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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, February 01, 1915, Image 11

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THE FARMER: FEBRUARY 1, 1915
11
AllfeilOlliSG-"
'Directory
l APPERSON
OLDSMOBILE
pboo isss $1,350
RIB
" - ' OAKTjA7VT. n.. O. H-
chevkojuett
tcrarrv' motor truck
(TBI'-UBGRG CARBURETORS
U. M. tX)Kl. MAIN SX. -
, SXUDEBAKKB,
v JEIiM AUTO CO, X
STATE ' STREET, : NEAR
PARK" AVENUE.
ST3:.-.e".TaacI''i--!-
PHONE 340Q CaTjg
Shock
febaorber
VELVET
Phone 312G-3
Shoe
170 Cannon Strest
"motor- Van
K. S. WAKEXKE, local and long dis
tance moving, storage for pianos
; and furniture, lowest priced. Phone
647 Offioe 167. Cannon St. -t
'i ,.. -. . A. 18 ti .-
HOIiIDAY PRESENTS.
HOLIDAY PRESENTS, all brands of
cigars, all ' kinds of pipes, cifcor
t holders cigar-ca5s, tooacco in tina
and jars, all cigarettes. iewspaper
' and magazines. Eckler & Co., 1224
Main fit.' near Gold St II 24 tf
TRUCKING, COAIi , AND WOOD
FURNITURE REMOVED, teamwork.
horses sale and aire, coal and wood
" Portable power, for sawing wood or
. other purposes. John X. Dixon, 12 6
Evergreen St TeL 466. ' T5 s tf
Chiropractic
JOHN A KEUCiER.jD. G (Graduate
Palmer School of Chiropractic),
Located 4 years In Bridgeport Tel. ;
- 1367-2. Consultation Free. OfMce
Hours: 9 to 11 m. ; 1 to 4 p. m.; 7
to 8 p. m. G 22 dj
: : ; Ostrich Feathers
FRENCH PIiUMES and novelties at
' manufacturers price Dyeing,
cleaning, curling and repairing. Old
feathers made - to any style. : .1
t Casella, 1042 Mala St, Bridgeport,
Conn. , yy?,".:,y' ; R. , afV.
Unclassified i
WATOH FOB' THE tSIGNS which
, means that your tyealght is falling
I- fit no glasses without a careful
examination. Harry E. tee, op
', tometrist. y Warner ; building; s 82
. Fairfield avenue. Licensed by x-
tminaUon to practice. "y. Xr 1 tf
DON'T ' MISS the : ' special. - bargain
sale at the Congress Shea . store.
.... now going-on. Shoes and hosiery
for the entire family at surprising
ly low prices. D. Greenbaum, 121
Congress street, just, around the
corner from Main. ' Open evenings.
. .-' :-.,.: ,. a li tf
SAFES all Sises, : new and ' second
, hand. Walter E. Marsh, Telephone.
' 192 Fairfield Ave. . G 2 tf
WE MAKE AND- REPAIR . anything
In automobile parts, such as studs,
bearings, bashings, wrist pins, rings,
Etc Waldorf Motor and Machine
Co.. ,15 Cannon St, City. : t
r.T.'W ;.'- -,;-., -;-i:-H 21. tf ;
., . ".tita. euu employment guar
v anteed. t Salary SI daily and commissions-.
Call mornings 7-9. Ste-
venson's, 402 Pembroke St . .
;'' -j-' v' . I SI a9
WANTED MEN, WOMEN travel ev
ery morning, early salary, commis
sions, expenses advanced. Steven
son's Institute. 95 Pembroke St
WANTED 25 : neat appearing men
every morning, steady workers, paid
dally; big money, experience un
: necessary. . Stevenson's store, 402
Pembroke St . Xt 8 ap
Wanted To Duy
WANTED TO BTO Second hand
" clothing. Send postal, will call.
Tale Misfit. i 88 Main St
' ' I 23 ajp
WASTED To buy all kinds of sec
ond -hand furniture. - Geo. F. To
tams, Redfield's old stand. 48 Har-
v rison -St Telephone 2544-2.
P 10 tf
i 'i i i ' l r i
WANTED TO BUY all kinds human
- hair. J. B. Adams, 1496 Iranistan
. avenue near Maplewood Ave.
: ' . U 80 a
WANTED TO BUS" - men's second
hand clothing and furniture. Mrs.
C. Meyer. 1447 Main St TeL 2852-8.
,''; -!-. ' - ..r', S 6 Si -
WANTED To. buy all kinds of sec
ond hand furniture. Geo. F. Totams,
, Redfleldrf old stand, 42 Harrlptm St
TeJ. 1015-2.. U 13 tf -
Mullinj! Typewriter Exchange '
-Cor. Main and State Sts. TeL
rtfir hf- niar Stl IjLjf
All Makes, for Sale. Rent or Ex
change, Supplies and Repairing.
SIDEWALKS
' .'Sand'and Graret, . ,
. THE DURX3 CO.
-li..V bAVlAba BA.NK
&2 Alain -St." " Room t 01 . '
STONE, AH l&ies,
r.OOLG
. : .Teleftft;.
Farmer Want Ads. 1c a
Word. '
y v.v ii
TODAY'S
WANTS
To Late To Be
Classified
LADIES Splendid opportunity, home
work, new line, good pay, experi
ence unnecessary, stamped envelope
for particulars. Natik Novelty Co.,
206 West 106th St., New York.
. B 1 bp
SHOE REPAIRING Sansone Bros.,
' shoe' repair shop for wise people
:, have removed to, 107 Congress St.,
directly opposite.. '
. ' " R 20 ;
TRUNKS AND BAGS We manufac
ture and repair, also "carry a full
stock-' oS trunks, , traveling bags,
leather goods, - and . umbrellas.
; Bridgeport Trunk - and . Bag Co.
Phone 5304-2. 1049 Broad St.
, , . .:; s 4- ' tf
PHONE 8290, day or night. Automo
biles for hire. Aston Garage.
v'- : R tfo 1 3 B
WANTED Everybody to know Mur
. phy the printer , formerly of 104
. Congress - St has located -at 417
Berkshire Aye. Telephone 37SS.
' . R SO tt v''
"CONTINENT AI MOTOR MFG. CO.
of Muskegon,. Michigan, want sev
eral first class Builard' Boring Mill
.operators. .Must be spesdy opera
torsv In reply state experience, .-.go
i and salary expected." j I35eb
1 ! . . , 1 -
MONUMENTS
ARTISTIC liASTTWO i ,
'Tnn operated by pneumatic cuttlnc
" v .. i " -. and polishing tools
EUGHES & CilAPAIAN
- tOO STRATFORD AVENUE
phone Conoecttaa. B 1( U
Hawley, Wilmot & Reynolds f
- Undertakers ana Bmbabaen
No. 168 State St, Bridgeport, Ct
- All cans, day or night, answer
ed from fHoe. ' George B. Haw
ley, 118 Washington Terrace;
Edward H. Wfimot, 885 Clinton
A-; John B. Reynolds, 48 Psdflo
St
1 11. J. GANNON
FVNE&AL DIRECTOR
UK D E M B A li M E R
I ' 1051 Broad St, near John
'i 'Phone 349S v
:i Keaadencse, 247 Vtoe St r
J TbOM 12S9 i
Wxa. Ibenrm & Son
, BmbolmerB and Undertakers ,
Offioa and Residence
5 8 1 MAI NT STREET
Telepbone Connection
EOITRKE & EOURKE
Undertakers
a n d Embalmers
IMS MAIN STBEET. Tel. 1861
. CallH Answered Day ear Night
JTOHN E. j GAMjAGHER
MARGARET . r; li. G ALLAGHER
. Undertakers and )Embatanera
Margaret lu Gallaghear, only 11
ceneed, graduate woman embabn
er and Undertaker In the city ca
pable of taking entire charge of
land refrtdeooe, '
1 571 PATRFTELD AV. Phone 1300
mSUUILU .'.AIW!liA.AM...,.. .. MUSftyssfi
f ROSES, VIOLETS
ORCHIDS
AT
Hawkins
FLORIST.
ESCALLOPS
2 QUARTS SOR 25 CENTS
W. D. COOK -& SON
523, Water Street I
, EaOSMAlTB BMMBWaGOOCl -
' i-""" MTXTUKSS ..L
A splendid Femato Regulator tn ease
ef suppressed aenstmatlosu deteya
ae to colds, ID health, or other sua
natural causes; 81-73 for the whole
outfit Made only at the
WOMAN'S DRUG STORE
STO Main Street Bridgeport. Cona,
Lauly 4iv"'""- Always Uere -
Feel Yoong Apoiii
-XTILAX (ThcTCertified "
:-: t Laxative).
Beware of the habit of constipation.
Coax the overworked bowel muscles
back to normal action with CERTI
LAX. "the certain laxative." It is the
favorite prescription of an eminent
New York City specialist, selected by
five hundred physicians, who have
tried out thousands of laxatives and
decided upon CBRTILAX as the best
They believe in gentleness, persistency.-
and Suture's assistance. CBRTI
LAX opens the bowels; their action
is gentle yet positive,- never accom
panied by griping or pain. -One at
night will give positive relief. CBR
TILAX IS FOR SALE AT ALL DRUG
STORES, or: will . be sent direct upon
receipt of price. ' CDRT3 CHEMICAL
CO., 117 E. 24th St., NEW YORK,
PRICE, 10c, 25c, 60c. One at uigbt
makes, you right. m
HICHESTER S PILLS
Xittdicat A1k yonr lraa;flrisl for
Jlil in Red nd-oit metalli?
boxes, sealed with Blua Klhhnn.
'I'ako n ether. Bur ef too.
: frnKffl.t. Ask forCSO-CirES-TEH S
ycais known as Best, Safest, Always Reliable
SOLD EY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE
Results From Farmer Ads
a
UNEMPLOYMENT IN
WAR AND PEACE
War Measures Teach How To
Mobilize Armies of ''.
Industry.
GRAHAM .TAYLOR
(Exclusive Service The Survey
Press Bureau.)
Unemployment is testing . the pa
triotism and national resources of all
the peoples at war. The test In the
rear was instantly recognized to be
one and the same with the test at
the front The military army and
the; industrial army were considered
equally vital to the national defense.
Howover industrial depression had
hitherto been left to crush whom it
might, however unemployment . had
been regarded as a 'misfortune to.be
borne as . best it might by the indi
vidual or by the class, "however the
right to work had been denied and
the assertion of it denounced- now
without a moment's hesitation this
laissez faire attitude toward unem
ployment was abandoned and the
nations recognized the claim of their
people to be kept- at work. As soon
as, each parliament was faced by the
possibility of war, it squarely faced
the certainty of unemployment as a
national crisis which could be met
only by national resources." " : ,(,
War Budgets Provide Work At Hpme
The necessity of making some pro
vision1 in advance '-to meet the lack
of work was anticipated by the gov
ernments, before It began to be felt
seriously by the workers themselves.
In, the very first ; war budgets large
appropriations' were included to pay
for public work undertaken to com- j
pensate in part, at least, for the de- i
crease in private employment Among
the earliest measures f of national de-
fense taken in Germany, France and
Britain, were enabling acts -authorizing
the national and local administra
tions to protect and promote employ
ment.' y Public work already under
taken was ' thus continued. ' ; New en
terprises requiring' labor on a large
scale were initiated. ' The British
Parliament added to its first appro
priation of $500,000,000 for war pur
poses, another of $20,000,000 to keep
the building trades busy in erecting
and renovating dwellings for better
'housing of the working classes-Hous
ing thus be came a national issue, as
a legislative principle at least. -
In Germany new public enterprises
have been started v by many - munici
palities, urged by the Reichstag and
supplemented by the imperial govern
ment ' Experience, in social legisla
tion enabled both these nations , the
more readily and effectively to mobi
lize all their national resources, not
only for the defense of their frontiers,
but for the conservation of their in
dustrial forces at home., "Arms and
the man" found its. equivalent V In
"tools and the man." , .
Crisis, of Peace -
' If the certainty and ' disastrous ef
fects of economic depression and un
employment could thus be anticipat
ed,, foref ended, and provided for, in
any : measure, by people distracted
and distraught by war. Is not the
; possibility suggested oi mobilizing the
greater resources or xoretnought and
reserve capital available in times of
peace, to meet the same sort of an
emergency in a nation's Industrial
life?. - ' . - 'v,- y -y '
No crisis has become more chronic
than ' that which - throws multitudes
of workers In every land out of their
employment. - And yet no industrial
nation more than purs has so utterly
Ignored the possibility, not to say
certainty, of the frequently, . almost
regularly, recurring sjeriods of In
dustrial depression - and unemploy
ment ,- ." -.;.'.;." '.-. -
We act as though : such as emer
gency would never come again,,, how
ever many times we well - remember
it to have come. When it - does
com, "we .do nothing directly to
meet it. Indeed, with more caution
than ' Is truly cautious, we ' diminish
our. commercial and industrial activ
ity, thus making matters worse.. Al
though the classes who most suffer
by industrial depression are least re
sponsible for it and least able to pro
tect themselves from it they are un
justly left to bear the brunt1 of the
burden . and to suffer disaster from
which many of them never recover
either their self-dependence or their
industrial efficiency. , . ; ;
National Strength For Industrial ;
y ''".' Disasters. ' y " " ; '
. Here-then is the sorry contrast be
between mobilization for war and the
lack .of it in peace. Under theurg
ency "of war the nation instinctively
feels that the strength of all Is im
paired 'by the weakness of any, , that
its whole resource is available to
conserve every vital force, that as
each individual and class is needed
by all, so all that. the nation has. is
available for each. .This Is the jus
tice newly experienced in Germany,
ISrltan and France by those who
have hitherto for the moat part been
left to suffer alone the national in
dustrial disasters of peace. V '".'
. The difference , between, the' - two
experiences lies precisely at the point
thus indicated. It is in the presence
or absence of a national conscious
ness and resourcefulness in meeting
national industrial emergencies. In
peace we have not yet become., con
scious that unemployment is a na
tional emergency, to be met only by
the concern and the resources of. the
whole nation. In America," the emer
gency Is still thoughtlessly and un
justly left, to th,a-lndiyidual tha.fam
ily, the locality, - and the class suf
fering most from it, to grapple with.
Even they delay so late to do so that
they can have recourse only to char
ity, seldom to justice; only to relief.
never to prevention ; only .to recovery
from disastrous effects, not' to deal
ing with causes of disaster.
This has been and now is -the ex
perience of every industrial com
munity hit hardest by the present
paralysis of trade and labor. Private
employment. .. agencies., fail J;o, . find
work for their , applicants, ' who are
often their victims. Public employ
ment agencies are so narrowly lo
calized and disconnected, so :' politl
cally exploited and therefore ineffec
tive, that they are no better than
private organizations, if as good, in
bringing the demand and supply to
gether. Employers are besought for
jobs that they do not have. Their
charity is appealed to for part-time
work, when there is no demand for
the product of the workers already
employed. Public authorities are
turned to as a last resort to provide
"relief work", which generally proves
to be only another form . of public
dole to the unemployable and ineffi
cient. - - ' " ' "v
Great constructive public work to
employ the employable is . the last
resource to be thought of - in peace.
-and the Worst
although the first to be resorted to
in war. Should it not be resorted to,
not at the very end of ' everything
else, but when private employment is
slacking up,' and ' as an alternate
with seasonal work?. .On the other
hand, should not great private In
terests, which . demand reserve labor
for work' unavoidably seasonal, be
expected to tide their " own reserves
over periods Of slack work" or unem
ployment? If both public and pri
vate employers deem It not waste; but
economy to sustain their reserve sol
diers, police, firemen, watchmen, and
emergency corps during periods of In
action, have not the reserve mechan
ics, ,i craftsmen, and. laborers of Indus
trial forces somewhat the same claim
to- be upheld while they are in re
serve?. - - ,-'.'.? , ' y y- r. y
In the very act of denying The
right to live, war. is asserting the long
and unjustly withheld right to work
for a living. ' Not the least of the
reprisals . which peace - may ; take
from war may be constructive;1 conJ
stant, " progressive national policy to
assure employment to the , employ
able.. ..
LITTLE BENNY'S
NOTEBOOK
By Lee Pape'
Us fellos was going to Inishiate uPds
Simkinses sissey cuzzin Persey into
the Park Avenue Athaletick Club yes
tlddy, not ibeeins ehy eutch club ony
we was going to Inishiate him Jest as
If thare was, and Persey ran like eny
thing, yelling', (Now you stop, I dont
wunt to join pure old .club. - And we
coodent ketch him, so we let him, get
away. y -'i"i . :y'y
Lets postpone the inshiation till he
kums erround agen, sed Sid Hunt,
Wlch we did, and he cairn e tHotma
agen aftlr suppir last nite, and who
was with toim but. a big Md in lawns
pants . with reddir hare than Reddy
eMrfeys, looking as if he cood flte sum
if he ewlr got etartid.
This is my big toruthir, ised Persey.
he lives in the kuntry but ne -cairn to
visit met - - y :'-.' - ' :
I Undirstand you kids did sum tawk-
ing about inishiating my ibruthlr Per
sey wen he dident wuntyto be inishiat
ed, ser Perseyabruthir.r
Wy, w-ho toldi you that, sed Sam
Krawss.
I did, and ita troo, toJaed Persey. ,
O," we was bny-kidding, -sed Sid
Hunt; .r.": -) - " -
G, I gesa he thawt me ment It 1 sed
Skinny Martin. ". , 1 - ,
Wy, we havent got enything to in
ishiate him into, I eed. , '
And -we awl laffed as if Persey was
krazy, and then we got Up a gaim of
prizners base and let Perseys big
ibruthlr in It, and, 'this aftirnoon wen
Persey calm erround thare wasent
enyobddy with him. -
Helo, Persey, wares , yure bruthir.
sed Sid Hunt ' .
Re went hoani agen, , sed Persey.
And we awl yelled and grabbed a
hold of him, yelling, inishiation, inishl-
ation. ' .
You bettir not, you bettir not eed
Persey, my tig bruthiirs kumlng back
agen next Krissmus. . . . ," ,
Irissmus is a. lawn way awf, sed
Sam Krawss. And we awl laffed like
enything and inishiated him, doing' it
by awl getting erround him in a serkil
and hitting him awn the hed with our
caps wen he tryed to brake out and
he -went hoam rrying, and saying. You
wate till next Krissmus, you wate till
next Krissmus. ' . i
CLARK UNIVERSITY
CELEBRATES CENTENARY t
OI" FOUNDER, TO-DAY
Clark University at Worcester,
Mass., will celebrate today the cen
tenary of the birth of Jonas Oilman
Seeing a lawn wile yet.
Clark,- the founder of the small ' but
famous institution of higher learning.
The merchant and philantropist who
dedicated a large part of his fortune
to the institution which commemo
rates his name -was born in Hubbard
spn, Mass., Feb. 1, 116. " His native
town has also good -reason to remem
ber him, for toe conferred many gifts
upon at. - i... .
Clark - University - -was founded in
1887 ' and was designed for advanced
students in science. It was liberally
supported by Its founder during his
life, and on his death in 1900 the uni
versity received a bequest of $2,500,000
for the establishment of an undergrad
uate department The university now
employs twenty-seven instructors, and
has about 130 students. The library
contains 60,000 volumes.
Under the presidency of Dr. G. tan
ley Hall, Clark has attained a high
place In the educational world. The
birthday of the founder of -the univer
sity is also that of its first president
as Dr. Hall was born in Aehfleid,
Mass., on Feb. 1, 1846. He had at
tained wide fame as a psychologist at
Harvard and Johns Hopkins before he
was chosen to assume the presidency
kot the Worcester institution.
Is Yet to Come
CONSPIRACY TO VIOLATE
Food and Drugs Act And Other Fed
era! Statutes Brings Heavy
Penalties.-
Washington, Feb. 1 Conspiracy on
the part of two or more people to vio
late the Food and Drugs Act and Oth
er Federal ' Statutes has recently
brought heavy fines, coupled with loss
of citizenship, to certain dealers. In
a certain case',., the Department has
lately co-operated with another Fed
eral Department in bringing a crimi
nal action and in 1 helping to secure
the convictlon; of a prominent .coffee
merchant and a shipping agent for
conspiracy to violate the Food and
Drugs Act Involving the shipment of
coffee in interstate . commerce from
New York to the West In these cases
the , two . def endants were each fined
$3,000 and by reason of their convic
tion of a felony lost their citizenship
under the provisions of, a New York
Statute.. iy '."' ..ry -.
In another . action in co-operation
with the Customs' Service, the Depart
ment was of assistance in the proceed
ings that resulted in the Imposition of
a fine of $5,000 in the Massachusetts
Federal Court on one defendant en
gaged in tampering with revenue im
port stamps and selling domestic li
quors, as imported. A second defend
ant is now awaiting sentence. ' In two
other jurisdictions, the Department
assisted in procuring the indictment
for conspiracy to. violate the Food and
Drugs Act of a number of egg hand
lers who have been illegally shipping
spoiled eggs in interstate .commerce
for food purposes. ;.,'
THE NEW DRUG LAW.
t
A stringent federal law takes effect
March 1, controlling the sale of habit-forming
drugs. The ' number of
so-called "drug fiends" in this coun
try Is estimated from 1,000,000 to 4,
000,000. It is time something wre
done to alleviate this national trag
edy. Vy The haggard men one so often
sees may not -be the subject of nor
mal physical decay, but the victim of
their, own folly, which need's severe
restraint i ' , ....
The most brilliant men often, form
these habits. The phlegmatie per
son capable of only mediocre work,
takes his daily task easily .and rarely
feels compelled to seek artificial stim
ulants. Rut it is the man who could
rise the highest who also may sink
to the. lowest: -y -v yy. ' -,
. The physicians who resort to ' tills
fatal support are numerous. Often
they are at the top of their profes
sion.' They 'have the peculiar alert
ness of mind that goes with the nerv
ous temperament, with marvelous
acuteness "of perception and capacity
for. swift judgments. It is this sensi
tive nature that feels strain most se
verely. It is so easy for a doctor to
brace . . himself ' with drugs for isome
.trying ordeal. .- r ..
Manufacturers of cocaine and other-drugs
promote these habits with
shameless lack of scruple. 1 The sam
ple of headache powder i that is given
away on the street or thrown on your
porch may contain deadly' narcotics.
Dealers. In 'candies and soft drinks
sometimes keep these man i killers.
The closet - shelf contains headache
remedies a slight overdose of which
will stop a person's heart.
Whether the law mentioned above
is enforceable or not it is too soon
to ; say, but public sympathy will be
with its purpose.
The United Cigar Stores Corpora
tion of New Jersey declared rti-H-
dend of 50 per cent payable January
3U. i
QUICK RELIEF FROM
; CONSTIPATION
Get Dr. Edward's Olive
' Tablets.
That is the joyful cry' of thou
sands since Dr. Edwards produced
Olive Tablets, the ' substitute for cal
omel. Dr. Edwards, a practicing physi
cian for 17 years and calomel's old
time enemy ' discovered the formula
for Olive Tablets -while treating pa
tients for chronic constipation and
torpid livers.
Dr. Edwards Olive Tablets do n
contain calomel but a healing-, soothing
vegetame laxauva. io griping is the
"keynote" of these little sugar-coated,
olive-colored tablets. They cause the
bowels and liver to act normally.
They never force them to unnaturai
action. . .
If you have a "dark brown mouth"
now and then a bad breath a dull,
tired feeling sick headache torpid
liver, and are constipated, you'll find
quick, sure and only pleasant results
from one or two little Dr. Edwards'
Olive Tablets at bedtime.
Thousands take one or two every
night just to keep right. Try them.
10c and 25c per box. All . druggiets.
The Olive Tablet Co., Columtvus, O.
Adv.
Financial
First-Brldffeporl
CORNER MAIN AND BANK STREETS
HGHTY FIRST DIVIDEND OF THE
MECHANICS & FARMERS SAVINGS BANS
A dividend at the rate of four (4) per cent, per
annum has been declared by the Directors of this
Bank for the six months ending December 31st, 1914.
For the convenience of our depositors, this dividend can be drawn, it
, desired, after December 25th
(Signed) . '
' LYMAN S. CATLIN, Treasurer. " -
i. m
PEOPLE'S SAVINGS BANK
MARBLE BUILDING.
The 100th Consecutive Seml-Annual Dividend baa been '
V declared by the Board of Trustees at the rate of FOUR per '
oent per annum, payable January 2nd, 1915, on all deposits
not exceeding $4,000. and at the rate of THREE per cent
, on the excess over 44,000., ' -', . -., -
This Dividend Is Declared Upon $6,737,220 Deposited
On 14,332 Accounts. , , 1
Deposits Received From $1 to $1,000. In Any
,, Calendar Year.
START AN ACCOUNT WITH US TODAY
indgepori ;bavffipi;iieMi
CORNER OF MAIN AND STATE STS.
The 144th Consecutive Semi-Annual Divi
dend has been declared at the rate of 4 per
cent, per annum on all deposits payable on
and after January 2, 1915.
BERMUDA
The Lovely Lily Land.
Only 40 hours from New
York, with the choice, of two
fine, fast steamers. Round
trip rate $25.00 and up. :
Complete information sup
plied promptly1 by .
S.Lowi!h&Co.
Authorized Agents for All
y Steamship Lines ;
116 BANK STREET
Telephone No. S
IRIIEUnATISD
MHJIONE FREE
- We want the name e. every per
son everywhere who is suffering with
rheumatism, so wo ean mtvi him a
free sample bottle of Hill a Rhea
matio Remedy. We don't care how
Ion . or how severe ha has had it, as
there are very few eaaea that have
not yielded and been thoroughly ear
ed with tt 't works at once. Is
twenty-four hour, it stops the pain.
Don't take eur word for it test tt at
ur expense. This is not a new un
tried thing. For twenty-five years it
has been regarded by physicians as
practically the only certain treatment
for this terrible disease. . i
Over 10,000 Testimonials Lttte These J
.. ...
Mr. B. K. Bhlers, Booty. Grand
Lodge of Mason of Hew York City
writes that "Although a sufferer
from rheumatism for many years,
two dosee stopped all pala, and one
bottle cured me."
Mr. A. Goldman, Victoria, Texas,
ays: I am very well pleased with
your medicine; am recommending - it
very highly. It has done more for
me than anything I have ever tried.'
Marshall F. W. Geraty, of' 70 Man
hattan St. New York, aaya: "I have
suffered with rheumatism for many
years, have rled almost every knows
remedy but got no relief or cure un
til I took yours. In forty-eight hours,
I was entirely cured and free from aU
pala. I send this unsolicited."
Hill's Rheumatic Remedy Is on sale
at most drug stores at 91.00 per bot
tle. One bottle generally effects a
complete cure. Call or send for free
sample bottle and booklet at once.
There is no greater service you can
perform for humanity than to tell
any rheumatic sufferer about this
wonderful preparation. Address: Hill
Medicine Co., 117 East 84th St. New
York, N. Y.
AGENTS WANTED EVERYWHERE
Good Men -Make $10 a Day on Our
JPreparations. WRITE NOW, -Adv.
Parmer Want Ads. lo a
Word.
THE...
Nations
924-926 MAIN STREET
NOTICE
For forty-eight years we have hesem
conducting business at the same old
location, corner of Main and John
Streets, Bridgeport Conn., and one
Private Bank has been established
there continuously. We have received
and paid out on demand without no
tice millions of dollars of money de
posited with us and we continue to
receive money subject to depositor's
check at sight on which we allow
three per cent per annum, credited
to each account monthly. We solicit
the accounts of Individuals, business
men, firms and corporations, and all
who want a bank account where they
can ' deposit money, checks or drafts,
and leave It for one day,one week, one
month or one year,, and draw interest.
We give to the business our careful
..ii i wl t i rtr n tha AlrlfMBf- T I ra
of private bankers in this state.
T. L. WATSON & CO.
. A TRUSTEE SHOULD
HAVE;
not only legal knowledge but the ex
perl enoe, resources ' and facilities to
properly execute the trust
Make sure of it by appointing James
Staples & Company, Bankers, to act la
this capacity. .
JAMES STAPLES & CO.
J . BANKERS -189
STATE ST., Bridgeport, Conn,
To Rent For the season, 9
room bouse, fully furnlsheJ
large grounds. t ; $
NDERSON
f
CI
63 JOHN STREET
THE CITY NATIONAL BANK
Savings Department Pays
y y 4 Percent Interest
Start Saving Now.
'107 WAiaU STREET.
THE CONirECTlC U
NATIONAL BANXX
BRIDGEPORT
Cor. Main and Wall Cirssti
Farmer Want Ads 1c a t:

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