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The state rights democrat. [volume] (Albany, Linn County, Oregon) 1865-1900, December 08, 1871, Image 1

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OLDEST DEMOCRATIC PAPER IN OREGON.
III ill 111
rCBLUBKD (VERY FRIDAY IT
MART. V. BROWN.
CFFICE IN PARRISH'S BLOClf.lRST STREET.
" IrCBllO ... . . n Ad n
VOL. VII.
ALBANY, OREGON, Fill DAY, DECEMBER 8, 1871.
NO 17.
STATE RIGHTS DEMOCRAT
3mit
i
UM V
111 .
in ioTiscB i une year, j an
months, $2 ; Three months, It ; One mouth, SO
ents; Single Copies, 12 ceuts.
Correspondents writing over assumed signa
tures or anonymously, must make known their
proper names to the Editor, or no attention will
he given to their communication!.
BUSINESS CARDS.
X. B. CBASuR. H. B. nt'MPBKKY.
V CRANIO R. & HUMPHREY.
ATTORNEYS AXD COUNSELORS IT LAW.
(N. B. littaiphrcy, Notary Public.)
Orrtca In ParrUh's Brick Building, up
stairs, tftany, Oregon.
vTuStf.
M. MclXXX & CO.,
'OOL, HIDES, LEATHER,
AND GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
BOUGHT AND SOLDON COMMISSION.
Liberal Advances made oa Consignments.
- No. 818 Battery Street.
v033yl SAN FRANCISCO.
CHEMEKETA HOUSE
SALEM, OREGON.
R.P.EARHART, PROPRiETOR.
THIS NEW AXD El.FUAXT HOTEL,
supplied with every modern neroiuuioda
tiun, U now optn fortius ivcepti.iu of gue.tn.
uiarl2tfiii:yf
E. N. TANDY,
ATTORN EY-AT-L AW
Asn
XOTARY PIBI.IC.
HARRISBURG, LI XX CCUXTY, ORICO
Will practice in the Curt. of Linn anl ad
joining o-mitu-s : nnd will bny good ueotiaV-lt
(spur at a rcaonahle di.-count. i-S'7I
F. A. CHRXoWETB.
Corvailis."
I. s. xutTn.
l.inu Co.
CHENOWETH &. SMITH.
ATTORN EYS AT LAW,
Corvallis, Cregoa.
&OmcK at tile Court lI"Cce. 6n27
C. . DKLL1NUER.
tbeo. etnatsrcii.
. BELLINGER & BJF.FslESTER,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
No 89 First Street,
PORTLAND, . . OREGON.
Special attention jri-en to matters in B.inkrupt
cy and all buiincs in United Suites Courts.
vfia24tf.
J. C.MENDENHALL,
NOTARY PUBLIC,
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE AG EXT.
ALBAXV, OREiiOX.
Rents Collected and Tales P .id for Xon-Resi-dent
and others, milou; Krai Eita'e pacer, etc
jGjJ-GiEcc next door to Telegrapil Office.
v5n4ltf.
. GEO. R. HELM,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAV
Will practice in all toe Courts of this State.
OFFICE: A LB A XT, OREGOX.
Xor. 11, 1S70.
issue KELSAT.
Joseph uasxus.
KELSAY &, HANNON,
UTSRYS AN 3 COUNSELORS AT LAW.
ALBAXT. OREGOX".
Partner fur Linn County.
Office np stairs in Post OELce Building,
voutyl.
G. F. SETTLLV11ER,
.Druggist and Apothecary!
DEALER IX DtiTGS, MEPICIXES. 0TLS
Faint.", Window iila-t, Dyetu3. Liquors,
2" n-y Soaps, Brushes, Perfumeries, Ac.
Prescriptions Carefully Coaiponatfed.
AU art cles and Drags in uar liaa warranted
of 'he but quality.
First street, Post OIEee building, Albany.
ju.laviuJSjl
CONSTANTLY OX HAXD AXD RECEIV
iSii a large stock of Uroccr.es and Provi
ions. Wood and Wiilow Ware, Tobacco, Ciar.
Confectionery, Yankee Notions, ttc, etc.
Wholesale and Retail.
aST-Opposite R- C. Hill & Si-n's Drug Store,
Albany. Oregon. junlevSuASy 1
v O, B. RICE, M. D.t
PJlYfflCIAX A.D Sl'RGEO.V,
ALBAXY, OREGOX.
. nM c...u : .1 . ..r nr..;.. tu.
ftesidenee : Oil the corner of Third and Baker
trot. apr!5v5ii35if.
JOHN J. HUITXEY,
iJT0E5EI AXD CODxNSELUa AT LAW
and Notary Public.
Special attentions given to collections.
Orrice Up stiir iu Parrisu's Brick.
Albany, Oregon. Y3u33tf.
TAKE NOTICEjJYERYBOliY.
THAT WE WILL PAY FOR GOOD BUT
TER from 22 to 25 cents per pound, aid
;ZU eaats a dozen lor Luliti, in traiie
i Larfe Assorlment of Crockery War
Those who wih coods AT A BARUAIX ba
etlr i.'e as eli at the CASH STORE and
ee for themselres. R. CUEADLE It CO.
6n-15tf.
ALBANY BATH HOUSE! '
TnB UNDERSIGNED WOULD RE3PECT
. fully inform tbe citizens of Albany and Yi
?ip4y that be has taken charge of this Kstablisb
ttvU, and, by keeping elcan rooms and paying
trietattu.juo to business, expects to suit all
shose who mtj fs-vor hiin with their patronage,
placing heretofoie carried on nothing but
FJrstrClagg SaJi- Dressing Saloons,
fie ex peats to give entire satisfaction to all.
SirChildien and Xa dies' Hair neatly cat
nd suajpooed. J0SE?H WEBBER.
T3nS3tf.
FOR SALE.
ALL PERSONS INTERESTED ARB BE
spectfully informed that tbo undersigned
dt now on Land, from selected lots, all the
varieties of a
CHOICE SEED WHEAT,
carefully and separately stored, and for sale on
reasonable terms.
?BlOtf C. B. COMSTOCK 1 Ce.
, Wm. S. Nbwbebrv, Agent.
, KOTICE.
A LLPERSONS OWINfi ON SUBSCRIP-
Atioa or note on account of railroad comple
tion to Albany please eall and "ttl e immediate
ly. ' - iS. nUliuAVAIi .
T?ff?Jf, $J 3. H. foster,
A D V E ltT ISEMJSNT3,
FINE BLOOD SHEEP.
COTSWOLB XXALr BHSESS
FOR SALK Apply t S. B. h.M
EltSOX. Moiiiitiiin Vii'W, Situls
Clara Co., Cal. r JOHN AXUEUao., C3
Clay St., Sau Franritao. junliln.il
DANIEL GABY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW AND NOTARY PUBLlt.
SCIO, OKI.GON.
jpjjr?pcial attt-utiuu given to the collection
of notes, accounts, Ac. dcclCvCntS.
JOHNS & GABY,
SCIO, OREGOX,
Kcal Esate Dealers
AXD. IMPROVED OR VMM l'KU
is chcaucr at tuc hik ul tlie Aa:.tiuiu
.uo iu uuy oilier part
XSu-lnouir"' of J- -M-
.r t. o t?t.tc.
Jutiy, Murion
Station.
oruf Uimll Uahv, tcio, Liuu county.
vti::3;!tf.
FRANKLIN MEAT MARKET
FIRST STREET,
SSALnAXY, OS'S.
Next Ocor to A. Cowan A Co." torc.
J. R. HEBRF.X. PROPRIETOR. WILL
.Iways keep the bist n.tal lhj trarkct aJior.ia
and t'Ut it up to ut: b;s iu.-onicis.
aul.-iv7t.ltf. J. K. HKBBEX.
b. r. RfKsri.L.
Att'y at Law.
c. r. rti'iiv.
Notary Pulilic.
ETJSSELL, ITEILY &
REAL ESTATE BROKERS,
C0LIECTIN3
AGENTS.
tjrPpccial at!ention (f:vcn to the aslcof Ren!
,tte. Real Etsto Lnig:.'i--u aid the t VHc lo t
E.-tatc
of ClniiiM. OEice. N.
VVvhiugton Streets.
W. Corner I irt and
PorllantI, Oregon.
Feb.
1S7.
v5o2Stf.
FROMAN BUILDING!
WHEAT AND FLKX-SEED DEPOT !
Clcanin; nnd EifTatice fcpacily 10,000
Eckels per tayl
150.000 EusLeb "Bleat TTantfetl in Store !
50,000 Sa L? f.ir th..e who with to sell or
store wi ll u.
Flax-S.-ed Contract. r. of Piotirer Oil Co. will
caii on us f-.r k.
T5n51vl. E. CAKTWP.IGHT.
THE JUSTLY
CELEBRATED
BAIN WAGON!
R
ECOGXIZED EVERYWHERE AS A
FIRST CLASS FARM WAGON.
Xo other Wa;on hat a Home r-putaii 7"'
to ' Bain" uir.lte, and it if tho oi ly
has be n U.u l and known to stan i tl.i ciimat.-.
In s word it is made of ti e L"t Hiuter.ai ai.d i
tbe best fiuiehed wa-u that cam to tUia mar
ket. We bsve different stvle of II oun lsand Reach,
Patent do. (so called) ioi-lcd-d
BLAIX. YOLXO A CO.
Tn43 A;.:ot at A .any.
FG3 THE HARVEST CF 1S71.
PITT'S THRESHERS!
HAINES. HEADERS!
LATEST I3IPKVCO 3JOTS:itS!
And A!l Kinds of
AgricuBlura! EiiipIcRieiits!
COXSTAXTLY OX HAXD!
Also the
CELEBRATED EAIK wAGOII
ELAIX, YOUNG t CO..
Tf,n37tf. Albany. Orjr-n,
STAR BKKWB3R Y I
TALLY & HOUCK,
HAVE E.STABLIS1IED AX EXTENSIVE
Brewery tusincss in
ALB tXT AD COKVAZ-.fc.IS,
Mr. Houck keeping the old s!and of Tally in
A.bacy aud Mr. T-il!y snj-erintonditis tbo Es
LU.I:ouiciit at C-rcaliis. Beer turpi died to
SALOONS ANLrFRIYATE FAMILIES
to order, and
WAE2ASTZDD TO EE TH VEEY BEST !
TALLY A II0UCK.
itf.
April U. 1871 vfinl
JOHN CONNER'S
mm AMD EXCHANGE OFFICE,
ALBANY. OREGON.
DEPOSITES RECEIVED,
SUtJECT TO CHECK AT SIGHT.
Interest Allowed on Time Deposits in Coin.
EXCHANGE ON P0RTLAXD, 6AN FRAN-
- CISCO, and NEW YORK, for sale
at lowest rates.
COLLECTIONS MADE AND PROMPTLY REMITTEO
ScTBnnking hours, 8 x. k. to 4 r. m."5
Refer to II. W. C0RBETT,
HENRY FAILING,
Feb.,1, X871-yl . W. S. LADD.
.. STORE, AT LEBANON!
A. COWAI4 & CO., Prop's.
S. II. CLAUCHTCN, Agent.
Fresh Stock Just Received !
X "ST C3- O O 3D S !
GROCERIES !
CLOTHING, HATS & CAPS !
Boots and Shoes!
GLASS AND QUEENSWAS.E!
Iron, Hardware, tie.
HTitci fill all he Disposed of at Albany Price !
PRODUCE TAKEN FOR GOODS !
se25v3n8tf. A- C0TTAN k CO.
WILLIE DAY'S FORTUNE.
Harry Cowpcr was a book-keeper
in a large commission house, ami his
employers prized bim because, though
only an employee, tifon a stated Bilia
ry, ho made their interests h'm own,
and suH'ored nothing to intertero with
hit duties, lie was a stout, healthy,
handsome youth, hi elear blue eye8
and purely tinted skin showing very
conclusively that his habits were vir
tuously regular.
It was towards the close of the day,
and Harry was busily engaged in bal
ancing his accounts. The only other
occitpxnts of the counting room was
Peter l'hipps, the delivery clerk.
Peter was an old man GO at least, and
had been in the employ of the house
for many years. He was broken in
health, hut was able to keep an ac
count of goods as they were deliv
ered, lor which trilling sen ice ho re
ceived Kufilcicut lir Ins ouppm t.
Harry had just cio.ud his ledger
w hen Jasper Groome entered iho of
fice. Jasper was Harry's Senior by
two or three years, .ml held a limited
interest iu a small house near by. Ho
WiiS well and fashionably dressed, and
might bo accepted as a fashionable
man.
"Harry, my son, have you heard
the nevvs 'r" cried the new comer, tap
ping his friend upon the shoulder.
"i have heard nothing wonderful,
Jasper. Is gold up or down?"
"A certain kind of gold is high up.
Haven't you heard of the stroke of
fortune which has fallen to Millie
Day?"
At the mention of that name Ilarrv
Cowpcr caught his breath, aud a quick
Ilu-it was visible upon his clear creek.
"I have not heard," he said.
"Drii't yon remember an uncle of
Mill.e.s who was sick here in New
York a lew years ago, aud whom blie
nursed so tenderly "
"Mr. Snyder her mother's brother
vou mean";"
"Yes."
"1 remember htm very well, for I
parsed a great many evenings very
pleasantly in his company."
' Well," pursued Jasper, "old Sny
der, it seem, was one of the lucky
ones in Chicago laud. About two
months ago he died without chick
or child, ami his attorney has been
on here to inform Miss .Millie Day
that she is solo heiress of his whob;
fortune. It is somewhere in the
neighborhood, of half a million.
There is over two hundred thousand
in bank. What d'ye think of that,
old fellow
Harry Cowpcr shrank like one
w ho received a blow. He was silent
and thoughtful.
'How, my boy! don't it plcac
you?" demanded Jasper, w ith a show
of surprise.
Harry rallied and answered, with
a shake of the head:
'Xo, Jasper I nm sorry for this."
"Sorry? And wherefore? I thought
voti had a peculiar regard for the
Cowper looked up, and ft-ntly
smiled. It was a smile, but there
was pain in it:
"Jasper,'' he said seriously and
earnestly, as one sjicaks in confidence
to a dear friend, "I love Millie Day,
though I have never spoken to her a
a lover. 1 have been waiting until I
could insure her a home if she accept
ed my proffered hand. As you
know, I have only my salary to de
pend upon, and a portion of it is set
ap::rt for the maintenance and educa
tion of my sister."
"Are you serious?" asked Groome.
'Wtll the coining of this fortune de
ter vou from pressing your suit?"
"Yes."
''But, man alive! Is not the priza
worth more than ever before? If
Millie Day was worth winning when
fche had hardly a dollar of her own,
what must she be now ?
"Mie can ie no more to me now,
replied Harry. ''It was Millie Day
that I loved Millie Day 1 fat I love
still, and no amount of worldly
wealth can add to the price I would
have set upon her love in return.
Hut that is past. Had she remained
poor I had hoped ere long to have
been able to oiler her a home a home
w here she could help me to find joy
and comfort."
"And do you mean to Bay, Harry,
that you give her up?"
"She is not mine to give up."
"I dare not press it. After so long
a time my past silence might be mis
construed, and my claim be regard
ed as mercenary."
"Hy Jove, old fellow ! she II make a
rich catch for somebody."
"No richer than before," said Har
ry with solemn seriousness. "I tell
you, Jasper, that ior tne true man,
seeking a true wile, JUiuie Uay, with
only her truth and her goodness for
her own dower, would be a priceless
boon. I should esteem it the richest
gift this side of heaven. I think if I
had her for my companion I should
challenge the world to exceed my
happiness."
"Harry you're a fool!"
"Thank you." .
"If you are to step out, I shall go
in, and try to win."
Harry winced, but betrayed no
feeling,
"Yon are your own master, Jasper."
"I shan't be rivaling you?"
'No If Millie can love you, then
it is prove that she has "not loved
me."
"Then count me in on tbe race for
the heiress. By Jove ! I'll make the
attack this very night. I shall meet
her at Darwin's. Are you going ?
"No,I don't belong to that 6et.-
You forgot that I am only a book
keener." '
'Yes, I; remember. But you'll
get into a house one of these days.
You'll find it pleasant, Th title of
a merchant gives a fellow a lift in so
ciety. But I aint vain.- If you'll go
with me I'll introduce you at Dar
win's." "No."
"Then I'll go alone; and be sure I'll
make love, bold and strong, to Miss
Mildred Day."
"One word," said Harry, as his
friend was upon the point of depart
ing. There was a pain mark upon
his face, and his lips quivered; but ho
spoke calmly though with a pitiable
effort: "You seek to win the love of
! Millie Day. Y'ou may succeed. If
such should le tho result Jasper, I j
pray you to be true and faithful; for I
she is an angel and is worthy of all j
love ami honor!
"Never fear, old fellow. I'll make
her a good husband if I win her.
Haifa million! Zounds! Isn't that
worth working for?"
And with this Jasper Groome
turned from the office, ami Harry
Cowpcr bowed his head upon the
edge of his desk.
"Shall I put up tho books Mr.
Cowper ?"
Harry looked up, aud saw the old
delivery clerk.
"All, vou here, Phipps?"
" Yes, fve been copying permits.
Shall I put the books in the safe?"
"Yes, you may, if you please. I
must go round and call for my sister
on my way home."
And Harry Cowper left the store.
Ami that n'uht, when he was alone iu
his chamber, his thoughts were sad
and painful, lie had loved Millie
Day a long, long tima; but he had
not yet ventured to speak of his love
for reason already made known.
Hut now a change had come over the
spirit of his dream. He asked him
self if he had decided rightly, and his
own sense of manly honor told him.
Yes. He felt that the maiden had
been lilted away from him, and he
hired not approach her. What had
he, a poor clerk, with an orphan sister
to support front h;s scanty earnings,
to do with offering his hand to the
heiress of half a million ? It would
be simple beggary.
Time passed on, and Harry Cowper
was punctual at his desk, and at
home. He went nowhere else. On
the first of January his salary was
raised five hundred dollars a year.
He had looked forward to this event
with high hopes. He had once
thought that upon a salary of two
thousand dollars he might venture to
ask Millie to become his w ife. Hot
tho bright dream had fled. Still he
hailed the increase as a blessing, as he
could now do more for his sister.
A month had passed from the time
of the arrival of the attorney w ho had
come to place Millie Day m posses
sion of her fortune, and as might be
supposed, suitors for her hand had
been plenty and persistent. Harry
Cowper was on his way home when
he fell in with Jasper Groome.
Friendly salutations were passed, and
for a time they chatted upon various
light topics. At length Jasper said:
"By the way, old fellow, it's all up
with the heiress."
Harry started and grasped for
breath.
"She has refused me, plump, square
and flat. What d ye think of that ?"
"JJeftised you?" rejeated Harry,
regaining his breath. "Has Millie
Day refused you V"
"Yes. I guess she's after higher
game. There is a perfect army of
suiters in her tram, but 1 think she
looks with the most favor upon old
Corydon."
"Do you mean Warren Corydon,
the banker?"
'Yes. He's worth a million and a
half. Depend upon it, she has her
eye upon the Fifth Avenue."
Harry's only response to this was
"Pshaw P And yet
Hut he would not reflect upon it.
He went home aud tried to forget all
about it, and the more he tried to for
get, the more he remembered and re
flected. A few days after this, Mr. Stnrgis,
the senior partner of the firm in whose
employ Harry served, entered the
couuting-room, and accosted his book
keeper:
"Mr. Cowper, my wife bade me
give you this." And he handed him
a daintily tinted and embossed envel
ope. Harry took it, opened it, and found
within an invitation to attend a party
at her house on the following even
ing,
"It will be a very quiet and sensi
ble party," said Mr. Sturgis, "and my
wife is anxious that you ana your
sister should honor her. 1 think we
may count upon your presence !
Mrs. Sturgis had been a true friend
to both IJarry and his sister, aud she
was a worthy and estimable woman ;
and after a little consideration he
said he would go.
The large drawing-room of the
Sturgis mansion were brilliantly
lighted and the assembly was select,
not selected upon the basis of fashion,
but called with appreciate care from
the realm ox intellectual worth. Mrs.
Sturgis had taken charge of Harry's
sister, and our hero was proceeding
to join a friend whom he had discov
ered in another part ot the room,
when he met Millie Day. She
changed color when she saw him, and
for the moment it appeared to Harry
as though she would have avoided
the meeting, but she presently rallied
and greeting him with a smile. Her
greeting was very brief, however, and
with a hurried step she passed on,
and joined tho old banker, Corydon
No wonder that men gazed admir
jngly upon Millie Day as he moved
7ast them. She was beautiful in every
sense. The father might pray that
his daughter could- be "Tike her; the
brother might pray that God would
bless him with such a sister ; the child
of sorrow and want could but thank
Heaven for giving such a friend ; and
the love who might win her for his
own could surely declare that earth
bore nothing of womankind more
bncht and lovely,
Harry saw her give her hand to
Corydon he saw Corydon tenderly
draw that band upon bis arm-rand
then he saw them walkaway together,
engaged in earnest conversation
Harrv CowDer felt faint and dizzy;
but be struggled against the load and
1 turned away to other scenes; and yet
other scenes could not drive llfat
painful scene from his mind. Could
it be possible that Millie was about to
sell herself to Warren Corydon? He
was old enough to be her grandfather.
Yet he was a-well kept old man far
more manly and vigorous than were
manyofthoso pinks of fashion who
claimed to bo young men. Nevor
before had Harry realized how deep
ly he had loved the beautiful girl, nor
how large a space she occupied in
his bright hopes of tho future. Fully
assured that ho was lost to him for
ever, he turned away to a window
and leaned his head upon his hands.
He did not wish to remain longer
with the party. He thought it best
for him to plead illness to his hostess,
and go to his home. He knew full
well that he could not appear himself
under such a cloud.
Ho was reflecting thus when he felt
a light touch tipo-.i his arm, and on
turning ho beheld Mdhe Day. She
was gazing wistfully up into his face,
and there was a wondrous sparkle in
her clear azure eyes.
" Harry, I want to speak with you.
Will you come with me?"
Without venturing to answer in
words, he followed her. She led the
way to a small conservatory where
they stood by an oleander iu bloom.
A brief pause, and an evident struggle,
ami then Millie looked up and spoke.
Her face was radiant, and the sparklv
of her eyes had deepened to a fervid
glow.
"Harry, I have a difficult task to j
perform; but I have prayed forstrength '
and I think the strength has corue to
me. Pardon me if I am brief. I
seek your counsel. You know that I j
have lately inherited a large fortune."
" Yes, I know," eaid Harry, in a
gasping whisper. j
"And already," she paused, "that
fortune begins to oppress me. Mr.
Corydon holds it in charge for me,
and he will do with it just as I say. It
stauds between me and a very dear
friend a friend w hose love 1 prize
above all the wealth of the World
and I hate called you here here, Har
ry, to ask you if 1 shall give my for
tune up."
"Millie! I do not understand.''
Thrice she tried to speak, and her
words failed her. At length she
caught her lover by the hand, and her
speech burst forth:
' lfarrv, do vou know that old le-
ter Phipps is one of the best and tru
est friends. He was a clerk in my
father's store. It was mv father who
saved him from prison. and who lifted
lum up from the 1 read 1 ul slough ol
iiiteinpereiice, aud it was my lather
who recommended him to his i rwnt
position, w here he lias been many
years. 1 was but a little chdd then.
and Peter used to toss me in his arms.
Hut the dear old fellow has not for
gotten me. lie is never afraid to call
upon me, for lie knows that my heart
is warm ami sym pain. zing to want
him. He came to me. Harrv. and
told me of the conversation between
yourself and Jasper Groome. when
Jasper came and told you of my for
tune, lie told me ot ad vou said,
Ham all; all, and then I knew how
truly you loved me how noble , you
were and how blessed must le the
woman who could secure such a heart
and I I O, Harrv! the fortune has
put this upon me. Say that you do
not blame me!"
Harry did not try to speak. He
.. .. -
ouiy caught the biessel being to uis
bosom, and held her there a long,
long time held her there with her
head pillowed upon his shoulder un
til he could find words for utterance.
And so the fortune did not sever
those two pure and loving hearts, af-
terall. It became a secondary thing
in their lives; aud while thev found
their chicfest good in the cultivation
of those joy that sprang from the old
true love, their friends everywhere
those in prosperity and those in r.d
versity shared with them in the
blessings ol t tic fortune which Uncle
Snvdcr had left. And wo may add,
lh.it of all who gained sunshine from
.Millies fortune, not one had more
reason to be grateful than had good
old Peter Phipps.
Mixed. A jolly young fellow
named Corcoran, who, when last
heard of, was in the post of librarian
of the Chicago Historical Society,
when he arrived in this country some
years since, propounded a puzzle to a
gruff old clerk in the New Y'ork Hall,
which is believed to have shortened
that ofllcial's days. Corcoran went
up to the office of the Clerk of the
Circuit Court, to apply for his "first
paper." The deputy, who took charge
of that business, and had got it down
so line that he could grind out natu
ralized citizens by the dozen with his
eyes shut, was a' serious old chap,
whose custom it was whenever any
body's shadow fell across his desk, to.
sieze a blank form without ever look
.. . . n,..w.AA.l .a .Ka m-ncAi-iK-i-l I
lug tip, ifiuwct;. 1-1 puo W1U ll VilV-l IUI.M
formal interrogatories. So he did
with Corcoran.
"What's your name?" he demanded.
"John Corcoran."
"Your ago?"
"Twenty-one."
"What nativity." '
"Well; that's what bothers me; I'll
tell you, and maybe you can make it
o,u,t. My father was Irish, my mother
was English, and I was born on board
of a Dutch brig, under the French
flag, in Flemish waters. Now how is
it?"
The old clerk looked up aghast,
shoved his spectacles on his brow, and
slowly made answer : , , :
"Young man, your nativity and that
of our Savior are the only ones which
ever puzzled me" ' T:
A pretty girl says: ''If it was wrong
for Adam to live, single when there
was not a woman on earth, how
guilty are the old bachelors with the
world full of pretty girls I" k
.'TA man is in no danger as long , as
be talks love, but when he writes it
i he is impalling himself an bis own
I pothooks most effectually. .
From the Nnnlivltle Banner, October 17th.
TENNESSEE) TERRORS,
Miocltluir Oitf rugc MwlfYly Aven-
Red V 1,1,4 w;iv lii Alintrcis)"
More Lynching.
Two of the most diabolical outrag
es ever perpetrated iu a civilized com
munity occurred last week, near
Sbelbyville. The victims were two
of the most respectable white ladies
of t Hud ford county, and the guilty
parties two l.otoriou negro despera
does named Henry Wi'liams and
Samuel Gillilaud.
Miss Susan Patterson had gone a
short dhnauce from her dwelling,
scarcely out of sight of it in fact,
when she met Henry Williams, who
addressed her in language of the
most iiiHulting nature, li.fore she
could utter a cry for aid, the villain
seizud her by tho throat and threw
her to the ground. She now shrieked
ut the top of her lungs for help. Iu
the meantime her watchdog which
had followed her, poouued upon Wil
liams, and in his efforts to bite tore a
piece of cloth from the right leg of
Jus pantaloons. Tho ruvisber not be
ing able to manage both, as his in
tended victim was resisting with ail
the desperation of despair, while the
dog was liurrassiog him with fierce
and frequent attacks, he jumjcd up
and attempted to make Lis escape
without having accomplished his pur
pose. At this instant Miss Pa ter
hoii's brother came upon the scene,
immediately gave chac and ran him
into Shelbyville, where he was cap
tured on Hatui day, while hiding un
der tho house of Johr. 1). 1' tiller.
Williams was committed to jail,
and was not oaly identified by Miss
Patterson, but the piece of cloth
which the faithful dig hil torn from
his pantaloons was found to match
exactly.
A day or two after this attempted
outrage Samuel Giliilaud went to the
houe of Mrs. Holers and asked her
if any oiu was at borne beside, her
self. Frightened at bis menacing
manner, she replied that she thought
there were others about the house,
whereupon he told her the lied; that
he had been watching around the
house for some time, and not n soul
tra there beside herself. He further
iiuormca Iter tna. ne iiai driven the
lieare iu whi. b her husband bad been
conveyed to his giave, and that be
had bad his eyes upon her ever since.
Suspecting now what was his inten
tion, Mrs. itodgers commenced to
ncream, when the fiend clutched her
by the throat, threw her on the floor,
polled out-a U:rk aud gave ber to un
derstand that if ube u.ade any noise
it would be her death. Notwith-
standing this murderous threat, she
resisted him wi.h all ber unequal
strength, and, in ber struggle, she
scratched hint on the nose with ber
linger nails. After having satisfied
bis brutal desire, Gill laud weut to
the door to see whether any oue was
approaching, returned aud with bis
dirk ieady to murder his victim if ube
made any further resistance, aga-.u
outraged ber person aud rushed out
of the house. Her brother, Johu
Johnson, a constable, happening to
come up at the time, chased the ne
gro dowu and brought him back.
.Mrs. llogets immediately recogniz
ed hi in by bis peculiarly repulsive
face, by the scratch upou his face, by
the scratch upou bis nose, aud by the
shoes which be wore, they haviug be
longed to her deceased husband.
Giliilaud was committed to jail at
Shelbyville, and was, ith Wi.hains,
taken out las'. Saturday to the dis
trict where the outrages had been
) erpi-tra eJ for esaminaiiou before J.
M. Oolsey, a Justice of the Peace.
The magistrate not being at borne,
the prisoners were detaiued there by
E. W. Raney, the Deputy Sheriff, in
whosj eaarge they were uutil dark,
when the officer started to return
with them to Shelbyville.
Not long after dark, aud about
three and a half miles irom Shelby
ville, on the Tultahoma road, they
were met by about live hundred men.
none of whom, it is important to
state here, were in disguise. The
nrisoners were seized by the mdig
uant citizeus and immediately buug
to a limb of a tree. Upon their bod-
ie wjre placad placards warmnj no
one to it move them until tho next
evening, unless br legal authority, on
nain of Mharin? the same fat. The
Deoutv Sheriff, who had been direct
ed by Sheriff Fonville totakeaguard
along; "and not allow the prisoners
to be harmed or taken away from him
protested against tho course of the
law being interfered with, but he and
his guard were .obliged to yield to
sunerior numbers; The night was
so dark, and the execution so sum
mary, that not one of the avengers
was recognized, - though, as ueiore
of tbjm were disffuiw
Boh Williams aud Giliilaud w
... ....
ed.
ere
a terror to the whites and blacks of
Bedford, and all rejoice at having
Leen rid of their presence.
A bill is now before the Legislature
making rape a capital offense. We
hope that it br some similar measure
will be speedily passed into a law.
The crime is one which has been
committed with fearful frequency of
late, and no offense against the laws
of God or man more richly merits the
heaviest penalty that can be infliced.
Pretexts for interfering with the due
process of the law can be no longer
offered when the severity of the pun
ishment is made equal to the enor
mity of the crime.
"How is your wife to day?" said a
friend to a.French gentleman. 'Oh!
nioche de Bern," said he, "she is no
boter, and I 'fraid ver litle wuss. If
she gon to nie j wish jhe would do
it soon. I feel so unhappy me
m'nd it so moche unsettled. When
she die I shall not be so moche dis
satisfied." '' ' " ' " :'
Josh Billings says he will never
patronize a lottery as long as be can
hire anybody to rob bim at reasona-
ble wages,
From the Sacramento Reporter.
MARSHALING THEIR BLACK BAT
TALIONS. We have additional evidence that
the negro vote is the salvation of the
Republican party. That vote was
not needed by the victors in this
State this year; but if the victors this
year are not the vanquished next
year, the black man will be the cause.
However, in more thau one-half the
States the black Republicans have
saved their white brethren this Sum
mer aud Fall from utter rout, and in
one-third of the States, as is well
known, the blacks made up the bulk
of the Radical organization. In four
States South Carolina, Louisiana,
Florida and Mississippi they out
number the whites. The dominant
party is now, more thau ever, a negro
organization. The black oiah(agcinst
whom we bear no malice, ami whose
rights we recoguize, be it remember
ed), is the life, the support, the hope,
joy aud pride of that party.
The contest last month in Texas
was a battle between the whites and
blacks. The whUe population there
is5(;i,0C0nud the black 2.j3,000.
The ratio of votes amoug the whites
and negroes are about the same. The
Germans, like all other white men,
voted the Democratic ticket at the
recent election. That it was a case
of white against black is shown by
the large Democratic majority of 40,
000. Probably not one hundred re
spectable white men voted the negro
ticket.
It now appears that tbe great State
of Pennsylvania is kept, under the
black flag by the black man. That
State gave a Radical majority of 14,
000 on the 10:h ultimo an increase
of 10,000 on Geary's vote. Of course
there has been much Radical exulta
tion and some Dernociatic despon
dency. But it is not surprising, nor
Ls it fatal to our cause in that Com
monwealth. While the Radical ma
jority was 14.0TX), the negro vote was
20,000. But for their black recruit
the Radicals would have been scat
tered like chaff before the hurricane.
Ia spite of anti-Orange riots, Euro
pean wars, Tammany frauds, and
other drawbacks, tbe gallant Democ
racy of the Keystone State would
have rolled up a majority of ticelre
thoumnd for their ticket last month
but for the greatest of Radi;al god
sends, the everlasting nigger. The
State of Pennsylvania is more firtnlv
joined to her idols now than ever.
The Democrats have a heavy majori
ty to overcome there at the Presiden
tial election next year. It will be
known by the time the National Con
vention assembles, if it is essential to
success to secure the electoral vote
of Pennsylvania. If tbe Convention
looks to Pennsylvania as the battle
ground they will nominate for Presi
dent the only man who will stand the
gho.it of a show to carry that State.
Everybody knows who that man is.
A CAT-ASTBOPHE.
The captain of one of the largest
teamboabt running on the Potomac
was astonished one day lately, as his
boat touched the landing at one of
the riverside watering-places not a
great distance from Washington, to
see all the guests assembled with
their baggage ready t take passage
for the city. In making inquiries as
to the cause of this genera exodus,
he soou discovered that therby hung
a tale. A cat s. it appears the lare
at the hotel bad disagreed with the
boarders, and not satisfied with com
plaining, they took French leave.
A batch of dough bad been prepared
for the oven and placed on a table.
A playful kitteu thought it would be
nice to run over it. It looked so
snowy, warm, and templing. Kitty
tried it aud soon found her delicate
little feet sinkiug in the dough. She
straggled to ecap, and like Gover
nor Morton in thj Etla:i treaty busi
ness, ouly struggled to sink deeper,
until this youthful cat disappeared
entirely, aud so Hie young lochiu
var weut into t ae yeast. She never
rose again, but tho bread did. It
closed over I h.s unfortunate specimen,
not leaving a hair apparent. Cooky
of course was not aware that instead
of a loaf of bread she had a kitten
dumpling, and put the mass into the
oven and baked it. When the bread
was opened at breakfast next morn
ing the birds did not begin to sing
'ut the boarders did. They fairly
howled with wrath. They knew tba
there had been a family of kittens.
"and as hash had been served for
brreakfast before this extraordinary
loaf was opeued, the conclusion "was
natnral that the other part of the
family had gone into the hash and
down their throats. They were first
taken with sea-sickness, next with
home-sickness, and then ensued
general packing up. The fashionable
summer resort was left with, no in
habitants but tbe cook and the bar
keeper and what remained of the
family of kittens. .
I was once walking a short distance
behind a very handsomely dressed
young girl, and thinking as I looked
at her beautiful clothes. "I wonder
if she takes half as much pains with
her heart as she does with her body?"
A poor old man was coming up the
walk with a loaded wheelbarrow, and
just before he reached us,, he made
two attempts to go into a yard of a
small bouse, but the gate was heavy j
and would swing back before becouhr
get through, "Wait," said the
young girl springing lightly forward,
"I'll hold the gate open." And she
held the gate until he passed in, and
received his thanks with a pleasant
smile as : she went on. - "She de
serves to have beautiful clothes, "I
thought, "for a beautiful spirit
dwells in her breast." Liltle Corpo
ral. A paper out West has for its mofc-
j to, 'Good will to all men who pay
j promptly.' ' Devoted to . news and
j making money. . ' ' -
TO; MY MOTHER.
Could I rs-lie my happy childhood years,
And then, si now. ! conscious of tbe pain.
The wakef ul nights,, the anxious hopes and art,
My carols words, or thoughtless actions
Tain
Hiith given thte, dear mother, gladly I'd
Repay the f.-nd indulvnrs, eounsal kind,
Tln u gave.t. toattuy e.Ud might he allied
To the in goodness and superior mind.
Ort times, forsooth, my lips did theeup'rraid
Fr checking some wild fancy, dearly in j
Matuouglit tby heart was hard, and wisdom
stayed, -
But nw I know full well thy daty's don.
Tba precepts irom tbe depths of pure heart,
;ombind with practice, studied well tii9
while.
Perchance has been magtKt set apart
To draw me far from influences v ie..
Thine eye has etely watched my daily round.
Thine ear was ever open t my wants;
In sickness, ia-tlier, tbu wert niehlly found '
Reside, my eou.u to catch tbe whispers!
thoughts,
Tbe fund maternal hand which pressed nay
brw,
. And fonder rtill tbe lips tbst oft met mine.
Have bwn to me a sola, e, nnd even bow.
In fancy's dream, toy bead is laid sear thin.
Or wbat i- dearer yet, am lulled to sleep
Upon thy bwm. One boon alone I crave;
'Ti. strong In lire, and at tbe end as deep
As bi-r dark slumber, broken by tbe grave.
Maybap the bpe it selfi'h, felt by me.
Uut thus it is ; n-.r wu!d I bre.k the bands
Which bind my soul, aye, so firmly to thee.
My all. That Time's bour-glass may stay
tbe san.is
Which measure life and Icnjtnen out tba days
Rgyond the years allotted to mankind ;
That when I'm sutnutuned bene tbe cheering
rays
Of tby soft smile may lore my way, and find
A pt'faye bright t-rouzb tbe dark vale of death,
Is all I ak- Xi-n other fru-nd will weep
Such tears of heartfelt grief; none other's
breath
Will warm my cheek when in death's anas I
leep.
iioyv son e won est white.
In a recent issue ot WoodhuU and
Ciajtin't Weekly, edited by females,
we find the following choice senti
ments on tbe subject of "Chastity:"
"Chastity is not a virtue. It is
rather a crime against nature
fee ling life's fame with elf-subs'antial foal.
Miking a famine when aboadaaee lie.
It is peevish, proud,- and made of self
love, the most inhibited sin in the
canon. It is either want of capacity
or opportunity, want of a heart cr a
bigoted prejudice ; or else a mero
6ham or pretense, a cover for the
grossest crimes against the body."
Can language go further ? What
journal in the United States or any
where published by the sterner sex
would venture upon such a line of "ar
gument ?" And these women
Woodhull and Claflin are the recog
nized leaders of the Woman's Suf
frage and Woman's Rights Associa
tions, and their sentiments are re
echoed by thousands of mistaken
women all over the land. The Bos
ton Eceninn Gazette, after reading
the passage we have copied, uses the
lollo wing forcible language:
Here we have the whole thins in a
nutshell. Let us have no more ridic
ulous prejudices against tbe indiscrim
inate commerce of the sexes. Pat an
end to those mere shams and preten
ses that have deceived the world un
til now under the insidious names of
modesty and virtue. To the winds
with chastity, since it is a crime bora
of self-love. No more crimes against
nature. We bave lived under mis-;
taken notions regarding virtue Ion;
enough. Cats, dogs and beasts of ev
ery degree are not so trammeled. Let
us break the shackles that have so
long bound us, and rise to the proud
freedom of a brute." -
4.
The Subsidized Press. The re
port of the Sub-Committee on Print
ing and Advertising has been pre
sented to the Joint Committee of Su
pervisors, Aldermen and Citizens of
New xork. it shows that the city
frauds have long been winked at by
many of tbe most influential papers,
who condoned the offense against
la iv and honesty, as long as they
shared the booty. In 1S69-70, and
up to September 16, 1871. the Herald
received $54,105, the Tribune $19,
212, the Tiirvs $31,093, the Sun $64,-
707, the Star $247,648, the World
$9 1,39 J, the Cotainerciai Adoertiser
$78,177, the I'ost $2 ,45o, the Demo
crat Pomeroy's paper $17.9 ft, tho
baiiAi y M -.rciiry ?ld,7as, and so on..
AU the trumpery little sheets tuat
have been in existence during tliat
time appear in the list for sums vary
ing from ten to fifteen thousand, dol
lars each. The total for advertisins
was $5,259,353. In 1859 and 1860
this item cost the city and county
only $480,453. These figures include
both city and county, the increase for
advertising the county business hav
ing been 3,709 per cent, in ten. "
The Cincinnati Enquirer b&js: 'On
Wednesday afternoon, two Sisters of
Charity, who bad been in charge of
the one hundred orphans which ar
rived from ..Chicago in the morning,
accompanied by two prominent citi
zens, called upon Mayor Davis, to ob
tain passes for the Sisters to return
to the city of Chicago. The Mayor
hesitated for a considerable time in
granting their request; . but, being
urged by the gentlemen accompany
ing the Sisters, he finally concluded
to issuo passes for their return." But
to show the spirit animating our wor
thy Mayor, it is only necessary to
give the reading of the pass, as fol
lows: ' 'Pass these two Catholics to
Chicago. Being thus insulted, the
Sisters and their escorts retired.
The pass was shown at the Archbish
op's residence, when the aforesaid
document was placed in an envelope
and' politely returned to Mayor,
Davis." .
A Brooklyn mother advised . her
daughter to oil her hair, and fainted
fiat away when that candid damsel
replied, "Oh, no, ma, it spoils -the
gentlemen's vest!"
A mule team was run over by
a South Carolina' locomotive. Tbe
train was wrecked, the car, destroyed
and the driver pitched headlong to
the ground, while the njule calmly
stood still and watched the proceed
ings with a pleasant b2. -

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