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Bellows Falls times. [volume] (Bellows Falls, Vt.) 1856-1965, February 26, 1869, Image 1

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PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY,
It bellows falls, Vermont.
A, . SWAIN, Editor and Publisher.
,tro$.
Toall subscribers In Windham and Wind-
Counties, in advance t2 00
( nml m auTiuwo . i m
a, tiiuiciv - -- " - w
BATK3 OF ADVERTISING.
,ronlsiiuaro, insertion . hi
r ens soi w i. w
JOB PRINTING.
lf...Affipft Is furnished with the moat aimroved ma-
i;ii used in the art, for doiim job pk.ntno in all
:itieM, oo snari notice, aim on roiuwnubiu teriug.
lll$f&:
gwtafsj (Cants.
H. BIXBY, Attorney and Counselor at
i Law. aim oouoiwr iu vuaucery.
UUAFTON, VT,
I
MBELL, TOLMAN ft CO., Manufacturers
g;,wi lleaiers In Pine. hestnut. Spruce and Iloui
A Lumber. FALS, VX.
1CKNSKU VKTEKINAHY SURGEON.
Livery siauiu, x. a. iur.lt,
WALPOLK. N. II.
I1AS. M. MAXFIELD, Dealer In AVntclics,
t lucas, jowoiry, silver, raney 4 Toilet W arm,
,:acles. Cutlery, Stationery, Photograph Albums,
: Hatches, Clocks and Jewelry Kconired. Also,
filing done, Hotel Building, CHESTER, VT.
'). W. PORTER & CO., Dealera in Dry
Hoods, Groceries Floor, Hardware A Kelt in?.
:i goou aesorttaont oi z.cpnyr w orit,-tt ana small
ji.MAN & KRAETZER, Manufacurew of
a-a, poors ana minus. 2
K. STOUGUTON, Counsellor at Law and
-olieitor in Chancery.
BELLOWS FALLS. VX.
h'SLOW S. MYERS, Attorney at Law,
BELLOWS FALLS. VT.
s. A. BALL will give instructions in
hTh Hew American Method " for the Piano
alter Jan. isi, .
IM. GEORGE, Dentist Rooms in Depot.
3,-MVnlar attention Paid to insnrtinv tnnlh r.n
"ilver and rubber. All work warranted.
tGII HENRY, Attorney and Counsellor
a' Law, and Insurance Agout. Office over E. B.
latere, CllESIEU, VI.
IANK WHITMAN, M. D., (late Sur-
h.vn U. S. A,) Physician and Surgeon,
iiUlAins AUUtit VX.
F. MERRILL, Teacher of InstrnmenUl
usie, . . liKLLOWS FALLS, VT,
VOL. XIV.
BELLOWS FALLS, VT., FRIDAY, FEB. 26, 1SG9.
HARTFORD f
SORGHUM MACHINE COMPANY.
URAKCH OFFICE AND MANUFACTORY
at
BELLOWS FALLS, VT.
JAS. B. WILLIAMS, PRESIDENT,
F. fl. BUTLER, Secretary.
This Company was organized for the manufacture
of Evaporators, tane mill. , nnrt I all apparatus neces
sary tor the Ji ANU1 AO'IX'Kli OK pUUAR. from
Cane ' te Sorghum and Southern
COREY'S SUGAR EVAPORATORS,
combining the advantages ofJCorey's Cook's and
Harris patents, and fully licensed by the proprietors
ol each, has been proved to be tho boat apparatus
known for the .
MANUFACTURE OP MAPLE SUGAR,
requiring but about half the fuel, and leu care,
while it will produce sugar which sells from three to
six cents per lb., more than that made in any other
Way. Our hVaiiOratoni hftv h,wn auA.rl...l tl,l,;.i,-
cal preuiiuius wherever exhibited. The sugar which
carried on the first prite at the recent Vermont State
air was uiad in one of our Evaporators. Wc also
man u tact u re
GUILD'S PATENT SAP REGULATOR,
The simplest and ninet perfect feeder, which is fur
"'fj1 who o"1'" I'iViiporator. making it a perfect
selt-teedicg apparatus. Circulars sent to any ad
dreas. gi
NO. 9.
l-uiiiodU and Music fumiahed.
1'ianos Taned.
tS. E. ARXOLD, Attorney and Conn
i lor at Law. Office In Wcntworth Block,
I BELLOWS FALLS, VT.
AS. B. EDD Y, Attorney and Counsel-
r at Law, Solicitor an I Maxtor in Chancery.
-Td Affent for procuring Peisions, toMier'
iue. Utlice opposite trie itank.
liKLLOWS FALLS, VT.
D. BRIDGMAN. Attomer and Coun
Kllorat Law, and Solicitor in Chancery,
Commluioner to take the acknowledgement
itiii aud oLhar iuKLruruentji. fur the Slhlu of Now
4
CARK H. CHAPMAN, Attorney and
insellnr at Law, and Solicitor in Chancery.
Kent for Fire and Life Insurance Companies,
rllUvTUKc VILLK, Windsor Co., Vt.
8ERT A. DAVIS. Attorney and Conn
er at Law. FELCHVILLK. VT.
lor and Master In Chancery, Notary Public,
i- and Fire Insurance Agent. Also Licensed
ft gent for the collection of Pensions, Bounties,
K'ee ot uovernment ana ntAte 1'ay.
MADON, Watchmaker and Jeweller
tantlj for sale Watches. Clocks, Gold and
rk and Fancv floMls. Alfto a rnfMl asort-
.Vew Uuilding.
)!. HLAK.K, Uentist. Performs all ope
t;'ms in Ilental Surgery, and manofaetares
ai Teeth in Blocks and Full Sets. Office in
f Block, up stairs, BELLOWS FALLS, VT.
iKGE E, WALKER, Mannfactnrer and
tier in Raddles, Harnesses, Blankets, Sleigh
Whips, Ae. A good assortment constantly on
f l for sale at the lowest cah prices. Please
1 examine my stock of Harnesses before pur-
Laewhere. Kopainng done at hort notice.
Main Street, Lt BLOW, VT.
T AFT, Photoprapher,
BELLOWS JfAWuB, VI.
F.
II A D L E Y ,
EELL0W3 FALI5, VT.,
Dealer in all kinds of
K, PARLOR AND BOX STOVES I
Ware of all kinds, Pad -Tron?, Zine, Lead
Ic, Pumps of alt Sizes. Plain Tin and
Japanned Ware, Brittanuia
Teapots, Lanterns,
itcrn ninhed nf &11 .if.,.,,. Tin. Sheet Trnn
'tk on hand and made to order. Also,
HOT AItt FURNACES I
jr-'hee. Town noils, or Private Dwellings, sot
in uie oest manner.
!uive Airent for the sale of P. V. STEW-
FUEL-SAVINd. AIR-THillT, SUM
MER ASU WINTER COOKlXtJ
STOVE.
havn Eiiwm " . : . t . KA
fcwn touudry of Barstow Stove Co., Provi
l 1., to which I call special attcntiou.
gove goods will be sold at reasonable prices,
IT Pay.
ya want a poor article go somewhere
JOILNSON & BABBITT 1
GENERAL INSURANCE AGENCY,
BELLOWS FALLS. VT.
REFERENCES:
Col. ASA WENTWORTH. Bellow. Fn. v.
A.N.SWAIN. . . :.
W. FLINT, . .
J. D. URIIlfiKMAW 'Ran -
C. B. KBUY. E.s., .
WII.I.KON A CO., . -
CLARK A CHAPMAN. .. ..
I). S. NICHOLS. - .. ..
CH A3. TOWN, . .
ft. - . Windsor. Vt.
E. K. OSHOOI), '- .
L. C. IirMHAHn Pan .,
PARKS & WOOLSO!?, -HOLMES.
WHITMORE d..
VI I 12 niH'1'THkr 1 r
S.MITlf, MASON A Co.. .
Dlh RIVER MANP. Co.,
BATES t ALHRICIL
OTIS BARDWELL, - -J.
B. CLARK.
Springfield, Vt
Proctorsrile, Vt.
Walpole, S. U.'
POLICIES WRITTEN IN THE
-ETNA.
HOME, N. Y.,
INTERNATIONAL,
HARTFORD.
HOME, CT
LORILLARD,
PHCENIX. Hartford,
NORTH AMERICAN,
SPRINGFIELD. -
PEOPLE'S, Worcester,
VERMONT MUTUAL.
CONN. RIVER
ASSETS,
N.Y.
8,375.000
l.ut.irjo
1,800,000
1,571.510
1,425,000
1.108,000
755,000
710,000
450,000
Any amount and v f .i,m rrT..,. : j
can be placed at this Office in the best Companies,
and at as low rates as at any agency in tho country.
Expiration Notices Promptly Given.
WATER WHEELS!
WHY LS THE CHAPMAN WHEEL
THE BEST WHEEL IN USE ?
BECAUSE it will do the same work with Un water
than any other iron wheel made.
Persons using them find their I'oudt htpfiUl. and
with other wheels they rfrrtic tmm or dry up.
Bpaulding A Patch of Ludlow, say: "l he wheels
put in for us meet our expectations perfectly, we
can grind as much grain with one half the water as
with the old wheels ione of tho wheels taken out
was ait t Jonval Turbine.
CIRCULAR SAW MILLS!
Thft fttipntinn of I.nmKnnnon ta lnvXtA
CfRCULAR MILL with " w u""
BALL'S PATEXT LEVER SET.
The superiority of which is obvious at sight. A mill
can be seen at work at our place and it wUI teU its
own story oetter man we can.
Persons in want of a good wheel or a good mill will
find it for their intreet to call and see us or send
their orders.
Bellows Falls. May. 1868.
CLARK k CHAPMAN.
20
FLORENCE SEWING MA-
P'E is the best machine in the world Tt
i,ferent stitches. The LOCK. KNOT.
. i und DOUBLE KNOT, each stitch
on both sides of the fabric,
not require finer thread on the under than
Per side.
Hons. Fell Tt;n T-: J v.M, .-.i
;d sew on a ruffle at same time. It has a
iciki motion if desired, the work runs
lH, Tllrht LA XT ,1 1? I
re.t a range of work as the FLORENCE.
'mng Machines, will be thoroughly in
to run them on nil kinds of work.
". U ilNdMlKK & CO Agent,
Bkluiws JTaus, VT.
W GUN SHOP!
;,iteriber has opened a Shop on Atkinson
r tne manutacture ot
PRTING RIFLES, SHOT GUNS,
AIRINrt of all kinds of FIRE ARMS. alo
JUACUlNEij, and all kinds of LIUHX
ular atteation given to BORINO SHOT
x'ntjvtivria iiuni'i:u:iv
FxiLS. Doc. 18. 15C7. ' 1 '
G3 AND MEDICINES.
Mriber has a fresh itock of DRUGS
"CISES. PURE CHEMICALS. .
FY Ann TmuT r.onns
PATENT MEDICINES,
,LRS, TOBACCO, CIOARS, ie.,
utX riptions earefully compounded
f ay an experienced Apothecary.
JOSEPH CLARK.
, v No. 1, 2 and 3, Revere Hall.
;". Jan. 1,1860. 49
PES AND GENTLEMEN,
NY'S VEGETAriT.T! nOMPOTTNTJ
IfV1' U"ir- '"it will keep it dean, soft
n? dandruiT, and cure yonr headache.
fifteen years among the hairs,
aat I speak. M. M. WHITNEY.
BollowsFalls. Vt
hSDERRY WOOLEN COMPANY
1-?W)SDERRY WOOLEN COMPANY.
fc ii ,C "anzementa, are about to com-
-roT-V1- 'heir customers may desire,
"JJ have a good supply of cloth on hand
' ui exchange for w.1 on rconabls
NOAH WHITMAN.
A. M AM.P.B t
Try Vt v , .BARREN GARFIELD. ;
-ZlJgly lsu WA.
Oil "T.. 1
F?'S OP KITPKDIAD M- . t i.
F i ..... v v i i r i in
hApra,.,1'-1--
ESTABLISHED 1846.
J. ESTEY & CO,.
Manufacturers of the
ESTEY COTTAGE ORGANS.
BRATTLEB0R0. VT. '
The Inventors of the original and genuine Cottage
Organs with Patent " llarmonio Attachment,"
Patent " Manual Sub Bass' Patent "Knee
Swell," Patent " Organ Bellows," and
the new and beautiful Patent
"Vox Humana Tremolo."
They have added a new and valuable feature in
Instruments which they have named the
Reed
" VOX JUEILANTE."
IT IS A STOP OF MORE COMMANDING
FECI THAN HAS BEEN BEFORE
OBTAINED.
EF-
Tliey have owned this Patent for tome time,
but only after years of trial and experiment has
this feature of the invention been discovered.
MESSRS. ESTEY & CO.,
Wish to inform the public that they OWN and con
trol the several Patents under which their instru
ments are made and also the Cofly-Rights as Trado
Marks under which they are known and sold, and
any infringements upon their rights subject the par
ties so doing to the penalties of the Law.
SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUES.
J. ESTEY & CO.,
15 BRATTLEBORO. VT.
II
ARD WARE, , & c.
The Subscriber has now on hand the largest
and best stock of HARDWARE to be found in the
Sute, consisting of
BUILDERS' HARDWARE. ALL KINDS. IRON.
STEEL AND NAILS. DOORS, SASH
AND BLINDS.
Mill, S-Cut, Circular, nand and Wood Saws: Glass,
all sixes: Carriage Hardware, Ac
Customers in want of Hardware will find it for their
interest to call before purchasing.
JOSEPH CLARK.
No. L, 2 and 3, Revare HaU.
Brattlcboro. Jan. 1, lSTsa, - -
BUY
HAIR DYE.
HAIR OILS,
COMBS.
' r - . BRUSHES I
- ' RAZORS,
... . STROPS.
SOAPS. C.
at 1
" WHITNEY'S. f
AMERICAN
AND FOREIGN PATENTS,
Ji. II. EDDY,
SOLICITOR OF TATENTS,
Late Agent of the United States Patent Office, Wash
ington, under the Act of 1837.
No. 78 State St opposite KUby St, Bolton.
Atter an extensive nractlce of nr. war,) f
years, continues to scrim patents in the United
nw., , , ,.-, ,u umain, r ranee, ana otner for
eign countries. Cuvette K,u,;ea,;nB Tt.,...i- a-
signinents, and all papers or druwinKS for Patents.
executua on reasonable terms with dUpatch. Ro-
iu.o luBi nmencau ana foreign works, to
,r,i,iii u,,,iuu, ana utility or 1'atents of In
ventions, and legal and other advice romlorod or, all
matters touching the same. Copies of the claims of
,iniL juiuiMieo, i,y remitting one UoiJar. As-
snrnmcnlj re,or,ird in ws!,inffi,.
No Agency in the United States, possesses superior
acuities for obtainuiK Patents or ascertaining the
patentability of inventions.
kurint eig " m.ontl'. the suhseriber. In the course
ot bis large proctioo, malc on ficx-e rejnW applica
tions. Sixteen Appeals, Every One of which was de
elded ta ku favor by the Commissiotiers of Patents.
TESTIMONIALS.
I regard Mr. Kddv unn.nF tl n.nB -,.-,i.i, j
r -"v m sr;tiuuuers oi wnoia x nave nau omcial
I ART.rq Ulfiov n ...en.. i
hmnahfuiluhn. . . , i . . , .
,. ...... ,u ouiiu. luYciiHira tnai
tney cannot employ a man mart cmiipctent and Inut
wortfty and mora capablo of putting their appliea-
u iu, w iu ewyrc mr luuBi an early and la-
, -.,,.-.,M.,,i,MMii mi me ratent umce.
li ii ij fvM1i IB'e uomr. "t Patents."
Mr. R. H. Eddy has made for me Thirteen anpli-
""""""i "i "n "ui jno oi wuicn patents have been
granted, and that one is now pending. Such unmi-
great Uilcnt and ability on his part,
inmend all inventors toapply to him
PatAnla (I,., n.a. k. . ft
ing the moat faithful minntinn m,.i . i,.i
en,, uu fc viy reasonauie enarges.
. . JOHN TAGHART.
isoston. J an. 1, 1509. 1-52
M.
NEW JEWELRY STORE.
D. JACKSON & CO.
Have a new and eTtrnaivA .tftfh nf nr.Am
. wiuia
LliOCKh, GOLD
AND SILVER WATCHES,
SPECTACLES. JEWELRY.
SILVER WARE,
SOLID AND PLATED.
Also
A splendid lot of Fancy Goods.
STATIONERY, &C, &C.
Also all kinds of HAIR "WORK furnished.
Special attention paid to repairing of all kinds.
52 M.D.JACKSON A CO.
FASHIONS! FASHIONS'!
FASHIONS!!!
CLOAKS! CLOAKS ! ! CLOAKS!!!
MISS R. C. DINSMORE 4 CO.
Havo received their Fall fashions of the latest styles
lor CLOAKS. SACyUES and DRESSES, and
CHILDREN'S CLOTHING,
' (both boya ud girls)
We have three exnerinnrJ Drui Fitt TViad
coming front a distance can have garments cut and
baa tod with dupatch.
Also Grave Cl4hes made on short notice.
Wo open tbia week a nice selection of
DRESS GOODS, CLOAKING S, LADIES'
Packings, Rcpellants, Flannels, Ladies FarnUhiiig
uooas, etc., &c. uo in es tic Uottona and frinta.
CHEAP! CHEAP M CHEAPIII
AlfO an Mpimnt njumrlmpnt nt Pnlnrsvl an1 PlaV
Velvet Ribbons, (limps. Buttons, Fringe. Laces,
KmhroitlerioH, Edeinga, Ac., Ae. The KKAL Frcneh
Kid La04MI back iluVnH. Vrv nnir warruntnl llwit
SkirU, Curseu Uudervesta, Drawers, iioaitiry and
Gloves.
Wo have as nice an aiojortment of Trimmings and
Fanoy artiolee as can be found in the State. Ladies
call and examine and see for yourselves, by 00 doing
you can save money and irrntify your taste.
Remember Chase's Block, Wewtrnmater Street,
Bellows Falls, Vermont. 42
JHAtJiUMS STiTCUINU, STAMPING, FLUT
ING AND PINKING DONE TO ORDER. 17
uood Nature at the Table. To
meet at tliebreakiust tallo, father, moth
er, children, all well, ought to bo a hap
piness 10 any Heart ; it should be
source of humble gratitude, and should
wake up tho warmest feelings of our na
ture. Shamo upon the conternptiblo and
low-bred cur, whethor parent or child,
that can ever corao to the breakfast-tit.
ble, where all the family have met in
health, only to frown and whine, and
growl and fret ; it is prima facie evidence
of a mean, a grovelling and selfish, and
degraded nature, wheneesoever the
churl may have sprung. Nor is it less
repreheusible to make such exhibitions
at the tea-table ; for before the mornin
comes, some of the little circle may be
stricken with some deadly disease, to
gather round that table not again for
ever. . Children in good health, if left
to themselves at the table, become, after
a few mouthfuls, garrulous and noisy
but if within at all reasonable and bear
able bounds, it is bettor to let them
alone ; they eat less, because they do not
eat so rapidly, as if compelled to keep
silent, while the very exhilaration of
spirits quickens the circulation of the
vital fluids, and energizes and assimi
lates. The extremes of society
r- w
ly meet in this regaid. The tables of
the rich and the nobles of England are
models of mirth, wit, and bonhomie ; it
takes hours to get through a repast, and
they live long. If any body will look
in upon the negroes of a well-to-do fami
ly in Kentucky, while at their meals,
they cannot but be impressed with the
perfect abandon of jabber, cachination.
and mirth ; it seems as if they could talk
all day, and they live long. It follows,
tnen, that at the family table all should
meet, and do it habitually, to make a
common interchange of high-bred cour
tesies, warm affections, of cheerful mirth
fulness, and that generosity of nature
which lifts us above the brutes which
perish, promotive as these things are of
good digestion, high health, and a long
life. IlalFs Journal ,
IVotice.
THE Subscriber has taken the Store of Mr. Nor
man Harris, one door east of Messrs. Arms k
n llson's Store, in Mammoth Jilock, where he is of
fering a fresh stock of .
WEST INDIA GOODS AND GROCERIES
of the best quality. Also a general supply of
COUNTRY TRODUCE AND PROVISIONS.
Such aa
BUTTER.
CHEESE.
PORK.
LARD,
BEANS.
DRIED APPLES,
POTATOES. &. Ac,
Good assortment of
CROCKERY AND GLASS WARE.
All of whieh will be sold at reasonable nricea for
cash or Country Produee. llease call and examine
for yourselves. Feeling thankful for past favors, I
hope to receive a share of patronage for the future.
Bellows Falls. June 10, 1867. 24
BUY LUBIN'S EDREHIS,
WOOD WORTH'S 4 BARNEY'S EXTRACTS
AND NICE COLOGNES,
at 1
WHITNEY'S.
Wanted,
SECOND growth BLACK ASH TIMBER. Apply
a T1HPII I iUftVet
Bellows Falls, Dee. 3. I860. 60
CT. AGNES HALL,
O BELLOWS FALLS. VT.
A Boarding and Day School tor Young Ladies.
Teruie For Boarding Pupils, fcXKi per your.
Day a 50 " "
The Spring Term will begin on Mondav. Jannarr
2"th. All communications to be addressed to the
Rector of Immanuel Church, Bellows Falls, Vt.
60
s.
E.MOORE
Has last taken room in Chase's Block oyct O. F.
Wood's Drug Store, where he is prcj&red lo do all
kinds of
UPHOLSTERING,
Such as SOFAS. LOUNGES. BEDS. CHAIRS. Ac
ALSO . .....
CASTORS FOB BEDS, LOUNGES AND
Tables furni.hed at a low price. Also pictures fram
ed or uie moulding lurnlsoeo.
Bellows Falls, Oct. 22. 18.
S. E. MOORE.
3
Farm for Sale.
TJ1E SUBSCRIBER offers for sale, his farm in
Suuth Reading. u. formerly known as the" Eb
enrtcr Robinson farm. Sairt fans contains about
300 acres of good land, well divided into tillage. pas
taring, and wood. iood two story bossa.4 barns
and other outbuildings, au ta gonri repair.
Soath Reading. VU Oct. 8, 1.
KDWARD HALL.
41
"I Will in a Minute." Here is what
some good man says about the way boys
and girls ought to mind when spoken to
by their parents . : : ,
The other day I heard a mother ask
her little son to do something. "In n
minute," he- said. She spoke again.
Hut it was one, two, three, four, five
minutes before he minded her.
It makes me think of the switch-tender's
boy. What if he had waited a
minute before minding his father ! A
switch-tender in Prussia was just going
to move the rail, in order to put a com
ing train of cars on a side track, when
he caught sight of his little son playing
on the track. The engine was in sight,
and he had not a moment to spare". He
might jump and save his child ; but he
could not do that and turn the switch in
time ; and if it were not done the in
coming train would meet another train,
and a terrible crash and smash take
place. ' ,
The safety of hundreds of lives de
pended upon his fidelity. What could
he do? what did he do? "Lie down, lie
down!" he called, with a loudquick
voice to the child ; and seizing the switch
the train passed safely on its proper
track. . . .,
Did the heavy train run over the lit
tle boy? Was he crushed ? No, he did
just as his father told him, and did it in
stantly. He fell flat between the rails,
and the cars went high over his head ;
and when the anxious father sprang to
the spot, there he was, alive and well;
not a hair was touched. It was his
quick obedience, you sec, that saved his
life. He did not stop a minute. Even
a moment's hesitation would have been
too late. ' ' ,
ricnliitvrtl.
WcslminHter Farmers' Club.
Never Complain. Never complain
of your birth, yonr training, your em
ployment, your hardships ; never fancy
that you could be something, if you on
ly had a different lot assigned you. God
understands his own plan, and he under
stands what you want, a great deal bet
ter than you do. The very things that
you deprecate, as fatal limitations or
obstructions, are probably what you
most want. What you call hindrances,
obstacles, discouragement, are probably
God's opportunities; and it is nothing
new that the patient should dislike his
medicines, or any , certain proofs that
they are poisons. No ! A truce to all
such impatience! Check that devilish
envy which gnaws your heart, because
you are not in the same lot with others ;
bring down your soul, or rather bring it
up to receive uods wiJl, and do His
work in your lot, in your sphere, under
your obscurity, against your temptar
tiocs ; and you will find that your con
dition is never opposed to your good, but
reallv consistent with it, Dr. Bmhman. i
A Hungarian desiring to remark on '
the domestic habits of a young lady, said, '
Oh, miss, how homely you arc. 1
... ....... .. ..
.Feb. 15, 1869.
MANUFACTURE OF MAPLE SUGAR.
N. G. Pierce, Esq. Some may think
this to be a subject of little importance,
thinking perhaps there can b but little
if any improvement. Let us see. Once
maple sugar as then manufactured, was
very dark colored. Now the question is,
Can it be made white. " Neat and quick"
are the watchwords. First I would have
tin buckets if necessary to buy new, but
; as most have wooden ones and do not
wish to meet the outlay it is wise to keep
them painted, especially the inside.
Paint often, using raw oil and venitian
red. . Do not attend auctions and buy
old musty buckets. For spouts I prefer
the wooden spout Thb bit of half inch.
bonng three inches doep. I think the
amount of sap drawn from the tree, de
pends more upon the depth of the hole
than size. Now if your sap runs through
clean spouts, into clean buckets, conveyed
in clean holders, boiled in clean appara
tus, sufficient so as not to need much
storage, keeping everything out of the
sap rather than to strain it to get it out,
making it into sugar the same day, (not
let your syrup stand or cool for it turns
red) and you ha ve white sugar. I don't
know as I have the best apparatus for
boiling. I have a heater and one pan,
and can boil sap enough for 100 pounds
sugar in a day.
urestus if . Feck. I tap my trees
when it is a sap day, and never would
tap unless it was a good one. I use f bit
and sumac sprout. I consider them the
best sap spout. I scald thera in lime wa
ter when done using, to neutralize the
acid generated by the absorption of sap,
and before using run a hot iron through
them which chars thera, tending to purify
as well as to retard the ingress of the sap
to the wood of the spout. I prefer the
small bit to the larger because the hole
being smaller does not dry up as readily.
Have everything about your premises
new or nearly so, as you can keep them
painted, especially your buckets with raw
oil and venitian red. I boil my sap into
syrup every day, and it is test when
boiling to drive it as fast as possible and
steady, lor if it occasionally cools down
it colors, which if we can get it into sy
rup without becoming colored, my opin
ion is it will remain so. I then strain
and let it stand 12 to 24 hours before su
garing off. Then I turn off the syrup
from the settlings or sediment. In the
early part of the sugar season I put
nothing into my syrup to cleanse it. I
have tried it and can sco no difference.
Later in the season, when sap runs a lit
tle white from the bucket, I use 3 eggs
to 1 pint of skim milk. When testing
to ascertain whether done or not (if for
caking) in raising the dipper as it runs
from it, leaving long hairs I call it done.
(If for tub not do it near as much.) Re
move from the fire letting it stand, and
stir rapidly, which avoids that glassy ap
pearance seen upon the outsido of the
cake, in turning immediately into the
moulds. To have nice tub sugar, enough
should be sugared off at once to fill the
tub, for if filled at two or three different
times, a glassy coating is formed between
each layer which obstructs the draining;
when it comes Warm weather, turn the
tubs bottom upward and from 100 lbs.
you can get 70 or 75 lbs. of just such
sugar as this, (here Mr. Peck presented
several specimens of sugar which was
pronounced by the club to be XXX.
Question. Do you see any difference
in the sugar made from trees standing in
Jime rock soil or where the pcroxyd of
iron exists, rendering the soil of a red
cast ? j
Answer. I see no difference.
Ques. What is the apparatus you use
for boiling 7
Ana, Two pans, two barrels each,
and one heater in one arch. My arch
is not high enough ; it should be 18 to
20 inches above the grate ; my heater
heaU too rapidly and runs over ; it is ten
foot from mouth of arch to the heater.
I would have the arch all tho way of a
depth. I think my heater increases the
boiling one-fourth., I can boil from 5
o'clock in the morning till 10 at night,
16 barrels, or 25 barrels iu twenty-four
hours. , I would have sugar house ar
ranged so as to draw sap from holder to
heater more clean. The best sugar weath
er is when the thermometer runs down to
10 at night and up to 00 to 65' in the
day. . .
Shubael Peck. I have made sugar
ever since I was a boy, from the five pail
kettle hung upon the crane in the old
fire place, next four or five of the same
kettles hung in the woods upon a pole
between two large logs or by the side of
a large rock with a big log in front, all
of which methods made black sugar.
Then came the old chaldron kettle set in
stone arch ; still it would burn in boiling
down, and filling np, would scorch and
burn on the sides, consequently would
color the sugar. Lately I have used
pans set in arch. (Mr. Peck here pre
sented some nice specimens of maple su
gar not much behind those of the son.) '
Henry Floyd. In regard to making
maple sugar, I have made it as long I
think as any one present and in all ways.
But in tapping I would use half inch
bit, boring three to four inches in, large
trees, using the sumac spout for I think
it tho best ; the metallic spout is not stiff
enough. One reason of black sugar is,
much sap is boiled in coarse iron. , Boil
ers should bo of fino material and pol
ished to make white sugar. The galvan-
izod pans I know nothing about except
i have seen, the sugar made in them and
it was as nice as I ever saw, equal to the
specimens here presented. I believe in
letting the syrup stand and turn off from
the sediment, which you cannot get rid
of by straining. I think there is a dark
sediment coming from the maple in the
sap.
N, G. Pierce. I do not agree with
Mr. Urestus Feck. I once sugared with
a gentleman in company, he being san
guine that H waa best to put in eggs to
cleanse our syrup, after I persuaded hira
to Jet it stand, cool and turn cff. Fi
nally we adopted the system of sugaring
off immediately when hot, and my part
ner fell in with it that we made nicer su
gar with the latter mode. , Now I have
a strainer on my holder, then runs from
holder to heater ; no pails, no dippers
come In contact with the sap. "Neat
and clean " keep iu mind.
S. Peck. No more difficult to make
nice sugar than black poor sugar.
Sylvester. Grout. I have sugared
about as long as Mr. Peck, perhaps be
gan younger, though there is something
to be learned yet. 1 About twenty-two
years ago 1 made some sugar, that was
earned to Boston, and it was so white
and nice they would not believe it waa
maple sugar. My -sugar-house was floor
ed overhead and kept wet, there is a dust
constantly accumulating overhead, much
of which, sooner or later, will come' in
contact with the sap, I never cleansed or
strained through wollen or cotton flan
nel. bap from the tree is pure. Now to
aim at perfection, you should have your
sugar-house as nice as your kitchen :
who has not noticed, that has sugared,
ooumuiations of trust npon every thing
in the building, if open aud unfloored,
1 think I am not visionary have the
wood in another apartment I think to
make a nice article, let your syrupsettle,
strain yonr sap before boiling. Again,
i do not agre with Mr. Peck. I think
difierent sugar-bushes produce different
sap, and makes different sugar.
S. Peck. Trees differently located
produce different sap.
T. W. Wilet. for some ; ten years.
I used three-fourths bit, with two spouts
to abucket,buthave abandoned the prac
tice now using five-eighth bit, one spout,
think I can get as much sap, bore from
two to two and a half inches deep. I
endeavor to cleanse my buckets well in
spring when I take them from the trees,
also keep them well painted inside with
raw-oil ; and red paint I think the
quicker we can get it into sugar the bet-
1 Iiko to have sap strained either
ter.
at the holder or at the heater. I strain
my syrup- through a woollen strainer,
never used the so-called "felt-bat" I
think I can improve the quality of the
sugar by syruping down twice in the
day. I never put anything into syrup
to cleanse it, it you put in milk the su
gar is apt to sour in hot weather from
the particles left in it I use the sumac
spout, cleanse them well.
b. Peck. I think I can get as much
sap from one spout as from two.
j S.Gkout. I used last year, spouts
part sumac and part the turned wooden
ones. I think the latter better, because
they more nicely fitted, being perfectly
round and of the right bevel. . We are
apt to drive the spout too far, and have
it shaped too much like a pin, not stunt
enough ; two spouts are better than one.
rt t t - . ...
v.. xjhja.. x wo spou is win run as
much again as one, and if the tree is
good size, you may put two, three, or
tour buckets to a tree. I knew of a tree
that run 16 pails full in one day, into
ten buckets. Now, if you will notice.
the sap drops just as freely from thp sec
ond epout as from the first one, if the in
cision is made in just as healthy a spot
in the tree. I would not use the metal
lic spout, as it tends to conduct heat
from the sun to the sap. Spouts should
fit in the bark, and not the wood.
N. G. Pierce. I like to hear these
different opinions expressed. A good
many new ideas have been advanced.
I know some things have a strong tenac
ity to live. I once heard of a cat that
had her head cut off, and it was not long
before she was seen bringing her head
forward. I don't believe it in vnnmvl
w put but one spout to the bucket Mr.
Gront's idea of dust accumulating is
something I never thought of, but there
is something in it
S. Grout. I intend to tap under a
large limb or into a large root when con
venient. I think trees make wood fast
er that are habitually used for sugar
trees.
i Piercb. I think in the fore part of
the season, a tree should be tapped high,
later in the season, tapped low. . . , ,
F. G. Butler of Bellows Falls.
I came in this evening to learn rather
than to say anything. Last spring I
commenced in Massachusetts, and trav
eled northward, stopping all along by
the way visiting and witnessing a great
variety of modes in the manufacture of
maple sugar, making the observation a
speciality, visiting some forty different
sugar place and ending my research
near Canada ; noticing the more intelli
gent and neat to the less intelligent and
slovenly as I passed along, summing the
generalities as thug : The bit about one
half one half of an inch is best, boring
on thejupward slant The cause of bo
much black sugar was a want of proper
regard to cleanliness sign of human
degeneracy. Should commence with the
flow of sap to use Post's patent spout, as
it keeps clean. Have your sugar houses
tight I observed one last spring where
the wind blew through and the snow in
side was black with dust Again, cold
air checks evaporation. , If your build
ing is tight eo warm you wish to take
your coat off, you will see nj steam.
Sugar is improved by doing the work
quick as well as neat Mr, Wiley says
sugar off twice a day. I say, sugar off
all the time, which is better still. " We
run sap into one end of our evaporator
and syrup out at the other. (Mr. Butler
here presented a model of his evapora
tor, also a sap strainer, with a tub of ex
tra sugar made by his process, the flavor
of which, we think, surpassed anything
presented.) ' One reason why you color
your sugar in your pans is, you do not
keep them boiling at the same height,
so by filling np and running down, there
is a scorching and drying on the pan,
producing a coloring matter that be
comes commingled with your syrup, and
this coloring matter is very strong.' It
takes but little to color a very large
amount of sugar. We can boil at any
required height and remain so, which
avoids this rinsing from the sides of the
pan. Tin undoubtedly would be the
nicest material to boil in, but would not
be stiff enough. Galvanized iron is the
next best." Shallow boilinp- is ranid
... ' O L
boiling, hence we boil from one inch
and a half to two inches. . Wood never
should be kept in tie same apartment
with the boiling, but in an adjoining one
at the mouth of 'the arch. If kept in
the same it gathers dampness, making
poor fuel as well as dirt.
t. Henby Willard. J. am no suirar
maker practically, but theoretically it is
summed up in two words, "quick and
clean." . Sugar-house should be neat and
clean. Who has not noticed where sap
is caught in a new tin pail for instance,
and carried to the house and boiled im
mediately down to sugar? bow nice
equal to honey, almost perfectly clari
fied, getting the fine flavor of the maple.
I would have a partition passing between
the mouth of the arch and the boiling
apparatus, to avoid all dirt from wood,
or ejection of soot, ashes, or smoke from
the fire. Thore would be an expense, it
is true, but supposing it did cost four or
5vo hundred dollars I think it wnnlrl
.
O. F. Peck. (Question to Mr. Butler.)
-If wood will absorb sap so as to be
come impure, would it not be better to
have the Bides of your evaporator of the
same material as the bottom ? (The sides
are made of wood.)
Mr Butler. Ans. This obiection-
has been raised before using, but I have
seen those that have been used for years
and no such trouble was visible. We
make them out of the best of pine.
Mr. Peck. Would it not be advisa
ble to cleanse them with lime water to
neutralize the acid ? ; , , ..,,.
; Mr. Butler. If we made them all
galvanized iron we should have to have
very stiff iron and they would be difficult
to mend. Now when they leak we put
on the wrench and tighten them up. , j;j
Mr, Willard. I think this to be
somewhat different from sap in buckets
standing still.' That might sour, this is
constantly passing along and no acid
would generate. '
Mr. Peck. I understand in the boiling
of the evaporator the scum and sediment
(if any) is thrown to the sides from the
rapid ebulition through the ' center,
leaving but little if any, motion at the
sides, affording an opportunity to pene
trate the wood. :
: ; Mr. Willard. Look at tub sugar,
tubs that have been used for years, we
have no such difficulty aa souring. -, j
. Mr. Peck. Sugar is different from
sap or syrup. Sugar does not change as it
is cooked. ' ' ' . ;
Mr. Floyd. What is the expense of
the evaporator 7 ; .
M. Butleb. From $40 to fl00t the
former with grates and cast iron door
will cost $60, and you can boil from one
barrel to a barrel and a half an hour ;
the latter, four barrels an hour; sap
travels in going over the evaporator one
hundred feet ,
Mr. Grott. i Now will it pay? I
think it wilL if we can boO four barrels
an hour; it wouldhavepaid fifty dollars
last year for sap lost where I sugared.
- '.- ' i M. W.DATis,Sec.. ;
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