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Bellows Falls times. [volume] (Bellows Falls, Vt.) 1856-1965, July 05, 1894, Image 2

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BELLOWS FALLS TBEES, JULY ,5 1894.
NEW ENGLAND NEWS.
MAINE.
Albert G. Tenney, the oldest editor
in the state of Maine, died Friday. He
had 58 years in editorial work.
William It. Walker, clerk at the
Moosehead Inu, aged 19, was drowned
in Moonehead Lake, while canoe Bail
ing Friday evening. He belonged in
liucksport.
George S. Leighton ia under arrest at
Portland on complaint of the postoitice
authorities for stealing a registered let
ter in Vermont. He says he belongs in
New Haven, but has relatives in Port
land. Holding a picnic in a cemetery may
Beera a rather grewsome festivity, but
it worked happily in the town of Tem
ple, the other day. All hands took
hold and beautified the grounds, and
the cemetery picnic was so successful
that it will be repeated uextyear.
Prof. George Colby Chase, who has
fceen chosen president of Bates college,
comes of an old New England family
-which sprang from one of the signers of
the Declaration of independence, we
has for more than 20 years been con
nected with the college of which he has
now been chosen president, and has
done a splendid work for the institu
tion, lie has devoted himself chiefly
to the -English department, and has al-
so taught Ureek and Latin. He is a
diligent student, and has given much
Etudy to educational methods.
NEW : HAMPSHIRE.
Wednesday morning 86 members of
the senior class of Dartmouth college
received their diplomas from the hand
of President Tucker. The graduating
exercises, which were the 125th of the
institution, were held in the college
cnurcn. JN ever before has so large an
audience witnessed a Dartmouth com
mencement.
All the workmen in the department
of steam engineering at the Kitterv
navy yard, Portsmouth, were suspend
ed Saturday afternoon and a number of
men in the department of yards and
docks were discharged. No discharge
or clerks and skilled laborers took place
as was expected, ine yard is practi
cally closed, but it is thought that it
will be reopened in a short time.
Two burglars entered the jewelry
store and postoflice at Bristol kept by
j. Jti. rroctor, inursday nignt. As
they approached the safe they were
fired upon by a clerk named Eastman,
who slept in the store. The shot hit
one of the men, but both ran to the door
and turning, fired at Eastman, but
missed him. The burglars fled to New
Hampton and stole a team, with which
they are now traveling. It is believed
that one of them was hit by Eastman
and badly wounded.
Arthur W. Porter, holder of the
world's record of 2.06 for class A, one
mile cycle riding and the acknowledged
champion of his class, was notified last
weeK tnai ne naa oeen piacea in crass
B, no reason being given. Porter will
make a vigorous protest, as he claims
he can prove that he bought and paid
for his own wheel and never received a
cent for riding. Similar notice of trans
fer to class B has been served on Wil.
liams, Bobinson, Haggerty and Seavry,
all in the foremost ranks of class A.
This includes all the riders of the
Waltham cycle club's racing team,
which had claimed the championship
of America.
CONNECTICUT.
Small-pox is spreading in Litchfield
county.
The Collins ax company ofCollins
ville, employing 700 men, has shut
down indefinitely.
The new New Haven city directory
published yesterday gives JNew Haven
a population of 103,000.
The supreme court of errors of Con
necticut finds that Yale students under
the age of 21 cannot be held responsible
for bills contracted during tneir minor
ity.
Hermann Denabaugh, a New Britain
baker, was assaulted by two unknown
men Friday morning and beaten so
seriously he cannot recover. The w
sailants escaped.
The commencement exercises at Yale
college took place last week. Four
hundred and ninety-seven studenty re
ceived diplomas. This number is near
ly 100 larger than any previous gradua
ting class at Yale.
Under the will of William Walter
Phelps $50,000 is to be added to a like
sum left by Mr. Phelps' father to Yale
university, and the whole to be used
for the erection of a building on the
campus. The estate is valued at7,000,-
000.
Presiding Elder Tirrell of the Nor
wich District of the New England
Southern Conference has issued an or
der to the Bev. E. L. Thrope of Hart
ford directing him to discontinue hold
ing services in the East Hartford Mem
orial chapel after next Sunday. The
occasion of this was a complaint entered
by the Burnside Methodist church
which alleges that the East Hartford
society is drawing members and patron
age from the Burnside church. Next
Sunday Dr. Thorpe will explain the
reasons occasioning the discontinuance
of these services. Dr. Thrope is a very
popular minister. He is also a chaplain
of the Putnam Phalanx.
BLUE WINS.
Yale Flayed Hone with Harvard
in the Race.
Under the rowing conditions declared
by the Harvard coachers most favorable
for the success of their crew, Yale left
the crimson oarsmen more than 17
lengths behind on the four-mile course
down the Thames Thursday night. A
gentle breeze, a calm sea and a flood
tide were what the Harvard navy asked
for and their prayer was answered,
yielding their representative eight the
most signal and indefensible defeat
since Capt. Stevenson's boys in blue
established the American intercolle
giate record over the same water in
1888.
A quarter of a mile lead is margin
which makes any boat race dull, unlets
a record goes down in the struggle, and
Yale feels doubtful as to whether con
gratulations are in order or not after
such a contest.
The Yale coachers are nearly as sour
after the exhibition of oarsmanship
given as if the blue had lost, and assert,
almost to a man, that another similar
performance will kill rowing in Eastern
colleges.
Thirty thousand people saw the race,
and that figure is at least the average,
if not the maximum; for a Yale-Harvard
'varsity struggle on the Thames.
The crowd was thoroughly cosmopoli
tan m cnaracter. JNeitner college
seemed interested enougn to send a
good delegation.
VERMONT.
Conductor Drew of St. Johnsbury in
dicted for railroad manslaughter, was
on Thursday acquitted by a jury after
feeing out nearly 24 hours.
. Mrs. Lottie Baker of Montgomery
strangled her four children, aged seven,
live, three and one year, Saturday,
whity, as is supposed, under the intiu-(
ence of morphine. .She' is now a the
county jail in St. Albaiis. ... j..
1 There are now 119 prisoners at the
Jfcouse of correction at Rutland and only
76 cells for their accommodation. Beds
are set up in various parts of the' insti
tution for prisoners serving short sen
tences. The report of the house of cor
rection for the past two years shows 805
commitments, which is the largest
number since the institution has been
built.
The Morrisville News and Citizen
eays: An averaged sized calf skin laid
upon the floor takes up a space of about
3x5 feet. At this rate, 125,000 skins
-would cover about thirty acres. Graci
ous, what a carpet this would be! And
yet ex-Gov. Page's sales of green calf
skins for the two weeks ending June 20
were more than 125,000 skins, with
Jaelirly 2000 heavy hides thrown in.
Allowing 4000 skins or 400 hides to the
carload, they would make up a train of
35 cars. Again, allowing u skins to tne
foot, they would make a stack 1562 feet
high, of the calf skins alone, without
counting the hides. Who says Hyde
Park is not a booming town on green
calf skins?
RHODE ISLAND.
By the gift of 525,000 by Lewis W.
Anthony of Providence the completion
of a new building for the Cobb divinity
school at Lewiston, Me., is assured.
Detectives Parker of Providence and
O'Day of Worcester are looking for
Frank Moulton, alias llev. William B.
Snow, who is wanted in Worcester for
forgery, at the instance ot tney,uinsiga
mond national . bank. He obtained
$1800 on a check that was worthless. .
VERMONT INVENTORS.
MASSACHUSETTS.
The petition for a receiver for the
Gape Cod ship canal company was de
nied in the supreme court at iioston
Saturday. ,
The senate Friday afternoon passed
the Meigs elevated railroad bill to be
engrossed 27 to 10. The bill now goes
to the house for concurrence.
A riot occurred at the state prison at
Charlestown last week, and Joseph
Cakes, a convict, was accidentally shot
by Officer Donovan and died in a short
tune.' umeers were cauea irom isosion
and the riot was quickly quelled.
The commencement exercises of Har
vard college took place last week. In
all. 721 degrees, exclusive of the hon
orary degrees, were conferred. The day
also marked President Eliot's 25th year
of service at the head of the university.
The Boston Herald learns that Moody
Merrill, Boston's missing financier and
trustee, who left his many creditors
with a highly complicated condition of
affairs to unravel, is now living in Chi
huahua, Mexico, where he was recently
married. His bride was Hester Clpri
co, of a Spanish line which came in
with Cortez.
Judge Colt of the United States cir
cuit court, Thursday, in the case of
Shebaito Saito, the Japanese, who made
application in court to become a citizen
of the United States, decided against
the petition. The judge finds that, like
the Chinese, the Japanese do not come
within the term, "white persons," as
presented in the naturalization laws of
the United States. This is the first
sa.se of the kind ever brought before a
United States court.
Arthur B. Hutchinson, son of Boston
attorney, was arrested Friday charged
with embezzlement. The charge is
brought by Delia E. I). Jenkins of Ches
ter Vt., with wnoin nutcninsoii warn
ed 'for sometime about 1891. He did
Home business for her aud it is alleged
agreed to deposit for her 158 in the
five cent savines bank in Boston. This
Rhe c laims he failed to do, aud she
roused his arrest on the charge of em
bezzling the sum. He was granted a
continuance until August 1 aud gave
Fruitful ia the - Development of
Great Inventions.
From article by Gov. Fuller in "Men
of Vermont" just issued by Tran
script Publishing company of Brattle
boro. In many respects the state of Ver
mont has been as fruitful in the devel
opment of great inventions as it has
been unique in otner interesting pnases
of American history. A few of the
wonderful deeds of Vermonters areiere
reoorded and their rightful place in the
progress of a century pointed out. Dur
ing the century there were 600,000 in
ventions patented in the United States,
of which nearly 4000 have been granted
to Vermonters, upward of 1000 of these
being the first of their class. Many of
them have indeed been important and
controlling, even revolutionizing, de
partments of industry; but in many in
stances important inventions were
never patented.
How came the inventions and im
provements of the century to be made?
They were not conceived or born in the
patent office at Washington, or in any
government bureau, mucn less orougnt
forward by the order of any public
official. They were of an impelling
force, far dinereut in its nature,
strength and magnitude; a force that
had its source in that spirit born of
freedom of thought, unfettered hands
and unbounded opportunities; a force
that has carved a nation out of the for
est, and made the prairie and the desert
to blossom as the rose; that has pre-
served to us freedom, and given to the
nation prosperity individual responsi
bility and opportunity witn govern-
mental care only so tar as is necessary
to secure this in its largest and noblest
sense.
Thus we see, up among the fertile
valleys of our little state, and among
the green hills, where live a hardy,
thrifty and self-reliant people, left to
carve out their own fame and fortune.
the ordinary citizen has grappled with
the most important inventions of the
age, has solved successfully the me
chanical aud industrial problems of the
century, reaping, in many instances, a
fair reward with unusual distinction,
many with gratifying honors.
Sold "Perfume Plants."
, From Chicago Tribune.
"Speaking of street fakirs," said the
tall man of the party, "I used to know
a fellow in Lawrence, Kan., who was
the king of the crowd. He could make
money out of anything. A block of
common soap was worth many dollars
to mm as a grease eradicator or some
thing of the kind, and for an outlay of
a few cents he could turn pockets full
of cash.
"One day this young fellow came to
me and asked me in a mysterious man
ner to go into a loft with him. I went,
and there found one of the most ingen
ious outfits I ever saw or heard of for
doing' a gullible community. This is
what the outfit was:
"There were 100 small cloth bags.
each filled with wet bran. In each bag
was planted a cucumber seed. Under
the warmth and dampness these seeds
would soon sprout, aud then my youug
inend would take each bag and dip it
into a tub' tilled with highly perfumed
water. Then the small flat leaves which
first sprout would be carefully taken ofT,
leaving the next leaves,' which are
rough and wrinkled and do not bear
such strong evidence of identity. Then
the hundred bags with their sprouts
would be put in boxes and carefully
carried to some 'jay' town, where my
young friend would actually get fifty
cents apiece lor them as 'perlume
plants.'
"The plan was worked by him suc
cessfully a number of times, and he al
ways managed to get away without be
ing injured. He was a fluent talker
and always disposed ot his 'perlume
plants' in an easy manner. Then, as
persons who have been caught atAji
such 'sucker' game do not ca"f to
'squeal ' his chances of detection were
reduced to a minimum.
The Difference.
From the Detroit Free Press.
"Life is a mighty river," began the
gentleman who was to deliver an ad
dress to the messenger boys.
"Us messenger boys ain't that kind,'
interrupted one oi the Kids.
"Why not?" asked the speaker with
a smile.
"Cause rivers runs," and the other
boya gave a unanimous second to th
comrade's motion.
Novel Illustration.
A revolution in n-wsraner illustration
mav be experts! as a result of the enterprise
of the Boston Journal in employing photn-
jrrapnic pictures jne ourni wait certain
that success count le made with them ami as
a result of perfecunir the process the Sunday
Journal now is pietoriuiiy, as in otner re
spects, a most interesting and original paper.
During the coining summer particular atten
tion is to be paid to printtug photographs of
Sew England scenes. Portraits of promi
nent people are also to be published, giving
to the Illustrated Supplement of the Journal
the same features mat maR Harper':
Weekly so popular, while the other pages
vi:
Don't be
Deceived
t By those who offer sub
stitutes for Cottolene.
Its success has been so
phenomenal thatnumer-
rme imitahnnc arp nrtxxr
ibeing offered which ares'
I claimed to be, "just as
good. All these
Imitations
lack the intrinsic merit of
Cottolene and will prove
disappointing and disa
greeable to those who use
mjt, them. These counterfeits
, ainerwiaeiy irom cotto
lene and are mere
Experiments
when compared to the
TT. 1 v 1 i t. r-i.
jjjjf leiiauiesiiunening voi-
7 toiene. oave monev, an-.
noyance and your health
by refusing all substitutes
offered to take the place
of Cottolene.
Sold In three and five pound palls. .
Made only by
The
tN.K.Fairbanlr.i
Company,
Caicnco,
f 224 State St., Boston.
Portland, Me.
W. L Douglas
53 SHOE
IS THE BEST.
NO SQUEAKING.
5. CORDOVAN,
i rtnvnuiCIVWCLLt.lWLr.
4.$3.s? FlNECAlf&kHNBAROl
3.5P P0LICE.3 Soles.
$2s?.2.W0RKINGMfn
extra fine. u'
2.l.7s Boys'SchodlShoes.
LADIES
otMJ rUK LAIALUuUh
WL DOUGLAS,
BROCKTON. AIAS3.
Voa con Hn mnnrr by purchasing W. L..
Ionaia Shoes,
Because, -we are the largest manufacturers ol
advertised shoea in the world, and guarantee
the value by stamping the name and price oa
the bottom, which protects you against high
prices and the middleman's profits. Our shoes
equal custom work in style, easy fitting ani
wearing qualities. We have them sold evervj
where at lower prices for the value given thaH
any oiuer maw. Take no substitute. It yout
ucaier caunoi supply you, we can. bold Dy
HARRIMAN & ROCHE.
AYER'S
Hair Vigor
i fnAMTI A
yvot-fwv.y
'GROWTHS
" l-M
Prevents
BALDNESS
REMOVES DANDRUFF
AND
Restores Color
T0
Faded and Cray
HABR
THE
Best Dressing
LIgrowthV
l-H AND JQ-J
7$OLo9cy
HUMPHREYS'
Nothing has ever been produced to
equal or compare with Humphreys'
Witch Eazel Oil as a curative and
healing application. It has been
used 40 years and always affords relief
and always gives satisfaction.
It Cures Pii.es or Hemorrhoids, External
or Internal, Blind or Bleeding Itching and
Burning; Cracks or Fissures and Fistulas.
Relief immediate cure certain.
It Cures Burns, Scalds and Ulceration and
Contraction from Burns. - Relief instant.
It Cures Torn, Cut and Lacerated
Wounds and Bruises.
It Cures Boils, Hot Tumors, Ulcers, Old
Sores, Itching Eruptions, Scurfy or Scald
Head. It is Infallible.
It Cures Inflamed or Caked Breasts
and Sore Nipples. It is invaluable.
It Cures Salt Rheum, Tetters, Scurfy
Eruptions, Chapped Hands, Fever Blisters,
Sore Lips or Nostrils, Corns and Bunions,
Sore and Chafed Feet, Stings of Insects.
Three Sizes, 25c, 50c. and $1.00.
Sold by Druggists, or sent post-paid on receiptor price.
HUMPHREYS UKD. CO., Ill lit WllUira St., New York.
WITCH HAZEL OIL
I Drink '"7"
I WILLIAMS' -
1
Root Beer.
It is made from the best
roots and herbs. Easily
and cheaply made at home.
Improves the appetite, and
" aids digestion. An unri
vailed temperance drink.
Healthful, toaming, lus
cious. One bottle of extract
makes 5 gals. Get it sure.
Send 2-cont.stnmp for pictures.
Williams A Carle-ton, Hartford, Ct
EATON & NORWOOD
HARDWARE,
COAL,
LIME,
CEMENT,
. PAINTS,
OILS,
VARNISHES,
GLASS, Etc.
v MILL SUPPLIES.
Eaton & Norwood
Bellows Falls, - Vermont.
Telephone Call 16-2.
WHIST PROBLEM.
N
Hearts 8, 7
Clubs A, 2
Diamonds J, S
-
Spades Q, 7
Clubs J, 8 A
Diamonds Q,7
Hearts trumps
o to ieaa jn
and S to win all
tricks.
S. S. WASHER,
Baker.
Telephone 16-2.
Spades J, 6
Clubs 8
Diamonds 10,
8, 6
CENTRAL VT. RAILROAD
Time Table corrected to May 6, 18M. Train
111 leave Bellows FallM diiilv ex cent Sua
days unless otherwise uuted, as follows:
GOING KOKTU RUTLAND DIV.: '
fi.15 a. m. MIXED for Butlaml and intermed
iate stations.
12.20 p. m. BOSTON MAIL, for Rutland, Bur-
miKUm, sc. A I Dana, Montreal ; ulso, Ogueus
burg and the West.
2.05 p.m. GREEN MOUNTAIN FLYER for
ciittsler, J.udlow, Kutlnnd, ilurungtoa, tit.
Albans, and Montreal. Connects for all
points West via Montreal. Through i'arlor
Curs. Pullman l'alace Sleeping Car, Essex
Junction to Chicago without change.
7.30 p.m. LOCAL EXPRESS for Rutland,
and intermediate Btatlons.
11.15 p. m. Night Express for Montreal, Og-
(lensDurgand the west. Through Sleeper
for Montreal.
NORTH GOING via SULLIVAN RAILROAD
8.O0 a. m. MIXED, for White River Junction.
12.10 p. m. EXPRESS MAIL, for White River
.i unction, Montpeller, itarre, St. Albans,
M alone, Ogdensburg, Montreal, and all
points West.
2.Mp. m. FAST EXPRESS, for White River
Junction, Aiontpelier, Itarre, Burlington, St.
Albans, Montreal, Chicago and all Western
points.
0.10 p. in. PASSENGER, for WhlU River
junction.
11.10p. m. NIGHT EXPRESS, for White
Jtivev junction, Montpelier, Burlington,
St. Albans, Ogdensburg, Montreal, Chicago,
and points West. Wagner Sleeping Car,
Bellows Falls to Montreal. (Runs daily,
Sundays included) to Montreal.
TRAINS ARRIVE AT BELLOWS FALLS:
1T2.20 a. m. Night Express from Montreal,
Ogdensburg and the West via Rutland.
4.48 a. in. NIGHT EXPRESS, from Montreal
via White River Junction,
8.25.a. m. . LOCAL EXPRESS from Rutland.
22 a.m. LOCAL EXPRESS, from White
River Junction.
1.17 p. m. EXPRESS MAIL, from St. Albans
aud all points ou Central Division.
1.25 p.m. EXPRESS MAIL, from St. Albans
ana all points on Rutland Division.
3.52 p.m. LIMITED EXPRESS, from Mon.
treal and ogdensburg, via White River
Junction.
3.55 p. m. GREEN MOUNTAIN h LYER, from
Montreal, via Kutland.
7.15 p. m. MIXED, from White River Junc
tion. 7.00 p. m. MIXED, from Rutland.
F. Wr. BALDWIN, Gen. Supt.
S. W. CUMMINGS, Gen. Pass. Agent.
Daily. ITDaily except Monday.
s
Spades 10, 9
Clubs 10
Diamonds A, K, 9
The correct solution to this problem may be
aau on application at my omce.
S. S. Washer.
Having just newly furnished my bakery
inrougnout wiin me latest improvements, etc.
am now able to 1111 all orders, old fashioned
home made, fresh or stale, fastidious or other
wise, cheerfully and with dlBiiatch.
Bread, Buns, Rolls, Doughnuts, Cookies of all
kinds, very best line of Cakes, Pies, etc.
Our competitors have come often and been
many, but have one by one dropped behind,
while we are still at the "old Btand." smllinar and
shall continue to give our trade the "cream" and
iuu cents value lor a dollar.
Telephone Call 16-2.
F
OR FINE PRINTING
GO TO THE TIMES OFFICE.
Hoi:, Did You Say !
Well 1 Why need you roast and swelter when you could just drop
into the BLUE STORE and get some of that Light Clothing and keep
cool. Coats selling from 50c to $2.50.
THE FOURTH will soon be here and you need a new SUIT
Come and see how we can use you.
We are going to offer some extra bargains this week. Now is the
time to buy.
Our friends, the Jews, could not stand the pressure. They could
not find any dupes; so they strike their tent, like the Arabs, and si
lently steal away.
We especially call your attention this week to our line of Straw
Hats. .
The Blue Store,
. Bellows Falls, Vermont.
1 PIERCE'S PHARMACY.
i& Telephone 17 2. Bellows Falls, June 28, 1894. &
K.M ... , . - - ,. , , . V A
m
p
Don't forget that we keep a full line of Family Remedies.
PAREGORIC, CAMPHOR,
CASTOR OIL, WITCH HAZEL,
CARBOLIC ACID, AMMONIA.
These goods are all warranted to be of first quality and
guaranteed satisfactory.
Insect Powder, Hellebore, Fly Paper, Beer Extracts.
I
'' '-i
Pierce's Pharmacy. J. F. Tierce, Ph. G. Chester Drug Store, F. W. Pierce
" Bellows Falls. Vt. Chester: Vt.
A '' O :' : A A V . tf ..: f v ..." .A
FITCHBURG RAILROAD.
FAST EXPRESS TRAINS
With elegant PALACE PARLOR and SLEEP
1NG CARS to aud from
BOSTON and CHICAGO,
and
BOSTON and ST. LOUIS,
NIAGARA1 FALLS
Without change.
1 PASSENGER TRAINS
On and after JInv 27, 1804, leave Bellow a
Falls for
Boston, Worcester and Providence,
as follows :
2Q fl h M Express with Sleeping Car.
0U SKt I'll Runs daily except Mondays.
Due In Boston at 7-00 a. m.
J" .Ti nn Accommodation to Fitch
U'4U A. 11. buvg, Express to Boston, due
at 9.45 a in.
8 Of! A M Accommodation to Fitch-
OU n. III. burg, Express to Boston, due
at 1.40 p. m.
1r Q M Accommodation vrith Parlor
,r0 r III. Car to Fitehburg, Express to
Boston, due at 5.48 p. nx.
3 00 M SUNDAYS OXLY. Due at
,UU r. III. Boston at 7.08 p. m.
4(1(1 D M "ust Express vc-ith Parlor Car
iUU I 111. due at Boston at 7.35 p. m.
Time tables and further information on ap
plication to
H. C. JOHXSON,
Ticket Agt., Bellows Falls
3. R. WATSON, Gen. Pass. Agt., Boston.
BOSTON & MAINE R. R.
Connecticut River Division.
PASSENGER TRAINS GOING SOUTH.
A. M. A. M. P. M. P. M.
Lv. Bellows Falls 4.50 8.30 1.25 3.55
Brattleboro 5.80 9.22 2.12 4.36
So. Vernon 5.50 9.45 2.35 4.55
Greenfield 6.20 10.10 3.02 5.20
SpriiiKtleld 7.50 11.45 4.3C 6.33
New Haven 9.35 1.35 7.10 8.10
Arrive New York 11.33 3.30 9.00 10.00
A. M. P. M. P. M. P. M.
PASSENGER TRAINS GOING NORTH.
Leave Bellows Falls 8.00 a. m., (Mixed),
12.10, 2.52, 11.10 p. in.
Arrive Windsor at 10.30 a. m., (Mixed), 1.00,
3.35, 7.00, 6.10, 11.59 p. m.
PASSENGER TRAINS FROM THE SOUTH.
A. M
Lv. New York nt
New Haven at
Springfield at
Greenfield at
Brattleboro at
Arr. Bellows Falls
A. M.
8.00
10.10
12.15
1.22
2.10
2.49
P. M.
A. M.
11.00
1.05
3.00
4.25
6.20
6.05
P. M.
P. M.
4.00
5.52
8.15
9.25
10.20
11.00
P. M.
" 6.40
9.15
10.22
11.10
11.55
A. M.
PASSENGER TRAINS FROM THE NORTH.
Leave Windsor at 4.05, 7.25 a. m 12.25, 3.08,
5.40 p.m. (Mixed).
Arrive at Bellows Falls 4.48, 8.22 a. m., 1.17,
3.52, 7.15 p. in. (Mixed).
Daily.
D.J. FLANDERS, Gen. Pass. Ag't.
January 21st, 1894.
PAGE'S DYE HOUSE
THE SPRING HAS COME
And with it the natural return from
dark, sombre tones of color to some
thing clear, bright and cheerful. There
are lots of ladies' and gents' nice gar
ments that only require the skilled
Dyer and Cleaner to be restored to
their original pristine condition, at a
small percentage of their original cost.
This is done with certainty at "Page's
Dye House," as several hundreds of
people in this vicinity can testify.
Any article of Personal AVsar, or
Draperies, Bugs, Carpets, Portieres,
Curtains, etc., can be made solidly
serviceable at an almost nominal charge
of their original cost, without sending
to Boston or anywhere. Let us en
courage our home people and help the
new industries that live among us.
PAGE'S DYE HOUSE
BELLOWS FALLS, VT.
bail.
carry tue news.

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