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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, January 05, 1916, Image 12

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THE FARMER: JANUARY 5, 1916
(Home J and Abroad
LATEST TIDINGS FROM SPORTLAND (Edited b WV
ST. LOUIS MOGUL
RAH $3b,0d0 TO
ROLL OF MILLION
Next season -will see a. iumber of
blavers from one league going over in
GIANTS SEEKING
CATCHER RARIDEN
OF NEWARK FEDS
NAMING FOLWELL
FOR PENH COACH
PLEASES STUDENTS
. .tti in sw
Louis, and thus" histon in a. way
will be -repeated, fbr-the players who
pack up asd move will land in Sports.
, man's park, Just a was the- case
nearly 15 -.yea.rs apix -- There, however,
the comparison ends. It! was during.
the war tetweea the -American and
2"-ati-oia.l Leagues that almost a whole
. team of Cardinal players packed up
and Jumped Into the Browns' park,
causing one of the greatest' sensations
of those -sensational times. That was
a war measures"
This new "jump, will be a peace
move "for -when Tobin, Marsans,
. Flank,. Davenport and perhaps oilier
ex-Slouf eds ,mpve over "to Sportsman's
park it will be the final chapter in the
settlement of a. three-years' war that
Is ended through. . amalgamation of
two of .the three clubs in St. Louis.
It was Jimmy McAleer, Jthen man
ager of the Browns, who. engineered
the big jump years ago, thatf in a
sense yjlbe. repeated in 1916-f- Mc
Aleer induced ..Wallace. Heidrick,,Bur
Icett, , Powell and Sudhoff to jump the
reserrve clauses which, tEie National
Xieague held, bound them to the St.
Louis National ' League team. Al
though the, players .were . not - under
contract.. to. the-.. Cardinals, g the fac
that -they jumped' to the 'American
S League created a greatdeal of senti
ment in favor of the Cardinals and.
against the -Browns in St. Louis, and
- much Qti it , sill- remains - ampng the
older "fans. As a matter of fact Har
per, a pitcher, was the only affected
player who Jumped the Cardinals -who
- was under contract to the .. National
League team." . '
Th Rofeisohs, "owners ' of the Car-
, finals, asked Judge Talty of the Cir
cuit Court, to enjoin Harper, Powell,
Wallace, Heldricfc, Burkett and others
-' from playing with the Browns. It
wastfai jdx&SajzvSZKf ajd " death with
the American League Judge Talty
denied the Robisons' petition and that
decision, laid, the foundation of a for-
- tune for Robert Lee -Hedges, "who had
, invested $30,00. in an - American
- League -venture, in St. Louis. . ,
. The hold procuration j of the "qest
players of the Cardinals enabled Mo
' ' Aleer to " lead the American League
race of 1902 for five-sixths of the sea
. son, only to bo-6fif ented if or ..the cham
pionshiD, ,by .the. Athletics in the last
" month,. 9! .the race. .Withal the good
showing of the team,' the club made
little, money, t Local prejudice favored
-the Cardinals and there was a deal of
counter attraction in - the shape of
horse racing- in St. Louis. Ent it meant
that the-Browns -were established and
since then they have prospered finan-
cially, if not always artistically, and It
is estimated, that Colonel Hedges' or
igmal investment of f 30,000 has netted
' him.wejl toward a million 'dollars.
SIHCJLAIR 1Q GETT
INTEREST ill CUBS
CmciniiatJ." Jan. " 5 Harry F. Sin
clair seems to be the big man in base-,
hall -' just : now. : 1 When- the Oklahoma
millionaire arrived yesterday ' every
one appeared to lose interest In, the
session of the National Commission.
This fellow Sincalir, Often referred
to as the "new angel," is anything but
that. He adheres to business methods
which are entirely foreign to some of
. our baseball magnates. ,
1 Just now Sinclair is trying to swing
a, deal whereby, he can become . part
owner of the Chicago Cubs. After this
has been done Sinclair will come to
NewTork and try to tempt Harry N.
Hempstead to dispose, of some of his
stock in the Giants. ' r . -. ..,. .
"Mr. ,Hempstead offered me the
Giants', at. a very high . price,"- said
Mr. . Sinclair.. "I named my figure,
' and that is as far as the negotiations
have gone." . c -.'"
- Charles ; P. Taft and Sinclair were
eloseted for an hour,, and at the con
clusion of the . conference -both an
nounced -. that, -. further negotiations
would, take place tonight upon the ar-
1 rival . of Weeghman from Chicago
Taft said there were no serious ob
stacles in-the way. of the completion
of thef sale . of the Cubs. j
YOUNG CY YOUNG IS
rf Cleader in Shutouts
Young Cy ' "Young of ' Milwaukee,
whose prefix will become a paradox
after his years of service on the slab,
led the American Association pi ten -ers
for. 1915, in the number .of shut
outs administered . to oponents in
regulation, contests of nine innings or
more." He ..stands in a class -by him
self with seven such victories, while
second place is held jointly by Steele
and Hall of St. Paul and Schardt of
Indianapolis. ,
An interesting . commentary on
-Young's -record is that six of his sucr
cesses were accomplished . on or be
fore July 1, with only one shutout
after that date. Hall of St.-Paul
worked "along somewhat similar linesv-
for he recorded all 'his. five shutouts
toefore August 1,- and none afterward.
Schardt, on the other hand, did not
get a-grip on his whitewash brush un
til August 6, and then spilled the four
remaining coats in the period from
September 2 to September 15. t-
The total number of mound men
who at some time during the season
blanked an opponent was 37, of whom
18 had the honor of winning one or
more 1 to 0 affairs. . .
SMITH-COlf STOCK CO
REDUCES CAPITAL STOCK
The iSmlth-Comstock' Co.,Inc., of
Bridgeport, has filed: ,a certificate
showing a reduction of its capital
stock from, J100, 000 to J50,000. The
company . retired and- cancelled -342
Shares of its capital stock., -,,
FUNEKAL DESIGNS AND ,
BOUQUETS, .
v JOH.r
New York, Jan. 6. While the Fed
eral league was In existence it . was
often said "there is not a catcherin
time there seems to be quite a tight
on for the few good receivers in the
league. - -
, Several clubs, including the Tanks,
are after Bill Fischer, the former
Dodger? while Bill .Donovan says that
Grover Hartley,, the former Giant, who
jumped , the Reds after being sent
there in the Herzog deal, is the best
catcher In the league.
The Fed catcher who seems most in
demand appears to be Bill Rarlden of
Newark, who jumped the Braves.
Rariden has been doing very good
work with the Feds, and the Detroit
club has put in a nice -bid for him.
MoGraw1 also la after the player, and
whether or not Sinclair buys the Gi
ants, it is believed that Rariden will
ply his trade on the Polo Grounds next
season. ,'
AWARD O'CONNOR
$5,000 IN ACTION
AGAINST BROWNS
St.. Louis, Jan. 6 A verdict . of -a
Jury in the State Circuit Court in May,,
1912, which awarded John O'Connor
damages of $5,000 against the St.
Louis American League club because
O'Connor was discharged as manager
while, he - was) under contract, for
another year,' was affirmed by the
Court of Appeals yesterday.
. Evidence was brought by tne ball
club to substantiate the charge ' that
O'Connor as manager conspired " with
his fellow-players in October, 1910,
to allow Lajoie of the Cleveland team
to get a larger number of hits and
thus defeat Cobb of ., Detroit in a con
test for an automobile, but; the Court
of Appeals held that this evidence
failed to convince ., the trial jury that
O'Connor was guilty of the conspiracy.
The court held also that ; the con
tract with O'Connor, waa not void be
cause of ambiguity. . . , .
.
FTTCHBURG PROUD OF
BOTH PAT MORAN AND
CALLAIIAN OF PIRATES
: - v'. . ., " - . i ."',-'
(Sporting News.)
Out Cape Cod way folks take their
sport more seriously than in some
parts of the country. They, are pos
sessed of all the violent prejudice that
once featured a. boutat poker in : the
Bad Lands. No divided loyalty is in
vogue. 1 That's why Fitchburg, Mass.,
is ..all wrought up. , Fitchburg is the
home of Pat Moian, who piloted the
Phillies to a National. League cham
pionship this fall. ' Moran was the"
town hero. The whole city moved to
Boston when Pat's team played there.
All. Fitchburg has been prepared to
worship Patrick into another pennant
next year.
Now the blow has fallen. Jimmy
Callahan- has- been made manager of
the Pirates, -a club that is very likely
to give the Quakers all sorts of . trou
ble in 1916. And. Jimmy is another
native son of Fitchburg, - beloved of
all the boys. Most towns would be
all swelled on themselves if they hous
ed two. big league rival managers.
But it's a' tragedy In Fitchburg, for di
vided allegiance is not the Cape Cod
way. ' ' - .
It has taken " Callahan just a- gen
eration to' climb aboard the Pittsburgh
payroll since' Pittsburgh first wanted
him. .In 18951 both Pittsburgh and
Kansas City put in, drafts for him, and
the Eastern city made a hard fight to
retain him, for Jimmy was a very
promising pitcher. . But the Packers
got him and it has been a 20 -year trail
rtallafuiTi has traveled back to
the Smoky City.
BOWLING.
CHOP SUEI LEAGUE.
(Park City Alleys.)
Goulash Club.
Garavanta,
Smith, .
Douglas.
Bednar,
Kotay,
Totals, '
Hansen,
Lucey,
Wallie,
Banks,
Warnerj
Totals, .
105
110
74
97
100
93
77
90
91 .293
110' 321
72 239
77 233
76 238
79
72
' 440 457
427 1324
90 271
93 273
119 298
92 279
97 310
Iocey's Pets.
100
79
: 89
89
110
81
101
90
98
103 1
467 473 491 1431
Wooden Heads.
94 80
Gallagher,.
Bowden,
Thomas,
Walsh,
T. Monks,
Rinck, -
97 271
90 - 265
.. 86
86 185
8 6 260
89 - 277
83
86
92
99
93
105
81
83
448 1344
90 283
, . . 205
,104 J04
79 267
90- 277
98 278
461 1414
Ham Fats.
Mahoney,
Brown,
Ball,
Musante,
Feeney, '
Totals,
78
86
105
91
: 96
85
75
88
91
102
76-81-88-88-83-
239
242
281
270
281
456 441
416 1313
90 171
88 270
. . 164
90 291
90 291
85 166
Meigs' Rounders.
Benedict,
81
. 91
82
101
-108
Grindrod,
Dickson, j
Perkins,
Terrill,
Rose,
Totals,
91
82
100
93
81-
463 447 443 1353
Farmer Want Ads. One Cent a Word
Totals, 427 469
Chop ' Sueys.
Madden, . 90 103
Kelly, ; 104 101
Washington, v
Green, 94 94
Peterson,- 96 91
Murphy, . 89 ' 91
Totals, " 473 480
"LITTLE DROPS OF WOTEBo
LITTLE GLEAMS OB SUN
;MAKE THE
BOTTHATS TELLING WATCH
IN THIS PAPER,
THEY'RE-
99
JUST
SPORT TALK
O'Connor After Springfield.
One of the best known of the ap
plicants for the Springfield franchise
in the Eastern association is Pat
O'Connor. The former .St. Louis
backstop is anxious to get such a val
uable franchise for nothing and as he
is very popular ' in Springfield it is
probaible that the Eastern magnates
will View his application with favor.
Jack Zeller, who is organizing ithe
Eastern circuit, visited Pittsfield yes
terday. "Tie says the. fans there are
anxious ' for baseball again , and he
predicts a ,fine season. ' The situation
regarding the entry of Worcester is
puzzling. F. H. Bigelow, who con
trols thepark there, ' wants aN fran
chise , but Secreatry ' Farrell of the
National association, when asked if
Worcester was open territory; wired
back, "These matters will be settled
at January 17 meeting." ' It is gen
erally believed that ' the, refusal ol
Bigelow to do business with the New
England leaguers has broken ,the
merger plan.
The attraction ', for , next Tuesday
night at, Colonial hall, where the Blue
Ribbon basketball players hold forth,
will be the Sheepshead Bay five. The
New Tprkers- already have 'beaten the
Ribbons twice this season.
'If. the Cleveland -syndicate succeeds
in buying the American league fran
chise in that city every local fan will
be given an opportunity to buy. stock.
That will assure a full attendance of
stockholders at home " games with" all
hands telling the: manager how to run
the club. - '
Things look brighter for Pennsylva
nia football. The selection of Bob
Folwell as head coach is an assurance
LARRY WILLIAMS
AND M'GRATH ARE
TWO HARD HITTERS
Larry Williams, who is to tackle
Sailor McGrath in the semi-final bout
of the boxing show aX the . Casino,
next Monday- night, isa battler who
always pleases the crowd., Williams
ris
always boring in. He is a hard
hitter who never stalls but is ever
ready to follow his opponent. Wil
liams is a Stratford boy and since he
won his last four fights by knockouts
the whole town is rooting for him.;
McGrath claims the championship of
the United States Navy. . He is j also
a slugger. This bput is slated for eight
rounds. .
LARRY WILLIAMS.
Young McAuiiffe Is displaying lots
of life in his work at Levinsky's camp
in s51.1aLi.oru. . xiB kiiuws ne win xace
a ptrong opponent in Johnny Drum
mie, the Jersey City marvel. Brum
mie declares he is the logical oppon
ent for Kilbane in an effort to take
the featherweight title. McAolilic
would also like a whack at the title
and is in line for a 'bout with Kil- 1
bane if he beats Drummie. The stafsi
bout is carded for 15 rounds..
The six round go in which Jerome
Hennessy of Jersey City and Tommy
Shea of New Haven, will mingle, is
sure to be fast. Hennessy made a
hit here on Christmas, day and. Shea
is well ' known to , local ' fans. Kid
Alberts and Mike Farrell will meet
in the curtain raiser.
Terry Lee has been selected to "ref
eree and Slim Brennan will do the announcing.
T
- 1
Illliililf !fp:ss f::::,.;4;;;',;
r f
- f J- - M V
x !; t ;-
I ' " '' ' ', -'v v,
OOF
HANDED OUT
BY WAGNER
that the material will not be wasted
as in former years. Folwell has turned
out great teams at Lafayette and
.Washington & Jefferson. The latter
with only 400 students became one of
the strongest teams in the country.
Folwell declares that no cliques or so
cieties will help players next season.
He says he will give every man "an
equal chance to make the team.
The fact that Frank Moran has ac
cepted an offer to meet Jess Willard
in New Orleans is taken as an insult
by Jim Coffey's manager. The. latter
thinks Moran is too sure of beating
Coffey when they clash in New York
Friday night. If Coffey should defeat
Moran," the Pittsburgh 'boxer would
proDably be rejected for the Willard
engagement.
After a long abse"- due to" troubfi
with his eyes, Joe Shugrue is ready to
appear in' the New Xork ring again.
He is ready to concede weight and
meet Packey MoFarland at 142 ring
side. During - his eight months' : rest
Shugrue took on considerable weight
and may fight as a welterweight' in the'
future.- .eSJ;ut,.ci.a;-.,-'i,.-i--
The Athletics have called off thelr-
spring series' with the Phillies.' Con
nie Mack said , the Phillies wanted to
call off some ofthe games and he de-"
cided to cancel all. ':-"'
i s '-' -'
Manager Fielder Jones bf the St.
Louis Browns is after Hal Chase, the
Buffalo Federal first . baseman. He
also wants Pitcher Fred Anderson of
the Buffalo outlaws. Manager Tinker
of the Cubs likes Anderson, too. Al
though his record was not impressive,
Anderson is regarded 'as one of the
best pitching prospects in xthe Fed
erals. ,
RIBBONS RETURN,
TO WINNING FORM
IN LIVELY BATTLE
(By Wagner.) . 1
A rural chauffeur from Naugatuck
Ibod in front of Colonial hall last
nig
lsrht and inauired of bvstanders if
I the Naugatuck basketball players were
through yet. "They were through be
fore they started," some joker replied.
"I guess them fellers is too hard for
our boys," .said the chauffeur, who
was waiting to drive the Naugatuck
five home. And it was even so. The
Naugatuck boys, who were to get $100
if' they won, never had a chance to
open wine with that money. When
the' Blue Ribbons had been beaten by
20 to 3 in the first half the slaughter
was mercifully. stoppd.
The first game of the double .header
was good. Joe Jeanette, the chocolate,
soldier of boxing, brought a fast team
which made the Ribbons step lively to
win Joy 33 to 26. Brugy, a youngster
who was drafted by the Boston Na
tionals as a catcher, was 'the star for
the visitors. He caged five goals and
did fine floor work. Harvey and Cor
rigan of the visitors also starred. .
' The Ribbons' were strengthened by
the addition of Joe Dreyfuss, substi
tuting for Swenson, who was unable
to' , appear. Dreyfuss is one of the
strongest 'players in the game today.
ie is a hustler, a type always popular
with the fans. Jimmy Clinton came
back to form and caged two goals in
addition to four fouls. Smith and
Leonard also did well.
The Jeanette five were going great
in the first half and led by 18 to .17
when the half ended. In the second
session the Ribbons drew ahead .after
a fine rally. The lineup:
RIBBONS. STARS.
Clinton " Jeanette
L. F.
Smith
Doyle
Harvey
Corrigan
R.F.
; Lgonaxd
Dreyfuss
R. G.
Roach, Smith Bruggy
L. G.
Goals, Smith 4, Clinton 2, Leonard 3,
Dreyfuss 2. Roach 2. iRru srtr-v K T-ir-o-ii
2, jeanette 1, Harvey 2, Corrigan 1.
Goals from wouls, Corrigan 3, JeanV
ette 1, Smith 2, Clinton 5.' .
Referee, Wallum.
January clearance sale of reliable
fur scarfs and muffs in black fox, rac
coon, natural skunk, narobia lynx,
red Cox, coney and many other kinds
It will pay you to buy your furs now
for next year at E. H. Dillon & Co.'s
1105 Main street. Adv.
Farmer Want Ads. One Cent a Word
Philadelphia, Jan. 5 The selection
of Robert C. Folwell, ( captain of
Penn's 1907 football team,1 was ratified
yesterday afrnooh by the board of
directors of the Pennsylvania Athletic
Association as head coach . of the
Quaker eleven for 1916. His appoint
ment was to have , been approved., by
the faculty athletic committee before
the board of directors was allowed to
vote on it, "according to: the new'rul-'
ing made by the faculty yesterday.
However, owing to the impossibility
of the faculty committee meeting be
fore the board" of directors this after
noon, Dr. Arthur Goodspeed, chair
man of the faculty committee, per
mitted Folwell's name to be put he
fore the board of directors. This un
questionably means that Folwell's
choice as head coach is agreeable to
the faculty. .
The official selection of Folwell put
an "end to one of the bitterest contro
versies that has ever been waged in
Pennsylvania athletics. For the last
two seasons there has been a bitter
dispute over the coaching question. It
began at the close of the 1914 season,
one of the poorest a Penn team ever
has had. The 'members of the football
team voted by an overwhelming ma
jority" that George Brooke's contract
for the next year be cancelled. '
The new football committee for
1915 asked Brooke to resign, but he'
refused. Una"ble to appoint another
head coach the committee compro
mised with the players by taking away
practically all of Brooke's authority
and placing, a board of coaches In act
ive charge of football.
The board of coaches proved an
overwhelming failure last season, and
there has - been one of the bitterest
fights ever wage'd in Penn--.athletics
since then over the selection" of this
year's head coach. The selection of
Folwell is popular with students and
alumni.
J :
ZBYSZKO THROWS
GBAPPLER LUNDEH
New York, Jan. 5. In one of tHe best
.catch-as-eatch-can contests that has
ibeen seen at the Manhattan Opera
House since the wrestling tournament,
began, Vladek Zbyszko last night de
feated Hjalma Lundin after a battle
lasting 46 minutes and 14 seconds.
The big Swede gave the Polish grap
pler a hard .tussle, - and several' times
had Zbyszko in ticklish holds- Lun
din also wriggled out of some locks
that looked as though they were un
breakable, but finally the Polander got
a wrist and body hold .and brought his
opponent's shoulders to the mat.
Mort Henderson, the "Masked Mar
vel," took . a night off, and in conse
quence there was a small crowd and
little excitement. .
The Masked Marvel tonight meets
Alexander Aberk, the title holder, in a'
return match to a finish.
Aberg threw the hooded grappler In
an hour and a half In their last match.
Previous to that the Marvel and the
champion had wrestled two hours and
twenty minutes to a draw. ' ,Zbyszko
will meet Strangler LewisJa a catch-as-catch-can
bout, to a finishtomor-
row night.
HOLY CROSS WON'T
PLAY GEORGETOWN
Worcester, Jan. 5- Prospects for a
football game between Holy Cross
and Georgetown .in Springfield , next
fall look pather dubious ' just now.
The "Home City" men,- who were in
terested in the proposition, made a
substantial and satisfactory - offer ' to
the Holy Cross management, hut was
unable to meet the guarantee asked
by the Georgetown, team.
In a recent letter to Graduate Man
ager Thomas . J. - Flaherty ofv Holy
Cross, C. C. Cox, graduate manager of
Georgetown declared that satisfac
tory arrangements have not as yet
'been made and it is doubtful if the
proposed game will materialize.
Georgetown would like to play the
Mt. St. James team in Worcester or
any other city where dt would be as
sured of a good crowd and an attrac
tive guarantee. '
WARDS AND GWINNER
BIDDING FOR CLEVELAND
AMERICAN LEAGUE CLUB
Pittsburgh, Jan. 5 In conjunction
with the Ward interests represented
by C. B. Comstock, Edward W. G win
ner, president of the local Feds, is ne
gotiating with President Ban John
son for the Cleveland franchise in-the
American League.
The conditions named by Johnson
entail the; payment of $200,000 to
President feharley Somers and assum
ing -a mortgage held by Forest City
bankers against the property for
$376,000. Added to this, the bankers'
j committee that holds the mortgage in
' sists that a Cleveland .man must head
the team. 1
On the latter point Gwinner and
the Wards ' have agreed to elect a
Cleveland banker who represents the
Wards' Interests in that city. They
are willing to assume the mortgage,
but balk on paying $200,000 for the
franchise. It is known that they have
offered to split the difference, but so
far no satisfactory agreement has
been reached.
Rebel Oakes, former manager of the
Rebels, yesterday, after a conference
with President Gwinner, stated that he
would be "taken care of" next year.
That the price asked for the Cleve
land club is $560,000 is confirmed by
conditions of the sale communicated
o Robert McRay, former secretary of
"he American League, who, with Jake
-tahl of Chicago, has been mentioned
is a possible purchaser of the club.
SE " I TFORD BROTHERS BUY
-J UNION LAB4.L PAKTS B
10 Kast Side and "West End Y
Free Trousers end Satur
day! This is the last call
your last chance to order a tailored
to measure Suit 'or Overcoat we
have them as low as $14.75 too
and get extra Trousers Free. After
Saturday, these .same Trousers,
now FREE cost you $5. They are
fitted and tailored just as scrupu
lously perfect as if you paid $5. At
prices no higher than readymades,
we give you tailored to measure
garments that will cause you to
; wonder how you were ever content-'
ed with anything else.
Open eyery evening this week
to enable all to get Free Trousers.
English Woolen Mills
1134 MAIN STREET. NEXT TO DORSEN'S
TRIPLE TIE IN HOLY
N AME BASKETBALL RACE
The Holy Name basketball leaguers
will dissolve a triple tie for first place
tomorrow night when two games will
be played at St. John's hal. .The St.
Mary's and Sacred Hearts will meet
in the first game and in the second the
St. "John's and St. Charles' will be op
ponents. The lineup: ' . :
First Game. '
St. Mary's. . ' - Sacred. Heart
Whelan - ' ' ' ' Doyle
' Left Forward.
Malone . Garrity
Snyder,
Baker ,
Right Forward
v - .Kenny,
Hulton
. Center f
Lyddy, Casserly . Luddy, T. Martin
Left .Guard.
I
Rainville
E. Martin
. Right Guard.
Second Game.
St. John's.
Lucas -, r- .
St.
Charles'.
Christy
Ritter
Dennis
Ahearn
Henbury
Left Forward
Liptak
Gartland
Creevy ' .
Hudak ,
Right Forward
Center
Left Guard.
Right Guard
Referee, Joe Waters.
FRATERNAL PINOCHLE TO
- START FRIDAY EVENING
After a vacation bf several weeks.
the Fraternal Pinochle league will re
sume its meetings Friday night at the
Casino. yW6wompon leads at present.
Harris is second and the Koncks are
third. The Independents are in fourthl
placeAdelphians stand fifth and the
Marinas, Waldemeres and Uncas
teams are tied for last place.
George Foster, Red
Hose Hero, Product 6f
. -1 the Indian Country
George Foster, the red-hosed hero
of the last world's series, -will pass his
twenty-eighth milestone on this day,
as he was born, on Jail. 5, 1888., Of
course, even at this late day, you re
member how George went into the
box in the second contest of tne ocr
ies, and, in the. presence of President
Wilson and the lady who is now his
wife, won the game by his airrtight
twirling and his timely slugging. ; Also,
'When Carrigan had to decide on a
pitcher for the fifth pastime, he said.
"Let George do it. And George did
--although it must be confessed that
he didn't display the finesse, and form
that he . had exhibited in his earlier
appearance on ..the slab.
Foster's native town is Lehigh,
Okla., but it was in Indian Territory
when Foster made his mundane de
but. The country was then largely
inhabited by aborigines, and George
had many Indians among his boyhood
playmates. A part of his youth was
spent in Pittsburg, Kansas, and it was
there that he first began to make a
reputation as a pitcher. Foster visit
ed .his friends and relatives --in the
Kansas mining town soon after' the
conclusion of the series and donned
the Pittsburg uniform in a game
against the Webb City, Mo., which had
Walter Johnson , of the Washington
Americans in the box. The Pittsburgs
shut out the Johnson aggregation,
winning by three runs in the ""ninth
frame after a scoreless eight-inning
pitching duel between Foster and
Johnson. 1
It was in Tulsa Okla., back in 1908,
that Foster broke into the professional
pastime, in the Oklahoma-Kansas
league. The next year he was with
Bartlesville, Okla., and in 1910 he
played with a semi-pro .club in Car
son, La. In 1911 Foster formed a
partnership with Tom Wilson, last sea
son witii Galveston, as a reversible
battery, George pitching one day and
Wilson catching, and vice versa. They
first pulled this stunt with a semi-pro
outfit in a little Oklahoma town, but
they soon landed a job with Musko
gee, in the Western Association. Lat
er in the season the "reversible, bat-i
III
, . , OLD CUSTOMERS: Your check we
sent you expires Saturday. Don't let any
thing prevent you from coming by that
time or you lose its value.
I, . . . . . - . -.
tery" mates were sold td the St. Louis
Browns. All they did was to'help
keep the bench warm, and after a few
weeks of that the pair were sent to
.Houston and in 1912 they helped to
win the Texas league flag for that
city. At the close of the Texas season
Foster was sold to Boston for the
juicy sum of $5,000. An accident
prevented him from showing much in
1913, but in-1914 he hit his stride.
Foster isn't a remarkable pitcher in
the mechanical arts of the game, but
he uses. his gray matter. and never
knows when he is licked.
Like so many other diamond stars,
George has a fondness for the soil,
and he has acquired, 320 acres of it
in the vicinity of Bukoshee, Okla., and
he spends the Winter months with his
wife and children on . the. farm. St.
Paul, Nebraska, hasn't any more en
thusiasm in its admiration of Alexan
der the Great than Foster's home
town displays in' its adulation of, the
conquering hero of the Red Sox.
Arthur Fletcher, the shortstop of
the Giants, - begins his thirtieth year
today. He was born and still lives
In Illinois, but it was with Dallas, in
the Texas league, that he made his
first .splash in the baseball world. He
was sold to the Giants during the sea
son of 1908, ' and was used at third
basef or some time before he was
ehifted to the shortstop position.
ANNIVERSARIES
OF RING BATTLES
1900 Spike Sullivan : -and' George
McFadden fought" 25-?round draw in
New York.. And some fight that was!
Old-timers would like to see either
Spike or "Elbows" in the ring at their
best, pitted against Freddie Welsh or
any of the other lightweights of to
day, and you can bet .they "wouldn't
put their money on the modern boys.
Spike was a sawed-off little- fellow, al
though a little taller than either Kid
Lavigne or Joe Walcott. . McFadden
was the best defensive boxer of his
time, and perhaps of all time. Sul-
Llivan who was a true member or tnat
clan and a native of Ireland iouglit
many long and famous battles. lie
knocked out Ed Daly in 37 rounds,
Dal Hawkins in : 22 rounds and Al
Smith in 28 rounds. Met aaaen
and Sullivan fought two long draws.
Both Spike and Elbows were defeat
ed by, Joe Gans, the negro battler.
1862 Frank Slavin, once famous
Australian heavyweight, born at M ait
land, N. S. W. '
GEORGE P. GABRIEL
OF BRIDGEPORT GETS
AUTO LICENSE AGAIN
(Special, fo The Farmer.)
Hartford, Jan. 5. The license ot
George P. Gabriel of Bridgeport was
re-issued by Secretary of State Burnes
yesterday after a hearing in the Cap
itol. He was concerned in an accident
at Putney in 1911 and another later in
Waterbury and careless driving was
alleged, for which his license was re
yoked. ' . '
Gabriel asked for a re-issue of his
license, the request being supported by
his nVother, who had formerly desired
its suspension; and by about 50 owners
and operators of motor vehicles i in
Bridgeport, who" were represented by
petition. After, considering the testi
mony in favor of Gabriel, Secretary
Burnes agreed to issue a new license.
upon sunrainje, ciiicr cu-Litujiiing i x
briel as to Its proper use.
Steve Eslinger of Bridgeport report
ed by telephone that he - couldn't af-
ford to come to Hartford to explain"
why he sped by a standing trolley car:
Nov. 20, 191"5, narrowly escaping'
n 1...L n ..if,. uv.nu o. J J " -J --i ... . I . A w UU W 0.3
alighting near State street. As he
couldn't afford to attend the hearing
Secretary Burnes suspended his license"
until he could appear and explain mat
ters. Policeman George L. Benedetti-.
of Bridgeport testified that Elsinger
passed the trolley car at a speed of 25
miles an hour, while a woman was
alighting.
FUNERAL DESIGNS AKT
BOUQUETS.
JOHN & SON.
S

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