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Washington standard. [volume] (Olympia, Wash. Territory) 1860-1921, November 10, 1916, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022770/1916-11-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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Official
Newspaper of
Olympia
VOL LVI. NO. 34.
Wilson and Lister Re-Elected by Big Margin
PRESIDENT LEADS HUGHES BY 10 ELECTORAL VOTES
RE ELECTION ASSURED WHEN CALIFORNIA, NORTH DAKOTA, NEW MEXICO AND NEW
HAMPSHIRE SWING TO PRESIDENT—MINNESOTA AND WEST VIRGINIA STILL DOUBT
FUL, WITH BOTH LEANING STRONGLY TO WILSON—RESULT HANGS IN BALANCE
FOR TWO DAYS, EARLIER REPORTS FAVORABLE TO HUGHES BEING GRADUALLY
OVERCOME BY GAINS FOR THE DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE—FIRST ELECTION EVER
WON WITHOUT NEW YORK OR INDIANA.
Woodrow Wilson lias been re-elected President of the United States by a margin of at least 10
votes in the electoral college and a likely majority of 22 or 30, in the closest presidential race since
the Hayes-Tilden contest of 1876.
This result became definitely known Thursday afternoon when it was reported that California,
with only 139 precincts, claimed for Wilson, missing, had given Wilson a majority of 2,500, and
when North Dakota and New Hampshire, first credited to Hughes, had been officially placed in the
Wilson column.
Only two states now remain in doubt—Minnesota, with an electoral vote of 12, and West Vir
ginia, which easts 8. '
Latest reports from practically all the precincts in Minnesota give President Wilson there a lead
of 800. The votes of the 2,800 members of the Minnesota national guard on the border remain to be
counted, and it is confidently predicted by national Democratic leaders that the President will have
at least 1,000 to spare when the final Minnesota count is known.
The earlier reports from West Virginia showed Hughes leading in that state, but the later returns
• «
have pushed the Wilson total ahead and, basing their prediction on reports from representatives in
the state, national Democratic leaders claim it for Wilson by 10,000.
• ...
If Minnesota is finally added to the Wilson column, the President will have a majority of 22 in
the electoral college, and if West Virginia swings into line, too, his margin will be 30.
MOST REMARKABLE ELECTION.
The national election is the most remarkable in years. For two
days the final result hung in the balance, the first flush for Hughes,
offset by steady gains recorded for the President.
First reports from the big Eastern states, showing one after the
other—the New England tier, New York, Pennsylvania, Indiana and
Illinois—going strongly to the Republican candidate, indicated
a Hughes landslide.
But as reports came from one after the other of the Western
states, beginning Wednesday morning, the Hughes enthusiasts began
Continued on Page Fire.
President of
for Four Y
HaslnuQtou Bton&arD
ESTABLISHED NOV. 17, 1860
"HEW TO THE LINE; LET THE CHIPS FALL WHERE THEY MAY "
OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 10,1916
UN RUKS CLOSE 10 HUGHES II COUNTV
President Only 300 Behind—Republican County Candidates Defeat
All the Non-Partisans, Bliss Shaw Losing for Auditor by Only
376 and Peters for Assessor by 546—McBride Carries County by
Only 745.
Complete victory for the Republican county ticket, from State
Senator down to constable, was registered in the election Tuesday,
the majorities ranging from 300 up to 2,400.
Miss Margaret Shaw made the best race of any of the Non
partisan candidates, Miss Gaston, who led the Republican candidates
two years ago by a plurality of more than 1,500, pulling through this
time by about 376.
Stieklin defeated Peters for Assessor by only 546.
George P. Yantis was defeated for prosecuting attorney by T.
L. O'Leary by about 1,129.
The local count was made slowly, especially in the city, the Sixth
ward, on the West Side, being the last to report.
Thurston county's vote was cast for Hughes, Poindexter and
Mcßride, but the majority for President and Governor was low,
Hughes coming out only about '3OO votes ahead of Wilson, and Mc-
Bride polling about 745 more than Lister.
Poindexter led Turner by 1,356, and Congressman Johnson won
by 1,566 over Fishburne-
Incomplete returns as to the count on the initiative and referen
dum measures and the constitutional amendment show that they were
defeated here by a two or three to one vote.
C. C. Aspimvall, unopposed for representative, polled the highest
vote of any of the Republican candidates, 3,784- State Senator Car
lvon, who was also unopposed on the Non-Partisan ticket, ran 47:5
behind.
Close to Aspimvall were Stocking for treasurer, Weir for en
gineer, Gifford for sheriff, Holmes for clerk, Goss for county superin
tendent, Mills for coroner and Sams and Bennett for commissioners.
Miss Shaw led the Non-Partisan candidates, Peters coming sec
ond, Yantis third and Caton fourth. Miss Shaw carried the Third,
Fourth and Sixth wards in the city, tied in the Second, and carried
the following precincts in the county: Black Lake, Bordeaux, Little
Rock. McLane, South Union, Tumwater and South Bay.
The vote on President in the county was striking, for a district
generally so strongly Republican. The unofficial count shows that
the President received the majority of the ballots in the Second pre
cinct of the Third ward in the city, ran very close in several other
wards, and carried the following county precincts: Black Lake,
Bordeaux, Bucoda, Chambers Prairie. Gate, Cull Harbor, McLane.
Rainier, South Bay, South Union. First of TeninO' Second of Turn
water, and Hunters' Point. In se\'-rnl others Iltiirhes nosed him nut
by only two or three votes.
Similarly, Governor Lister carried tb<> Black Lake, date, Cull
Harbor, McLane, Rainier. Rochester, South Bay, Smith Union. First
Continued on Page Five.
GOVERNOR'S MAJORITY OVER M'BRIDE AT LEAST 12,000
SWEEPS THE STATE WITH THE SUPPORT OF PROGRESSIVE, ' DRY" AND WILSON VOTERS
AND PLURALITY MAY REACH 12,000—OLYMPIANS WELCOME HIM TO CITY THURS
DAY, 400 GATHERING AT DEPOT WITH BAND TO GREET HIM—-POINDEXTER LEADS
TURNER BY MAJORITY OF 50,000 OR MORE—ALL OTHER REPUBLICAN STATE OFFI
CIALS VICTORIOUS—INITIATIVE AND REFERENDUM MEASURES AND CONSTITU
TIONAL AMENDMENT SNOWED UNDER.
Governor Ernest Lister, winner by approximately 12,000 over the Republican nominee,
was "weleomed home" to Olympia Thursday afternoon by an enthusiastic erowd of local Democrats
and statehouse officials of that party, who gathered at the 0.-W. station at 2 o'clock to meet him.
Some 400 Olympians, accompanied by the band, joined in the welcome to the Governor and gave
three rousing cheers to him, Mrs. Lister and Miss Florence Lister. The crowd jammed the station and
depot yards, crowding around the Governor as he alighted from the train, and showering congratula
tions upon him. '
The Governor was tired and his voice was husky, but he responded to the welcome Olympians ex
tended him with a short but characteristic talk:
"This is indeed a great surprise to me," he said, "and I want to tell you I appreciate it deeply.
"During the past four years I have done what 1 thought was the best to do for the State of
Washington and its people, and I want to) say to you that for the next four years I am going to try
even harder to do those things that will build up the State and its people."
The Governor and family rode direct to the ex cutive mansion in J. W. Brislawn's automobile, and
the Governor spent the remainder of the day at the mansion, resting.
Governor Lister's plurality is far larger than anyone had expected and continues to grow as the
later returns come in. First put at 5,000, it was moved up to 7,000, then 9,000 and finally to 10,000, with

every indication that it will go still higher.
PRJCE FIVE CFNTS
His advocacy of the defeat of all the initiative and referendum
measures and his espousal of the "dry" side of the prohibition
issue, coupled with the large vote cast for President Wilson, are
the factors held to be responsible for the Governor's re-election by
a majority that promises to be 15 times or more greater than it was
Tour years ago, when there were three tickets in the field. Then
he won by 622.
Contributing factors undoubtedly were the almost total lack
of any sort of a campaign against him, aside from the dirty mud
slinging of the Perkins Press; his own personal record in vetoing
extravagant legislative appropriations and the referendum meas
ures, and the record of the departments under his control in the
(Continued on Page Five.)
Re-Elected Governor by an
Unusual
FACTORS IN HIS ELECTION.
Publish
Contii:"ov.--!y
For 55 Years
WHOLE NUMBER 2933

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