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National opinion. [volume] (Bradford, Vt.) 1865-1874, May 30, 1874, Image 1

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iatioiul (Opinion.
HEN: F. STANTON,
KMTOH AND M'llI.IHHKII.
TKItMS OK SUBSCRIPTION l
ono cupy oii year I'J.OO
If iIU nctly In uilittiioe, t.0
fuSINKSS CARDS
HHADFOKU.
EATON te (ill.
rAUDWAKK, IRON. STKKL, 1'OAU
Nails, t.'ul Itr.v, HeoiU. Glass. It. llini;.
i-daife, 0. Wholesale ma l(tuil. Mill n M.
l'HK'llAKD it HAY.
MMtKION AND DOMESTIC DK Y GOODS
G nit's r uruUli ini! Goods. IIiiIh mill Culm,
ocories, Toii, Knit, Fish, I'ork, I.unl iiii.I
iintry PhhIhoh. Main Street.
ORW GAMHKLL, Jit.
nwnliUL'V i. ...kllVLI'l I nu IT I A W
Muster mill Sulicitor in Chancery,
BRADFORD 1IRA8S BAND.
E. WHIIVOMH, LKADISKj L. It. JWe-
Diitt'oc, Clerk. Music furnished lit
iiMonahle rates.
H. 11. ALLEN.
HOTOOI!AI'1IIO ARTIST. ANI DKA-
ll'l 111 HelonsCimoS ailll. WeWS, Alliums,
ill l'ictiirn h'riiiue. Ki-nuio- for W rent lis
ill kimlH Kil ted tu Oiiliir. Nu. 15 und Hi
urdy's Hiiililini;,
G. L. HUT LIC It.
ARLOU. CHAMBER AND KITCHEN
t iirnttiire, tenuis, l. linkers, itoues, i.iim,
IlltllS, Mllslcul IlltrltlllClltS, Sco. 1st uuor
mil of Trotter House, Minn Ht,
C. JI. IIARDINU.
TA TOM IS 8, C LOCK 8. .1 E W E L it Y,
T Spooturles, Stationery, und Yankee No-
lunii. Watches iiiiu jewelry repuireu nnu
u mm led. 1'nstOlhce Huildiujt,
J. A. HAUDY.
Hlock & WATCH MAKKK, .lEWELEH,
Vj Ont-iciun, mill Dealer in reliable Wat -lies.
IVork Olllcc iionr hi Residence. Established
Ictober IH'J.
RO.SW K.LL FAR N II AM.
1 TTOHNKY & COl'XSKLLOIt AT LAW
' Muster anil Solicitor in Chunccry uml
'cusiou mid Claim Ajjent.
J. B. ORMS1IV.
IIYSIC!AN AND SITRGKOX. ROOMS
fnrine.lv ncciuiicd livJ. N. Clitrk. Deli
st. Speoiul attention puiif to Female discuses
id diseases in riiti iiiiiu.
II. STRICKLAND.
RON FOUNDER & MACHINIST, AND
Manufacturer of Agricultural implements.
0. lfl. l'UTERS.
I VERY STAIILE. IHIUU TEAMS KL'R-
nislied tit rcusniinhlc prices, Stable ill
losideiicc, Main St., Himlfoid.
. 0. P. CLARK.
KY GOODS, GKOCKKIES.IIIAHIJWAUK
it Klour. Suit, l'uper HiiiiKiiiiM. Huts, Caps,
liurl Couutrv Produce. Main Slr.'i't. Hi-udfoi-d.
DR. J. N. CLARK.
DENTIS1 li). ALL THE MODKKN1II
nrovvniciits in the art. Knnuis No. II
mil i Hardy's llnililiii)!, Hrudford, Vermont.
.1. A. WARREN.
AD1KS', MISSES' AND CIIILDHEN'S
l J Hunts, Shoes., Slippers, anil Kuhhi-rs
Wen's I'll irk Kip anil Call Hoots. Hint ouali
Lou prices, liouk .stoi-i'.Maiii St.,l-'i'aillot'.l
J. II JONES, M D.
ITTOMtEOl'ATIIlC I'VSlClAX AND
J-irSiirjitoii. Ollico at ltHiilt'iii'v. Jut Door
Suiilh of liunk, liniill nil, Vt.
JJ. T. 1'ILLKUl RY.
IOTDVES, TIN WARE. 1IMN WAKE.
WnoiU'ii Ware, Ao. Muin St., Itrnilfonl.
C. II. CURTIS.
IVEAT AND PROVISION MA It KET.
Il'l Mittn, Kii.li V.'utulil.'H, all I'h jIi ail, I
iiiiu. 11 ineiiii iit, Mala St., Kruillunl.
C. O. DOTY, AGT.
1 ANCEACTL'I.'ER OF .DR. DUTY'S
ill Ct'U'brati.iI, Mantli'iiki! Hittri-N.KIavoi'iiiL.
Exti'iii'tM itnil i.s((im'cfi, ,Vo., at WlioliKalo
anil lift nil. lliaiHiinl, Vt.
E. S. 1'K.V.SLF.E.
I'.VERY SI'AliLE. U)OD TEAMS KUR
J nislii il ul nil ikuiiH, ami at n ioioiiitlilo pri-
u.n. Slagt to iiml It'.'in Drpot. Apply nt Sta
lilt; Otlirfc. ri-ar of Ti-oltui' Hoiikh.
A. A. ll lWliN.
ILOI K, ORAIN, MEAL. I'HOVKXDEIf,
Slioi'td anil Has,solilat tlm Lowi-st Mar-
kut iirko. Mills at thu Smitli unit of Hriul-
toi'il il ai..
.1. M. WARDEN.
1.1IXK WATCHES. CLOCKS. JIVELliY,
. Silver Wair, Spi'ulai'li H, Cutli-rv, Kevol-
vern, rancy t.ooiU ami lov. rai'ticulai' ul-
ti'iilion uivitn to Id', minis Kiiii' WittrlioH,
Ollico W. U. Til.'ijiapli Co. Hiiiilfoiil, Vt.
II. E. HARRIS.
rilUOTTElt HOlSK, HRADKOItl), VT.
X Coat'li to ami from all paMK;nj;ci' traiiiH,
dny and nilit.
W. II.
CARTE It, M. D.
AND St'Kd EON, UK A II-
THIYSICIAN
lord. V t. OtliL'O at. hi i-t-siiloio.f. 'nfi
oiih Mi'dii inal Compounds, of Ug tried expo
rieiice, and of moiloru iiuprovoinunt ; prepar
ed liy liiuixi'lf, kept pitfiHiiinily ou hand for
tlie. Iirnetit of tli itic-K and lumo.
111SS C1IARI.OTTK NELSON.
rpEACHER OF PAINTING AND DRAW
X int.'- Room in Academy Hniltliii", lirad
l'ord, Vt.
EAST CORINTH.
L. V. FOSTER.
HOTEL. FLOUR AND GRAIN MILL.
Rent of Flour ami Grain constantly on
liaud. East Corinth, Vt.
S. THOMPSON.
rpiN SHOP. SHOVES. TIN WARE. IKON
1 Ware, Wooden Waro,&e, All kind of
Job work neatly done. Kitxt Corinth, Vt.
CORLISS & ROGERS,
DRY GOODS. GROCERIES. READY
Made Clothing, Hoots &. Skoes. c.
Largest stock iu Eastern part of Grunge
County. Eust Corinth, Vt.
H. L. 1HXBY.
KW" PHOTOGRAPHIC ROOMS, CHEL
ll sea, Vt. Ontu Mondays, Thursdays uud
Saturdays.
EDGAR W. SMITH.
ATTORNEY Jfc COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
Wells River, Vt. Office with Judge Uu
derwood. E. L. BOOTHBY.
pHYSIClAN AND SURGEON, FAIRLEE,
A t. Reters by permission to Drs. Carter
and Doty, Bradford, Vt., and to Dr. Frost,
Hanover, N. II. .
J. F. JOHNSON.
QTAR II ALL, ELY, VT. LARGE AND
C? well fitted up forlaccoiniiiodution of Dances
and all kinds of entertainments. Let at reas
onable rates.
C. II. SIBLEY.
CARRIAGE TRIMMER, AND MANUFAC
turcrofall kinds ol Harnesses. Repair
ing done in the best manner. Alain St., Op
posite Hotel, West Fairlee.
J II. O L M S T E A D & S O N,
Manufacturers of
WOODSKAT I'll AI ItK
of all kinds.
SETTEES & RAILROAD CHAIRS
specallty. Cane-Seats repaired.
South Newburv.
S7yl Vermont.
One LIGHT BUGGY WAGON, open body.
Palmer Springs, Steel Axles and Steel Tire.
Has been run one summer, is newly varnished
and in perfect repair. W ill be no'ld at a Bar
giiu. 3w4 A. T. CLARKE.
National
VOLUME 9.
The Kld of CwIIIiim (irincii.
All Iiulili'iit of tin Klooil In MiiHHiu'liiiitrt t.
on May HI, IHM.
1IVJI1MN BOVI.K o'llKII.I.V.
No uniig of a Koldier ridiuu dowu
To the iiikIihi lllil from WiueheHtiT town j
No sonic of it lime thut shtaik Iheiiili'lll
Witli tint n.llii.u'. throe lit H uutiou's birth I
Hut tliu souk ( a briivi. iiiiin, fn'0 from li ar
la Kliei'idiin's self or Paul Revere :
Who risked what thev liskod, free from strife.
Anil its promise, ol kIoi'ioiis pay IDs lite.
Tim neaeeful valh-v has waked ami Stirred
And the unsnrriii)! eelnais of life hik heurd ;
Tim Hew 'till eliuiis to tlie trees ami tt"i"i
And tliefarlv toilers sioilinir nass.
An they cluiieeasideat "i whilo-wulled lioiue
ill' up Hie valley, wneiv merrily conies
The brook that sparkles in iliiiiuoiid rills
As the sun conies over thu Haiiipshiro hills.
What was it, that passed likn nu ominous
lirentli.
Likud shiver of fenr or u toiieh of death f
What was it ? Tlie valley is peaeoful still,
And the leaves are atire on top of tho hill.
It was not n souml. uuru lliilm of sense
Hut u pain, like the iianuof the short suspense
Hint wraps tlie lieiiiK ol tnosn v- iio sou
At their teet (lie KUll ul hlernity !
The uir of the valley has felt the ehill ;
ho workers iiuiise at the doir ot the null :
Tim lioiisewilu, keon to the shlveriiiK uir,
i tresis her loot on the eotlaue stair,
lnslinetive taiiL'ht liv the iiiolher-love.
Ami tliiuks of the sleeping ones above I
Why start the listeners ) Why does t lit)
Of (lie niill-streaiii widen I Is it a horse,
eourse
Hark to I he sounds of Ills hoots, the v say,
That Kiillopsso wildly Williamsburj; way I
(loil! what was that, like a human shriek
From the winding valley f ill nobody speak,
Will nobody answer those women wuo ery
t llie HWllll wuillllius looil.iei uy I
Whenee e r. they f Listeu ! And, now they
hear
The sound of the eallopiuu horse-hoofs near ;
I bey win ell the trieml ol tlie vale. Hint sou
The rider, who thunders so menacingly,
null waviuu iiilns anil wiiriiiui! sereain
Tu I he home tilled bunks of the valley stream
He draws no rein, but he shakes I lie street .
VMth a shoiU. ami Hit' 111101 the i;alloplug
feet.
And this the cry that he flinjjs to the wind :
"To the hilh fur ymir linen ! The flood in
oeniiia ; "
He cries and is amie; hut they know the
worst
be treacherous Williaiiisliur 1I11111 bus hurst !
i'he hasiu that nourished their happy homes
Is changed to a demon It comes! It comes!
A luousieriu aspect, wilh sbaun.v front
Of shalt red dwi'llitis, to take the brunt
Of the dwellings they shatter whito-iiiaiied
ami hoarwe.
The luurcile.ss tirror fills the course
Of the narrow valley, and rushing raves,
Willi Deulli on the first of ils liissiiiK waves,
Till cottage and street ami crowdeu mill
Are crumbled and crushed.
Hut onward still,
In front of the roaring tlood is heard
flic galloping horse and tiie warning word.
Thank Cod, tb.tt the brave man's lilu is
spared !
From Williamsburg town he nobly dared
To race wilh the liood and to take the road
In front of tlx' lerrible swnih it mo ved.
For miles it. thundered and crashed behind,
Hut he looked ahead with a steadfast mind ;
"77iry iitutit be vuriieit ! " was till lie said,
As away 011 his terrible ride he sped.
When heroes are called for, bring the crown
To this Yankee rider; send iiiiu down
On the stream of 141110 with tlie Curtius old;
His deed as the Roman's was brave and bold.
And tiie tale can as noble a-thrill awake.
For hu ull't'i'tol his lite for the people's sake.
THE OU), OU) XT0KY.
"The course of true love ne'er did run smooth."
'Just ton yours a go, on this very
spot, almost at this si'lf-saine hour,
we parti'il !" cxclainiiMl Mrs. Trev
eliyn to herself, us she Nat on a lit
tle inoiss-t'overed seat lienealh the
sliaile of an old oak. ".Just ten
years, yet so lon, loniip)! Why
do men say that life is short, and
flies! Forme, nothing has flown,
but my dreams," ; s she spoke, she
shaded her still youthful and love
ly face from the bright sunlight,
and fell into a revery so dee), as to
lie quite unconscious of approach
ing footsteps.
The intruder was a tall, handsome
man, as yet, senrco in his prime,
who, catching a glunpseof the lady,
stepped quickly forward. I'.ut ere
he could speak, Mrs. Trevellyn be
came suddenly u ware of the presence
of some one, and glancing at the
figure- of the stranger, she rose as if
to move away.
With a half-audible apology, the.
gentlemen raised his hat, and in a
moment was lost in the thick shrub
bery, while the sank back again up
on the seat, as she said :
" "l is lie ! my God, and ho does
not know me ! Only ten years, and
I forgotten."
Yes, only ten years since these
two had parted he a youth ot
twenty-one; she the beautiful girl
of seventeen summers.
Clive Lee was just out of college :
and before settling down to the
study of his profession, lie was to
spend two years in Europe. Jessie
Trevellyn was si ill a school girl.
But the two had met years before,
and a child's love deepened into
something tender and enduring
enough for the exchange of lovers'
vows.
"You will write to me often," he
said as they stood together beneath
the old oak ; "von will write ine
often, and on your coming birthday
you will let me tell your lather how
dearly 1 love you !"
"Yes ! when I am eighteen, papa
shall know where I have given my
heart j meantime, lie knows you are
my warm friend, and I well, I shall
write you a few words each day
BRADFORD, VERMONT, SATURDAY, 31AY 30, 1874.
"Not so fast, little one ! Every
day, lor a fortnight, ami in six
weeks forget fulness of my very ex
istenee."
A look of mingled lovo mid re
proach from her beautiful dark eyes
a moment of silence, and he spoke
again :
" You have your own way, usual
ly, have you not, Jessie V
"I have rarely been ciossed in my
life," she replied with a smile, "and
since mamma dietl, poor papa seems
only to livr for mo !"
"Well, cara mio, listeu I When
the fall comes, persuade your father
to bring you nbroad for six mouths.
You can study music and the Ian
guages ; we can all be together. To
learn a language thoroughly, make
love in it, says an old scholar,
Think of a winter for us in Italy!
Yes, dear Jessie, if your wishes are
commands your father will surely
bring you to me, ore long."
So thev naited. Clive Lee went
over the ocean, and during the sum
iner that followed, Jessie proved a
most faithful correspondent.
Early in the fall, Mr. Trevellyn
was taken very ill, so that for many
weeks he lay between life and death
Letter after letter came from young
Lee, which Jessie scarce found time
to read, much less to answer.
"Cousin John,"she said ono morn
ing to Mr. Trevellyn's uephew, a
young mini of twenty-five years of
age, who had been a constant at
tendant at her father's bedside ;
'Cousin John, you know I corres
pond with Clive Lee, but poor papa's
illness has left ine no time for my
pen. Please write Clive, explain
the cause of my . silence, and tell
him," she added, with a tell-tale
blush, "that we do not forget him,"
As soon as Mr. Trevellyn was able
to move, his physicians ordered him
South. It was not until they reach
ed Key West (the point of destina
tion) that Jessie had leisure for a
careful perusal of Clive's letters.
She noted with pain how they had
grown less tender but reproachful
in tone, till, at the last, they were
colli and infrequent.
"I am sure he cau't have received
John's letter," she said to herself;
nit I will write to day and explain
all. Poor Clive! Yes, I will write
this very day."
For an hour her pen moved over
and across the paper, tilling sheet
after sheet with details of the past
three months. As slits was sealing
er letter, a knock was heard, and
to her cheerful "Come in!" a tall
figure appeared in the door-way.
'Good morning, fair cousin, 1
have just left your father very com-
brtable. Have you any commands ?"
"Thanks, John, just post this
missive tor tun European man.
What would papa and I uo without
you ! Yon seem like his own son,
and my own brother!"
"1 am content to be his son, dear
Jessie, but not your brother."
"Cousin," said the young girl,
scarce heeding his reply, "did you
write Clive, as I asked you to do V
"Did lever break a promise to
you Jessie V
'I remember no promise, John,
but simply my request. Poor Clive
evidently knows nothing of papa's
illness."
"Oh no ! this pointing to the
packet explains all."
Weeks passed. No letters from
young Lee came to cheer the heart
of Jessie, as day alter day she sat
in her father's sick-room. She grew
pained ; then hurt; finally annoyed
and indignant. Meanwhile, Mr.
Trevellyn was growing weaker and
weaker with each day, and conscious
of his approaching end, he begged
his daughter to reward the devo
tion of young Trevellyn toward him
self by giving him her hand.
"I used to fancy, darling child,"
murmured the sick inau, "that
young Lee loved you! But ho is
far away, and too young to think
of marriage. Johu worships you.
lie has maturity, and much wisdom.
I should die easier to see yon his
wife and under his protection."
With a heart half-broken at her
lover's neglect aud her father's sink
ing condition, Jessie consented to
his dying request. A quiet bridal
iu the sick-room, a few weary, sad
days ot watching, and our heroine
was au orphan.
She begged her husband to take
her back to her owu Louie ; aud iu
another week she found herself once
more nt their country seat, just out
of New York.
Thu evening after her arrival a
letter was put into her hands, ad
dressed to her maiden iiarue. She
started at sight of tho old familiar
"Miss Jessie," and grew pale to
faintness as she tor open the en
velope and recognized the handwrit
ing. "What is tho matter T" asked Mr.
Trevellyu, as ho marked her pallor.
"I am tired, aud will go up stairs,
I think."
"Have you a letter !" ho asked.
"Only a note from a frieud,'' sho
quietly replied.
Iu her own room, without wait
ing even to close the ddor, she read
a long, loving letter from Clive, full
of self reproaches, and sympathy
for her. An accidental meeting
with a friend had given hiin the
first intelligence of her father's ill
ness, and their journey South. Why
had not some friend written him
for her ! lie had been so wounded
by her silence. Now he begged for
giveness for wordr of reproach and
coldness. Might he write her f ather
and claim her for his own Jessie?
Time had no wings while he waited
her reply now the impatient lover.
Mr. Trevellyu finished his paper
and cigar, looked at his watch, then
left the room iu search of his wife.
Through the open door of her
room he saw her sitting silent aud
motionless, tho fire of a chilly May
evening shiuging upon her golden
hair.
"What a picture for my home,"
he softly whiskered, as he bent over
her.- A face of marble whiteness,
a trembling baud which grasped ihe
etter, startled him into saying.
"Dear Jessie, there should bo no
secrets between man and wife. May
I see the note which so strangely
affects y ou V
"You can not!" was the brief,
measured reply, as she rose from
her chair, no longer the timid, suf
fering girl, but a wronged and out
raged woman. "You can not read
it, though I tell you from whose pen
it came. Dearly I loved this man
from whom your perfidy has forever
separated me, My answer you shall
hear, for I am your wife." she bitter
ly added. " 1 1 shall be my care that
it safely reaches Mr. Lee."
A night of tears and agony for
Jessie, of mingled remorse and rage
for her husband, and she stood be
fore him in the morning light, an
open letter in her hand.
'Mr. Trevellyn, you will hear what
I have written my friend:
'My Deak Mil. Lue;
" After a long winter, passed in the South
at the bedside of my father, I havu returned
to my old home an orphan, but u wife. In
the presence of my dying father I married his
nephew, Mr. John Trevellyn. This brief note
must be my reply to your letter written a
ortiiight since. God bless you forever.
" 'Jessus T .' "
Years rolled on. John Trevellyn
sought in the excitement of political
life to forget tho past. Jessie's
beauty and grace were everywhere
icknowledgeJ; but it was the per
lection of the statue which no lov
ing heart and hand warmed into
happy life.
Withiu a few months after nine
years of married life, Johu Trevellyn
had died, but not before he had con
fessed to Jessie in bitter, penitent
humiliation, thedeceptiou practiced
toward Clive Lee and herself. Free
ly, even lovingly, she had forgiven
him.
But the old wound was not heal
ed, and tho rememberance of her
old lover now a diplomat at a for
eigu court was ever one of mingled
pleasure and pain.
Ou tho morning of which we
write, Mrs. Trevellyn had seen in
a daily paper the announcement
that Mr. Lee, after an absence of
ten years, had returned to his native
land for a brief visit.
With a world of memories stirring
her heart to its very depth, she had
amost iuvoluntarily wandered out to
the oltl trystiug-place.
"Dow strange!" she said, as she
slowly started toward her home, au
hour later, "how strange that Clive
should not know me ! If he but
knew the truth ! But I can never
tell him ; the honor of the dead for
bids it."
As Mrs. Trevellyn stepped toward
the little stile which divided the
woody upland from the meadow be
youd, she saw Clive Lee, quietly
Opinion
setting on its lower step, like one
who waits for another. As she
came slowly forward, Uo sprang
from his seat, and with outstretch
ed arms barred her way, as he said
"Jessie, I hnvo come for you ! '.
demand my own that for which '.
have so long patiently waited."
There were no "whispering
boughs," among tho silent groen
trees, to tell us what the lovers said,
Enough for us to know that three
months later their was a quiet, but
very happy wedding at tho old
country-seat, and after that Clive
Dee nnd Jessie went over the ocean
to their new Eden, leaving behind
them all the sorrowful past.
A Correspondent of the Scicn
tifus American writes as follows :
"For the last twelve or fourteen
yeurs I have been employed in a
shop where there are over three huu
died men at work, aud, us is the
case in all shops of this kind, hard
ly a day passes but one or more of
us cut or bruise our limbs. At first
there were but few that found their
way to my department to have their
wounds bound up ; but after a while
it became generally known that a
rag glued ou a flesh wound was not
only a speedy curative, but a form
idable protection against further in
jury. 1 was soon obliged to keep a
supply of rags on hand, to be ready
for any emergency. I w ill cite here
one among many of the cases cured
with glue. A man was running a
boring machine, with an inch and a
quarter auger attached. By some
means the sleeve of his shirt caught
in the auger, bringing his wrist iu
contact with the bit, tearing the
flesh among the muscles iu a fright
ful manner, lie was conducted to
my department (the pattern shop)
and I washed the wound iu warm
water, and then glued around it a
cloth, which when dry, sunk into a
rounded shape, holding tho wound
tight and firm. Once or twice a
week, for three or four weeks, I
dressed the wound afresh, aud it
was well. Tho man never lost an
hour's time in consequence. The
truth of this statement hundreds
can, testify to. I use of course the
best quality of glue."
Mr. Gordon Burnham, a patri
otic citizen of New York, proposes,
as his personal offering for tho ecle
b ration of the coming centennial, to
erect at his own cost a colossal stat
ue of Daniel Webster, to bo placed
ou a suitable site in Central l'ark.
The statue is intended to be in every
way worthy of the man aud the day,
and will be a noble contribution to
the artistic attractions of tho park,
and of the country as well. This
is given as tlie initiative ot a move
ment of which Mr. W. S. Ward of
New York is the author, and tho
object of which is to persuade all
cities, towns, villages aud individu
als, so far as they have the power,
to build or endow some monument,
school library, museum or other me
morial, which can bo recognized as
a centeuial gift, and rehiain forever
as a monument of generous patriot
ism. Mr. Burnham's gift is in one
direction, and is worthy of imita
tion ; but there are many others
equally worthy-.
4--
A. man in a rural town had a pet
calf, which he was training up in
the ways of an ox. The calf walk
ed around very peaceably under
oue end of the yoke, while the man
held up the other end. But in an
unfortunate moment tho man con
ceived the idea of putting his owu
ueck iu the yoke, to let the calf see
how it would seem to work with a
partner; this frightened the calf,
and elevating his tail and voice, he
struck a "diad run" for the village,
and the man went along with hqad
down aud his plug hat in his hand,
straining every nerve to keep up,
and crying out at the top of his
vojee, Here we come ! llead us
somebody ! "
We all take things for granted.
This was the case at a prayer-meeting
in the northern part of Maine,
when the pastor remarked that if
any had relatives iu distant lands,
prayer would be offered iu their be
half. Thereupon a man of the peo
ple arose and said, "I would like you
to pray for my brother. He went
away two weeks ago, and I havu't
heard from him since, I don't know
just where he is, but you needn't
pray below Bangor."
NUMBER 1.
FOR BOYS AND GIRLS
How Arthur Man Away.
Arthur was a sturdy little fel
low about five years old, With hair
like sunlight ou n French marigold,
and a little freckled face, that was
a very pleasant face, too, when it
did not happen to have a shade of
discontent on it, as it did just now,
Arthur was giviug his opinion
quite freely to tho great yellow cat,
who sat perched ou the gate-post,
eyeing him with no very loving
glances. You don't remember, but
doubtless Kitty did, tho innumera
ble times when Arthur had tied the
string of "bell -peppers" rouud her
ueck, and left her to sueeze her un
ollcudiiig head off at her leisure;
nor tho time ho tied her to the ves
try door by the tail, aud sho faror
ed tho company assembled at a
Methodist watch-meeting with dis
mal howls in varied keys.
Well, as Arthur told his troubles
to his feline frieud, she listeued witb
grave attention, though a close ob
server might have detected an ex
pression ot latent malice in the
small green disc of her eye.
"I don't see why great big fellows,
five years old, that dress their own
selves, ought to be seut down town
for a dozou pearl-buttons every time
that Miss Scissors comes. Mother
never gives me a chocolate-drop
when I get back, either, aud Miss
Ellis always does, and"
Here his eyes fell on a tall angu
lar figure, stalking down the lane,
enveloped in an unusually gaudy
shawl, and carrying a few necessa
ry articles, such as a parasol, a bun
die of patterns, a reticule, au extra
shawl, &c.
"Mother, you don't mean Miss
Cecilia is coming here again ? "
"Yes she is, " was the reply from
within ; "and I want you "
What she wanted Arthur did not
stop to see, but darted up tho lane,
as if grizzly bears were iu hot pur
suit. Ho finally stopped before a huge
old-fashioned house, with lavender,
heath, and sweet-williams growing
withiu the white palings, and yes,
i fair youug lady just stepping out
of the door. It was his Sunday
school teacher.
"Why, Artie," and Miss Ellis
stooped for a kiss, "what brings my
little boy up here at eight o'clock iu
the morning ? "
"Oh, I do'know, nothing particu
lar," said Arthur indifferently. "I
shonld't wonder, either, if I had run
away."
ltnn away ! aud the blue eyes
grew souer, w ny, Artie ! uut i
suppose you are going back at once !
Oh no, said Artie disdainfully,
that wouldn't be running away at
all. I shan't go home till to-mor-
ow, anyhow, and perhaps I Bhan't
for sixteen years.
Miss Ellis smiled, but only said,
If you will come with me, Artie, I'll
show you a sad little sight, that is
very different from your nice, pleas
ant homo. The little boy we are
going to see, has never walked iu
his life ; his mother is dead, aud he
lies all alone in his room, while his
father is at work. I have been to
see him very often, and have read
to him, aud taken flowers to him ;
but I am afraid I shall never do
that any more.
They wont into a dark, dirty,
street, known as "Bag Alley," aud
stopped before a house equally dark
aud dirty, but into which a ray of
light had fallen four years before.
In a small room on a low bed lay
a little creature, strangely bent and
twisted, but with a face so sweet
and touching in its beauty that Ar
thur held his breath. The great,
wonderful blue eyes had a light
more of heavou than earth ; tho
white forehead, where the blue veins
showed plainly, was shaded by long
curls of pale gold color. The face,
with its look of patient suffering
brightened as Miss Ellis entered,
and a little thin hand was held out
to her.
I'm so glad you have come, he
said, with a little sigh. What little
boy is that ! It's little Arthur, Ted
dy, said Miss Ellis ; he has come to
see you, because he is so sorry you
are sick.
I am glad you are well little boy
said Teddy gravely. Is father here !
A bundle of rags, with gray head,
above, rose front its kneeling posi
tion at the foot of the bed, and came
round to touch the little face with a
tender, loving touch.
How long has he been so, Dennis I
asked Miss Ellis.
Since yesterday, mum, was the
reply. The doctor says he can only
last a little while uow, the little
saint that he is, father's poor little
patient saint t
There were tears in his eyes, but
he knelt down by the bedside, draw,
ing his rough coat sleovo across his
face.
Little Teddy, asked Miss Ellis
beading down, do you sufter much
now !
Not much, ma'am : I am only
tired now. I think I shall sleep
soon.
Yes, little Teddy, tho sleep is al
most here. The little life of pain
and deformity will soon become "one
grand, sweet song," the song of re
demption.
Teddy, could you say a little pray
er after me f
I will say anything after you, be
cause I know it will be so good.
ma'am ; and the little voice repeat
ed slowly :
"Now I lay me dnwu to sloop,
I pray the Lard my soul to keep ;
II I should die before. I wake,
I pray the Lord my soul to toke."
Arthur, gazing through his tears,
saw a wondrous change upon the
little face.
Teddy lifted his hand witb a lis
tening look. Don't you hear the
beautiful music f
And after a minute, The bcauti-
mnsie and the pretty light, shining
for Teddy t
Yes, the beautiful light had shone
out for little Teddy, and would shine
on him forever.
After a while a little child walk
ed into Mrs. Marden's kitchen and
threw himself on her neck.
O mamma, 1 was going to, run away
and not come back for twenty-fire
years ; and I went down to see lit
tle Teddy, and he never wal ked at
all, and he hadn't any mother, and
he is dead ; aud,0 marama,don't you
want me to go for some pearl-but
tons f
Max Adklkr's new book con
tains tho following dedication :
My original intention was to ded
icate this book to the friends of my
boyhood. Azanbin, Ghes, the
Imauin of Muscat, in memory of the
happy days, when together we play
ed marbles in the Omen desert,duck
ed each other in the Persian Gulf,
aud tortured offensive cats on the
island of Kishm. But I have chang
ed my mind; I have resolved to
dedicate tho book to a humorist-,
who has had too little fame, to the
most delicious, because the most
unconscious, bumoris, to the widely-
scattered aud multitudinous come
dian who may be expressed iu the
concrete as The Intelligent Com
positor.
To this facility of perpetrating
felicitious absurdities, I am indebt
ed for laughter that is worth a
thousand groans. It was he who
put into typo an article of mine
which contained the injunction, "Do
not cast your pearls before swine,"
and transformed the phrase into
Do uot cart your pills before". It
was he who caused me to misquote
the poet's inquiry, so that I pro
pounded to the world the appalling
conundrum, "where are the varnish,
ed dead ! " and it was his glorious
tendency to make the Bubliino con
vulsively ridiculous that refected
the lino in a poem of mine, which
declared that a " coma swept o'er
the heavens with its trailing skirt",
and substitued the idea that a .
"count slept on a haymow in a trav
eling shirt." The kind of talent
that is here displayed deserves pro
found reverence. It is wonderful
and awful ; and thus I offer it as a
token of my marvelling respect.
The current reports about snow
drifts and such things remind the
Christian Union of a "Vermont story
which we heard in our boyhood,"
On a July day, early in the pres
ent century, the mail stage was
passing over "Cabot plain," when a
passenger observed a woman, arm
ed with a broad, wooden shovel,
digging into a snow drift by the
road side. "Why, madam," said
the traveler, don't yon take snow at
the top of the drift, instead of tak
ing tho trouble to dig so deep!"
"Oh! "replied the woman, "the
suow that is three or four years old
is a great deal the best."
Boston has a woman newspaper
carrier eighty-seven years old. Ed-
hange.
The time has been wnen a great
-i i i
many young women iu uncu
newspapers ; but fashions change.
Advertiser.
-
A San Francisco man closed his
saloon to allow a lady overhead to
die quietly, and now sues the heirs
for $350 for the favor.

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