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Orleans independent standard. [volume] (Irasburgh, Vt.) 1856-1871, November 14, 1856, Image 2

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BDEPESDEST STiMURD.
A. A. EARLd EDITOtt.
1RASBURGH, FRIDAY, XOTESBES 11, ISj'6.
8. M. PETTINGILL & Co., 10 State at, Bos
ton, nd 119 N'ain it, Kw York, are authoriz
ed agent for the Standard in both thoee placea.
One column, one year,
linn
KATES OP ADVERTISING.
25
i in trtiiAr. nnfl Tear.
One square, tix month,
One aquare, three week,
Twelve line or lets make a iqaar.
The Great Result.
The contest is ended, and the Repub
licans are defeated. The combined in
fluence of slavery, the democratic party,
and the national Americans, have proved
too strong for the Republicans. The in
terests of Kansas and freedom appear to
be down for the present. Slaveocracy,
uot democracy, has triumphed. We
mourn over this result, not simply because
it is the defeat of a party, but because it
is the prostration of a great principle-
Freedom, or rather the nou-extension of
slavery, was pitted against slavery, or its
extension into territory once free, free by
the laws of God and nature, and till the
repeal of the Missouri compact free by
the laws the land and, slavery has tri
umphed. So far as this election can de
cide the question ; 60 far as the success
of the Cincinnati platform, with its ex
ponent upon it can prove the nation to be
in favor of land piracy and slavery, it
has done so. Mr. Buchanan is elected.
And yet it is noalone the slave power
that has done it. Sectional prejudices,
party lies, divisions and political huck
stering have really done more than the
slave power. They must divide the hon
ors between them. Mr. Buchanan Las
carried but three northern states,and none
of these by majorities unless it be Indi
ana. Mr. Fillmore has in reality secured
. Pennsylvania to Buchanan,' as also New
Jersey. Had it not been for the diver
sion in Mr. Buchanan's favor diversion
by professed friends of the same princi
ple the Republicans advocated, Mr. Bu
chanan would be master of only the one
hundred and twenty votes from the south.
And even there he is not strong. After
all this, by political bargain and corrup
tion, by dU'Utons, paid for with slave
money, he is this day the president elect
It 'u done, and complaining will not
change the result. All we can do is to
mark the conspirators. Still the Repub
licans have accomplished wonders, more
than ever party did before in the same
time. Materials existed, but the build
ing could not be said to be framed prior
to the u People's Convention," last June
which nominated Mr. Fremont. In five
months it put on its strength, routed the
democracy in its strongholds, conquered
Maine, New Hampshire, Connecticut,
and indeed all the northern states but
three, and has rolled up majorities that
re absolutely astonishing. It comprises
now three fourths of the native Ameri
can vote, nine tenths of the professing
Christians of all denominations except
Catholics, and all the ladle of the north.
Amidst our sorrow therefore, there is
much in which to " thank God, and take
courage." "We have missed the presi
dency, but we have gained the people.
Now, what will be the policy of the in
coming administration ? Reasoning from
the course pursued by the present admin
istration, the Cincinnati platform and the
Ostend manifesto, we might well feat
that wc should have four years of the
intensest slave aggression ever witnessed
on this continent. If wc look at these,
we can have no hone for free Kansas.
nor that we shall escape a war with all
Western Europe on account of Cuba.
Certainly we shall have Nicaragua an
nexed, and probably Mexico, all for the
extension of slavery. All these things
point to such a result. How terrible the
prospect. Let loose the dogs of war, and
let them glut themselves with blood for
the extension of the worst form of op
pression. Will Jehovah permit t ?
But when we look at the result of this
contest and bring Mr. Buchanan's past
history into the account, we have hope
of a somewhat different programme.
The president elect lias always been a
careful man, not overmuch given to con
flict even when his blood coursed more
swiftly through his veins. With the sin
gle exception of Ostend, in which case
he was led by the fiery Soule, he has
been ft conservative. He comes nearer
to the position of "old fogy," than
"Young America." AVill he now, at
Bixty-hve, strike out a new policy for
himself? Led by southern fire-caters
end bullying filibusters he might, had
the party showed itself strong in this
contest But as it is, supported by a
handful at the north, and four fifths of
them foreigners, with a small majority in
the electoral college, and full 350,000
minority in the popular vote, we think
he will pause before he rushes into mea
sures calculated to alienate all there is
of decency in the free states from him
self and party. Those who are for the
extreme southern policy are but a mea
gre majority of 65,000 in the entire
troth, whilo at the. north not even hi.
fcupporten are in favor of it. They vo
ted for him because they were bound to
the democratic party, and would have
done the same, many of them, if Mr.
Douglas's candidate had stood in bis
place. -v - ' .
Mr. Van Buren, giving in his adhe
sion to the movement, declared that with
Mr. Buchanan's antecedents and present
pledges, he was bound to support the in
terests of freedom in Kansas, and at the
west where victories have been gained
for bim, they were gained on this very
ground.
Taking the whole history of the cam
paign into the account, it is safe to con
clude that the whole north has declared
against the filibuster and slave policy,
while there are just 65,000 fire eaters at
the south for it. Will then a man of Mr.
Buchanan's acknowledged ability and
statesmanship, drive the country into an
archy and war for the snke of those
65,000, led by the insane Wise and Bul
ly Brooks ? Let us hope not.
Presidential.
Returns have come in very slowly,
but we give below a rough estimate of
such as have come to hand :
MAINE.
Fremont, 37,579
Buchanan, 15,171
Fillmore, 1,5-12
NEW HAMPSHIRE.
Fremont, 26,345
Buchanan, 21,913
Fillmore, 278
VERMONT.
Fremont's majority, 26,000
MASSACHUSETTS.
Fremont, 102,911
Buchanan, 37,373
Fillmore, 18,994
CONNECTICUT.
Fremont, 38,854
Buchanan, 32,140
Fillmore, 2,267
RHODE ISLAND.
phries," or the writings of Mr. Kelley in
whatever guise he selected. In merit,
far beyond the common run of literary
sketches which appear in our magazines
and journals, the efforts of Mr. Kelley
always attracted attention, and were sure
to have an extensive circulation. The
conductors of the press, ever awake to
the humorous or sentimental, seized upon
his compositions with cheerful alacrity,
and aided in their circulation. The
brain which conceived those amusing,
and at times serious fancies, glows no
more with divine thoughts the hand
which recorded so many droll lessons of
experience is now stilled forever Mr.
Kelley died young, leaving behind him a
wife and interesting family, for whose
benefit this compilation of writing is pub
lished. The book has been edited with
reat care and attention, so as to present
it with such revisions a3 good taste sug
gested, and the Illustrations are all orig
inal, designed expressly for this work by
Stephens, one of the best designers of
humorous scenes in the known world.
The work contains ONE HUNDRED
AND ELEVEN different sketches by
Falconbridge, on various subjects.
Copies of either edition of the work
will be sent, at once, to any part of the
United States, free of postage on remit
ting the price of the addition they may
wish to the publisher in a letter .
Published and for sale at the Cheap
Book and Publishing Establishment of
T. B. PETERSON.
No. 102 Chestnut St., Philad.
Fremont,
Buchanan,
Fillmore,
11,341
6,563
1,680
A Good Crop.
Mr. Editor, I have raised the pres
ent season on sixty-five rods of land, 83
1-2 bushels of ears of corn of excellent
quality, which is equal to 206 bushels to
the acre. Now if this has been beat in
the county, I should like to hear from the
man that has beat it.
O. V. Percital.
Glover.
NEW JERSEY.
Fremont, 8,244
Buchanan, 16,612
Fillmore, 6,473
NEW YORK.
Fremont, 250,000
Buchanan, 175,000
Fillmore, 125,000
PENNSYLVANIA.
Buchanan's majority, 25,000
OHIO.
Fremont's majority, 20,000
MICHIGAN.
Fremont's majority, 20,000
INDIANA.
Buchanan's majority, 10,000
ILLINOIS.
Claimed by both parties, but probably
for Buchanan by a small majority.
WISCONSIN.
Fremont's majority, 5,000
IOWA.
Fremont has a majority in this State.
ALABAMA.
Buchanan's maj., 5,000
ARKANSAS.
Buchanan's maj., 8,000
DELAWARE.
Buchanan's maj., 1,850
FLORIDA.
This State gives a small majority for
Buchanan.
GEORGIA.
Buchanan's maj., 10,000
KENTUCKY.
Buchanan's maj., 7,000
LOUISIANA.
TheBuchanicrs and Fillmoreites claim
the State. It has, we think, given Bu
chanan a small majority.
MARYLAND.
Fillmore carries this State by 9,000
majority over Buchanan.
MISSISSIPPI.
The Fillmore men claim the State j so
do the democrats.
MISSOURI.
Buchanan's maj., 10,000
NORTH CAROLINA.
Buchanan's maj., 5,000
SOUTH CAROLINA.
The Legislature of South Carolina
chooses her electors. The Legislature is
democratic
TENNESSEE.
Buchanan's maj., 3,000
VIRGINIA.
Huchanan s maj., 15,000
TEXAS.
Not heard from.
CALAFORNIA.
Not heard from.
VERMONT.
ADDISON COUNTY
.Fremont. Buck.
Scutt.
Charlotte, 184 16 1
Colchester, 105 60
Cornwall, 132 13 1
Hinesburgh, 228 14 2
Jericho, 228 37 26
Lincoln, . 75 8
Middlebury, 935 76 SO
New Haven, 194 9 9
Vergennes, 257 28 2
BENNINGTON COUNTY.
Bennington, 435 76 40
CALEDONIA COUNTY.
Groton, 100 28 4
St. Johnsbury, 555 147 2
CHITTENDEN COUNTY.
Bolton,
Burlington,
Essex,
Milton,
Richmond,
Williston,
ESSEX COUNTY.
Guildhall, 56 21
Maidstone, 22 14
FRANKLIN COUNTY.
Book Notices.
Is Press: "The Humors or Falcon
okiuue: uytbe late Jonathan F.
Kelley. Philadelphia: T. B. Peter,
son, Publisher.
Complete in one large duodecimo vol
ume, beautifully illustrated, neatly bound
in cloth, for one dollar and twenty-five
cents ; or in two volumes, paper cover,
tor one dollar.
There are few, perhaps it would not
be an exaggeration to say, that there are
no persons in the slightest degree ao
quainted with newspaper literature, who
nave not read with infinite satisfaction
ome of the numerous, intensely Jml
tketche. of "Falconbridg,," Jack Hum-1 Andover,
61
589
213
241
150
125
31
210
83
47
34
12
81
5
2
3
Fairfax,
Franklin,
Georgia,
St. Albans,
Swanton,
197
163
200
426
147
61
37
23
106
120
36
15
ORANGE COUNTY.
Braintree,
Chelsea,
Randolph,
Thetford,
Tunbridge,
171
317
396
214
236
26
117
91
173
60
ORLEANS COUNTY.
Barton, 130 34
Glover, 130 58
Greensboro', 138 55
Irasburgh, 146 11
Coventry, 153 25
Derby, 200 42 2
Salem, 26
Charleston, 127 15
Lowell, 80 56
Albany, 104 30
RUTLAND COUNTY.
Brandon, 407 68
Clarendon, 174 3 1
Danby, 220 10
Rutland, 786 222
WASHINGTON COUNTY.
Barre, 329 34 2
Berlin, 110 26
Calais, 209 110
Duxbury, 118 16
East Montpelier, 139 40
Marshfield, 146 42
Middlesex, 101 28 1
Montpelier, 726 198 1
Northfield, 477 332 2
Plainfield, 160 75
Waitsfield, 133 21 -
Waterbury, 287 111 2
Woodbury, 132 59
WINDHAM COUNTY.
Brattlcboro', 557 79 29
Guilford, 232 16 20
Newfane, , 139 49
Vernon, 117 22
WINDSOR COUNTY.
Andover, 119
Baltimore, 20
Barnard, 165 115
Bridgewater, 148 88
Bethel, 257 88
Cavendish, ' 250 22 17
Chester, 325 51
Hartford, ' 289 75 8
Hartland, 205 109 3
Ludlow, 263 24 , 1
Norwich, 220 109
Plymouth, 150 34
Pomfret, . ;. 181 . 41 - i
Reading, 155 27
Rochester,' 291 11 1
Royalton, 249 58 8 ;
Sharon, . 138 75
Springfield, 507 70 2
Stockbridge, 214 27
Weathersfield, 236 17 11
Weston, 202 7 1
West Vindsor, 150 43 1
Windsor, 307 78 11
Woodsiock, 612 75 1
Great Fire in New York.
I New York, Nov. 10.
A diiastrous fire occurred early yes
terday morning in Warren St., destroy
ing totally four large warehouses, to
gether with their extensive stocks of
merchandise. The following ; are the
particulars: .
Nf. 89 Warren street, occupied by
Hawland, Harrel Sc. Risley, wholesale
drugists, in whose premises the fire or-
igiiated. Loss estimated at about $100,-
00 ; insured for $90,000. The; build
ing is a total loss ; valued at $25,000,
ard insured for about $12,000.
, No. 37 Warren street, occupied by
James McCreery & Co., dealers in staple
and fancy goods, embroideries, laces, etc
Loss about $100,000; insured for $110,
000. The building is totally destroyed.
Valued at about $25,000 ; insured for
$14,000.
Nos. 41 and 43 Warren street, occu
pied on the first floor by J. A. Sweetser
& Co., staple fancy goods. They esti
mate their loss at about $2,000.
Nos. 37 and 39 Murray street, occu
pied on the first floor by Halsted, Brakaw
& Co., dealers in dry goods. Their stock
is a total lo3s. Valued at $60,000, and
insured for $66,000.
The second and third floors of 37 Mur
ray street were occupied by Van Vage-
nen, Yeoman & Co., dealers in cloths.
Their loss on stock will be about $90,.
000 ; fully insured.
The fourth and fifth floors of 39 Mur
ray street were occupied by Martin and
Bro., clothiers. Their loss is $40,000 ;
fully insured.
The building cost $38,000, was totally
destroyed, and fully insured.
No. 35 Murray street was occupied on
the first floor by Newell, Harman and
Williams, dealers in boots and shoes. A
portion of their stock was taken out.
Estimated loss by water about $10,000 ;
insured for $30,000, as follows ; Home
office $10,000 ; People's (of Worcester)
$5,000; Cochituate (of Boston,) $5,000;
North American (of Boston) $5,000
The second floor was occupied by T.
A. Morrison and Hoyt, dealers in shirts
and drawers. Loss about $5,000.
The fourth and fifth floors were occu
pied by Armstrong and Johnson, impor
ters of embroideries, laces, etc. Loss
about $20,000 ; insured.
The buildings No. 35 Murray street
and 60 Church street, was damaged
about $8,000 ; insured .,$15,000. E. &
W. Cook & Co., dry goods dealers, had
a lot of goods on storage on the fifth
floor of 60 Church street. They estimate
their loss at about $15,000 ; insured for
$20,000 in the following Companies :
Security, $5,000 ; Boylston of Boston,
$o,000 ; American, of Philadelphia, $5,
000, and $5,000 in a Providence office.
The rear part of 62 Church street
also caught fire. The roof and part of
the upper floors were destroyed.
No. 41 Murray street was occupied on
the first floor by Thomas E. Bishop &
Co., dealers m hardware. Their stock
was damaged by the falling of the wall
of the adjoining building. They estimate
their loss at about $12,000 ; insured for
$45,000.
The upper stories were occupied by
Pattens, Lane and Merriam, dealers in
boots and shoes. They estimate their
loss at about $5,000 ; fully insured.
Interesting from St. Domingo.
A correspondent of the New York
Timet, writinc from St. Domingo City,
Oct. 15, says on the night of the 11th of
October, a mob; instigated by JUr. a. jjx
Segovia, Spanish Consul-General, as
sembled before the United States Con
sulate for the purpose of pulling down
the flagstaff and the sign, throwing stones
acainst the eagle, and making the great
est disorder.' There were also cries of
" Down with the fillibusters ! down with
the American ensign !" The American
Consul, Mr. Jacob Pereira,.repa'tred to
the spot for the purpose of imposing re
spect, but all his efforts were in vain.
Not being able at that moment to oDiain
any assistance from the authorities, he
was obliged, for the safety of his person
and life, to leave the place of disorder.
The morning after the riot the consul re
presented the case to the government,
and the Mayoi offered him protection
and a file of soldiers to enforce that re
spect which was due to the United States
Consulate. This was, however, refused
by Mr. Pereira, who stated that the
American flag needed no guard to cause
it to be respected, and that he was then
prepared to meet any mob that might
appear. But all disturbance was soon
quelled. Mr. Segovia took fright and
remained at home.
The Spanish Consul has compelled
the Dominican government to withdraw
a treaty just made with the Unite States,
and is exerting himself to prejudice the
Dominicans against our citizens. He
has sent the American Minister, Del-
monte, his passports.
Buffalo, Nov. 10.
The severe gale of Saturday morning
caused considerable damage to the city.
The roof of the State Line railroad was
blown off and carried some distance. A
brick dwelling on Clinton st. was blown
down. A portion of the roof of the
warehouse of Welling, Tanner &; Co., on
Michigan st., was blown off. Also the
lower part and roof of Fisher's Elevator,
and the roof of the Central Railroad
freight depot, sustained slight damage.
The freighthouse, woodshed and a large
quantity of wood belonging to the State
Line Railroad, at Westfield, was burned
on Jnaay night. JMo particulars as
yet.
The propeller Wisconsin, from Og-
densburg to Chicago, with a full load of
merchandise and sixty passengers, burst
her steam-chimney off yesterday, off
Grand River, Canada, scalding a deck
hand fatally. She was towed back to
Port Colburn, from whence the passen
gers were forwarded by propeller Tona-wanda.
On the Liquor Law.
In the House, Friday, Nor. 7. Mr.
Powers remarked that there were many
members who professed to be warm
friends to this bill. He could not but be
reminded of a certain story which he once
read.
There was once a great gathering of the
numerous classes of animals. ' Among
them came one with a peculiar stripe.
He introduced himself to the assembly as
anodh. Some doabts arose among oth
ers as to his true character. At last one
spoke out "The professed coon didn't
look like a coon. lie didn't act like a
coon, and what is more, didn't smell like
a coon." .
So was it with these professed friends
of the temperance cause. They didn't
look like friends of temperance. They
didn't act like friends of temperance, and
whether they smelt like friends of tem
perance, those who sit in their immediate
vicinity could better tell.
He went on to say that he had met
different members from the town of Brat
tleboro-these lukewarm professed friends
of temperance, but he observed that
these members had never been returned,
He thought that these men misrepresent.
ed the true temnerance men of Brattle
boro.
Mr. Bradley opposed the bill, and
commenced by saying that mankind were
divided into two great classes. Class
No. 1 consisted of the gentleman from
Woodstock ; Class No. 2, mankind gen
erally. Class No. 1 was always unani
mous. Class No. 2 differed in their
opinions. Again, tiass jno. 1 was ai
wavs modest. Clas No. 2 were varied,
Class No. 1 knows all about Class No. 2.
but Class No. 2 don't know one half
about Class No. 1. He never said that
he was favorable to the liquor law. He
never said anything about it.
If any State's Attorney should neglect
any duties in 20 pages of the act, he
would be liable to the severest punish
ment. Why not apply this to other
crimes theft, murder, Sec ? In this case
there is no act described, no crime. One
of the duties of magistrates is to spill li
quor in one case, in another not. A case
comes up before a justice of the peace-
if the justice neglects his duty, he must
suffer. He must decide ; if he decides
one way, he is guilty if the other, like
ly to be guilty. What is he to do ? If
I am attacked personally, I consider it
addressed to my cowardice, and by the
God above me, such arguments shall be
as weak as weak can be.
I shall do my duty, and it will take
more than Tom Powers of Woodstock
to frighten me from it
We learn th.,
through Geneva thU
past four o'clock .
that villaw. ,v,t . V
wrge amount .
store and warehouse rf J
burned, with 3,000 wi":'
--oi rye.
were also destroyed, f (
burned 40 canal horv. 1
Chicago, Nov. 5. A tornado passed
over Schuler county, in this State, on the
4th ult., completely destroyed the vil
lage of Littleton. The village contained
a hundred buildings, exclusive of barns
and two churches, all of which were left
in ruins. Several persons were injured,
out none killed.
The same storm passed over the vici
nity of Quincy, 111., doing great damage,
aemolishing houses, barns, Sec.
C2Two curious cases of intermarriatrn
have occurred in Newton county, (3a.
air. btephea Daniel, aged 56, married
daughter of N. Rogers, who was 15. and
N. Rogers, aged 62, married a daughter
of Stephen Daniel 14 years of age.
A correspondent of the Richmond Die
patch gays j Will jou bo so kind
as to let us know the relationship of their
on spring ?"
Striking Scene at a Gaming
Table. As a company of our fast
young men were busy over the card table
a few evinga since, a singular noise at
traded their attention. It was of so un
usual a nature that they immediately be
gan to look about for its cause. It was
repeated in another direction. Some
thing more than curiosity was now ex
cited, and playing was suspended. Im
mediately one of the company dropped
into what the spiritualists call a trance,
and proceeded to utter, as if from his de
ceased father, a homily against gambling
and its associate vices. This was follow
ed by an admonition purporting to come
from a deceased sister of one of the com
pany, couched in such terms and uttered
with such sisterly feeling that the whole
group were irresistibly moved to tears,
There was no more card playing that
night. None of those present were be
lievers m spiritual manifestations, and
the scene was wholly unexpected to all,
Whether it was indeed spiritual or is
capable of some other solution, is a ques
tion. It was told at a religious meeting,
bunday, and we have no doubt it occur
red substantially as we here repeat it.
Springfield Hepublican, 9th.
New York, Nov. 10.
The Charleston Mercury of the 7th
contains a long letter, addressed to Gov,
Adams of South Carolina, by B. Barn
well Rhett, urging an immediate dissolu
tion of the Union, and the establishment
of a Southern confederacy. He urges
that next to abolistionism, the chief cause
of grievance to tho South is the tariff,
and ho proposes that in the approaching
mouincation ot that measure, South Ca
rolina should demand that it should be
refused at least to the standard and prin
ciples of 1833, and if such a tariff is not
conceded, why," he asks, " should S
Carolina, or any other Southern State,
any longer keep representatives in Con
gress ?" In another part of his letter,
air. Knett says : u In my humble judjr.
ment, all true statesmanship in the South
consists in forming combinations, and
shaping events, so as to bring about, at
speedily as possible, a dissolution of the
present Union, and the erection of
Southern Confederacy."
The Nashville (Tenn.) Gazette
states that some apples raised in that
State, and exhibited at the late fair, were
somoythe half-dozen, .and as mm-h
$5,20 per half-dozen paid for them. Tl
1 whole lot, about I 1-2 barrels, consisting
v ib wieues, Drought fill.
The Catalogue of Yale College
for the coming Academical year, has
been issued. There are 23 Theological
students ; 30 Law students ; 27 Medical,
and 46 students in Philosophy and the
Arts. The Academical students consist
of 105 Seniors, 105 Juniors, 128 Sopho
mores, and 134 Freshmen. Total, 598.
CiT Senator Douglas, it is reported
will lead to the altar the Beautiful Miss
Cutts, the reigning belle of Washington
C3T Lewis Baker was sent to New
burg on Saturday, (the venue havin
been removed) to be tried for the mur
der of Poole.
S3T An Irishman named William Cot
ter was thrown from a gravel train on
the Nashua railroad on Friday, near
the Worcester depot, in Worcester, the
cars passing over one of his arms and
completely erushing it. He was other
wise seriously injured.
Dreadful Casualitt at Bingham
ton, Nov. 8. The dwelling of Mr.
Perkins, near Kirkwood, was burned last
night. Mr. Perkins, his wife, father and
seven children perished in the flames.
lit.
Another riot occurs , :
between tw political:'
part of thecitv. '
tempt to cut downanAoK
Luns, pistols, and
1 rt .
useu. several nm...
wounded.
New Orleans par .
last week, are to hand t
no news of importance.
eAn English wrk
work on Norway, stales
vision of the Sea Serpen
xioros. -uii exami
" I found that it was iai
poises following close to ea
resplendent backs, as tie,,
down, I had mistaken f 4 ' to the
whole ot one tremendous ubian
ed mo:
In the
Engtis!
aha x
mi
eosduc
A12kn
( Thii
both in
affectct
that th
, explao;
allianc
Res;
the on
( Frend
British
' Coo
with t!
lished.
; The
" Frtncl
AC
ron wi
matter
The
The Superior Cour.i
has decided that a widow
pledge a certificate of p
torney who procures it fa
Congress intended to stcj
of its bounty to the pomls.
and to place it beyond th .
ditors.
G- W. F. Johnson, fe,
lard factory on the Lake Sls
cinnati, has recovered $0!.
from the Illinois Centra! Hi
pany for cutting thro-jgh Ls;
The Portsmouth h
that Ben. Perley Pooreski
a .Earrotcnet.
At Cincinnati!, a fei (
a German washerwoman sc
ed two teamsters whoinsbcj
water from her cistern far if
0"Mrs. Walter B. E
mouth, N. II., wasbadljbn
day evening last, by the In
lamp containing " Marsl'sK
3T The witty Jamei fe
November is the period
Englishmen taie have ch
nine months, and not a few
ever.
CaMr. McConnell, of S
Illinois, has the largest flock i
the United States. It mac'ie
and all of the choicest neras
CaTThe dwelling house si
ter, N. II., owned by Mt.Ex
and occ'ipied by aims!: at
Crane, with barn adjaceaa
on Friday morning.
Cg" Mr. Parker A
boro's Me., went to his Mors
ing of the 30th ult-japparc?
built bis fire, and in a fe e
plained of blindness, left
started for his house, bat
there before he expired.
irThe Medical profes,-
consists of 6,398 physician,
geons, 2,951 apothecaries, t
professional women.
A Bm Sn kkp. The St. Lawrence
American of Ogdensburg says :
" The largest sheep we ever saw was
on board the steamer Northerner, on her
passage from Kingston to this port. He
was two years old, and weighed three
hundred and fifteen pounds. lie was an
imported sheep, and was exhibited at the
Provincial Fair at Kingston. A gentle
man from Vermont had purchased him,
and was taking him home. The price
paid was $315 a dollar a pound for
mutton ! What think ye of that, farmers
of St. Lawrence ? He was as largo as a
steer."
CaT The trial of Gwgt 1
the Coburg Assize Court a r
the murder of Thomas Haie
22d of September last, h
the verdict of u Not
be remembered that the p
deceased had been ultimo
were practising attornfj'
Henderson eloped with IW
and hence the homicide.
doubt that Brogdin
that he was of sound v
so, but the jury doubtle
the provocation justified
It U
ed froi
moned
connet
That
to mei
Engla
cuspic
tween
the I
squad
same
those
Th
signec
' in trig
' Red
No
plate
Let
.That
ted-
By
po
Lc
lion i
ket e
upp!
was 1
till 1
empl
Tl
Boui
thow
Tl
lion 1
Ti
coun
bas I
A
railn
Frer
guar
dittoi
The
stcrt
tccu
degt
yv
Aus
icall
prol
Prii
A
the
cepl
Th
; 1
as
Betting on Elections. The Cin
cinnati Commercial says :
" The betting on Kentucky has been
very heavy. We know of many in
stances of bets of extraordinary mnU
tude having been made on the result of
the late election. Lands, negroes, cash,
everything that is property in Kentucky,
has been staked throughout the State
Hundreds of men are doubtless entirely
ruined, and thousand sorely impover-
wueu.
Delaware. In this State, the R
publicnus polled about 600 rote.
tczr A llambure
" .
London paper writes, u
rent paid by tho BritUh
his hotel during the
cow ia thirtu thou$i&
t ,
the house did not conti
large enough for a ball-r
Horriblk Mcw
was committed in DuJl j
the Webster DeiH.t,y'
ter Naughton,aqt',"7fr
trious Irishman and n .
lying dead in a
sleeping chamber.
I - id
room v,-"
An'
, -A hs'
handlo broken H un" ,
There is great excitem"5
ter. The perpetrate' T
ered. AchtMs,
neartbek-d.towlueh
ed to have had nwir. y
months old,
pod that aoo. one .Uf,
ItN.ughton'.r;
I
Brc
WSJ
gal
ricn
can
in
yea
ett'
Ijsu
of
pft!
1
tUi
J.I
bi
tn
ke
tia
a 1
ho
ti
fei
ti
t!.
tl:
T

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