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The Bridgeport evening farmer. [volume] (Bridgeport, Conn.) 1866-1917, September 20, 1917, Image 9

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THE FARMER: SEPTEMBER 20, 1917
tm
j
Amusement j
polfs
: The Idol of the American stage, Ethel
iiafrymore Is to appear on the Poll
screen tomorrow. Seldom has this
charming actress been seen In this
'city and her appearance now is doubly
inviting to theatre-goers because of
the vehicle -' of : her entrance. "The
Lifted '. Veil' -which wlW be shown . In
Its five Immense acts. This picture
which Involves society and love
.tragedy will be featured on the Foil
screen today and for the remainder of
the -:,, week, although - Hearst-Pathe
news release will have Its attractive
ness enhanced because of the extra
effort of the cameramen to take ac
curate pictures of the naval and army
movements of the Liberty forces.
. On the vaudeville program the most
Interesting, novel and. in fact vaude
ville's greatest dancing act comes to
this city. Tango Shoes, always new,
always- fresh and- always filled with
activity will be quite the rage among
dancers after they have witnessed the
company perform.
' Mabel Cameron and Alan Devitt In
1 the screaming sketch "The Groom
Forgot" are a special attraction at
' Poll's and come with a company ot
three to play this new act which has
been written, especially for their talem
, Greely & Drake, known as "The
Two Black Laughs" will add to the
hilarity of the- Poll week-end with
wells, Norworth & Nelson, introduc
ing to Bridgeport their - great imita
tion of a "Rathskellar," and the Pierre
Sisters in comedy novelty.
With the well stars that adorn this
offering to the Bridgeport theatre-going-public,
seating capacity in the
big house will undoubtedly be at a
' premium and the early showgoer will
riot be dissapointed. y ,
PLAZA -
Today ushers . In another brilliant
combination of vaudeville and photo
- plays at the Plaza and the new pro
gram will be presented three times
dally during the rest of the week. Ap
'. pearingat. the head of the vaudeville
list are Howard and Fields In that
tuneful, -shoulder swaying musical
novelty, "The . Rag Time Dining- Car.
Vaudeville patrons ever ready to give
the new and original a Warm wel
m will ..find in this act something
that Jharf hitherto been overlooked by
act, originators. . The act is so well
filled -with catchy music,- and the
. brightest most up to the minute sort
of comedy talk that It has been prov
ing a whirlwind success during a long
string of big vaudeville engagements.
Holding, the position of honor among
th'ePlaia screen productions for the
balance of the week Is a stirring
drama entitled "Soldiers of Chance," a
Greater- Vitigraph production featui-
lftg "Bvart Overton, Miriam Fouche,
Julia?- Swayne Gordon and: a strong
supporting compaly. , Here Is a story
Ul OUUIU AUIIHI "ILL ra aw.u. w
scenes set in the mystic enchantment
,- of the tf oplcs.- V It ls-a drama of finan
cial Intrigue and -a torave- man's fight
f or" IbVe: '"' "Soldiers-of Chance5' Is in
' every -way5' modern- pictures 'with - a
loveable hero and heroine who are,
through thfl. workings of fate, propell
ed tato the -midst of a South Ameri
can revolution. The picture is one of
stirring: action , and ..compelling .force
throughout the five faultlessly pro
duced acts that compose the strong
screen story. - Prominent among, the
vaudeville, acts. Is Kitty Flynn, known
as ;Tbe'j Girl From .. Brighton.'.'. Down
at that " particular portion .-.of New
York's "seashore this . clever singing J
comedienne has long . been, . a ruling
favorite,, a position gained by' her vl
. vacloua manner, .exceptional clever
ness and charming- personality. t Rice
ancfe. Francis, a clever comedian and a
pretty girl, deliver ' a particularly
fetching combination of singing and
comedy patter. . Olive Green. Sj Co.
form one of the strongest singing and
dancing trios in vaudeville and they
are positively sure of registering a de
cided hit with theatregoers i who at
tend the Plaza, The ninth episode
of "The Fatal Ring" with Pearl White
and the popular cast, occupies an add
ved feature i position "The .. Fatal
Rlngv ls proving one of the most ex
citing, gripping and thoroughly inter
esting. serial -pictures that has. -ever
" been produced: Each episode proves
'' a strong magnet of attraction.
LYRIC
Theodore Burt Sayre's gripping mil
itary play "The Commanding Gener
al' which! established new records for
runs when produced on Broadway, will
be the offering of the New Lyric stock
company 'in Its fourth week in this
city The .piece was procured only
filter a good deal of persuasion on
the part of the Poll management, be
cause Mr. Sayre was unwilling to
place k in the hands of stock compan
ies until he was satisfied that it would
receive ' the Interpretation and ex
cellent acting that it deserves.
Manager Arvine, however, quickly
' settled the matter. H had the noted
playwright as his guest here Monday
evening, and Mr. Sayre, after seeing
the work of the actors and actresses,
in-"Broadway and Buttermilk"' imme
diately gave his consent. He had the
highest praise for the. playing of Miss
Warda. Howartl and - Dudley Ayers,
leading woman and man respectively,
- and in addition put himself on record
as declaring that the minor parts in
"The Commanding Officer." which
aren't really minor parts kt all, would
be well taken care ef by thv. rest of
the New Lyric cast. ;
"Broadway and Buttermilk," re
leased for the first time for stock, will
continue as the attraction during the
remainder,, of the week, and Miss
Howard's now celebrated buttermilk,
. will be dispensed to, patrons between
the acts in the lobby.
There will be a get-aciualated mat
inee Friday afternoon at which . Miss
Edith Spencer and Arthur Buchanan,
two of -the most popular members of
the Company, will be the .frosts. There
will be ,-a special souv&ntr matinee
next Monday.
.George Greeley, Juvenile, who has
been obtained- from the Frohman
company as one of the highest priced
men n his. line, will soon make his
. debut before the new Lyric patrons.
. 'The 'British 'casualties for week
ended Sept. 18, total 4, $90 men and
oiflcers. ...
Bostoi) has., begun' her two weeks
off wheatless days, suggested by the
Food; Administration. ....
FLORAL BOUQUETS
-"' AND DESIGNS.'
JOHN KECK SQIT.
..
SUFFRAGIST OFFICERS CONSENT TO
CO-OPERATE WITH ORGANIZATIONS;
WON'T WITHDRAW RESIGNATIONS
(Special to The Farmer.)
Hartford,. Sept. 20. At the meeting
of the Connecticut Woman Surage as
sociation executive committee held
yesterday afternoon at suffrage head
quarters, Mrs. Thomas" M. Hepburn,
president of the association and Mrs,
M. Toscan Bennett, treasurer, tender
ed their resignations, which were ac
cepted. They will fill out their terms, how
ever, because Mrs. Ernest Thompson
Seton, who was elected to the presi
dency, said she would be unable to
take the job because of work she is
doing at Washington. The request t
Mrs. Hepburn.to stay In office tempo
rarily was accompanied by one to Mrs.
Bennett. Mrs. Hepburn's letter 01
resignation follows:
"The time has come when I can
no longer continue to be president of
the Conencticut Woman Suffrage as
sociation and I herewith send you
my resignation. .. : '
'For the past seven years we have
worked together and I have come to
have a very deep personal affection
for the members of the board.' It is
a great grief to me to realize that if
I am to follow my honest convictions
I must sever my official relations
with you. '
"During the time that we have
worked together the C. W. S. A. has
grown from small, organization to
one with over a hundred local
branches and 38,000 enrolled members.-
I like" to feel that the hard
work and generous contributions, not
only of the members of the board,
but of the officers and members, of
our local leagues, are largely respon
sible for these thousands of converts
to the. suffrage icause in Connecticut.
r "In the early days of our associa
tion we were . entirely independent
and could adopt any policy that we
believed to be good fou. the promotion
of suffrage but today this, has all
changed. The National American
Woman Suffrage association, of
which our association is a member
dictates our policy and determines all
of our essential concerns; -v I am- ont
protestlg against this attitude on the
part , of the national association. I be
lieve that they .cannot do otherwise.
Today national work is of first import
tace. Women now vote In 19 states
for president and it is obvious that
the shortest way to secure suffrage
for all the women of , the United
States is for suffragists to concen
trate on thefederal amendment in
stead of trying , to secure the vote
through state action. Naturally the
national association feels . that, . it
should dominate the states in order
to ensure a uniform policy within its
own organization. ? The question be
fore us Is therefore whetherr or not
we believe in the policies of the na
tional association, i. ,
' "I have reluctantly come to feel
that the policy of the. national asso
ciation in their work for the. federal
amendment .is futile, academic, ' and
but of date." "'After the last national
convention, held in Atlantic City, I felt
pretty hopeless about the ability of
the national association to lead us to
victory: : The president of the asso
ciation made a very fine speech call-j
ed "The Crisis" " in - which she said
that we must change from academic
to political methods, but -every prac
tical effort Imade' at the . convention
to secure the, adoption of any costruc
tive political' policy on the part of
the national was frowned upon. This
summer the nations,! has lined up with
the Anti-Suffragists in their condem
nation of the suffrage work which
the Woman's party Is doing at Wash
ington in . spite of the fact that this
1 the most practical work which has
been done this summer toward secur
ing the passage of the federal amend
ment. This' carping attitude on the
part of the national association, tak
en in connection with, their own un
willingness or Inability to adopt any
adequate political pSlicy has made me
realize that I cannot consistently serve
as president of a state branch of the
national association, notwithstanding
my -devotion to the' Connecticut Wo
man Suffrage association. ' .
-"The National Woman Suffrage as
sociation Is not the only national -association
working for woman suffrage.
The Woman's' party, a younger and
more vigorous body, Is devoting all its
energies to securing ',t"he passage of
the federal amendment. While, the
national association Ignores the wo
men's vote in the west as a lever to
ward securing the passage of this
amendment the Woman's party asks
them to vote against 'the party that
has refused, to pass the amendment.
I think that the Woman's party is
right and the national Is wrong. In
fact, the policy of organizing the wes
tern .women's vote to push through
the federal amendment would seem to
be the A B C of political methods in
any practical attempt to secure the
national enfranchisement of women.
"Today, more than ever, the im
portance of woman suffrage is thrown
Into high relief. England, Russia, and
Canada have given women the vote
since the war began. With ther men
gone it is Imperative for the women
left at home, the only representatives
of their families, to have a voice, in
the government. ' Both industrially
politically women in war time have to
do the work of the men who have
gone to the front. Our government
should pass the federal amendment at
once to protect themselves and their
families, but we know that the gov
ernment will not do this unless those
most interested insist upon it. -
"We have, gone to war for demo
cracy and yet millions of women in
our country are denied the right to
vote. Simply mentioning this fact In
suffrage journals and to suffrage au
diences is futile. We must say it in
such a way that all the world will
hear and that is what the pickets of
the Woman's Party have done at
Washington. . My sympathies are all
with them. I admire their honesty,
their self-forgetfulness, and their
practical wisdom. In my opinion it
is through such women as these, that
we shall secure, the suffrage, in Con
necticut by federal amendment. In
the future - I shall support the Wo
man's party."
Mrs. M..Toscari Bennett's letter:
' "Together with this communication
I present my resignation as treasurer
and member of the executive "board
of the Connecticut Woman Suffrage
association. I hope that the members
of the board will be able to accept
this resignation at once, for I feel that
the difference between my convictions
land those of the members of the na
tional American Woman Suffrage as
sociation with which our Connecticut
association is af filiated is so great and
Is based upon such fundamental mat
ters of . principle as to make it pos
sible for me to continue longer in my
present official position.
"At the risk of being misunder
stood, misinterpreted, yes, even mis
represented, as others of my faith
have been, I wish to endeavor to set
before you the reasons for that faith.
I feel that our long association in a
common cause makes this encumbent
upon me now when our ways seem to
lie apart.
"For years we have worked for the
advancement and fulfillment of the
reality of democracy. We have all
felt that this must of necessity pre
cede any true and lasting betterment
of the conditions of our country and
of our people, for it has 'seemed to
us that so long as one-half of those
people have no share in the control
of the government under which they
live; democracy was a hollow mockery
and human betterment dependent up
on the grace of those who thought
their own thoughts and perhaps
thought them well but whose thoughts
were not our thoughts.
"In increasing numbers each year
the men and women of our state and
of our country have been brought to
believe in the value of women's pos
sible contribution to the political life
and in the Justice of her being allow
ed to participate therein. I : assume
that all of usrfiave felt that this value
and this justice were matters of firm
and abiding conviction. To me they
were as deep and meaning a part of
my life as any other matters of spirit
ual faith were. To me they seemed of
at least as great a practical and im
mediate importance for realization as
any other subjects for which my creed
urged me to labor. . ,
"My postition today seems the log
ical Inevitable one based upon my con
tinuing faith. To me the day of the
reality- of democracy seems as much
worth working for as ever. The com
ing of this calamitous war and our
entry into it seem rather to increase
not to diminish the importance of that
work. ' The necessity for - women's
participation in government seems
greater, more immediate. ' If the wel
fare of our country and of our people
required that women ' be represented
in the solution of peace problems, it
requires it still more in the solution
of war and after-war problems:
"Believing as I dd, no course ap
pears honorable to me except the one
I have adopted. Believing as I 'do' it
is basically Impossible for me ' to con
tinue my official connection with a
group whose, connection with the na
tional American Woman Suffrage as
sociation,, seems to require, me Sto deny
the1 faith that is in me. Believing as
I do, I feel spiritually bound , to re
serve to myself the right to express
freely by speech and action my funda
mental convictions. What other work
I may feel called upon to perform, . I
cannot forsake a task "which lies so
close to my heart, nor abandon to the
vituperative epithets .ot foe' and fair
weather friend the women whose con-t
victions seem to be as my own.'
"The Washington pickets seem to
me to embody the spiritual principle
which has been responsible for every
great advance in civilization. They and
their associates have clung to this
faith in spite of every obstacle and
hindrance,- legal and illegal, which
could be raised against them. And
now to crown their sacrifice they are
being accused of the very crime their
inability to commit, which is respon
sible, for their doing what-they "arej
aoing. - rro-uerman traitors, aisioyai
are but a few of the names which
have been "'applied, to them even by
suffragists. Calumny Is heaped upon
them by those who are unable to see
that it Is this very loyalty to their
country which compels ,them to suf
fer. . That the day of the realization
of democracy may sooh" dawn, not
only-ln Europe but here at home as
well they have fought and will- con
tinue to fight, even as their men will
soon be fighting. These-women have
not the time nor the will to explain.
Their acts must speak for them with
those who can see and understand.
They have given generously, freely,
not alone in the line of pure suffrage
work, but in straight war help as well.
Those who impugn their motives must
do so from ignorance or malice, they
cannot or will not understand, and I
cannot" bring myself to add to their
burden even by my silence."
FTjOTSAIj BOT70TJETS
AND DESIGNS.
TOTTN TITX?!? PON.
RAINCOATS
Our line of double texture
coats for street wear are all
guaranteed to be waterproof
and the line gives a large va
riety to selSct from.
' A' good serviceable rain
coat for general, wear
$5.25
Better grades
$6.00 to $10.00
Our double' texture gar
ment with the best lining,
$16.00 ,
LADIES' DOUBLE TEX
TURE COATS
$5.00 to $15.00.
IBPYS' and GIRLS' COATS
. $3.50 to $6.00
ALLING RUBBER CO.
1126 MAIN ST.
AMUSEMENTS
The Poli Players
THIRD TRIUMPHANT WEEK IN
BROADWAY
UITI1MIL
MATINEE AT 2:15
MATINEE PRICES, 15c 25c
NEXT WEEK . GREATEST OF ALL WAR PLAYS:
"THE COMMANDING OFFICER"
OUR NEWTOWN
NEWSLETTER
(Special to The Farmer.)
Newtown, Sept. 20 Those who
were sailed and who left town today
to report at headquarters in Fairfield
for duty are Harry Bradley, Phillips
Morris, Israel 1 Goldstein, Charles
Hurd, James Lynch, William Conger
and Bert Cary.
A meeting will be held in interest of
the Woman's Committee of the Na
tional Council of Defense at Miss
Susan B. Scudder's home, on Main
street, at 3 p. m. Friday. About 73
of thet own's organizations will be
represented at this meeting by dele
gates. The Girls' Friendly society will
hold an afternoon picnic at-the Tie
man orchard in Mount Pleasant Fri
day, at 3:30 o'clock.
New recitation seats have been in
stalled at the High school. ,
STEPNEY
' The marriage of Miss Carolyn Os
borne to Roy' Turner occurred in New
York city Monday afternoon, Sept. 17.
The bride was tastefully attired in a
handsome traveling gown with lhat to
match and carried a bouquet. She
was attended by her sister, Grace
Jennings Osborne. Immediately after
the' ceremony the bridal couple left
for a honeymoon trip, the destination
being a- secret. - Miss Osborne's en
gagement was announced In August
for. October. But owing to the fact
that the groom received notice to re
port in New York where he was
drawn fn the selective draft the wed
ding date was made earlier.
Miss Josephine Briscoe. has been ill
for a few days' under the care of Dr.
GejorjA Smith. '
John Jurco has moved the . large
evaporator shed which he recently
purchased to his land on the main
roadr '
The . Misses Irma Nichols and
Blanche Gilbert have left to attend
school at Holyoke. x
George Cllngan has returned from
a trip to New York . city.
Mrs. Minnie Islevsky and children
of Long Hill have spent several daji
with friends here. " .
Or. George Smith has entertained
his brother from Hartford.
Mrs. Eugene Blakeman and Mrs.
Maud Gould of California, Mo., have
visited at the home of M. B. Hawley.
Mrs. Emily D. Leavenworth ha
vl;tted friends in Shelton this week.
Edwin Loucey is attending the
Lower school. - ,
WEEK END TRIPS TO
PORT JEFFERSON
The week-end trips to Port Jeffer
son, N. Y., on the Steamer Park City
Saturdays and Sundays are greatly enjoyed-
by those' who desire a pleasant
and invigorating sail on Long Island
Sound. The steamer leaves the wharf
at the foot of Fairfield avenue at
11:30 a. . m., arriving in Port Jeffer
son at 1 o'clock, allowing one hour
in this village; the return trip being
made at 2 o'clock, arriving in Bridge
port at 3:30. At this season of the
year, midday is the most enjoyable
time to be ton the water.
The world is so full of a ."number of
things,
But It's getting- unhealthy- for princes
and kings
And food speculators and fellows like
that.
They, ought to be canned, like this
year's straw hat. .
Zake Lohman, the Rochester twlrl
er, formerly of the New York Giants,
is proving to John MsGraw that some
times even the best managers make
mistakes and send away good material.
Zeke pitched excellent ball for the
Rochester club.
The Phillies 'are going to lose an
other veteran when Cactus Cravath,
the great slug artist, retires at the
end of the season. He is only one
of a number of veterans who are prac
tically through with the national
game in the. major leagues. Cravath
is 35 years old. He began playing
as a professional with- the Los An
geles club in 1903, and remained
there until 1908, when the Boston Red
Sox purchased him. He played with
the White Sox and Washingtons in
1909 and then went to Minneapolis
for two seasons. He joined the Phil
lies in 1912. His record of 24 home
runs was made during the campaign
of 1915. This is the rev-ord in tne
National league since 1900.
Chief Bender, according to rumor,
is working under contract that palls
(Talk Of Sports
AND
EVENINGS AT 8:15
" EVENINGS, 25c 35o-50c
. To-day Also
Friday and Saturday
THE . LAUGHING SHOW OF
THE WHEEL
Big Burlesque Review
With the Ever ' Popular Bnrlessue
. - Stars
Harry K . Morton & Zella Russell
and Company of 36 Entertainers
. MON. .SEPT. 24
MATINEE AND NIGHT
55th Stage Apniversary
MME.. SARAH
Bernhardt
(Herself)'
(Direction of W. .F.. Connor) ..
And her own company, from Thea-
tre. Sarah Bernhardt. Paris
s MATINEE
"Jeanne D'Arc"
ACTS 2 AND 3
NIGHT
... "Portia and "Camille"
At each performance the follow
ing: artists will appear: Jean Copp
er (contralto). Annie Lonise David
(harpist), A. Donnelly (shadows),
Florence . Hardeman . ( violinist ) ,
Rome Fenton (tenor), Jean Duval
& Co. in Gems of Art.
PRICES
Matinees ... , 25c to $1.50;
Evenings 50c to $2
MAIL ORDERS NOW
Regular Seat Sale Opens Friday
DANCING
A RA-CE FOR LIFE
THURSDAY EVENING
AT QUILT Y'S
COLONIAL HALL
nor,
A sea of bargains !
The wise housewife puts up
ner periscope to taKe a
view of our Aluminum
Week bargains
"Expert demonstrators are
showing at our store the
uses of aluminum in mod
ern cookery
Then there are the bargains!
Specials this week: 4-qt.
saucepan,regularly sold at
our store for $1.40 or 6
quart kettle now selling
for 95 cents
. tyon & Grnnunan. Retail Division
AMERICAN HARDWARE
STORES
(Incorporated)
PAffiimD AVE. AND MHIIiE ST.
for a small salary and $50 extra for
every winning game.
The New York State league has been
unable to sel a single player to any
of the major league clubs this year.
In the past this circuit has produced
such stars as George Burns, of the
New York Giants, Steve O'Neill, Heinie
Zimmerman, Graney, Evers, Hinch
raan, Cadore, Young, Schulte, Fischer,
Chalmers, Ehmke and Grover Cleve
land Alexander.
HI
AMUSEMENTS
(p1""'1"1 "lJJ1Jl nrnmnj immoimmim tmm i
- ""- "'-" 1
WHERE ALL-BRIDGEPORT GOES
AFTS. AT 2; EVES. AT 6:15 AND 8:30
Everything New On This Corking Bill For
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
HOWARD and
FIFfriQ SERVE
I lEiliUO THEIR
Latest Vaudeville
Delicacy
The .
Rag Time
Dining
Car
An 8 Course Banquet of
Swaying Syncopation
with a Toothsome Des
sert of Highly Seasoned
Song and Patter.
Get Into A Real South American Revolution
"Soldiers of Chance"
A "superbly acted,' faultlessly produced drama of the,
redvblooded tropics with Evart Overton, Miriam
Fouche and Julia Swayne Gordon
NINTH EPISODE OF
"THE FATAL RING
WITH
Pearl White and the -
J. X V V J.lllt? FAVORITE CAST
Each Episode More Exciting Than the Other .
Plaza Prices Biggest of Show Bargains
Afternoons 10-15c Evenings 10-15-25c
B ARRYMORE
In That Most Sumptuous' Of All Photo Offerings
teaE y nil ; mi'
A PHOTOPLAY OF SOCIETY AND DEEP LOVE
HearstPathe News'
y ..."
Of Thrilling War Episodes and World Events
Screaming Comedy
TANGO SHOE
VAUDEVILLE'S GREATEST COMEDY
NOVELTY DANdlNG ACT
"THE
GROOM
FORGOT"
MABEL
CAMERON
WELLS THE
NORWORTH PIERRE
& NELSON SISTERS m
HENRY W. SAVAGE Offers
The Latest Musical Comedy Triumph '
"HAVE A HEART"
DIRECT FROM ITS RUN AT COLONIAL
THEATRE, BOSTON
Metropolitan Cast and Production
Seat Sale To-morrow
MAT. 25c to $1.50 NIGHTS 50c to
Kitty Flynn
The Prety Girl From
Brighton Singing Her
Own Song Originations
RICE AND
FRANCIS
r
Nifty in Their Talk A
Hit With Their Songs
OLIVE GREEN
& COMPANY
Breezing Along on a
Wave of Song and a
Flood of Dashy Dancing1.
THE GRIPPING SERIAL
99.
The Two Black Laughs
ALAN
DEVITT
Tues. & Wed.
Nights Wed.
ETHEL :
1 ' -

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