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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, January 05, 1916, Image 5

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THE FARMER: JANUARY 5, 1916
SHIRTS !
SHIRTS Ms
I-
Ni-
t!
Mid-Winter Sale of
MEN'S SHIRTS
Starts Thursday, Jan; 6th
: ' No need to . "boom" this ! sale in
screaming type. "Men on the look-put
. appreciate instantly what this sale
means.1 It means that our best .shirt
makers have made up their ends of
cloth into smart new shirts ESPEC
IALLY FOR THIS SALE. No skimp
Sing in the making good generous
sizes everything up to our high stand
ard butthere have been sharp conces
sions in price which bring men savings
worth having. v ' ' -
The SHIRTS Stiff and soft cuff
styles, in choice percales and madras, chev-
iots and silky soisettes, soft mixed silk and
linen, and pure silk. Colors, stripes, com
binations in wondrous variety, and we've
every size to start with. . ; ''
The PRICES Shirts regularly up
to $1.50, now 89c. Usual' $2.00 Shirts, now
$1.35. Fine $2.50 Void $3.00 Shirts for $1.85. '
Elegant $4.00 Shirts are $2.95. Rich $5.00 and -$6.00
Silk Shirts, $3.95. -' - -
V
I
'A
r And a Sale of Neckwear A real
clearaway of every bit of odds and ends of
.our silk four-in-hands not old stocks but
fresh, newly bought goods for this season's
selling. Profit by-these offerings:
V Fine fifty-cent ties for 35e, three of 'em
for ?i.oo, ,v ... . 1 .,. v l
Rich Dollar ties for 79c; two for $1.50.
Elegant $1.50 ties for $1.15, and $2.00
ties for. $145.
Finest, richest $2.50 ties to go at $1.85-
-41
INCORPORATED
OOTFTTTERS TO MEV, WOMEN" & CHUBBEIT
T ' 'Bridgeport,- Conn.
JUSTICES RESERVE
DECISION III CASE
OF I II. WILLIAMS
P Jtition for New Trial Filed on
Basis of New Evidence
1 V ' '- . Claim. '
HartfoML Janl 6 -Xeclaion was re-
.. ierTvu u y ix j -
. 'court of errors sitting at Hartford
yesterday in the appeal of Isaac N.
Williams of Bridgeport. "Williams and
Harry poe, a companion! have been
- convicted - of 1 niurder. ; : ri . ,
- ' , The atgtiments in " the case were
completed and presented ' by Charles
H. Shapiro of Bridgeport and. Bernard
Higgins, counsel for the accused, and
, States- ! Attorney Donald " T. Warner
, and, Frank 3. Mann for the prosecu
- ' tioix; :' ' 'v i ' .
Williams and Hoe have , a stay of
eietration from Gov. Holcomb, pend
ing ihe decisten in their appeal. The
case- will be decided in two or three
weeks. Meanwhile, a petition asking
for a new trial has -been jfiled, on the
ground that new evidence has heen
discovered. . ,- , .
-T T
WHY HAIR FALLS OUT
Dandruff causes ; a feverish. irrita
tion of the' scalp, the hair foots shrink.
,. looseTl and then the hair comes out
; fast. To stop falling hair at once and
rid the scalp of every particle of
- dandruff, get a 2 5-oent bottle of Dan
derine at any drug store,' pour a little
in 'your hand and rub well into 'the
".' scalp. After a few applications all
i dandruff disappears and the hair stops
coming out. Adv.
yourxsick1;hild '
is constipated!
, look at tomgue
If cross, feverish or bilious give
"California Syrup
" ', of Figs." ; ;
i No matter what ails your child, a
gentle, thorough laxative should al
ways be the first treatment given.
If your little one is out-of-sorts,half-sick,
isn't resting, eating and acting
naturally-: look, Mother! see if tongue
is coated. ' This is a sure sign that it's
little stomach, liver and bowels are
clogged with waste. When cross, irri
table, feverish, stomach-sour, diar
rhoea, sore throat, full of cold, give a
teaspoonful of "California Syrup of
Flss," and in a few hours all the con
stipated poison, - undigested food and
sour bile gently moves out of its little
bowels without griping, and you have
a well, playful child again.
Jilothers can rest easy after giving
this harmless "fruit laxative." because
it eever fails to cleanse the little one's
liver and bowels and sweeten the stom
ach and they dearly love its pleasant
taste. ITull directions for babies' chil
dren of all ages and for grown-ups
'printed on each bottle,
v Beware of counterfeit flg syrups.
Ask yor druggist for a 50-eent bottle
of "California Syrup of Figs:" then see
that it is made by the "California Fig
; Byrup Company. AdT.
soc
Ial
AND PERSONAL
Chapter Day of , the Mary Sllliman
Chapter. D. A. R.,' will be celebrated
on Monday at the Odd Fellows' hall
on Broad street. Mrs. John Laidlaw
Buel, etate regent, will be present and
give a short address and Mrs. George
Wilcox, formerly dean of Adelphi col
lege, Brooklyn, will speak informally.
Under the direction of Miss Mary
Louise - Peck, chairman of the music
committee, a musical t program has
been arranged which will include se
lections by Mrs. Ethel Poland Hub
bell, soprano. . Mrs. George H. Smith
ia in charge of the committee on dec
orations. Every member is invited
to .bring a guest. ,
A daughter, weighing 10 pounds.
was born yesterday afternoon to Dr.
and Mrs.' J. F.- Sullivan, 579 East Main
Btreet. ; Mrs.. Sulliyai was Miss Anna
Sadler. -. - '
Announcement of the marriage of
Miss Becky F. Hoff, daughter of Mrs.
F. Hoff of Hartford. , to ' David 'A.
Davidson; son ofMr. and Mrs. M. Da
vidson, of this city, which was 'sol
emnized on Sunday evening,. Dec. 26,
at the' bride's-home in Hartford, was
made- last night with the return of
the young couple from their honey
moon trip. Only the immediate fam
ilies of Mr. and Mrs. Davidson had
been cognizant of their marriage. The
bridegroom is employed -at the TJ.
M. C. Co. in this city. Mr. and Mrs.
Davidson will reside at 424 Fern
broke street
The engagement of Miss Mary E.
McCullough, daughter of Patrolman
and Mrs. Simon H. McCullough of 98
Milne street, to Ambrose I. Ashley of
Catherine street, was announced, to a
lathering of friends of the youngpeo
ple at Miss McCullough's home on
Sunday evening. Miss McCullough is
stenographer at Peck, & . Dines ' Co..
and Mr, Ashley is a toolmaker with
the -Bridgeport Brass Co. No data
has been set for the wedding.
HIGGINS BAHBI6.
One of the prettiest of the holiday
weddings was that solemnized at the
Sacred Heart church yesterday morn
ing, when Miss Julia M. Rahrig, of
644 Park avenue, became the bride of
Mr. Thomas Higgins, the nuptials be
ing performed by the Rev. Matthew
Judge. The bride was becomingly at
tired In a suit of taupe faille silk with
a gold hat trimmed with plumes of
taupe, and corsage bouquet of orchids
and lilies of they alley.' Miss Rahrig
was attended by her . sister, Mrs. John
F. Lyons, as matron of honor. Mr.
Rogers attended the groom. Both
Mr. and Mrs. Higgins are well known
in this city, and were the recipients of
many handsome gifts. Mr. Higgins
is affiliated with the Locomobile Co.
Immediately following the ceremony
the happy couple left for an extensive"
trip to western points of interest. They
will be "at home" 664 Park avenue
after Jan. 20.
SCHOOPtERS ASH OR 10 IK G -VL10.
New London, Jan. P The. schoon
ers Bartley W. and Winegance, three
masters, bound , for New York with
cargoes, went ashore off this port
early today during a gale. They were
hauled off later by a wrecking com
pany and towed into this harbor.
What damage they sustained, if any,
has, not y,et been ascertained. ..
Farmer 'Want Ads. One Cent a Word 1
CO-OPERATIVE
PRINCIPLE MAKES
GAINS IN HOLLAND
Dutch Farmers and Merchants
United to Meet War Times
, ' Conditions. .
The Hague, Netherlands, Jan. 5
"War time conditions such as prevail
at present ' prove more clearly than
yards of academic discussion the prac
tical value and usefulness of the co
operative principle to the community,"
according to G. D. C. Goedhart, presi
dent of one of the greatest co-operative
societies n Holland. Originally
styled "Efgen Hulp" (Self Help) this
organization, which was founded here
in 1878 with a membership of 315 and
the modest capital og $2,100, has now
close upon 10,000 members and an an
nual ' turnover of about $1,000,000.
The basic principle of the Self Help
Organization was to enable the some-j
what scantily paid middle and lower
class officials of the Dutch civil and
military services to procure household
necessaries at minimum prices; all net
prooflts realized being returned to the
members in the shape of dividencts,
which have grown from $500 in the
aggregate in 1878 to nearly $100,000
for last year. Membership is insur
ed by. a . first payment of 12 cents,
which is the tenth part of a. "share,"
and no member is allowed to hold
more than 10 shares. On. this, deposit
money a fixed interest rate, of 4 per
cent, is paid. ;
or late years the co-operative prin
ciple 4ias made enormous strides In
Holland. All over the country. Co-op- !
erative organizations haves prung up.
The idea, originally intended for the
benefit of' government officials only,
has keen extended and made to- apply
to widely diversified objects; to agri
cultural, dairy farming, building and
credit societies, until the formation of
central "Netherlands Co-operative
Union" became j a necessity. This
body has. an advisory board of ex
perts in all matters, concerning co
operation.
Holland's chief wealth lies in her
agricultural and dairylrfg industries,
and it is in these branches of pro
ductivity that -co-operation-has proved
of the greaest benefit, especially to
the small farmer. The agricultural in
stitution known as the' Raffelsen Bank
at Utrecht has accumulated savings
amounting to $2,400,000, and has ad
vanced loans on mortgages to mem
bers of Its 250- branches aggregating
$1,400,000. The Central Farmers'
Loan Bank at- Eindhoven, in North
Brabant, has 378 branches, a savings
bank total at, $2,200,000 and a mort
gage loan account of $1,280,000.. These
are big figures for a Small country
like Holland. x :"'.'- ''
The difficulties encountered by the
co-operative societies during the pres
ent war have been many and varied;'
but the public spirit displayed by the
organizers of the various institutions
has succeeded in overcoming most, if
not all, of the trouble. The Putter
shoek Beet Sugar Co-operative So
ciety, for instance, which ; deals with
over 100,000 tons of beets annually,
fared badly last year owing to the
embargo laid on exportation by the
Dutch government. . On the other
hand, Undertakings of a purely social
character have done better. Only the
other day, jthe mayor of The Hague,
Dr. EC A. van Karnebeek, made an
inaugural inspection of a whole new
street of little dwelling houses, erected
by a co-operative building society
with the object of providing cheap
homes for members of the police force
and municipal employees.
MONROE
William S. Clark of Barn Hill is en
jojying a trip in the South, having left
here Thursday, Dec. 23.
Eugene Peck traded cows with Al
fred E. Edwards of Stepney last week.
Mrs. Walter vC. Hazard left last
Monday' morning for Ansonia, where
she will spend the winter with her
husband.
Harry I. Andrews - of New Haven
has spent several days with his sister,
Mrs. Edwin C. Stevens of Barn Hill.
Mrs. Harold S. - Bryant and child
of Meriden, spent the holiday recess
at) the. home of her mother, Mrs. Ar
thur J. Smith.
Mr. and Mrs. Myron S. Clarke have
entertained their daughter, Miss Car
olyn over the holidays. ' .
James McDermitt - has returned
home, from a .pleasant visit with hjs
daughter Mrs. John S. Hurd of Long
Hill. ,
L. Benedict Beardsley left Monday
for Storrs, Conn., where he will at
tend the short winter term of the
Agricultural college.
Mrs. J. L. Thorpe who has been
in the Bridgeport hospital, has re
turned with a bouncing baby boy.
Miss Carolyn ClarK spent Monday
with her friend, Mrs. Marshall Beach.
Webster Wood of New York spent
New Year's at thecoma of his par
ents at the center.. ' ,
The Mary Gorman estate at the cen
ter has been sold t9 Mrs. Eleanor
Clough of New Haven. She will take
possession about March I.
John Benno of Stepney has moved
his family into " the - Morgan place.
opposite Dwight M. Burr's.
Walter Freeman is caring for Mrs.
Hazard's stock during her ' absence.
Acting under Instructions of the
state supervisor, Mrs. Morgan of Hat
tertown, teacher of the Center school
for the last eight -years, has, again
assumed her old duties. Fred P.
Sherman has resigned his position at
Lower Stepney and likewise under the
advice of the supervisor, has been
succeeded by Miss Mary Collins of
D anbury, a former teacher at Upper
Stepney. -.'-..'
Washington lodge will hold a spe
cial meeting on Monday afternoon,
Jan. 10 at 2 p m., with initiation in
the M. M. degree. Tno officers for
the present year will be installed at
that time. Regular . communication.
Monday evening, Jan. 17 with work in
the M. M. degree.
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin C. Stevens will
give a social dance at their home on
Friday evening of this week.
The Clover Leaf . Whist club will
hold its -regular meeting Wednesday
evening at Riverside hall.
The Civic club of East Village meets
at the church Thursday evening, Jan.
6.
GIVES LECTURE OX
ELECTRIC HEATING
A lecture on electrical heating ap
pliances was delivered last night by
Fred B.,. Mitchell of, New Britain in
the rooms of the United Illuminating
Co. Salesmen and others attended.
, I.OTTA
SUN
I
9
ENUFF y
RAIN U
HELLO.
HELLO
GOOD" ? ; -.: ' -
HONEYANl BABIES.
WHAT ELSE?
WTCH IN 7THIS NSWSPAF
I f
THREATEN LIFE
OF NEGRO WHO
ASSAULTED BOY
Newtown Residents Frenzied
Over Vicious Attack By Col
ored Hotel Chef.
(Special to The farmer.)
Newtown, Jan. 5 Prompt action
by the justice court authorities in dis
posing of the case of WilHam Ellwood,
colored, of Danbury, probably pre
vented an attack upon the pris.ner
yesterday morning when " he was ar
raigned before Justice P. H. McCar
thy. Ellwood was charged with a seri
ous attack on John Carey, aged 13,
of Sandy Hook. . The -boy's father and
brother were in the court room. Their
indignation at - the testimony was so
great that threatenings against Ell
wood were heard and it is likely that
had not the prisoner been hustled out
of the court room , with dispatch he
would have been assaulted. '
Little evidence was presented, mere
ly enough to bind, over Ellwood on a
finding of probable cause. His
bonds were fixed at $1,000.
Ellwood had been employed as
chef in a Newtown hotel. , He culti
vated the acquaintance of young
Carey and Monday went . with him to
Danbury. On the suggestion of New
town police authorities he was arrest
ed there and Sheriff M. D. Beers
brought him to Newtown.
The .case is the principal topic of
discussion in Newtown today and
much of the population is wroth. Ell
wood Is so likely to come to harm
that he will be guarded. , As the
Carey boy Is the only witness against
him he, too, will be held.
SHELL EXPLODES.
Lyons, France, Jan. 6 Eight sol
diers and one civilian were killed and
19 -soldlers and one civilian Injured
here yesterday by the accidental ex
plosion of a shell in' the artillery park.
CHILDREN'S COUGHS
Children's throats are delicate and
sensitive. In play, at school or work
they are exposed to chilling drafts,
their little bodies are overheated from
exercise, they cool off too quickly and
a cold sets in. The minute your child
commences to cough get a bottle of
Leonardi's Cough Syrup (Creosoted).
It is good for children's delicate
throats, protects the lungs, raises the
phlegm, and gives quick relief. A
harmless, safe, pleasant remedy . for
coughs, colds, grippe, croup; whooping
cough and bronchitis-. that is healing
and soothing. Fine for adults, too.
25c at your druggist, or Hindle's Drug
Stores, 9 87 Main street and 909 Main
street. Adv.
The University School
. 836 FAIRFIELD AVE.
Next session, January 3, 1916. Col
lege preparatory, elementary and ad
vanced subjects, upper grammar
school and high school . grades, indi
vidual instruction. Students entering
now may save a. year's work.
- s T20 at .
.-.'EVENING-'
SLIPPERS
strapped - or strapless,
bead ' embossed, decor
ated or plain, in white -or
black.
WOMEN'S
WALKING BOOTS
of beat makes in tan
and black
' STYLISH
ROUGH WEATHER
.FOOTWEAR,
FOR YOUNG FOLKS
: ANATOMXK SHOES
for .men, women and
children .afflicted with
flat foot, etc. .
W.K.M0LLAN
1026 MAIN ST.
HEWTOWN CITIZENS
PETITION RAILROAD
FOR EARLIER TRAIN
Ask Change In Leaving Time
of Late Accommodation
Out of Bridgeport. '
(Special to The Farmer.)
Newtown', Jan. 5 A petition with
many signatures asking that the rail
road company put on an extra train,
leaving Bridgeport dally at 6: 30 p. m.
for the benefit of the large number of
Newtown commuters, was sent to New
Haven today. " '
It is not intended sto attempt tb in
terfere with the evening mail train
or add to the burdens of the postmas
ter, but it is believed that the time
schedule of the New Milford Special,
which leaves Bridgeport at 6:30 p. m.,
could be advanced an hour to the ad
vantage of the general public ; or a
came the familiar -pocket-like sound
could carry closed, mail pouches next
day on the return trip south.
The latter would be a decided ad
vantage to the business -men of New
town who have long agitated an
earlier mail from here. At present
the first -mail for Bridgeport,, or east
west, .does-not leave Newtown until
10:15 -a. m. This does not permit of
correspondence with New York and
a reply the same day. It" is hoped by
Newtown .citizens that the efforts of
the promoters of this move may prove
successful. Frank Carmody of Sandy
Hook and F. B. Allen of Newtown
are circulating the- petition. v
The railroads are trying to stop
track walking, particularly by offer
ing free transportation by freight
cars.
AN AID TO HEALTH PURE WATER
HIGHLAND SPRING WATER
A bealtbfui, Invigorating drink which Is absolutely nnoontamlnated by
Impurities of any kind and bas passed the most rigid tests
Bottled Daily Delivered Daily
Highland Spring Water Go.
'Phone 987
645 WARREN S TR E E T
PEOPL'ES
DAIRY
130 State Street
et BUTTEl
FRESH FROM THE CHXTRW
Tel GEO. A. ROBERTSON , 88S
Sprague Ice & Goal Co.
.;?:...;.'' DEALERS IN
1 ANTHRACITE AND BITUMINOUS COAL
EAST END E. WASH. AVE. BRIDGE Tel. 4673-4S74
NOTICE
' "SAVE MONEY" ALWAYS BUY THE BEST
: Remember to Order
OLD COMPANY'S COAL
"THE HAKD LEHIGH CO )
IX IjASTS LONGER AND GIVES MORE HEAT.;,', . ,. '1
EGG AND STOVE ........ .... .,. S7.GO
i)
,NUT
. . . ... . 57.25
THIS COAIi SOLD BY
t
PATRICK McGEE
269 E. Washington Ave. Phone 3323
THOROUGHLY SCREENED COAL
QUALITY GUARANTEED.
NUT . S7.SO per-Ton
STOVE OR EGG . . ; . -S7.2S per Ton
25c Less Per Ton For Cash.
The Wheeler & Howes Co.
1221 MAIN ST. .
EAST END CONGRESS ST. BRIDGE,
PHONE 844
CERTIFIED
NATURAL
HAND
SCREENED
PURE
ARTIFICIAL
BEST
LEHIGH
ICE
CO Aid'
BLOCK ANDTvyL- fK ffs TTTl HICKORY
KINDLING w MJ Jf ULJpor GRATES
THE NAUGATUCK VALLEY ICE CO.
Main Office & Plant, 421 Housatonic Ave. Tel. 597, 593
J
Our Annual January Clearance Sale Begins Today
! (The issue oi this paper of Dec. 31 gives a general summary or the greaC savings
to be had at this sale.)
However, an inspection is necessary to form any idea of the tremendous stock
which we throw "on the market at from 10 per cent, to 40 per cent, less than our usual
low regular prices. An early selection for the furnishing of a home is urged, as in
many instances there is no duplicate stock. Gome while the variety is greatest.
We hold, free of charge, any pieces, you select for FUTURE DELIVERY, making it
convenient for those who anticipate their wants at this time and at the same time get
the bene fit 'of the saving. 1 ' '
One entire floor is used to exhibit the" LIBRARY,
FURNITURE. No two alike. . ' .
LIVING ROOM AND PARLOR
75.00 Seven-foot Davenport ....... $52.50
All-over Stuffed, Upholstered in Tapestry.
$270.00 Two-Piece Seven-foq,t Davenport
and One Large Chair -to. match, in Turkish
style. The upholstering Is in large'diamond
pleated Turkish tufting, with fillings of gen
uine curled hair. The upholstery is of the
best grade of imported velour in old blue
$198.00
$.?65.00 Four-Piece of modern English de
sign, upholstering entirely plain, luxurious
ly soft and yielding, with fillings of genu
ino curled hair,
shade of blue
The covering is of a rare
hi' imported embossed
velour
i
$212.00
175.00 Three-Piece Fiverfoot Settee,
Chair and Rocker to match, upholstered en
tirely plain, very-pliable and yielding seats.
Upholstery is imported velour in the "new
mulberry and black stripe effect. A very
striking set ....... . . V ... .,. . . . $149.00
SvlOO.OO Three-Piece Mahogany f ramie. Tap
estry back and seat $79.00
$115.00 Three-Piece Massive Suit, genuine
Leather, Upholstered back and seat $92.00
$85.00 Three-Piece Solid Mahogany frame,
genuine Leather backs and seats $8.00
$95.00 Three-Piece All-over Upholstered,
genuine Leather v." $76.00
$55.00 Three-Piece genuine Leather seat
and back ... $44.00
$92.00 Three-Piece Silk Plush -Loose
Cushions : . : , . . . $73.60
$82.50 Three-Piece All-over Upholstered in
Old "Rose Velour ....... . . . . ; . $66.00
$68.00 Three-Piece Green Panne Plush
Seats I. $54.40
$42.00 Three-Piece Tapestrv back and
seats $34.00
$40.00 Three-Piece Loose Cushion Mulberry
Velour , $32.00
, $37.50 Three-Piece Silk Plush Auto
Cushions $29.00
$75.00 Seven-foot Davenport Tufted back
and seat,' in green denim . . . . . $50.00
$37.75 English Fireside Chair Wool Tap
estry Upholstered . $29.00
$18.00 English Fireside Chair Brown Denim,
Upholstered $13.95
$26.00 Wing Chair, Solid Mahogany Arms
and Posts, Tapestry Upholstery . . $19.85 .
$28.75 Chair and Rocker, Hepplewhite Per
iod, Upholstered back and seat.
Each $23.00
$28.00 Chair and Rcker, all-Over Uphol
stery, Mulberry Velour ...... ... . $15.95
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