The President's answer to the wom
en . is regarded here as final so far
as he Is concerned. In suffrage cir
cles ' today the President's attitude
caused keen disappointment.
STRATFORD
' Contemplated improvements on the
East Main street bridge will he started
in the near future. Corrugated iron
will be used Instead of concrete. This
will cut down the expense.
The residents living near Peck's Mill
and the selectmen held a special meet
ing yesterday afternoon in regard to
the extent of town property and the
private property owned by Mr. Klelri
lie. -
Attorney Chamberlain represented
Kleinlie and Attorney Boardman rep
resented the town of Stamford. Mr.
Kleinlie at present has fenced, in four
or five feet of property on the main
road and, on Shelton road, about SO
feet.
The matter was left in the hands
of the board of selectmen when a, hear
ing will be held next Wednesday, July
8, at , 8 p. m. and a decision will be
reached. j
The Paugussitte Oamp Fire Girls
motored 'to Steeplechase Island the
other evening and were entertained on
a house boat. v
The 1912 class of the Stratford High
school will hold their class reunion -a.t
the home of Miss Nina Aufford, Jirdson
Place, at 3 o'clock, Thursday afeer
noon.
The Stratford School Fife and Drum
Corps was reorganized last evening at
the Bed Men's hall.
Joseph Hampton, a mot or man, was
killed and three persons were serious
ly injured in a collision, of interurban
cars at Semple Station, a. suburb of
Pittsburgh.
New Haven. July 1 Eighteen persons
were drowned in this state during the
month of June. There were 89 deaths
by violence during the month, 66 of
that number being accidental, 19 sui
cidal and four homicides. In the list
of accidental deaths, next to drowning,
the greatest contributing cause was
falls, from which 13 died.
' Other accidental deaths and the
causes were: Train, seven . ;automo
bile, six; burning, five; crushing, five;
trolley, four; poison, three; hit "by
baseball; electricution. runaway, gas
and shooting, one each. .
Violent deaths in May were 88, di
vided as follows: Accidental 66; sui
cides 21; homicides 1.
SHIPPING COMPANY '
CUTS CAPITALIZATION
' -, ' " " " . -
Stonihgton. Con'- "Jv 1 At the
annual meeting of ""tntlc Ship
ping Company of -.lington held
Tuesday afternoon it was voted to re-,
duce the capitalization 40 percent,
making up the par value "of the stock
$15. .The directors are agreed on this
measure of retrenching reverses- that
the company "has met. The rece.nt
losses leave but four schooners in the
company's fleet.
A dividend ; of one and one-half
percent was voted on the. new capi
talization." . - - .
OBITUARY
P ACTj nickeesow. - '
The funeral of Paul Nlckersoh was
held from the undertaking parlors of
Cullinan & Mullins this morning at
o'clock. The Rev. Earl A. Kenyon,
pastor of St. Paul's Episcopal chutfeh,
conducted the services. Mr. Nicker
son was for many years a resident of
this city, and was widely known. A
big delegation from the Bartender's
union, of , which he : was ' a member,
attended and acted as . pall hearers.
Many floral tributes were received.
Interment was held at Lakeview ceme
tery. - ' .-":-..--."
JOTCC MITCHELL.
The body of John Mitchell of 45
State street, Waterbury. was sent to
German town. Pa-, this morning for
burial. The -body was accompanied
by his widow. Mitchell's body was
found hanging 'beneath the railroad
station last Thursday morning. Bur
ial is to take place from the residence
of his parents who live in German
- - - v
f . - - ; -
l
i
I
J
;FRANCI3
j JOSEPH-
Vienna, July ' 1 The assassination of
Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his
wife has been a hard blow ' to Emperor
Francis - Joseph. This vigorous old
ruler fac;s this new tragedy In his life
with bowed head and saddened heart-
It . is not expted that he will sur
vive long.. His life has been one cf
family trials and sorrows, and his
new tragedy, coming in the sunset of
his career, has left him ' weakened and
alone. - '
FIRST PICTURES SHOWING GREAT
, DAMAGE DONE BY BIG STORM IN PARIS
1 !!-,
SELiVESTEO PANSODA.
The funeral of Silvesteo Pansoda,
injured in a cave in while working for
the Bridgeport Hydraulic Co.. who
died at St. Vincent's hospital lollow
ing lengthy- suffering from his injur
ies, was held at 9:30 o'clock this m or li
ning from the Bishop mortuary chapel
on Fairfield avenue and half an hour
later from Holy Rosary church. Rev.
Angelo DeToro, pastor of the church,
officiated. There was a large attend
ance of fellow workmen. Burial was
in St. Michael's cemetery.
Daniel Sullivan, who gives "city" as
his address, was arrested by Police
man Dempsey near Bank and Water
streets today on charges of having a
saulted Edward B. Piatt.
' - - - J3' S . .
i" --"i--.--.; i'ff : " ?.. .
P. - c lit-- Ks,
i-HOW STRfFT Cn PARIS GAVE WAY VHOttt SURFACE TRACKS- 2-HOW PAJWC
WERE UWi.tL- ;
These picture's are the first to reach
America; from Paris since the recent
st..orm there. This storm was, so
sudden : and severe that streets were
undermined and caved in ,and several
live3 were lost. Much, property dam
age was done. Great gaping holes
were left in the paved streets, expos
ing the great sewers of Paris and
leaving the surface tracks, suspended
in the air. Americans in Paris at the
time said the citizens feared for awhile
that the whole city was .going to sink
into the ground.
-
(1
1 ant Ads Gent a Word.
' Strange -'Will. - ' ' '
' Many are the eccentricities 'to whlchr
wills have, borne testimony from tune
to toe.The Earl of .Portarfington '
left instrocaons teat he should be
buried with all his rings on his- finger.
The 'late" Earl of Ofi:y .stipulated
that lie should be taken to the ceme
tery "in 'an old' faehfoned : bearee, so
'that tbe eo2n conld ' not be seen and
that no Cowers sbould ,be placed pa his
grave.- He also left, word that his
coronet would be found by bis nephew
and successor ."In a cellar' - of his
bonse. i. ; .- '
A Vienna millionaire, who", died re
cently, left a stun of money with
which to defray the cost of twelve
months' electric lighting-, not only of
his -vault, but even of the very coffin
in which he was buried. Less particu
lar was the Frenchman' who ,asked
that his body should be thrown Into
the sea a mile from tbe English coast.
-. He was, too, so dirnsted with' his
own country that he would neither be
buried there nor allow any of his rela
tives or fellow countrymen to benefit
by his death. He left the whole of
his , money to the poor " of London.
London Globe..- - ' . '
The Ship's Rat.
: The black rat is tbe ship's rat, and it
travels from country to country. The
animal is found universally over the
Monte Bello group of islands, even on
the small ' outlying Islets - which are
never viirfted, on which it occurs most
abundantly. Its presence in attributed
to a schooner which was wrecked some
twelve years ago, for it Is well known
that this rat is a good swimmer. It im
curious to find that this animal, which
is .now, so rare in ita native countries
asto.be looked upon aa a great curiosity,-
should usually be one of tbe flret
species to populate new lands where it
is comparatively free-from 'competition.-
-Driven from ail civilized coun
tries by the brown rat. It has taken to
tte sea, being better adapted for a life
oQ board ship than its otherwise victo
rious rival. IV D. Montague in. Geo
graphical Journal.
Scientific
.--EI
6"v to i. -
- American Society A 1 :.
' - Father Hubbard. -f- 1
The" nursery knows nothing of Fa
ther Hubbard, but in 1604 Thomas
Mlddleton published "Father 'jHCub
bard's Tale ot the Ant and the Night
ingale." In tbe introduction he; ex
plains: "why 1 cal1 the Father
Hubburd's tales is cot to . have tbem
called in again as the Tale of Mother
Hubburd. The world would sbow lit
tle Judgment in ' that, i'faith, and I
should say then, plena stultorum om
nia, for I entreat here neither of rug
ged bears nor apes, no, nor the lam
entable downfall of the old wife's
platters. I deal with no such metal."
Since Spenser's "Mother ' Hnbberd"
does not seem to have been called in
and says nothing about bears or. plat
ters, Mlddleton is evidently alluding
to some other "Mother Hubburd.
London Standard.
THE PEOPLE OF THE t
STATES TODAY AF.
MOST WASTEFUL. i'E
WORLD, JUST A3 TH Z A
GOVERNMENT 13 TH " I
THRIFTY. THERE i'l L
THRIFT A LEO AfC- T
CORPORATrO3- THC
ARE IMPROV'l.ti. TH"- '
MAN IS CZTTUi-i t- C - T .
EARNS, AND UrfTiL 71 - -PLE
OF S4SErTlFiO f
BROUGHT HOV: TO T: - " ;
NO REFORM 13 FCC'.. 7 L 7 .
have been csTror-.-. -v.
tioB. over tho jrcr: i ' .
operative eeLIr t: .
reus do rot ta..t t' -
a- membership cf t-'o f
HUNDRED : TILLIO ' I -A
MTTLE Li:::3 T.T - "
TTJENOVEE '" O'F ' Tin: ;'.
TKTJ3T. .
eClENTtFtC CO-OFEfiAT''.
THE. GREATEST LC f? .":..,
TEREO TO ,60CI.,.''o-'.1.
g-AVJNQ MONEY C I fJ r i 1 .
TEN TO WINDY &-" I.i":T
TSES. AN ENCUSrir AM ri
CAPITAL, - WHO HAS 1
CO-OPERATIVE SOCfZTY,
ALL HIS SUPPLIES TKir .
AT THE END OF THE V" -CEIVES
A SMALL DlVCr
SUME8 A DIFFERENT iZ
BECOMES AM31TI0U3
BETTER CIT' " "
'" Ibsen and Love.
Tennyson says that It. is better to
bave loved and lost than never to have
loved at all. Ibsen maintained not in
a general philosophical way, but with
respect to the conditions he saw im
mediately around him that it is bet
ter, if youthfully, romantically in love,
to separate rather than to marry.' Ib
sen is In agreement with the brilliant
Frenchman who asserted that all com
edies end with a wedding, because it is
then that the tragedy begins! From
Archibald Henderson's "European
Dramatists." ,
The Daughter.
Oh, the blessings that a daughter can
bring into 1 a household if she only
, wishes to! ' The communion of her
mother, tbe comfort of her father, the
pride of her brothers and sisters, the
Joy of the whole household! Martha
Washington. - '
or1"
A very fine house, I.
Golden Hill St., .iir -teen
rooms, two L-Vh -. .
one of the finest vrt'.r .
city. It can he re n if d r
a very reasonable j. ri r-r.
ther particulars, inqnirc
231 Fairfle!;! Aver.-.--.
rm
ii
Only the Seventh.
Guest Delibtful party you are hav
ing tonight, old. fellow. - Host Yes. I
am giving it to my wife. It Is the
seventh anniversary of her twenty
eighth birthday. Censor.
, Make Up For It.
"So Kate and Alice are not on speak
ing terms. '
.'"No; bat they more than make up for
it-by what. they say about each other."
Boston Transcript.
In the North End, a v rr f,
flat on the corner of Fairy,
Avenue and Gurdon St. It i
nice corner house, hran I r
up-to-date in every parfir s!
solid tile bath room, f '
lights, beautifully decor -1
Jarge yard, and the heal';.
sppt in town. This is ar.
jceptional opportunity fo
one of the most desirabl r
at a very low price to a c
family. It is right close f 1
trolley. Particulars, inq ;i:
The Modern Dancer.
Madge Do look at that girl, Billy;
doesn't she dance like a chicken?
William Yes, It's the very poultry of
motion. Exchange.
"Of f r- r "'-
231 Fairfield Avm

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