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Bradford opinion. [volume] (Bradford, Vt.) 1874-1881, June 06, 1874, Image 1

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VOLUME a
BRADFORD, VERMONT, SATURDAY, JUNE 6, 1874.
i'dh.d lit J:,
NUMBER 2.
e ...
BUSINESS K0 ARDS.
BRADFORD.
BUN! V. STANTON, I
TTITOK AND
l'l!ULI8H Ell O
XJ the Bradfohd Opinion. Rates !of ad
vertslnt: furnished uMioUeatloj. Hu cuts
ou inside pmiM, Job printiiij( done jmniptly,
EATON & CO. I
TT ARDWARE, IRON.' STEEL, fOAL,
n. Nails, Cutlery, Seeds. Glass. ll.lliu
Coidaiie. Wholesale end Retail. Minn ht
. , t PBICHARD ft UAY. '
IORGIGN AND DOMESTIC DRY dO(
'Oout's Fiirulihlne; r)oxU, Uuti and Caps
ooorios. Teas, Salt, I" inn, fork, Lard
Country Prodiioe, Main Street.
'.'-; OKfN OAMBKLL. JK.
A TTORNEY & COUNSELLOR AT LAW
X. Maiie ana Selli'ltor in Cliaucory. '
1IKAUFIIKU iSKASM JIAIH1J,
T C. WHITCOMU, LEADER) L. !R. Mc
xti uunee, uera,
ATusio furuisbed
at
MUtSUUftble CtttlM.
K. H. ALLEN. i
TiIIOTOORAI'HIC. AUTIST.. AND DEA
IT ler 1b Kteieosooiies and Views. Albums,
and Picture Frames. Frame for Wreaths
of aU klndi Kilted to Order. No. 15 and lb
Hardy's IluiUllntr,
a. L. BUTLBR.
I
1ARLOR, CHAMBER AND KITCHEN
Furnitiiro. Collins, Caskets, Rouen. Clips
Plates, Mimical Iiitruin.'U te, &o. 1st door
eouth of Trotter House, Main St.
n. H. TTARTlINrt.
1H7ATCI1 KS. CLOCKS. JEWELRY.
T V Siieoturlos, Stationery, and Yankee Not
tione. Watches unu Jewelry repaired' aud
wan mi ten. roatumco niiuuing
J. A. IIAUDY.
CLOCK St WATCH MAKER, JEWELER
Until inn. and Dealer iu reliable Wut shea
Work Office near bit Ueaideuce. Established
Wetober IS'.1".
: ROSWKLL FAKNHAM.
A TTOllNEY St COUNSELLOR AT LAW
Lib. Master anil Solicitor iu Chancery and
jPonaion and Clulm Agent. ; I
J. B. ORMBBY.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.. ROOMS
formerly occupied by J. N. Clark, Den-
tint. Special attention paid to Female diseases
ema diseases ot tne lungs.
H. STRICKLAND. '
RON KOUXDEtt MACHINIST, AND
Mauufai'turcr of Agricnltural Implements.
0. E. PETERS. !
IVERY STABLE. GOOD TEAMS FOR
mulled at reasonable i.riccs. Stable at
Hsideuco, Main St.,
O. P. CLARK. '
RY GOODS, GROCERIES. HARDWARE
A.J Flour, Salt, l'aper Hangings. Hats, Caps,
ud Country Produce Main Street,
DR. J. N. CLARK. I
kENTISTKY. ALL THE MODERN I H
urovoinents iu the art. Uouuis No. 11
Id 13 Hurdy'i Building.
J. A. WAR KEN.
A DIES', MISSES' AND CHILDREN'S
J Hunts, Bones, slippers, aud Rubbers,
'sty. Thick Kin and Calf Boots. Best uuuli-
Lowe M prices. Jlnek Store, Main St.,
J. H. JONES, M. D,
rOMOSOPATHIC PHYSICIAN ! AND
f-M. SnrKuou, Otfhse at Residence. 1st Door
011 til ot Hank.
B. T. PILL8BURY.
CJT0VE8, TIN WARE, IROM
WARE,
woodeu Ware, c. Mum St.,
C. H. CURTIS.
VTEAT AND PROVISION MARKET.
LU. Meats, Fish Vegetables, all fresh and
ieo. ltiweiuuiit. Main St.,
C. C. DOTY, AGT.
f ANUFACTURER OF DR. DOTY'S
Celebrated Mandrake nit.t.efN.Flaviiriiio'
Extracts aud Essuucea, &u., at Wholesale
nit Ketuu.
E. S. PEASLEE.
IVERY STABLE. GOOD TEAMS FUR
I Dished at all times, aud ut reasonable Dri
es. Stage to and from Depot. Apply ut Sta
le Oflioe. rear of Trotter House. Also. Stable
ft Newbury.
A. A. BoWEN.
iriLOCR. GRAIN. MEAL. PROVENDER.
P Shorts and Bags, sold at the Lowest Mar-
ot prices. Mills at the South end of Brad
uril Villuge.
J. M. WARDEN.
TUNE WATCHES. CLOCKS. JEWELRY.
I. Silver Ware, Spectacles, Cutlery, Kevol-
vie, r niuij' UUUlli duu iip'B. ruilifuiur Ut
ention given to Repairing Fine Watches.
nice w. u. Telegraph Co.
H. E. HABBIS.
fROTTER
HOUSE, BRADFORD, VT.
X Coach to and from
all passenger trains.
by aud night..
W. H. CABTEK, M. D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON, BRAD-
ford, vt. Utttoe at his residence. Vari
lus Medicinal Compounds, of loug tried exoe
teuee, and of modern improvement ; prcpur
1 by himself, kept constantly ou hand for
ie oenent 01 tue sick ana tame.
MISS CHARLOTTE NELSON.
EACHER OF PAINTING AND DRAW-
iiig. Room iu Acadoniy Building.
I L. D. LIVINGSTON,
ERCHANT TAILOR. ALL WORK
IfX warranted to give satisfaction. Cuttimt
one for others to make.
EAST CORINTH.
L. P. FOSTER.
trOTEL., FLOUR AND GRAIN MILL
Al Best of Flour aud Graiu constantly ou
auu.
S. THOMPSON. 1
TIN SHOP. SEOVES, TIN WARE, IRON
Waro, Wooden Ware.&e, All kinds of
lob work neatly doue.
CORLISS St SOGERS.
ITVBY GOODS. GROCERIES, BEADY
Made Clothing, Hoots at Shoes, o.
Largest stock iu Eastern part of Orange
ounty.
MIHCELLANEO US.
H. L. BIXBY.
VTEW PHOTOGRAPHIC BOOMS, CHEL
f sea. Vt. Open Mondays, Thursdays and
laturdays.
EDOAB W, SMITH.
TTORNKY . COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
Wells River. Vt. Oflioe with Judge Ua-
erwood.
E. L. BOOTHBT.
)HYSICUN AND SURGEON, FAIRLEE.
- V t. Refers by pertnhwinti to Drs. Carter
i Doty, Bradford, Vt , aad to Dr. Frost,
anwer, K. H.
J. P. JOHNSON.
TAH HALL, ELY, VT. LARGE AND
J well fitted ud fnr .MWMn.i.iL. Mr n..nM
na an ainus ot
entertainments. Let at reas-
liable rates.
C. H. SIBLltV.
DARRIAGK TRIMMKR, AND MANIFAC
riirerof all kinds of HarnauA. Unir
ff done in the best mnm u.iH u. , ...
fite Hotel, West Frlee. - r
ofily. Brother, niy.
Softly, brother, Iu tne words
' Which thy angry toiiKue wouhl say,
Keep the sharpest till to-morrow, ,
Apeak the softer words to-day.
Let the nightly iliailowa come
'Twut the BiiKry tliouulit ami word.
And before tho curse is spoken
let the eveuini; prayer be said, j
ft Softly, brother 1 of tin blow
, Ready Id thy uirriiised arm, i
" Sfrike to day the very (eiitlest ;
Let tn-uinrrow do tlu barm, I
Iu the tire of thiue eye '
Let a ((leant of pity shine.
That the pity which thou luekest
Iu thy closet uiay be thiue.
Softly, brother: in thy steps 1
On the broad aud Howeiy way,
Take the lung aud swift to morrow,
Take the short and slow to-day. ;
Let no future Kaiu eutioe thee, ,
let no past success enthrall, , ,
But let sturdy effort lead thee 1
To the Lord, thine all iu. all.
!
Softly, brother) ere the class ',
u . 1 f : ....... -
U' nl, ..1. if iA j ' .rfl JtZ'i '" '
viif, iiipiiii hit uriinnrowi .
Qucnib thy thirst with dew to-day.
NotbiiiK cun be lost by wuitiui;,
Aud oue day is not so Iouk,
Thou may'st liuto tho bowl to-morrow
For the evening prayer is strong.
Softly, then, my brother, softly,
Seek the evil to delay
By ilelurrinu' till to-morrow
What thy hot heart craves to-day,
Aud thou It tiud the prayer of evening,
And the solemn hnsh of uight,
Will have power of Uod to vanquish,
Aud put evil thoughts to flight.
WIIlItMr Cheney'K Warning.
IT THK 1II1EAKIS0 OP TDK HAM.
Hide. I Cheney, ride I For close beside,
On a ghostly galloping steed,
Is a grizzly shade, iu a shroud arrayed ;
Death rides behind thee I Speed 1
Ride well, ride fast, for the die is cant,
And the game has been won by Death ;
And he Cometh now with exulting brow,
Aud a laugh iu his icy breath.
And after him two sceptres grim ;
My friends I the Pale One suith
They are oome with me ; good friends are wo,
Destruction I Havoc I Death !
Uiilo fust and well, the news to tell I
Fly ! neighbors, for your lives !
If yo would save from a watery grave
Yum1 little ones and wives I
Fly ! Neighbors, ily ! for the Hood is nigh,
It has shattered its flimsy bound ;
It is cowing fust as the whirlwind's blast
Hark! hulk I to its dreadful sound I
So Cheney rode, but the torrent strode
With giant steps behind ;
And its fateful roar went oa before
On the wings of the morning wind.
He rode full well, hut the echoes tell
Of a wail of deep despair j
For the spectrul Three, with murderous glee
Were holding carnival there .
HOW IT WAS DONE.
Wulkiny along Broad street the
other day I unexpectedly met Ab
bott Drake, a frieud from whom I
had been separated for many years.
need not say the meeting gave me
great pleasure, for we had been
mostly educated together, having
passed our boyhood at tho same
school, our youth at the same col-
ge ; but our fortunes were difler-
ent. He, born to large wealth, left
college to mingle with the world nt
home and abroad, while I turned to
the profession I had long since made
choice of, aud began to work my
weary way towards independence.
We found each other a great deal
changed. Drake lost much of his
buoyancy of manner, much of the
merry, happy, careless flow of spirits
for which he once had been so cele
brated among his companions. I
was less grave than I had beeu reck
oned duriug our former acquaint
ance, yet I am a man of business,
and married. We had a great deal
to say of the different changes that
had occurred to us, and I foun d
that, although altered in manner,
habits, aud character, w met the
same to each other as wa had past
ed. It was verging towards eveuiug,
(I dine late,) aud I asked Drake if
he would go home and dine quietly
with my wife and self. I told him
I occupied a small house, and lived
in an uupretending way, for I had
not yet growu rich. lie shook me
by the hand, aud instantly accept
ed my invitation, and we forthwith
set out for my residence. Duriug
our walk I endeavored to describe
my wife to my friend, aud detailed
to a great degree on her amiable
qualities aud excellent kuowledge
ot housekeeping, when all at once
it occurred to me that we were with
out a servant. We kept but one.
I think if we had beeu unfortunate
enough to have had two we should
have gone mad. Our maid of all
work left ns the previous day be
cause we could only giant her four
afternoons out of the week for rec
reation. When the reflection that
my wife was without aid crossed
my mind I regretted that I had not
set a later day for my friend to dine
with me. But I kuew that my wife
had intended goiug nut that morn
ing to seek a servant, and a faint
hope that she might have been Suc
cessful in her mission cheered my
heart. My wife had indeed beeu
fortunate enough to secure the ser
vices of Mary Maloney, a raw-boued
typo of the Milesiau race, who bad
been landed jast thirty days from
tho Green Isle, Mary had plenty
of good qualities, but amiability of
temper did liot seem to be one of the
number. She arrived at my house
about ten o'clock that tnoruiug, aud
baft boon kept busy answering the
door boll, as it happened to be a
field day among the book canvass
ers.
"Shure, jiud does this happin (very
day T w inquired Mary of my wife,
as she answered the suminous of
one of these persistent booknieu for
the twoutith time. ' !
"1 should be so sorry if it did, "
answered my wife. "I never kuew
the clrcnmstance to occur before. '
"An I should be sorry, too," re
joined Miss Moloney, her face flush
ing to a rod glow, "for I couldn't
agree to stand this kind o' work :
the devil must bo in those chaps,
I'nv thinking. It's nodacent way
to bo tratiug the dure stips. Lofk
at the mud, mam. I've wiped them
stips siven times already, au' that's
the blessed truth."
"I really wish those pests would
keep away," replied my wife, as she
bit her lip.
After a half hour's walk I came
iu sight of my home, where I knew
my wife was waiting me with a hap
py greeting. My heart beat high
as I ran up the steps to opcu the
door. Putting my hand in my pock
et, I discovered that I had forgot
ten to take my night-key out with
me. I tried the door and found it
open, but the vestibule door (which
was furnished with blinds) was
locked, I was, therefore, compelled
to go back and ring the bell. I
should have remarked before that
I had stopped at the bookseller's
and got three or four magazines
that I regularly subscribed for.
"We'll soon get in," I said to
Drake, with a laugh.
1 waited for a reasonable time,
and, as the bell was not answered,
I gave it another pull more vigor
ous than the first.
"I'm aftaid," I said, "that my
wife is without a servant. You
must therefore excuse the style of
dinner you will get.
" Don't mention it, " returned my
frieud ; "but if that is the case, had
I uot better come and dine with
you another time. I may put you
to trouble."
"By no means by no means,"
replied ; "if you are satisfied, I am
sure I shall be."
"All right," he replied, with
laugh.
My second ring at the bell beiug
unheeded, I rang it again; this
time I made the house echo with its
notes.
Pretty soon I heard a heavy step
hurrying along the eutry, aud as my
wife's feet were exceedingly small,
and her step light, I wondered who
the comer could be.
The next moment the blinds were
turned, and a vicious pair of gray
eyes peered out, and the voice of
Mary Maloney broke forth as she
called up stairs to my wife,
"May the divil devour me, but
here's a couple more of thim pests
as ye call them, Get out of this,"
she yelled, "away, wid ye ; it's not
the likes o' you the missus wants,
wid yure dirty trotters all over the
stips that I've claned sivin times
this blissed day."
Abbott Drake laughed until the
tears ran from his eyes and although
I did not partake of the full force
of his merriment, I could not re
frain from a smile. -
"What in the divil are you grin
in' at t " shouted Miss Maloney, the
ominous purple rising to her cheeks.
"Will ye begone I"
Drake was leaning against the
wall screamiug with laughter. "Oh,
this is too good, " he exclaimed. " I
was compelled to join in his mirth.
"Divil a bit will they stur," shout
ed Mary Maloney, looking up stairs.
My wife was dressing and she could
not come down immediately. "Ye
won't go, ye won't, hey ! " cried Miss
Maloney, gazing fiercely through
the blinds.
I thought the amusement had pro
ceeded far enough. So I put on a
serious face and began :
"My good woman, I am the "
Mis Maloney did not wait to
hf ar the conclusion of my remark,
but the door flew open with a bang,
aud she planted herself before me,
her face livid with anger, audi her
red hard fists placed in an attitude
that betokened coming hostilities,
' ''Say that again, ye blackguard,
if je dare. I'm yuro woman, am
If ttoiry the day that should come
to pass. Yure womau t"' j
She stood iu the vestibule door,
her person taking up so much room
that it would have been, , danger-
ons feat to hare attempted to dodge.
past ner. . aue was exoeeuingiy an-
. ni 1!
gry, anil the' 'fight" was strengly
manifested in her words and attl- room into which I had been usher
tude. , . .' . J ed, wheu chancing to raise my head
My wife, hearing the noise, hur-
ried on her dress, aud now came
down the stairs teleru4he cause
of tho unusual sensatiftu. flhe first
caught sight of Mary Maloney, who
soeiug that reiuforccmeut had ar-
rived, was uow"spoiliug for a fight",
"Uomoon, mam , she cried ; "we'll
clear these pests of blackguards out
in a jiffy, or me name is uot Mary
Malouey."
My wife did not at first observe
Abbott Drake, who had stepped be
bind me, therefore she burst into a
fit of boisterous laughter at the
sight of my discomfiture; but' the
iustant she saw Drake she cou troll
ed her merriment, aud laid her hand
on Miss Maloney 's shoulder.
'That is my husbaud," she said
impressively.
"Yure husbaud t " echoed Mary,
her eyes opening with astonishment.
"Thin why in the divil didn't he
say so, " replied the maid.
Mary," continued my wife, "I
cannot permit such language to be
used iu my house by my servants,
You must learn to be more respect
ful and less profane."
Miss Maloney stared at my wife
in a sort of dumb amazement.
"Uu, let ner swear to uer heart's
content, " I said, " if she only ans
wers in other respects ; and, now
that the seige is raised, let me
present you to my wife, Abbott
This, my dear, is Abbott Drake,
you nave often iicard me speak
of him often enough to know who
he is."
"I am very happy to meet you,
Mr. Drake," said my wife, "and re
gret the stupidity of my servant in
causing you so much delay in get
ting into the house," and my wife
began laughing.
"Indeed, my dear madam,"' said
Abbott, "I assure' y6u, if you only
kuew the real pleasure this circum
stance has afforded me, you would
not make any apology. I have a
keen sense of the ludicrous, and
this scene has aroused in me the
love of fun that sometimes I fear
has departed from me forever. Oh !
I would love to witness such an act
as this every few days. I think it
might bring back the heyday of my
boyhood again."
My wife reascended the stairs to
conclude her toilet, aud I took Drake
into my office. The lower part of
my house was occupied by my
office, a small library where we
dined, aud parlor. Of course my
wife had to superintend the dinner,
Jiut women are very adroit at these
matters wheu they are to be per
formed under adverse circumstances
My wife is uot one of those who, to
make a parade upon occasion, lessen
the comforts of every day life. She
has never, since we have been mar
ried, set before me a dinner I might
uot have brought a frieud to partake
of ; nor has she ever appeared be
fore me iu a dress she could uot
have worn on occasions of ceremony,
Yet our expenses do not, by any
means, come up to our limited in
but we increase ixuuriea as we go
ou. We do not live in the world,
but we live in society society that
we like, and that likes us, and as
similates with us. All this, and
more in the warmth of my heart, I
told Abbott Drake, over a bottle of
my best wine.
After awhile Drake began to rally
us upon our way of life, aud tried to
persuade my wife that in former
days I had played the inconstant
among our circle of beauties, being
foud to admire and fickle to change.
I saw that in his then mood it were
vain for me to dispute his asser
tions ; so, to divert the time, I
pleaded guilty to oue serious attach
ment, and offered to tell my story.
"Some years ago," I said, "when
I was a briefless barrister, I went to 1
attend court at the county town of
N . I had a fatiguiug day's jour-
uey, and was dusty aud , way -worn
when 1 : arrived at tho only public
house in the place that was diguitl
ed with the name of hotel. It was
market day. and , the streets fwere
I filled with people and wagons."
I At this part of my story my- wifls
pushed usido her glass of jellej and
looked up anxiously iu my face.
smiled and proceeded- i !
i "Having ordered refreshment si
. . a
x sai uown r,o iook over a newspaper
which lay upon the table iti the
mv BVos fell unon a mirror Ihinh
h nncr -mi t1i nru.naiYn wall itAtfu.ta.in
two pictures, - one representing a
bold dragoon leaping his horse1 over
ativer, aud the other the ''Sailor's
Adieu," where a mariner, clad iu a
tarpaulin hat, blue trowssrs; aud
leather belt, was kissiug a woman
up0n the cheek, while each of his
legs was iu the possession of, two
small Bpecimeus of humanity,' who
seemed determined that he shoul d
not go away. There was a boat in
waiting, and the crew (who all had
red cheeks) seemed complacent
enough to have waited until the
young ones thought proper to re
lease pappy. before they pulled him
off to the vessel, whose sails ap
peared in the horizon. As Hooked
into the mirror I was struck with
horror at my appearance. I sprang
towards the bell-rope and gave it a
pull.. When the waiter appeared I
inquired if there were a fisst-class
hair-dresser iu the town on whose
skill I might rely. He replied that
oue of the finest artists in that line
in all Ameriky had his saloon with
in a few doors of where I was1 then
standing. I always had an aver
sion of putting my head iu the
hands of a bungler. ; With hasty
steps, th en I sought the shop of
Mr. Strop, and was surprised to
find the waiter bad spoken the exact
truth. Mr. Strop was an honor t
his calling. He went at my head
as only au artist could. When he
concluded he smilingly handed me
a small glass to survey myself. Mv
satisfaction seemed to please him,
He was a worthy man, and I shall
always hold him'in grateful recollec
tion. I returned to the hotel parlor,
and began to look at myself iu the
mirror that hung between the out
ward-bound sailor and the fiery
dragon. I was perfectly enchanted
with my mien. I was cut and curled
in the most distingue style."
My wife here laughed outright
and Abbott Drake smiled.
"The hotel stood back from the
street in a large courtyard, the pro
jecting wall of which, on each side.
preventing any view beyond,
Across this court people were con
stautly passing. I sat down at the
open window to watch them. One
group in particular engaged my at
tention ; it consisted of an elderly
lady and a young oue. The latter
dressed in white, with a chip bonnet
trimmed with blue. They were in
conversation with a gentleman who
was dressed iu a velvet coat and a
white vest. He had a Scotch cap
ou his head and light buff panta-
loous ou his well-shaped limbs. He
was laughing and talking with the
young lady, and she seemed to be
excessively amused at something
he was saying. She happened to
look my way, aud I saw she had a
pair of the most heavenly blue eyes
I ever beheld. I fancy she must
have guessed my thoughts, for she
looked away quickly. But that head
of mine was a thing not easy to
disregard. After a little while she
cast another timid glance at the
window. Again our eyes met ; she
blushed. Oh I good Mr. Strop !
Presently they walked away with
the man in the velvet coat. I poked
my well-curled head out of the
window to get a last look at her
beautiful form. She never looked
back. Then I tell back iu my chair,
and wished in my despair that I was
the man in the velvet coat. My
dinner came in. I could have mur
dered that waiter for bringing it. I
had no appetite. I ate little, swal
lowed a tumbler of wine, and lit a
cigar. I thought it might console
me.
"About three o'clock I walked
out, my head being full of the chip
bounet and blue eyes. Should I
ever see them again T There is no
escaping destiny. There, in front
of the saloon of the worthy Mr.
Strop, stood the velvet coated gen-
tlemau talking to the old lady and
her beautiful companion. I took
dislike to that man ou the iustant,
The vounr laoy had a scarlet rose
lu her hand, which she was medhau
ibally pulling to pieces. She shower
ed the leaves upon the pavoment,
and I cautiously went behind her
and commenced to pick up the pet
als. Turning about suddenly she
detected me in the act. Our eyes
mBfragain, and she blushed as redly
as'the ilower she was destroying.
I quicklygot out of. tho way and
went ' and stood by the curbstone
Velvet coat didn't see me. Spon
velvety coat; lifted hU Scotch cap,
aud,, making, a , profound, bow. do
parted. I was glad when he went
away. Blue eyes again sought mine
more uiusues. jusi men u. car
riage drove up ; the driver got down
and opened the door, and both la
dies entered it. Oh I I felt very
lonely and miserable. At first I
thought of getting lu also. The old
lady said something to the driver,
he jumped on his box, and as tho
carriage started the blue-eyed beau-
tv extended her small hand out of
the carriage . window, holding the
damaged rose towards me, dropped
it at my feet. It was the work of
au instant. I caught her hand,
nressed it to mv lii)S. gave it a
fervant kiss, and then picked up the
flower and gazed wildly after the
retreating vehicle."
"Don't don't believe him," cried
my wife, interrupting me, and speak
ing to Abbott Drake, "There is not a
word of truth ; I assure you, it is
pure' romance. I never looked I
never meant to drop "
I interrupted her in my turn, and
seizing her hand she had extended
in the energy of the moment, I
kissed it, saying, "That is the way
it was done, Abbott."
A Brave Yankee School Mabm.
On Monday of last week there was
an occurrence on the Harlem Ex
tension Ilailroad that is worth re
counting. About nine in the morn
ing of that day a serious collision
a collision between a girl and
train of cars was avoided iu a very
singular way. The girl is a school
teacher and she was on her way to
school. Tho train was from Chat
ham, ou its way to Rutland. Both
met on the trestle work near Brain
ard's station. The girl stood still,
while the alarmed engineer whistled
down brakes and managed to stop
the train only when his engine was
within ton feet of tho obstruction.
The treBtlo-work is thirty-six feet
high, and bears only one track.
"What do you mean do you want
to be killed !" inquired tho engineer.
"No," said the girl : "I'm going to
school." "Well, go back uutil the
train crosses tho trestle," said the
engineer. "I can't." sue replied
"I'm late now." "Step aside, then."
And she steped aside, outside the
track and on the edge of the ties
But the space was too narrow ; the
engine's wheels could not clear her
skirts. Her next plan was to sit
down, with her legs dangling be
tween the tics ; but thus the hoops
spread all the wider. Provokiug
delay for the engineer; humiliating
failure and posture for the school-
marm. "Hold on," said she, "I'll
fix it I" and then gathering up her
limbs and skirts, she stretched her
self at full length upon the outer
edge of the ties, seized underneath
with one hand the string peice to
which the rail is spiked and coolly
bade the train pass on ! In a inin
ute the train moved over the pros
trate form without jar or jolt; and
the next instant the girl was on her
feet, hastening towards her expect
ant pupils, before whom she was
determined to be "on time," though
she disarranged a dozeu railroad
time-table. Troy Times.
A Nevada man, who was walking
with his brother to atteud his wed
ding, was astonished by a proposi
tion to take tne bride elect off his
hands and marry her in his stead.
He was equal to the emergency and
did so, to the satisfaction of all con
cerned. A prisoner, brought up before a
police magistrate one morning re
cently, pathetically said : " The city
is a bad place; the whiskey is
stronger than that in the country.
1 wish I hadu't left the country to
come here. The country is the best
place for a man."
OTJlt BOYS AND GIRLS.
Mother's Honest Little Hoy,
BY JI.'UA A. MATTUH1VS. '
"Oh, see what I have done I " ex
claimed Mrs. Chalmers, as with a
sudden movement of her hand she
knocked down from the toilet tablo
before which she stood, a box of
sugar plums, which, dressing iu
haste, she had not noticed, "Here,
Neddie, come help mother, I am in
a great hurry, for Aunt Helen is
waiting for me. If you will pick up
all theso candies and put them safe
ly away lu the box you will bo a
groat help to me." '
Little Ned was sitting on the
floor playing with his blocks, but
ho jumped up at ouco at his moth
er's call and his busy fingers began
to pick up the scattered sugar-plums
very nimbly.
"Put it on the table wueii it is
ready," said Mrs. Chalmers, " and
then you and Lilly can go out with
Milly. When we all como home wo
will have a nice treat out of that
box."
"Aren't you afraid to leave Ned
aloiie with all that candy," asked
Aunt nelen, as the two ladies left
the room. "Ho will surely make
himself sick with it."
"Oh, no," replied Mrs. Chalmers.
"Neddie wont eat it unless I give it
to him. He is a very honest little
boy." . '
How good thoso candies did look
as the rosy fingers lifted them one
by one and laid them in tho pretty
box. A sunbeam peening in at tho
window struck across them as they
lay on the floor, and tho crystalliz
ed sugar sparkled like diamonds in
the light.
"Wouldn't dey taste good," whis
pered Ned. "But I mustn't bite
one: oh, no ! mutlder said I was a
welly honest little boy."
But he turned them over and over
most longingly, and the more ho
looked at them the harder did it be
come to resist the temptation to
taste oue.
"One little one, dess one little
one," murmured Ned, taking one of
the prettiest into his chubby hand
and looking at it on every side. "No,
dess two. One for Lillio, and one
for me," aud another sparkling can
dy lay beside that already in his
hand.
"Dess two, and dere's such a big
lot here," ho whispered.
But tticu something else seemed
to whisper.
"He is a very honest little boy,"
aud with a great sigh Neddie drop
ped tho iwo candies into the box,
aud shut the cover tightly down up
on them. As he sprang u to lav
the box upon the table something
lying beneath a chair close by
caught his eye. Two more of those
beautiful crystal drops ! As he bout
over them and saw the delicious
creamy substance which filled the
centre peeping out from a tiuy break
in tho top of one of them tho temp
tation was too great for his resist
ance. "Dey doss leff deirselves out for
me aud Lillie," he said, graspiug
them aud thrusting thein as deep
into his small pocket as they could
possibly be pushed down. "I must
go find Lillie, aud give her one. I'll
tell her"
His hand was ou tho door, but the
guilty little heart stood still. What
should ho tell Lillie 1 The naughty
fingers might steal the pretty caW,
dies, but the little tongue had never
yet beeu stained by a falsehood,
and it shrank back from the cherry
lips in dismay at the bare thought
of such a thing. As tho boy stood
there all trembling and bewildered,
the door opened from without, and
Milly, his nurse, an old colored wo-
man, who loved him almost as dear
ly as if he had been her own child,
entered the room.
"Neddie I Why, bress ye, honey,
what, ails ye T" she exclaimed, as she
caught sight of bis pale face and
statled, troubled eyes.
"O Milly 1 I'm 'most a tief ; a
wicked, prison tief t and mudder
said I was her honest little boy,"
sobbed Ned throwing himself into
her arms.
"Who said you was a thief, hon
ey t They'd better let old Milly
catch 'em," said the nurse, thinking
that some one had been teasing her
darling. ,. , , ,a
"'Twas me said so," faltered Ned,

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