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Bellows Falls times. [volume] (Bellows Falls, Vt.) 1856-1965, July 05, 1894, Image 1

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VOL. 39. NO. 27.
BELLOWS FALLS, VT., THURSDAY, JULY 5, 1894.
TEN PAGES
i m.
gcUowft fall "Poatcffice.
Offiok Horns : 7 a. m. to 8 p. m. Sunday,
M.80 a. Ill, to 10.80 a. ni.,
BARNEY CANNON, JH., P. M.
MAILS TO AND FHOM
Boston Close nt 8.13 a. m., 1.20, 3.35 and 8 p.m.
Arrivo at 11.50 a. in., 7.05 anil 10.55 p. in.
New York Closo at 8.15 a. m., 1.15, 8.35, 5.55
ami 8 p. in. Arrive at 12 in., 2.5U, 6.05 and
10.55 p. in.
Rutland Way Close at 11.40 a. m., and 6.55
p. m. Arrive at 8.25 a. m. and 1.25 p. in.
Sullivan Way Close at 11.40 a. lu., 5.55 and
8 p. in. Arrive at 4-.40., and 8.20 a.m., 1.25 p.m.
South Acworth, Drewsvllle, Alstead and
Langdon, N. H. Closo at 12 m. Arrive at
8 a. in.
Townshend, Grnfton, Cambrldgeport, West
minster West and Athena Close at 12 m.
Arrive at 11 a. in.
Saxton'8 River Close at 8.30 and 12 m., 4.15
and 7.20 p. m. Arrive at 8.10 and 11 a. iu.,
and 1.10 p. m. . ,.
H. R. BECKWITH, t
- " ARCHITECT.
Office at Residence, No: 37, Summer St.
Claremont, N. H.
48-39
H. D. RYDER,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
Arms Block, Bellows Falls, Vt. 48-37
GEORGE A. BROWN,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
Boom 60, Ames Building, Cor. Washington
and Court sts.
9-39
Boston, Mass,
O.M.GEORGE,
DENTIST, - . Room No. 1, UPSTAIRS,
52-38 Union Block, Bellows Falls, Vt. '
W.F.CASSIDY,
LIVERY) FEED AND SALES STABLE,
Towns Hotel Barn, Bellows Falls, Vt
86-38
EDWARD KIRKEAND, M. D.
OFFICE AND RESIDENCE, SOUTH ST.
Office honrs till 9 a. m., 1 to 2 and 6 to 7.30p.m.
Connected by telephone. 48-38
C. E. C APRON,
MERCHANT SAILOR,
22 89 Bellows Falls, Vt.
MARBLE AND GRANITE CO.
X3AYER & SMITH'S RUTLAND BRANCH.
Westminster Street,
Allbee's Block, 48-38 Bellows Falls, Vt.
GEORGE A. WESTON,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
AND SOLICITOR IN CHANCERY.
Office In Town Hall Building, over postofllce.
Bellows Falls, Vt. 48-37
WALKER &. HOLDEN,
INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS
Placed in Reliable Companies at Reasonable
Rates. -
Town Hall Building, 22-39 Bellows Falls, Vt.
MISS FROST,
TEACHER OF PIANO AND HARMONY , .
Synthetic Method.
17-39 Saxton's River, Vt.
Main Street,
GEORGE F. BALL,
FIRE, LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE.
Arms' Block, 18 39 Bellows Falls, V t .
R. H. RAMSAY,
DOORS, SASH, GLAZED WINDOWS, AND
GLASS, BLINDS
In White Trimmed or Painted.
Farr's Block, 26-39 Canal Street.
H.J.HUNTOON,
GUN AND LOCKSMITH.
Dealer in Guns, Ammunition and Fishing
Tackle. Jobbing of every description.
On School St. Stairs, 48 38 Bellows Falls, Vt.
GILBERT A. DAVIS,
COUNSELLOR at LAW and PENSION
ATTORNEY.
Windsor, - - Vermont.
Felchville office open on Mondays.
THE F. B. F. GROCERY CO.,
Successors to M. B. Kelley,
CHOICE FAMILY GROCERIES,
Agent for the Bridal Veil Flour.
Granger Block, 30-38 Bellows Falls, Vt.
A. W. GORHAM,
DOCTOR OF VETERINARY SCIENCE.
Graduate of McGill University of Montreal,
20 School Street. 26-39
MRS. E. P. KNIGHT,
LADIES' TOILET PARLORS,
Room 8, Brown's Block,
19-39 Bellows Falls, Vt.
DR. E. W. KNIGHT,
DENTAL PARLOUS,
Brown's Block, Canal Street.
urace nours, 8 to a a. m., ana l to 5 p. m.
19-39
:h. m. weeden
TUNE RAN D R E GI7 L A TO R OF PIANOS
AND ORGANS.
Graduate of NT. E. Conservatory School of
a jriano-ione runing.
82-39 Address, Rockingham, Vt,
GEORGCH. GORHAM, M. D.,
Bellows Falls, Vt.
Practice limited to the diseases of the Eye,
Ear, Throat and Nose.
Office hours 9 to 12 a. m., 1 to 4, and 7 to 8 p.m.
xuesaays ana r nuays ai uranieDoro. 48-38
B. FALLS MARBLE WORKS,
H. K1n or. lr.. Pronrietor.
MONUMENTS, TABLETS and HEADSTONES
constantly on hand. Scotch anil American
Granite Monuments a specialty. Call and ex
amine. Rockingham St., Bellows Falls, Vt.
4S37
LEWIS C. LOVELL,
PUBLIC HACK to and From all Trains.
Carriages for Weddings and Funerals.
Order Book at Pierce's Drug Store. 52-38
GEORGE ANDREWS,
Locksmith and General Repair Shop.
Bicycle Work and Safe Locks a specialty,
Also Inscriptions put on Marble and
Granite Monuments.
18 39 Farr's Block, Canal St., Bellows Falls.
E. H. CARTER,
Dealer in Improved Farms, Wild Lands, and
Ileal Estate Mortgages.
Wahpeton, Richland Co., North Dakota.
4K-37
THE O. M. BAKER JUNK CO.
DEALERS in ALL KINDS of OLD Jt'SK
Rubber and Metals a specialty. Rags, Old
Rope, Bags, Sheep Pelts, Furs, etc. Agents
- . - , .. i i i i . i- . i . i ,
W&nieil W UUy OH! JUIIK. V-1U1111-.1I.-V1 111
satisfactory gnaramy. commission at
lowed. George Street, Bellows Falls. 24-40
; Quart ij;
j:j .Oysters . i;j
Ij; yields 36 per j:j
i;i cent, of nut ri- ;
: tion. You ;
j: get just four jij
ji: times the nu- ;
j;j trition in one j-j
0 package of jij
jjjirjr Hornb jjj
jij H-OfSZ jjj
Segal glinjetrttacments.
C. L. KING ESTATE.
STATE OF VERMONT, j The Probate Court
Westminster, ss. j for said District. To
all persons intere-ted in the estate of O. L.
King, late of Rockingham in said district,
deceased, Greeting :
You are hereby notified that this Court will
decide upon the allowance of the account of
Zina H. Allbee, Administrator upon said
estate, and degree distribution thereof to the
fiersons entitled at the session thereof to be
leld at the Probate Office in Bellows Falls on
the 7th day of July, A. D. 1894, when and
where you may be heard in the premises, if
you see cause.
25-27 L. M. READ, Judge.
FreedQm Notice.
Having given my son, Charles N. Farr, his
time during his minority, 1 shall claim none
of his earnings and pay no debts of bis con
tracting after this date.
ROBERT D. FARR.
Westminster, Vt., May 28, 1894,
Our Low Prices
Always attract economical buyers . This
year our prices are lower than ever, and
the goods better. Step in and see our
1 Russet Shoes for Ladies and Gentlemen
at $2.50. They are in all respects equal to
Shoes sold at $3.00 at other stores. They
Are Fetching
the trade in crowds that are daily in
creasing. Our Boys', Misses' and Child
ren's Russet goods are sure to have a
larger sale than ever this season. Prices
run from 75c to $1.50. The low price news
spreads. One customer brings another.
The Trade
-
In Hat and Furnlsliing departments is
showing daily increasing activity. Derby
Hats at 98c, $1.25, $1.50; worth 50c to $1.00
more.
Straw Hats 15c, 25c, 50c, 75c and $1.00. The
greatest values we have ever shown.
Men's Hosiery, 2 pairs for 25c, are having
an immense sale. They are the regular
20c a pair kind ; and the same bargain
story runs all through the store.
Men's fine French Balbriggan Shirts and
Drawers is a banner bargain at 50c and
are the 75o quality. '
Hammocks at prices that will astonish
you. Fully 20 per cent lower than last
year's prices.
C. H.Waite,
" Big Hat," Bellows Falls.
WE WON'T GO
THERE ANY MORE!
i
EVERYBODY will be glad to know that
Jack Jones has taken the JMorrell Cure,
and neither uses tobacco, morphine or
liquor now, and he used to have all t hree of
these curses attached to him. These "three
devils" are hard ones to kill, but the Morrell
Cure never fails to cure any man or -woman
who is faithful in taking the treatment.
After we have taken away the. love for the
accursed thing, we cannot make it impos
sible for the patient to go back to drink. No
one can.
IF you have any one in mind who has no
mental balances, no moral backbone,
don't bring him to us, if he has millions of
money. We are after saving men, and to
save men, it is necessary to have MEN to
save. Some of those fellows love their deg
radation and "glory in their shame." It's
no use to cure such fellows; they won't stay
cured ! Write us for particulars, and we will
"keep quiet" about it.
MORRELL CURE.
Nearly 20 Institutes in Vermont.
VERMONT ACADEMY, Saxton's River, Vt.,
A first class Preparatory and Academic School
for both sexes. Prepares for any College. Ad
mission on Certificate. Eight large buildings.
Delightful location. Thirteen Teachers. Folly
equipped Laboratories for Chemistry and Phys
ics. 11 )me for the sick. Fine new Library
building. Telescope. Gymnasium. Mliltarv
drill under U. 8. Army nicer. Training tor
cnaracier ana lor cinzensnip. x or catalog ana
otaer Information, applv to
GEO. A. WILLIAMS, Ph. D., Principal.
Wanted
We want names and
post office addresses
of reliable men 25 vrs.
of age and upwards who will make good
local or traveling agents for the sale of our
Canadian Grown Nursery Stock. Over 70
acres under cultivation. Stock guaranteed.
Our patrons are our lest references. We
nuean business. No drones need apply. Ad-
nress stone w f.i.i.im.ton, Temple buna
ing, Montreal, P. Q. J. W. Beall, manager,
Name this paper.
cllfla trails Spnw.
PrllUSIIEU TllUKSUAYS BV
A. W. EMERSON & CO., Proprietors.
A. W. EMERSON,
A. G. DAY, .
A. F. SPARROW,
EliITOlt
Managku
Local Assistant
One copy, one year, in advance, - $1.50
One copy, six months, in advance, - .75
One copy, three months, in advance, - .40
Single copies, . . - - -05
I , . ' CHANGE OF ADDKESS.
' Subscriber who change their postofllce ad
dress should notify us promptly of the fact
and send their old as well as new address, that
we may be able, to make the chunge on our
books without delay.
Subscribers neglecting to notify us of a
change of residence, will be held responsible
for all papers sent to old address, unless
ordered discontinued and paid to date.
! 9-It is our invariable rule to expect noti
fication from subscribers who wish Tub
Times discontinued to their address. We
have no desire to force our paper upon any
i one and a postal card order to our ollioe will
promptly take from our list any name not in
arrears.
I ADVERTISERS
Will And The Times the best advertising
medium iu southern Vermont. Located in a
thriving manufacturing village and railroad
center, at the border line of two states, and
circulating in those states and In four coun
ties, it is not excelled as a means of reaching
a large and thrifty population. Rates will
be furnished on application. Marriage, birth
and death notices will be inserted free, but a
charge of 5 cents a line will be made for
obituary matter. Cards of thanks, Business
Notices, and all matters, not of a public na
ture, must be paid for in advance at the rate
of 10 cent per line each insertion. Busi
ness notices in local column, 15 cents per
line.
THE TRAMP AND THE HIGHWAY.
Coxey and his nondescript retinue
were the legitimate subjects of a great
deal of ridicule and contempt. His
crazy undertaking and grotesque meth
ods could hardly have been expected to
meet with any other reception. Who
shall say, however, that his impracti
cable ideas do not contain the germ of
what with proper treatment might de
velop into one of the most popular and
beneficial movements of the age?
The demand for good roads is by no
means original with the sage of Massil
lon, nor will it lose any of its force by
the failure of his ill conceived and bad.
ly managed expedition. The sentiment
in favor of improved highways is not a
mushroom formation but a plant of
long continued and sturdy growth.
Seemingly of spontaheous: origin, fos
tered by a diligent press and astute
leaders of public opinion everywhere,
it has taken deep root in the minds of
a long-suffering people, and its propor.
tions are such as to give promise of an
abundant fruitage. ." .
The need of action in the matter is
everywhere conceded. What Better
time than the present to formulate
some definite plan for such action?
The fact that this movement has ar
rived at its present stage of develop
ment just at the time when thousands
are demanding work seems to be some
thing more than a coincidence. May
it not providentially prove the opening
wedge to a solution of both of these
grave problems? What more fitting
than that a nation's unemployed should
build the nation's highways ?
The policy of economy and retrench
ment has been assiduously preached
during the hard times. Possibly it has
been carried too far. Supposing, for in
stance, that every state had ' appropri
ated a generous sum for the building of
highways. It would have furnished
employment to thousands who have
been suffering for the necessities of life.
The money would have found its way
into every channel of trade and every
industry and every individual would
have been ultimately benefited, while
the slight increase in taxation would
have been scarcely noticed. It is not
yet too late, and if the doleful predic
tions of still worse times are realized
the opportunity will be widened.
We believe this is a matter which
may fairly claim a large share of the
legislator's attention everywhere. Es
pecially in our own state do we hope to
see some action this fall. Considerable
impetus will doubtless be given the
movement in other states by the na
tional road congress held this w eek in
New Jersey. Vermont is one of the
states where the matter had early at
tention and some little progress has al
ready been made. Let the good work
go on. Let us have full and free dis
cussion by the press and people until
the desired end is attained. There are
numerous details to be passed upon,
some of which will furnish texts for
future dis courses.
ON A FOOL'S ERRAND.
It seem scarcely credible that busi
nessmen from the south are visiting
New England with the expectation of
securing financial aid for southern en
terprises. Is it possible that they have
never beard of the revolt against that
particular species of folly, and that they
are not aware of the disrepute, into
which that -once vaunted method of
rapidly acquiring wealth without work
has fallen? The New England capital
ist who invests money for profit has
1 ng since discovered that home enter
prises are the safest and vleld best re
turns, and any who are benevolcutly
inclined will do well to remember the
old theorem that charity should begin
at home nas never been disnroven. "
- To say nothing of the general busi
ness depression, the northern capitalist
Is not in the mood just now to risk
much iu the way of business invest
ment in a section whose political repre
sentatives are displaying such .bitter
and open hostility towards the indus
tries of other sections, and are doing
their best to destroy them.
No, no, Mr. Dixie, go away, please ;
go home and patch up your broken
fences, pull up those old greenback
weeds, muzzle your populist blood
hounds, cease your barbarous lynching
bees, grant to all your citizens equal
rights and a fair show at the ballot box,
stop throwing stones at northern indus
tries and cussing the Yankees, and you
will have little need of going begging
for outside help.
NOTE AND COMMENT.
, A fireman and engineer were lynched
by strikers at Pueblo, Col., Tuesday
because they refused to strike.
So we have Populists in Vermont.
Nearly 50 of them, they say, had a con
vention last week and nominated a list
of state officers. Well, well; what
next?
The Burlington Daily News is a new
penny paper that has the marks of
prosperity. It is good looking, has lots
of news and does not advertise to run
any other paper off of the track. Suc
cess to it. ' '
Bill Nye, in a contribution to a Sun
day paper says: "Make the presiden
tial term eight years and no second
crack at it. Settle the national policy
for eight years at least." Gee, whiz!
William! You are cruel. Would you
want us to endure eight years of this?
In the Mud Hook regatta off Glas
gow yesterday the American yacht
Vigilant was beaten by the Brittania
by 35 seconds. The Vigilant had a big
lead, but was interfered with by small
er boats. The Valkyrie was sunk in a
collision at the beginning of the race,
but all on board were saved.
. -; - ; -'r-.-r-f
The Boston Journal says : "The tor
rid weather did not prevent the Green
Mountain Republicans from holding
one of the largest and most enthusiastic
conventions on record. Their ticket is
a strongi one and the state will outdo
itself in the size of its Republican ma
jority." That's right ; so she will.
The amendment offered by Senator
Morrill to the naval appropriation bill,
providing that the superintendent of
the naval observatory shall be a person
in civil life and not chosen from the
naval ranks, is a common sense meas
ure, and ought to pass. In charge of a
competent chief the station might be
of some benefit.
At the convention of the Republican
league clubs at Denver there were per
sonal statements of presidential prefer
ences from 863 of the 900 delegates pres
ent. Of this number 587 favored Mc
Kinley, 142 were for Reed, 23 for Harri
son and the balance divided among
Allison, Alger, Cameron and Lincoln.
Speaking of prophecies here are two
brief extracts from the Bellows Falls
Times which we may be pardoned for
reproducing just at this time. They
are taken from the issue preceding the
national election in 1892.
We believe Mr. Cleveland is above and be
yond his party and acknowledge to him the
partial courage of his convictions. But, as
he fails to truly represent that party, so he
must inevitably fail to control its actions.
Placed in power we believe he would do his
best to guide it in safe channels, but as a
matter of history it is shown in repeated in
stances that' the majority of his party is
rarely guided by aught save selfish and sui
cidal motives. With his ideas, the platform
on which they have placed him, and the un
certainties surrounding those who should be
his most powerful allies, Mr. Cleveland's po
sition can not be one of calmness undis
turbed. We cannot go so far as do some enthusiasts
in foreseeing m the possibility of Democrat
ic success, an immediate and never-ending
national chaos and destruction. So long as
parties are made up of men, and men are
free, men will be greater than parties, and
false theories will, eventually, die the death.
So much in justice to Democracy which holds"
in its ranks many who are honest in the be
lief that they are politically right. But we
canhot see bow, in the event of Democratic
success on Tuesday, we as a rapidly growing
people, can avert disadvantage how serious
or bow long continued no man can say. Be
lieving in the soundness and moral height of
the policies now in practice and proposed by
the dominant party of to-day we can not
contemplate the upheaval of such policies as
anything short of unfortunate.
PRESS POINTERS.
Gov. Hogg of Texas has reached Bos
ton; all pork and beans jokes will be
barred during his sojourn. Lowell Citizen.
A niicroscopist says a mosquito has 22
teeth iu his sting. When somebody
counts the number of pieces iu his brass
band we shall have statistics about the
Insects which are worth knowing.
Taunton Gazette.
The United States Senate was quick
to adjourn out of respect to the memory
of President Carnot of France. Why
couldn't it also adjourn out of respect
to the people of the United States?
New Bedford Mercury.
There is but one logical inference from
all the taritt" debate and manipulation
in this congress and it is that the Mc
Kiuley tariiTis near enough right to be
let stand. Democratic exigency is on
the other side, to be sure, even that
frames a tariff on McKinley lines.
Liowen uouner.
We understand that the Democratic
voters from Vermont are going to meet
at either Waterbury or Morrisville later
in the season and excursion to the top
of Mount Mansfield in a double team.
The seats may not all be occupied, but
it will be a very pleasant trip if it don't
rain. Haid wick Gazzette.
Postmaster General Bissell's order
against the offensive partisanship of
Postmasters was not taken very ser
iously at the Vermont Democratic State
Convention, but it was probably taken
quite as seriously as Mr. Bissell ex
pected that it would be. Boston Jour
nal. From a bushel of corn a dealer gets
four gallons of whiskey, which retails
for $16. Of this the government gets
$3.60, the retailer gets $7, the distiller
gets $4, the railroad gets $1, the farmer
who raised the corn gets ten days or
more in "the cooler," and the policeman
and judge get good salaries for sending
him there. N. Y. Tribune.
"I look," said Comptroller of the Cur
rency Eckles, "for a resumption of gen
eral trade as soon as congress adjourns."
and so does every thing else. But why
in tne name ot common sense, does it
not adjourn? Since the confederacy ob
tained control congress his been the
curse of the country and the bane of
business. But since business is mostly
northern, and congress is, through a vi
olation of constitutional law, mainly
southern, the protraction of the session
is manifestly wilful and malicious.
New York Commercial Advertiser.
The law will again trv to preserve in
tact the tails of horses for their benefit.
The law means well, and it should be
enforced; but can it prevail against
rasmon ana tne wisn or gentle woman?
If women did not favor docked tails, if
they refused to use horses - sorely afflict
ed and deprived of natural glory,, legis
lation against tnis species ot cruelty
might easily command respect. . Here
is a feminine paradox: A woman will
weep over a canary that lost a leg by a
rat bite; he will nurse anxiously a bull
dog that was wounded in drinking de
light of battle with his peers; yet she
will insist on docked tails as an orna
ment to team and equipage. And she
protests wnen pnuoHopners claim tnat
she is naturally crueler than man Bos
ton Journal.
FROM EVERYDAY LIFE.
There will be no cry of lamentation
go up from the workingmen of this
country as it becomes known that the
number of emigrants leaving the United
States for Europe is as large as the num
ber ot immigrants coming to our snores.
Favors of this kind thankfully received
and credited to general depression ac
count. "Yes, sir. I'm a veteran of the army.
I am. It's well I remember them aw
ful days nigh the valley of the Cumber
land and the long and dreary marches,
with nothing to eat, whem the commis
sary waggins was slow. I've been all
through it, comrade, and no mistake."
"But, of course, the government gives
you a pension."
"i'eusion! iiawsy,no! it was joxeys
army I was with, and the gov'nment
thrun us down fur walkin' on the grass
at Washington. Chicago Record.
He was a hard-working and zealous
board school-teacher, and had just told
the class that wool comes oil' the slieep
and is made into blankets, clothing,
etc., to keep as warm in cold weather,
and he proceeded to question little Wil
lie, who had been rather inattentive
during the lesson. "Now, Willie," said
the teacher, "where does wool come
from?" "Off the bheep's back, teach
er," replied Willie. "And what then?"
inquired the teacher. Willie could not
answer. "What are these made from?"
asked the teacher touching Willie's trou
sers with the cane. "Uncle John's old
'uns," replied Willie. Tid Bits.
He thought he would learn to ride a
bicycle, and started for the outskirts of
the .village to practice. His courage
was good and he considered an instruct
or quite unnecessary. He tried to
mount, and, after hopping along as he
had seen others, made a leap for the
saddle. There was a moment's wrestle
and the bicycle was on top. Next he
got the thing by the side of a bank, got
on and started ofT with one foot while
theotherdid crank duty. The machine
was contrary; he gripped the handles
with all his might; no use; the second
attempt was a failure, but he name
down on top. Another trial was made
from the bank as before. He was mad
now, and pushed off vigorously; got a
start; went a rod or two; the wheel com
menced to wobble; he lost his seat, and
plunged headlong upon the gravel road.
Itesult: one sprained wrist; one skinned
hand; one wrenched knee; one bruised
hip. He led the machine home after
dark, thinking all the while that there
were a few things in the world he did
not yet know, and fully persuaded to
hire an ancient wheel and a teacher on
the next trip.
WAYSIDE TALK.
We have often read of t lie ideal town
of Pullman, 111., founded by George M.
Pullman. Here we had. until recently,
supposed employer and employe lived
and worked in peace and happiness..
Everybody knows that the Pullman
cars are manufactured in this town;
that the laborers are furnished with
good homes and are subject to certain
restrictions. We. fancied that if we
were a mechanic, Pullman would be
just the place for us. It is not strange,
perhaps, under this illusion, that we
were surprised to hear of a strike there.
It seems that the Pullman company
has been losing money of late,- like
many other corporations, and deter
mined to cut the wages of employes
and otherwise reduce expenses. The
company offered to prove by their books
mat tney were iorcea to take tnis step..
Their employes did not have confi
dence in this plan and wanted to arbi
trate. The company said there
was nothing to arbitrate; that
they ' must reduce wages or close.
A strike was the result, and the
daily pay roll of $7000, or $2.33 a man,
on the average, ceased. This was the
beginning of the present labor troubles
which are absorbing the attention of
the country.
If the strike had been confined to
Pullman it would have been of little
consequence to the outside world, which
is accustomed to such proceedings
Unfortunately, the sympathetic strike
came into play. The Pullman strikers
called vipon the American Railway
Union of Switchmen to refuse to handle
Pullman cars. The Union acceded to
their demand and war commenced. It
was a very unjust move for the Union
to make, for the railroads lease the
Pullman cars and are forced by con
tract to pay for them w hether they use
them or not. The loss in boycotting
them does not fall upon the makers,
but upon the railroads. Thus the fight .
is really transferred from the Pullman
company and their employes, whose,
trouble it was, to the railroads and their
employes, whose own' relations up to
this time were friendly. It seems par
ticularly unwise that 50,000 men satis
factorily employed should quit work
because asked to do so by 3000 men who
did not think they were properly paid;
especially when they were employed,
by different corporations on entirely
different work. This is the second
chapter and finds all the principal roads
of the west , and northwest moving
trains w ith greatest difficulty. Passen
ger service is interrupted, pensnabJe
freight destroyed, and there is general ,
demoralization in all shipping interests.
The General Managers' association:
takes a firm stand, and although their
roads are losing hundreds of thousands
of dollars a day, propose to run their
own affairs in their own way. The
B resident of the American Railway
fnion now declares boycott on all the
roads represented by the Managers' as
sociation, and calls upon engineers,
firemen and brakemen to join the
strike. There are 20 railroads involved
and the struggle for mastery will be a
hard one. It would seem to us that
the victory must be with the railroads,
for certainly there never has been any
reasonable ground for a strike. The
sympathy of the public is with the
managers and it is confidently expected
that they will win. There are idle
men enough to take the places of the
strikers provided they could work with
out fear of bodily harm. Militia has
been called into service again, and very
likely the government . troops will be if
the United States mail trains are
stopped from making regular schedule :
runs.
All this from the Pullman strike,
which amounts to nothing in compar
ison with the great struggle which it
has brought about. There will be more
than the usual amount of suffering con
nected with these labor troubles, but
we hope that the State and United
States authorities will act promptly
and vigorously in keeping order, and
in moving the mail trains. If these
trains run and carry Pullman sleepers,
the collapse of the strike will soon
come.
Admiral Farragut's old flagship, the
Hartford, is to be put into commission
again. This is good news and will be
hailed with delight by all true Ameri
can citizens. Since the loss of the Kear
sarge the Hartford is the only one of the
famous wooden frigates of the navy
which under the law may be retained
for use regardless of the cost of repairs.
She is to have new boilers and modern
armament and will probably be assigned
to duty in the South and Central Paci
fic ocean when refitted. The naval ap
propriation bill contains the necessary
items for repairs which will be com
menced at Mare Island, Cal., where the
Hartford now is, as soon as the presi
dent approves it. We hope no such
disaster is in store for the Hartford as -befel
the Kearsage; long life to the re
juvinated old frigate.
It seems after all that Boss Croker
just took a run across the Atlantic in
the interest of Tammany; not to escape
the Luxow investigating committee. At
least latest reports say so. He felt that
he must place his hand in Whitney's,
Cleveland's ex-secretary of the navy.
Aud what for? Only to induce him to
become the Democratic candidate for
governor of New York or, if he would .
not smile at that whispering, to get his
good will aud sympathy. Possibly his
money is needed to help some other fel
low w'ho is willing to pull the Demo
cratic boat in such a current of oppo
sition as has set in this year. Croker
gets back just in time. The investiga
ting committee has adjourned, and the
boss will lay out the work to save Tam
many's skin. The better element in
New York is trying hard to down the
ring and it is doubtful if any manipula
tions of the bravest of the braves can
save this rotten organization. Never
theless, we'll just look about as Croker
comes in.

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