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Bellows Falls times. [volume] (Bellows Falls, Vt.) 1856-1965, May 14, 1903, Image 1

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It Costs No More than
Others, Yet Contains
MORR LOCAL, NEWS,
MOBU STATE NEWS,
MOKti UEMCHAL HEADING.
Guaranteed Circulation
3000 Copies Weekly.
11 ime
TEN PAGES.
VOL. XLV1II., NO 20.
BELLOWS FALLS, VT., THURSDAY, MAY 14,
1903.
FIVE CENTS A COPY.
LARGEST PAP13R
IN..
Windham or Windsor
Counties.
None Larger In Cheshire or
Sullivan Counties.
BeHlows
ell
STYI F. n(1MF(1RT.
These are the three most important Shoe Considera
tions. We keep each of them constantly in mind, and
if youbuy of us you'll be sure of all of them. We are
always ready with the latest styles, our large stock in
sures a fit for every foot and our big and wisa buying
saves money for us and you. So when you want any
thing in the shoe line, no matter what, call and see us.
Meanwhile we are cleaning up all odds and ends and
broken lines at ridiculously low prices. If you look
them over you might find a dollar, for a dollar saved is
better than one earned.
J. T. KEEFE,
WE REPAIR SHOES.
Fishing
Before buying we have a fine
line we would be pleased to
show you s g S
SPLIT BflMBO POLES $1.00. STEEL RODS, $4.50
Baskets, Reels, Lines,
Hooks, Bait Boxes, Sinkers.
Shakespaere Revolution and Phantom Baits,
Drinking Cups. Buy a Fish Scale and tell a good
story.
Howard Hardware Co.
A
COPYRIGHT tssf t"
for example, I can sell you a genuine Rubber Trim
med Harness, all hand stitched and No i oak tanned
leather for $20, just think of it. Does it pay to take chances?
I can sell you any grade and give you the best line in
the state to choose from.
W. G. PARKER.
SUCCESSOR TO. KIMBALL CARRIAGE CO., BRANCH.
CANAL
Nothing Better Than the Best !
BARRE GRANITE IS THE STANDARD.
The claim often is made for other Granites that they are as good as
Barre, but never that they are better. You are told it is dearer. That is
not so. It may cost at times a little more, but the final result makes it the
cheapest. Barre Granite not only is the BEST but also the CHEAPEST
C. D. SWASEY & CO.
Office and Works Opposite Mlg., Barre Granite and
C. V. Station, Barre, Vt. General Line of Cemetery Work
Refrigerators
A NEW
Prices range, from $12 to $15.
OIL STOVES, most complete line ever carried in
Saxtons River. Prices range from 65c to $15.
We wish to call your attention to the complete line of
Lisk's Tin and foui -coated Enamel Ware.
WASH BOILERS, $1.75 to $3.50. Our line
was never so complete as now.
OUR GROCERY DEPARTMENT.
The public well knows that our grades of Groceries,
Fruit and confectionery are the best. We shall endeavor in
the future to give our patrons prompt attention in this line.
We shall appreciate your continued patronage.
FAY S. FULLER,
SUCCESSOR TO SIMONDS & FULLER, SAXTONS RIVER, VT.
FMNflMY. S
Bellows Falls, Vt
Tackle ! !
Poor Harness
May be the cause
1 of your death
sometime if it is subjected to
rough treatment. It simply won't
stand the strain. . The best is
the cheapest in the end too, now
ST. i. '
v y
o o
LINE,
Bellows Falls Times
Til L USD AY, MAY 14, 1903.
THE ASH BARREL ELIMINATED.
Charter of King Solomon's Lodge Not
Found Therein General Butterficld
Arises to Explain.
Derby Line, Vt., May 12.
Editor Times:
Having been a reader or subscriber of
your paper (particularly the latter) for
more than 40 years I naturally noticed
the article in your last issue headed
"Masonic Consolidation," and was very
much surprised in reading the same, at
the reference to the charter of King Sol
onion's lodge as having been found in an
ash barrel by my mother. Indeed,
wonder that the tiue story of the finding
of that charter is not so well known
Bellows Falls that such a mistake could
not have occurred.
With your permission I will give
brief statement of the circumstances
which, no doubt, can be found in full de
tail among the records of King Solo
mon's lodge: bomethmg like 20 years
ago or more Mrs. Benjamin Smith of
Saxtons River, widow of the late Benja
min Smith, a former prominent Mason
in our parts, said to me that she had a
small trunk, which had been-confided to
her by -her husband, many years before,
for safe keeping and it was her recollec
tion that it was said to contain Masonic
valuables and that she had for a long
time felt that it ought to be opened by
some member of the Masonic fraternity,
that whatever it might contain should
be returned to the proper custodians.
Xone of her sons or her daughters' hus
bands, however, were members of the
Masonic order and it remained to the
next generation to find someone with
whom she could talk, freely about such
matters. The writer having married a
grauddaughter, and having been known
as a zealous Mason, was selected for this
confidence. I immediately appointed a
time when I would come to her house
and open the box in her presence and.
having done so, found that it contained
the original charter and records of King
Solomon's lodge; lost at the time "of the
"Morgan excitement." r
Although, at that time, I had become
a member of the Lodge of the Temple,
I was very glad to be the messenger of
good tidings to King Solomon's lodge,
where I had originally received the Ma
sonic degrees. The lodge was very much
aroused and expressed the liveliest feel
ings of gratitude and respect towards
this aged Uidy, who had .prt served so
long the valuables of the order and had
been the means of restoring them at last
to the lodge, where they belonged.
A committee was immediately appoint
ed by the worshipful master to wait up
on Mrs. Smith and arrange for a day
when they should go in a body to her
residence and receive, at her hands, these
valuable treasures. A day was accord
ingly set and the lodge in a body visited
her at her residence and received from
her the charter and records of the lodge.
As a testimony of their high apprecia
tion of her sterling worth and integrity
they, at the same time, presented her,
on behalf of the lodge, with a very beau
tiful and valuable silver tea service, suit
ably engraved with a legend perpetuat
ing the memory of the occasion. All
these things, as I above said, will prob
ably be found in detail in the archives of
the lodge. '
I would further like to add an incident
growing out of this which occurred to
me in Washington, D. C. At a great
meeting of the grand lodge I was called
upon at the banquet, by the grand mas
ter, to make some remarks and in reply
ing told the story of my grandmother's
preserving the charter and records of my
old lodge. The entire audience was very
enthusiastic and passed an official vote
of thanks and a set of resolutions which
were engraved and sent to Mrs. Smith,
and a copy placed on file in the records
of the grand lodge of the District of
Columbia. . : .
I trust that this brief occount of the
manner in which the charter was discov
ered will refresh the minds of your read
ers and that no one will ever again think
that any, of eifher my own or my wife's
ancestors would make it possible that
such things could be found in an ash
barrel. Yours sincerely.
F. i. BVTTF.KFIEI.D.
A Protest from Athens.
! The article in the Times of May 7,
"Vermont Quarantine Raised," has
created quite a breeze in this locality.
Proper questions at this time may be:
Why are towns in which the foot and
and month disease does not now and
never has existed, included in the list of
those from which cattle, sheep, swine,
etc., can not be removed or moved with
out a permit from a designated official?
If the inspector mentioned as being Io
cnted at Chester is called upon to inspect
and issue permit to move or remove
stock from a town, who pays the bill?
If I own buildings and land in one town
and a pasture in an adjoining town,
which I use as a cow pasture and am
obliged to drive my cows in the high
way for a short distance in both towns
as they go to , and from pasture, must I
have a man drive from Chester, twelve
miles away, and examine my herd and
give me a permit before I can move said
cows from my buildings'? If I have
cows, fat cattle or calves to sell and par
ties in Townsheud or Rockingham are
ready to buy, must I call upon the in
spector to come and examine this stock
and give me a permit to remove this
stock to one of these towns, when I, the
man to whom I sell and every one who
lives upon the road to be traveled over,
knows that this stock is free from the
disease and that the disease does not
now and has not existed in the town
where I live for 30 years at least and no
one remembers that there was ever a case
in town? The matter of inspection is in
the hands of one man and he in all prob
ability is a stranger to the locality and
conditions. He says keep your stock at
home they may have the disease by to
morrow. I have known about Athens,
Townshend and Rockingham for 35 years
and I never knew of a case of foot and
mouth disease in either town during
that time. There is many a farmers in
these towns whose income is almost
wholly derived from his cows and their
products. When you deprive him of the
right to sell these cows and products
you deprive him of the wherewith to
buy the necessaries of life and are treat
ing him unjustly. I believe in all neces
sary precaution but when a town is lo
cated at least 12 miles from where the
disease has been and entirely away from
any road that diseased cattle may have
traveled over last fall as is the case with
the town of Athens I believe it to be a
great injustice to the inhabitants of said
town.
E. S. Xixgsley.
The Times cannot answer Mr. Kings
ley's questions. The notice as printed
was sent out from the experiment sta
tion at Burlington, evidently at the di
rection of some government official.
. - . -
Westminster Damage Cases, t
The hearing on the damage cases re
sulting from the laying of a double track
through Westminster and the widening
of the highway were heard in the pro
bate office Tuesday. The Corlew claim
for damages was settled Monday. The
hearing Tuesday was on the Church and
Weston claims. The court commission
ers, A. P. Ranney of Westminster, J. W,
Melendy of Londonderry and O. J. But-
terfield of Wilmington were present.
The railroad was represented by John
Young of Newport and J. L. Martin of
Brattleboro; the town of Westminster
by F. A. Bolles; the Misses Church by
C. II. Williams, and G. A. Wreston ap
peared for himself. The commissioners
and some of the lawyers went to West
minster and viewed the premises in the
morning, and evidence consisting largely
of maps and drawings was introduced in
the afternoon. This was the final hear
ing before the commissioners and if an
appeal is taken from their award the
cases will go to the county court.
"A Perfect Success."
The following signed communication
has been received, but the signature is
omitted because of some uncertainty as
to what it is, Mr. Kilbum states that
he intends to keep his employes going
ten hours: .
Deak Mb. Editor:
Will you please find room in your
paper for a few words in which I may
state that the nine-hour question is a
perfect success. All the contractors and
builders approved of it at first glance.
Not only are carpenters to have nine
hours with ten hours' pay but all the
wood-working shops, including Kilburn's
sawmill at Saxtons River. Thanking our
employers, we remain their obedient
nine-hour men.
THE
AMERICAN
FIDELITY CO.
MONTPEtlER, VT.
SURETY BONDS
ACCIDENT INSURANCE.
E. L. Walker, Bellow Falls
Lawrence & Wheeler,
Springfield
A. H. Humphrey, Ludlow
J. C. Enrlght, Windsor
AGENTS.
. TALKED, ATE AND SMOKED.
Semi-Annual Meeting of Board of Trade
Depot Matter Discussed. ,
The semi-annual meeting of the Board
of Trade with refreshment and smoker
attachment was held in Banquet hall
Thursday evening. There was not a
large attendance but considerable inter
est was manifested in the principal item
for consideration, the proposition sub
mitted by the railroads for a remodeled
depot.
Rev. J. II. lleid of Walden, X. Y.,Rev.
Albert Ilammatt of Xewtonville, Mass ,
were made honorary members of the
board.- G. II. Babbitt reported for the
railroad and transportation committee,
lie told in detail what had been done re
garding the depot situation up to date.
He also read the proposition made by the
railroads. 11. D. Ryder and C. II. Wil
liams, attorneys for the board, also made
brief remarks.
The adoption or rejection of the propo
sition made by the railroads was inform
ally discussed and it was finally decided
to leave the entire matter in the hands of
the railroad committee, the sanie com
mittee which has been pushing the mat
ter from the first. The resolution adopt
ed was as follows: Resolved, that the
railroad and transportation committee
and its attorneys be authorized to accept
the proposition of the railroads as to re
modeling the present station, its plat
form and approaches if able to obtain
such" other and additional concessions as
they may consider sufficient to warrant
its acceptance, otherwise to continue its
effwrts to secure the station as heretofore
demanded.
v . , Woman's Club Notes.
The annual meeting of the club for the
election of officers was held Tuesday af
ternoon. After a piano solo by Mrs.
Nettie Dunham and a selection by a
double quartet the roll was called, the
reports of the officers and chairmen of
departments were read, and the follow
ing officers were elected for the coming
year: President, Mrs. Frances G. Flint;
first vice president, Mrs. E. R. Campbell;
second vice president, Mrs. George A.
WTeston; recording secretary, Mrs. W. W.
Sawyer; corresponding secretary, Miss
Mary Read; treasurer, Miss Josie Derby;
directors for two years, Mrs. II. P. Ban
croft, Mrs. George II. Gorham, Miss
Anna Alexander. At the close of the
business meeting supper was served by
the social committee.
Holy Cross Officers.
At the annual meeting of Holy Cross
Commandery, No. 12, Knights Templar,
held at their asylum Tuesday evening
the following officers were elected and
installed: Eminent commander, George
F. Leland; generalissimo, George B.
Wheeler; captain general, Fred II. Bab
bitt: prelate. Henry L. Ballou; senior
warden, Eugene S. Leonard; junior war
den, Frank Adams; treasurer, George A.
Westcn; recorder, Charles II. Gibson;
standard bearer, Frank G. Pierce; sword
bearer. Claries S. Howard; warder, Car
roll A. Moore; third guard, Henry D.
Sparrow; assistant guard, Mortimer F.
Davis; second guard, Dayton H. Switzer;
assistant guard.Frank Barney ;flrst guard,
Victor N. Deming; assistant guard, Fred
A. Leland; assistant prelate, George II.
Gorham; sentinel, Benjamin F. Walters.
Cut Out That License.
Enrroii of the Times: f .
Referring to your statement last week
regarding one license being held for the
new hotel at Saxtons River I would call
attention to the fact that Bellows Falls
is the only village in our town where a
majority of its citizens voted for license,
therefore it is the only village that is en
titled to have license. ,
A majority of the people here are
strongly opposed to license and do not
care to have a hotel that will ''draw the
class of people who patrmize a bar.
Such people are not desirable or bene
ficial to any community because their
example often is the cause of the down
fall of many young men.
AH of our citizens would be very glad
if we could have a new hotel, one that
will be an ornament to the village and
attract a class of people that have no use
for a hotel bar. We cannot believe that
our license commissioners will inflict a
license on a village whose citizens are so
strongly opposed to it.
If a bar is indispensable to a new hotel
we prefer to have "the lions that so
watchfully have glared our main street
o'er still continue evermore."
Citizen.
' Saxtons River, May 13.
At the weekly shoot held by the Gun
club last Friday the following records
were made. There were three ev nts of
25 birds each: Xo. 1 Shepardson 18,
Duffy 18, Brooks 20, Ray 13t Xo. 2
Shepardson 20, Duffy 1", Knight 13,
Brooks 21; Xo. 3 Shepardson 18, Bar
nett 2; Knight 18.
IStliiSite-fl
,i
Jij-iMtit i-Yvr.' lMJ
(-... ' V ft.." LIE
BELLOWS
I
r.
U J
IsiT. Tffl Ill
!;;; '"Nta
Geo
HAVE YOU TRIED
SMITHS'
BUCHU AND LITHIA
KIDNEY PILLS?
Weill They are all Right.
WE SELL,' THEM.
AT
Fuller's Pharmacy
TELEPHONE, 1012.
E. i.. WALKER, President. .
A. H. CHANDLER,
Bellows Falls Trust Co.
CAPITAL, $100,000.
Transacts a General Banking Business.
SAVINGS BANK DEPARTHENT.
Safe Deposit Boxes in a fire and burglar proof
vault to rent at reasonable rates .....
Accounts of Individuals, Firms and Corporations Respectfully
Solicited. .
:::PLANTS:::
I wish to state to the public that Mr. C. Rice, the well-known gardener
of this city, has entire charge of ray Greenhouses and Hotbeds this season
and has now in stock and in first-class condition ready for sale Geraniums
Heliotrope, Coleus, Asters, and a variety of Bedding plants. He is grow
ing 10,000 Tomato plants and has the
date, besides several of the best known standard tomatoes. Do not fail to
try his new early variety of Tomato, as it is a winner.
Cabbage plants by the dozen or
frost-proof. Celery plants in their
Ghas. W.
SCHOOL ST., - - -
TWO GREAT HOSIERY BARGAINS ! !
Ladies' line gauge Black Hose,
regular 25c quality and sold by
all other stores at that price. Our
price on this lot of 100 dozen
Just 15c per pair.
Children's fine ribbed Black Hose,
regular 15c quality but slightly
imperfect, sizes 5 to 10 only
10c per pair.
3 pairs for 25c.
- - - AT ' -
Pollard's Specialty Store.
UNION BLOCK, BELLOWS FALLS, VT
BLUE FLAME OIL
AND GASOLINE STOVES
will be used more this year than
ever before. I have a few of
each leftover from last season
that will be sold at cost and
less.
I also have a very few second
hand stoves in first-class condi
tion that are bargains.
FALLS, VT.
C. E HOWARD, Vice-President
x . ...Treasurer. ,. .,- .
earliest Tomato in cultivation to this
thousand now ready to set; they are
season by the thousands.
Butterfiefd.
BELLOWS FALLS.

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