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Washington standard. [volume] (Olympia, Wash. Territory) 1860-1921, July 26, 1895, Image 4

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022770/1895-07-26/ed-1/seq-4/

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UK 11 ANUS PAPER.
Mr. (I icitlt uorlh*. i:\pi rli nrr nl
Hprluc 11 <> ii s«.«l<a niii t.
At the tirst-step Mr. Wigglcsworth
made into tin- front hall his foot n sl
ed upon n moist cake of soap, ami in
another instant In- was over hy the
dining-room Hour with his arms arounii
the hat tree anil some language trail
ing along hi him! that hit a coppery
taste in the atmosphere as it slowly
i uric! up the front stairs.
'• Who left that snap t ,n the floor?"
lie yelled, as soon as he could unhook
himself from the hat-tree.
" Why—l I guess Mary must,"
stammered Mrs. Wigglcsworth, who
had rushed in from the kitchen with a
potato masher in her hand. " We—
we are cleaning house, you know."
"Cleaning house!" said her hus
band; "well, s'pose ye are? You
needn't think you're going to use me
to flop up your moors with." Mr.
Wigglcsworth meant to say mop up
your floors, hut the suddenness of his
entrance had temporarily unhinged
his tongue. " Think you've seen nie
advertised in the' hack end of the
tn iga/.ine, don't ye?" lie continued,
" warranted to save labor or money re
funded! Keckon I'm to be had of all
grocers. I s'pose, or sent prepaid oil
receipt of price!"
These retorts were so keen that Mr.
Wigglesworth found his good-nature
coining back through their exercise,
and lie ate dinner without grumbling
more than a man has to do ordinarily.
When he went into the sitting room
he found the carpet up and there was
a bundle of wall-paper in a chair.
" What's this?'' he snitFed, suspi-
ciously.
" It's wall paper," his wife responded;
"I got it at a great bargain down to
Root it Gilder's —closing out of new
spring goods just received, at less than
cost."
" Hull!" grunted her husband, un
rolling a package and holding it wrong
side up. " Looks like a case of de
lirious trimmings."
" Yes," fluttered Mrs. Wigglesworth,
" it is the new art, the man said—after
Aubrey Beardsley."
" Who's Aubrey Beardsley?" coldly
returned Mr. Wigglesworth with a fall
ing inflection.
"He—he is—the—man that has
got up so many new ideas of—of art,"
Mrs. Wigglesworth explained ; " they
are quite crazy over him, you know,
so the man said."
" Well, if they're any crazier than
Beardsley I pity 'em," growled her
husband, dropping the roll in dis
gust. " Who's going to hoist this
nightmare onto our walls?" he added.
" I—l want you to step in and
speak to the paperhanger on your way
down," his wife returned, timidly.
"Oh, yes, that's it!" Mr. Wiggles
worth snorted, " feller with a black
board on his shoulder and a hinge in
the middle and four dollars a day—
and then an idea shot into Mr. Wig
glesworth's active brain. " B'george!"
he cried, firing with it, " I'll hang this
paper myself!" and he began peeling
otf his coat.
" But, Ellery," his wife said, in mild
expostulation, " you haven't had any
experience."
"Experience nothing!" retorled
Mr. Wigglesworth, " what's experi
ence got to do with a handy man?
Four dollars a day's experience enough
for me, and I must be a chump if I
can't smear some moist flour over the
rear end of a few sheets of paper and
slap 'em up against a smooth wall!"
When Mr. Wigglesworth had made
up his mind to a thing it was like the
French revolution, it had to go. In
brief time lie had the hired girl boiling
some paste and Mrs. Wigglesworth
had tied one of her aprons about his
neck, much to liis disgust. She said
when all nature was vocal with the
melody of spring, when birds were
fluting their first glad notes and a
thousand streams made music in their
journey toward the sea, she didn't pro
pose to have her husband going
through the street with flour paste
daubed all over his new spring clothes.
Mr. Wigglesworth opened one of the
rolls of paper, spread it out on the
dining-room table and, " taking a
sight" at the altitude of the room, cut
off a strip that appeared to be the
proper length. Utilizing a crumb
brush he spread on a copious quantity
of paste and then lifted the paper by
one end. He put his arms up to their
full length but the other end of the
paper still lingered on the table.
" Why don't ye take hold of it?" he
said testily to his wife, who stood du
biously looking on.
So Mrs. Wigglesworth upraised the
other end and her hnsband stood in a
chair. He reached for the border line
of the wall, but fell short of it.
" Why don't ye go fetch a table?"
he angrily roared at his wife. " That's
right!" he shouted as Mrs. Wiggles
worth dropped her end of the paper
and the paßty side trailed over the
back of the chair and clung about his
knees.
" Yon told n;e to get the table,"
Mri. Wiggles worth protested consider
ably abashed.
" Oh, of course!" Mr. Wigglesworth
snarled, "lay it all onto me. 'Fl'd
told ye to jump through a hoop I
s'pose you'd done it! Well!" he
yelled, as his arms began to draw out
of their sockets, "what ye standing
there all day on one foot for? Think
my arms are bAmboo fish poles with
German silver joints, don't ye? Why
don't ye go get the table, if you're
going to, 'fore I stiffen out here like a
blamed oIJ mummy and have to go
into a private collection under exhibit
A!"
Mrs. Wigglcsworth got back as soon j
as possible, but not before her litis- 1
band's arms had pulled out and he
had dashed the paper on the iloor and
was stamping on it. Nothing relieves
a man like stamping, so when they
had arranged the table—a mahogany
table with a shiny top—beside the
wall, and put a little hassock on top
of it, Mr. Wigglcsworth felt sufficient
ly mollified to snip off" another length
of the lleardsley pattern and apply
some more paste to its posterior sur
face, maintaining a steady current of
growling at his wife, on general prin
ciples.
" Now, don't he a fool," lie said, en
couragingly, as they picked up tlie
paper and he laboriously climbed to
the polished surface of the table with
it. Then lie stepped cautiously upon
tlie hassock and stood there an instant,
his knees wobbling painfully.
"Can you reach?" his wife called
from below. She was busy keeping
her part of the paste away from the
mahogany table.
"Keach?" echoed Mr. Wigglcsworth.
in a concentrated voice. " What ye
s'pose I'm up here for, anyway? Think
I'm addressing the county convention?
Want me to move an amendment in
favor of woman's suffrage, don't ye?"
Then the hassock turned slightly, as
the worm is said to do, and in catch
ing his balance and breath Mr. Wiggles
worth jerking the paper out of his
wife's grasp. The paper turned a
"mart corner and flapped up against
the wall and clung in a clammy and
tenacious embrace.
'• What ye do that for?" shouted
Mr. Wigglesworth, as loud as the un
certain hassock would permit.
" I—l didn't go to," returned his
frightened wife, and with what alacrity
she was mistress of she unpeeled the
cold and deathlike sheet.
" Now you let it alone, d'ye hear?"
warned her husband, and acting upon
his dircetion Mrs. Wigglesworth re
tired to the far side of the room, where
she watched him in a species of fasci
nation. This is the tragedy that
speedily unfolded itself before her:
Mrs. Wigglesworth, feeling more
and more the treacherous character
of the hassock, held bis knees at that
angle which gives to even the strong
est man an appearance of weakness.
His arms were thrust out to their full
capacity, and, though at a distance,
Mrs. Wigglesworth could feel their
dreadful ache. First, her husband
pressed hie end of the strip close up to
the border; the lower end caught on
also at the same instant, but in quite
another part of the room, and by the
time Mr. Wigglesworth had reached
painfully downward and fetched it
loose, at the same moment muttering
something that Mrs. Wigglesworth
tried hard to hear, but couldn't, dis
tinctly, the upper end came away and
flapped down over Mr. Wigglesworth's
forehead, leaving more paste there
than his wife had thought could be
left on one forehead in a single after
noon. Mr. Wigglesworth's comments
upon this transaction, as he frenziedly
snatched at the paper, were not only
clearly audible to the wife, but even
penetrated to the hired girl, who
promptly opened the kitchen door to
see if she might not be able to hear
still plainer. Then Mr. Wigglesworth,
with tin earnestness that nobody could
avoid noticing, spanked the moist side
of that paper against the wall and
slapped it witli both hands till the
creations of Aubrey Beardsleys's fancy
ran all into each other.
" Now fix the lower end," chirped
Mrs. Wigglesworth from the distance.
This was one of those things that
were better left unsaid. Mr. Wiggles
worth had stood on that uncertain has
sock till bis knees appeared perman
ently fixed at half-cock, his arms were
stretched clean out of their legitimate
precincts, his head was bursting with
the hot air of the upper strata, and per
spiration glued his garments so close
to him that he appeared to have been
born thai way. When this gratuitous
direction burst cooingly from his wife's
lips, he fetched a mad snatch at the
lower end of the paper, and on the in
stant the hassock, with a low, fiendish
chuckle, turned over on the other side.
Mr. Wigglesworth had only time for
one yell, but it was full grown in area,
and then vaulted into the air, the
paper letting go its bold and trans
ferring its affections to the falling for
tunes of the house of Wigglesworth,
and as that gentleman went sailing
through the atmosphere, the paper
wound itself in sinuous folds about
him, till a stranger looking in at the
window would have said that Mr.
Wigglesworth wae an admirable living
picture reproduced from the Yellow
Book.
"That's right!" be yelled, soon as
he could get to his feet and kick the
hassock through the door," stand over
there with your thumb in your mouth
and toeing in—that's all you're good
for. Wha' d'ye let go that paper for?"
he continued, shaking his fist toward
the ceiling; " why didn't ye steady the
table, same's I told ye? You make me
out the blamedest old fool in Knox
country, always trying to help you
with your economizing, but I want
you to understand that the next time
you get me chore around at house
cleaning, my name won't be Wiggles
worth !" and he rushed up to the bath
room to clean himserf.
"I felt awfully about it," said Mrs.
Wigglesworth to the ladies who called
soon afterwards to ask her to bake a
cake for the lodge sociable, " but if
you never saw a man fall off a ma
hogany table with a calico cooking
apron tied round his neck you never
can realize how dreadful Ellery looked
at that moment."
THE choir boys of St. Mark's church,
Seattle, inteud to ascend Mt. Rainier,
next Monday, under the leadership
of G. £. Englebardt.
SriALLER THAN USUAC
—lilliputian, in fact,
are Doctor
Chief Consulting
- Physician to the In
®ur I' ca ' Institute,
was the first to in-
a I.ittle Pill
tlie American
{axative and ca
thartic purposes
" these sugar-coated
"Pellets" are superior in a great many
ways to all mineral waters, sedlitz powders,
salts, castor oil, fruit syrups, laxative teas,
and other purgative compounds. Made of
concentrated vegetable ingredients, they
act in a mild, natural way. Their second
ary effect is to keep the liver active and the
bowels regular, not to further constipate,
as is the case with other pills. They aon't
interfere in the least with the diet, habits
or occupatiou, and produce no pain, grip
ing or shock to the system.
Dr. Pierce's Pleasant Pellets cure bil
iousness, sick and bilious headache, diz
xiness, costivene9», or constipation, sour
stomach, los 9 of appetite, coated tongue,
indigestion, or dyspepsia, windy beleh
ings, " heart burn," pain and distress after
eating, and kindred derangements of the
liver, stomach and bowels. These "Pel
lets" are easily dissolved in the stomach
and absorbed into the blood, stimulating a
flow of bile from the liver, and arousing to
activity all the glandular secretions. Thus
they act in nature's own way. In proof
of their superior excellence, it can be truth
fully said, that they are always adopted
as a household remedy after the first trial.
Put up in glass vials, therefore always fresh
and reliable.
One little "Pellet" is a laxative, two are
mildly cathartic. As a "dinner pill," to
Sromote digestion, take one each day after
inner. To relieve distress from over
eating, they are unequalcd.
They are tiny, sugar - coated granules;
any child will readily take them. Once
used, always in favor.
Accept no substitute that may be recom
mended to be "just as good." It may be
better for the dealer, because of paying
bim a better profit, but he is not the one
who needs help.
INTERESTING TO MINERS.
New Process for Extracting Gsld
from Ore.
A new process for extracting gold
from ore has recently been adopted in
Australia by the aid of electricity, and
several mine owners in this State have
made tests of the new idea with flat
tering results. It is not known who
first sprung the new scheme, but it
has proved so efficient that it will
doubtless be adopted wherever the
mines will justify the expense of put
ting in a plant, as the lowest clean-up
made by these tests has been 88 per
cent, of the total gold, and from that
up to 92 per cent.
The process is a simple one and is
described as tollows:
The ore is passed through a fine
crusher to an iron pan, beneath which
is a furnace. Water is mixed with the
ore, giving it a consistency of thick
soup. A vertical shaft having revolv
ing arms fitted with carbon shoes sits
in the pan and stirs the ore as it is
boiled. The carbon shoes are the
" anode," through which the electric
current passes to the bottom of the
pan, which has a dish of quicksilver in
the center, and forms the " cathode."
A small percentage of common salt
is added to the mixed ore, which being
decomposed by the electric current the
sodium passes to the mercury, and the
chlorine rising through the mass of
pulp dissolves the fine gold it meets
with, forming chloride of gold. This
is in its turn is also decomposed by the
current, the gold passing to the mer
cury and forming amalgam.
After boiling an hour the contents of
the big pan are drawn ofTinto what is
known as a " shaking table," the ob
ject being to recover any small quan
tity of mercury that might have mixed
with the pulp and any pyrites worth
subsequent treatment. The shaking
table has a horizontal movement, and
after its work is done the water is run
off* and can be used again.
It is estimated that when the appli
ance is once constructed the expense
of operation is much less than in ex
tracting gold by old methods, while
the additional saving of gold will soon
pay for the machinery.
A JURY OF WOMEN. —Judge Saufley,
of Girrard county, Ky., says he will
call a jury composed entirely of wo
men to sit in a breach of promise case
that is to be heard before him. He
even declares that he will have wo
men jurors even if lie lias to go out
side of the county to find 12 who have
not already heard of the case and
formed an opinion. This gallant
recognition of the rights of women
will be good news to the Olympia wo
man who insists that she has a right
to vote.
-•♦ -
A BLACK bear was shot four or five
times by Charles Mouncer and Ethan
Weathers, near the Sapsop river last
week. Mouncer thought the bear was
done for and started after liini, but
bruin rose and caught him and was
tearing his flesh frightfully when a
shot fired by Weathers killed the
animal. _
To transport the tea brought over
on the steamship Strathnevis, care
that, if put together, would stretch
nearly two miles will be required, says
the Tacoma Ledger. Twelve trains of
16 cars each will be required to trans
port that portion of the tea that is
destined for the East.
A LITTLE miss visitiug in Rangely
beard mention frequently of a local
firm, Neal & Quimby, but not com
prehending the exact meaning she
innocently asked, " I know what
kneel means; but how do you quim
by?"
OF old the question was, " Has the
mother-in-law come to stay?" To
day it is," Has the new woman come
to stay?"— Salt Lake Tribune. Of
corset its true; she stays.
HALL'S Vegetable Sicilian Hair Re
newer is unquestionably, the best
preservative of the hair. It is also
curative of dandruff, tetter, and all
scalp affections.
THERE are 114,149 members of the
organized militia in the United States.
The whole number of citizens in the
United States liable to military duty
is 9,945,043.
| THE |
imdfsm
3 JOB ROOMS L
Printing by hand, Printing of placards,
Printing by steam, Printing of bills,
Printing from type, Printing of cart-notes
Or from blocks by the ream For stores or for mills
Printing in black, Printing"bf labels,
Printing in white, All colors or use, sirs:
Printing in colors, Especially fit for
Sombre and bright. Thrifty producers.
Printing for merchants, Printing of forms,
And land agents, too; All sorts you can get,
Printing for any Legal, commercial,
Who've printing to do. Or bouses to let.
Printing for bankers, Printing for drapers.
Clerks, auctioneers; For grocers, for all
Printing for druggists, Who want printing done,
For dealers in wares. And who'll come or say call.
Printing of pamphlets, Printing done quickly,
And bigger books, to; Bold, stylish and neat,
In fact there are few things At the office of the STANDARD
But what we can do. On Washington street.
!:•
Corner "Washington and Second Sts.
CALL ON IIS ONCE, YOU'LL CALL AGAIN
E. C. Bickford & Co.
Ash Bedroom Suits, - $13.00 and upward
Beds - 50 and upward
W.W.Springs - - 1.75
Wool Top Mattresses - 2.50
Window Shades - - 25 and upward
STOVES, TINWARE, WOODEN WARE,
Granite Ware, Crockery, Fishing Tackle, &c.
SECOND-HAND GOODS!
_A.t Very Low 3?rices.
STOVES REPAIRED^^
C. BICKFORD & CO
Corner Fourth nntl Columbia Streets.
"THE FAIR.'
A new lot of goods just received*
from Chicago. Come and see the
new additions to our counters.
Curtain Poles, with leather lix
tures compete, only 35 cents.
All of 25 cent novels will be sold
for 10 cents each. 50 cent novels
in the same proportion.
"THE FAIR"
013-617 Union Block.
I IN NEW QUARTERS. ?
I Merrifield Co. j
/ HARDWARE, PAINTS, \
C OILS, &c., &c. • • • • i
I 318 FOURTH STREET, BETTMAN BLOCK. (
T. H. PHIPPS
Successor to the Popular Grocery Business established by J, N. Squires.
DEALER IJSI
CHOICEST GROCERIES.
114 FOURTH STREET.
The custom of old as well as new patrons is solicited, and goods will bd de
livered promptly to any part of the city.
Olympia, Jan. 26,1896. tf
Tbos. F. Gilt's, Ht'nry C. Payne, Henry f. Rose. Jwiier
NORTHERN
PACBPIC R.R.
11UN8
Pullman Sleeping Cars
Elegant Dicing Cars
Tourist Sleeping Cars
!ST. PAUL
MINNEAPOLIS
DULUTH
FARGO
GRAND PORKS
CROOKSTON
WINNIPEG
HELENA and
BUTTE
TilllOlfill TICKETS TO
CHICAGO,
WASHINGTON.
PHILADELPHIA
NEW YORK,
BOSTON, AND
ALL POINTS EAST
and SOUTH.
TIMIi SCHEDULE.
Seattle and Olympia passenger,arrive. 10 .10 a. 111
Olympia and Seattle •• leave t! ;tu p. 111
WAY FRBKiHT—WEST.
Monday, Wednesday and Friday 10 35 a. m
WAY FKBIOIIT—EAST.
Tuesday, Thuraday and Saturday 4 35 p. in
For information, time cards, maps and ticket
write or eall on
A. ST.tNI'OKD,
A sent, Olympia Wash
Or A. D. CHARLTON,
Assistant (leneral I'mseenser Agent,
No. 25.T Morrison Street, Corner Tnird,
Cortland, Oregon.
Sheriff's Sale
OM SPECIAL, EXECI'TION.
J N tlie Superior Court of the State of Washing
i ton lor the eounty of Thurston.
The First National Hank of (llympia. a corpora
tion, I'laiutilf, vs. Stuart ttice, Kate W. liice,
IsMae W. Auilerson, Maud I'. Anderson, Kd
ninud Rice. Ella F. Hlce, George I). Shannon,
Mary A. shannon, T. N. Allen Trustee, W. 11.
llauuaai.d Mollie llanna. Defendants.
Vnder and hy Tirtue of a writ of Special Exe
cution issued out of the Superior Court of the
Male of Washington, holding terms at Olympia
in and for Thurston eountv, said state and dated
on the irth day of July, 1835, on a judgment and
decree rendered in said Court 011 the 16th day of
July, 1835, in favor of the above named plalntiiT,
The First National Itank of Olympia, a corpora
lion, and again.t the above named defendants.
Stuart itiee, Isaac W. Audersou and Edmund
Kite for the sum of eleven thousand, six hun
dred seventy-seven and 27-100 ($11,077 27) dol
lars. with interest al the rate of ten per cent per
annum from date hereof, which auid writ of
Special Execution was to me, as Sheriff of
Ihurston county, Washington, duly directed
and delivered, ami hy which I am commanded 10
sell at public auction, according to law, the fol
lowing described real estate, to wit:
A tract of land bounded by a line commencing
at the northeast corner of the George W. French
donation claim number est. in towusliip is north
of range two west of Willamette Meridian, and
running west along the north line of said claim
3,830 feet, more or less, to the northwest corner
of the east half of said claim; thence south 7:t7.:l
feet, more or less, to the uorthwest corner of
Scammel's addition to West Olvmpia; thence
cast on north line of said addition, 2.726 feet,
more or less, to the west line of laud conveyed
by Emily C. French to Mlttou (tiles, bv Heed
recorded in Volume 17, page 171, of'deeds;
thence north 381.1 feet; thence east Sus ft feet;
thence south 213.6 feet; thence east 750 feet, to
auulbweat corner of laud conveyed by Emily V.
French to (ieorge T. Cllne by deed recorded in
Volume 17, page 18. ot deed-; thence north 402-6
feet, thence east 270 feet, more or leas, to the
meander line on east line of said claim; thence
north 62 degrees west on said meander line 450
feel, more or less, to the northeast corner of
said Claim, that being the place of beginniug,
containing >.72 acres, more or less.
'1 he part of the donation claim of Moses llurd,
No 50, in township 1.8 north of range two west
of the Willamette Meridian, bounded by a line
begiuning ou north boundary liue or said claim,
at a poiut so chains west of the northeast corner
of said claim; theuce west lo chains; thence
south 10 chains, thence east 10 chains; theuce
north 10 cliaius to place ot beginning containing
ten acres.
The north 33 acres of the W. W. I'lum dona
tion claim No. .">7. in township 1h north, ran"e
two west of the Willamette Meridian.
The southwest one fourth of the northeast
one fourth of sectiou s. township is north of
range two west of the Willamette Meridian,
containing forty acres.
The northwest one-fourth of the northeast
one fourth of section 17, in towusliip is uorth
range two West of Willamette Meridian, coutaiu
iug lorty acres.
The west half of the southeast one fourth of
tlic southeast one-fourth of section twenty-nine
iu township is uorth 01 range 1 west 01 the Wil
lamette Meridian. eOulalulug twenty acres,
lu Thurston county, State of Washington
Now therefore, public notice is hereby given
that I have tills day levied upou the above de
scribed real estate and will, oil tbe 26th day of
August, lMk>. at 2 o'clock lu the alteruoon of
aaiu day, at the Washington street from door of
the Court-bourse of said Thurston county, in the
city of Olympia, tell tbe same at public auction
to the highest bidder for rash, or so much tbere
-01 as may be necessary to raise sufficient to sat
iety said last sbove named amount, together
with increaacd costs and increased interest.
Hated at Olyuipia, Washington, tills 18th day
of July A. 1). IMIS. '
. _ GEO. GASTON,
Sheriff of Thurston county, Waatuugton.
Danikl Gaby, Attoruey for l'iaintiff.
l'atc of Brat publication, July 13,1835.
Sheriff's Sale
OM SPMI.IL GXECI'TIOI.
IN the Superior Court of the State of Washing
tou for the County of Thurstou.
John I'lilleo, l'laintlfT, vs. Andrew lloesl and Ida
A. PVBoesl et al. Defendant*.
Under and by virtue of a writ of Special Exe
cution Issued out of tho Superior Court of the
State of Washtngton, holding term* at ulvmpia.
In and for Thurston county, said Slate, ami dated
011 the ad day of Julr, 1M95, on a Judgment and
decree rendeied In said Court on the tli day oi
May, 1895. in favor of the almve named plaintiff,
audagaiust the above named defendant* for the
atini of nine hundred nine-two and 50-100 (JWJ.SO)
dollars, and ninety (S9O) dollars aa an attorney's
fee and costs of thisaelion taxed at thirty and
55-lUU (JtiO.Vi) dollars, with interest at the rate of
aeven per ceut. per annum from dale thereof, and
aniouutius in all to the sum of oue thousand one
hundred thirteen and 5-100 ($1,110.05) dollars,
which said writ of Special Execution wsr to me
asriherifl'of Thuratou county, Washington, dulv
directed and delivered, and by which I am com
manded to sell at public auction, Becoming to
law the followiug described real estate, to-wit:
Lots four (4) and tlve (5) of block two (•-') of
Pattisou'a aub-divlsion block sixty-two (6J) and
sixty-three <«3> anil part of Ally seven i 57) of
Swan's addition ta the town of Olynipla, as the
same Is designated ou the plat of record iu the
Auditor's office iu Thurston countv, Washington.
Public notice is hereby given that 1 have this
day levied upon the above described real estate,
ami will oil the sth day of August, at 10 o'clock
A.M. of said day at the Washington street frout
door of the Court-house of said Thurston tonuty,
in the city of Olympla, sell the same at public
auction to the highest bidder for cash or so much
thereof as may bo necessary to raise sufficient to
satisfy said last above named amount, together
with fucreased eosts and Increased interest.
Dated at Olympia, Washington, tin- u'd day of
July, A. D. 1895.
UEORGR GASTON.
Sheriff of Thurstou couuty. Washington.
W. I. Aonkw, Attorney for Plaintiff.
Date of tirst publication, July 5,1890.
Caveats, and Trade-Marks obtained, and all Pat
ent business conducted for Moderate Fees.
Our Office is Opposite U.S.Patent Office.
and we can seenre patent in less time than those
remote from Washington.
Send model, drawing or photo., with descrip
tion, Wc advise, if patentable or not, free of
Charge. Our fee not due till patent is secured.
A Pamphlet. "How to Obtain Patents." with
names of actual clients in your State, countv,or
town, eent free. Address,
C.A.SNOW&CO.
Opposite Patent Office, Washingtoa, D. C.
XWON6 HONG YICK,
LAUNDRY.
Washing called for and delivered.
Corner Fifth and Columbia streets, olympia
Wash. ajl
THE NEW
OLYMPIA THEATER
For Rent on Reasonable Tornis.
Apply to JOHN MULER MURPHY,
Manager.
GROCERIES A^c^t
GOODS SOLD RETAIL AT
WHOLESALE PRICES. • • •
Good Goods and Honest Weights.
No such prices ever heard of in Olympia before.
Call and see for yourself. Old Rope, Oil Cans,
Bottles, Rags, Rubber, Paper, Sax, Brass, Etc., Etc.,
taken in exchange for GROCERIES. Cash paid
for old iron, and a carload wanted at once. Re
member the place.
ED, L. MELTON
'205 West Fourth Street.
C. 11. SPRINGER. GEO. S. ALLEN. ALLEN WHITE
I'reaideut. Vice President. Secretary
OLYMPIA DOOR & LUMBER COMPANY,
Manufacturers of All Kinds
LUMBER, LATH. SHINGLES,
Snsli, Doors Blinds,
Mouldings, Brackets, Mantels, Band-SawinG,
Turning, Stair Work, Etc.
Cedar Mill at Elma, Wash. Saw Mill, Factory, Shingle Mill and
Ilead Office at Olympia. Wash. auu-92
Tel ephone No. 35.
D. W. McNAMAKA. VAN W. CHIPMAN.
OLYMPIA BOTTLING WORKS,
BOTTLERS r*-
SODA WATER,
SARSAPARILLA AND IRON,
Cream Soda and Mineral Water.
A Specialty, Fine Ginger Champagne..^
All our beverages prepared from pure artesian well water.
Ofllce and Works, West Tliird SStreet.
Here We are Again!
WALL PAPER.
Stationery, School Blank looks
TOTS, DOLLS, ETC.
Pictures Framed.
Agent for Butterick Patterns.
ME, O'COKTIVOR
Grainger Block, Alain Street, Olympia, Wasli.
MARK W. JONES,
DEALER IIV
STOVES AND TINWARE.
424 Fourth Street, Olympia, Washington.
PIGMBING,~STEAM and GAS
Fitting, Hoofing, lining, Etc.
Repairing Neatly Done and Promptly Attended To.
July 28. 1893 tf
Union Block Grocery Store.
The best staple Line of Groceries at
the Lowest Prices.
Try Us. We Will Give Satisfaction.
GOODS DELIVERED TO. 1 ANY PART OF THE CITY •
Sprague Mills tlour a specialty. Telephone 75.
GEORGE TURNER, Proprietor.

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