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Washington standard. [volume] (Olympia, Wash. Territory) 1860-1921, March 16, 1917, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022770/1917-03-16/ed-1/seq-3/

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A. Portable
Luminous
Electric; Tta-diator
For bathroom, nursery, library, dining-room, office—
anywherl there is an electric light socket —a turn of
the switch will produce instantly a cheerful, warm
glow from a radiator that requires no watching.
With electric radiators there is no dirt, gas or odors;
no oxygen consuming flames; no fires to build • no
ashes to remove; above all, no danger.
This electric radiator can be seen in our show rooms.
Olympia Light & Power Company
fy DONT YOU WANT
SOME NICE I
IFRESH LAID
NO COLD-STORAGE EGOS FOR US—NOT ON VOI R LIFE.
WE GET OCR EGGS RIGHT FROM THE COUNTRY AND
THEY ARE FRESH FROM THE HEN'S NEST.
YOU'LL BE DELIGHTED WITH OUR EGGS AND EVERY
THING ELSE YOU BUY IN OUR GROCERY STORE BECAUSE WE
KEEP OUR PLACE SO CLEAN AND SANITARY IT IS A DELIGHT
TO TRADE WITH US.
*
GIVE US YOUR GROCERY ORDER TODAY.
Reder & Phillips
PHONES 593-504 207 E. FOURTH STREET
More Horsepower per Dollar
Than Any Other Engine!
That is what the "Associated"' or ''Mule Team" engine
gives, because it has LARGER BORE AND STROKE AND
HEAVIER PLY WHEELS, and ITS CYLINDERS ARE
MADE OP SEMI-STEEL AND ARE CAST SEPARATELY,
insuring even expansion and consequently more power and
longer life.
AND YOU CAN OPERATE THEM WITH EITHER GAS
OLINE OR DISTILLATE.
Our 6 h. p. engine has a 6-inch bore, 10-inch stroke and its
fly wheels are 40 inches in diameter and weigh 250 pounds
each. Compare it with any other engine of the same rated
horsepower and you will see the point.
A full line of these engines is on display at my store —I
want you to examine them before you buy. They are backed
by the strong "John Deere" guarantee as well as my own —
they're the best you can get.
P. J. O'Brien
Agent for JOHN DEERE rami Implements of All Kinds.
THIRD AND COLUMBIA STS. PHONE 340
It is a Favorite Flavor —
That "mapley" essence so incomparable for making
syrup for hot cakes — YES!
. MAPLEINE
EE Is one of the most useful of the best flavors;
it flavors candies, ices, cakes, frostings, fillings,
H desserts and sugar syrup.
H Grocer M Sell It
Hj Guaranteed by Crescent Manufacturing Co. to
B comply In every way with all State and Federal
■ regulations. Satisfaction or Money Refunded.
THE WASHINGTON STANDARD. OLYMPIA, WASH.. KKIDAY. .MARCH It!. IMI7
NEW OPPORTUNITY
FOR DAIRYMEN
Head of Dairying at State Col
lege Says Washington Should
Produce Own Cheese.
Commenting on the course in
cheese-making now being given at the
State College, and the future of the
cheese manufacturing industry in
Washington, Professor A. B. Nystrom
says:
"The recent rise in the cheese-mak
ing industry in Washington is due to
the surplus of milk. An extensive
cheese-making industry in the state
will tend to equalize the price of milk
for different seasons of the year. As
matters now stand, there is an over
supply of butterfat in the summer
time. so much of which is used in but
ter-making that the price of butter is
lowered. If the dairymen could dis
pose of their milk to cheese factories
A. B. Nystrom
in the summer, the summertime price
of butterfat would be less fluctuating
—and this is why the entry of cheese
making in Washington, at this time,
will tend to stabilize the whole dairy
industry.
"Washington is now making suffi
cient butter to meet the needs of its
population—a thing which has come
about fairly recently. In fact, the
state now is producing butter for ex
port. Butterfat is now selling for
from 37 cents to 39 cents a pound,
which is somewhat less than former
prices, notwithstanding the fact that
feed of most kinds used by dairymen
has lately advanced rapidly in price.
"In the matter of cheese, however,
the state is far from self-supporting.
If the state were making its own
cheese, instead of shipping it in from
the eastern states, not only would
we have a state market for all sur
plus milk now produced, but a market
for an Immensely greater quantity of
milk than now is produced in the
state. The state's natural advantages
for cheese-making are so marked that
it should produce, and, no doubt, in
time will produce large quantities of
high grade cheese."
New Silos In Snohomish.
County Agricultural Agent C. F.
Monroe, of Snohomish county, reports
to the State College that in the past
year twenty-two silos with an aggre
gate silage capacity of 1,600 tons have
been built in bis county. He states
that in the experience of Snohomish
county dairymen, 40 pounds of silage
replaces 20 pounds of hay, and pro
duces a flow of milk which is superior
to the hay. With hay figured at |2O
a ton and silage at $4 a ton, he es
timates that the new silos will save
Snohomish county dairymen about
$14,000 a year.
He states further that the recent
introduction of alfalfa production in
the county is already saving the coun
ty over $9,000 a year on freight and
baling charges paid on hay formerly
shipped in from the Yakima valley
and other points.
State Must Inspect
All Hay and Grain
(From the State Capitol Record.)
It is the duty of the state hay and
grain inspector to inspect and weigh
all grain and hay received at ter
minal warehouses and to collect the
fee fixed by the public service com
mission for such service, according
to a formal opinion given the com
mission by Assistant Attorney Gen
eral Hance H. Cleland.
The question arose in connection
with the inspection of grain belong
ing to the Sperry Flour Company of
Tacoma. In addition to buying
grain from country points, which un
der the law must be inspected and
weighed by the state department, the
company also brings grain to its ter
minal warehouse at Tacoma from its
own elevator at Oreston. It contend
ed it should not have to pay fees for
inspection of this grain, inasmuch as
the grain is simply transferred. Ac
cording to the opinion, the state
grain inspector has no alternative
but to inspect all grain shipped into
terminal warehouses.
Legislative Resu
Set F
(From the State Capitol Record.)
Submitted to voters for decision
at general election 1»I8 question of
calling constitutional convention in
1020. Provided machinery for this
work.
Approved fish code amendments
ami ratified pact with Oregon rela
live to fishing laws.
Accepted general outline plan of
commission survey of higher educa
tional institutions, provided for sep
aration departments and for joint
meetings to prevent duplication
courses. Raised higher educational
inillage tax from 1.05 mills to 1.58
mills.
Validated military reserve act
which enables Pierce County to es
tablish federal army post at .Ameri
can Lake. Kecent supreme court
decision held legislative act valid.
Provided money for state roads;
revised highway laws; agreed to ac
cept federal post road law money;
provided system applying auto li
cense money to road work.
Appropriated approximately $12,-
000,000 for state government for
next two years. This includes $4,-
000,000 «»ut of industrial insurance
commission fund raised by assess
ments of employers and $1,000,000
for first aid work to be raised by
joint assessments of employers and
workers.
Passed bone-dry law; bank code;
guarantee bank deposits law; water
code; irrigation code; first aid law;
amendments to industrial insurance
commission law; extra juror law;
"criminal syndicalism" law, expect
ed to stamp out I. W. W. riots; act
revising statutes on military affairs;
probate code; coal mine code;
amendments to game code; act pre
venting mutilation of identification
marks on automobiles; new capitol
law, giving commission right to
change plans and providing $1,000,-
000 to complete temple of justice
and for new buildings; law estab
lishing single moral standard for
both sexes; law reducing rate delin
THE HOG THAT DOES BEST
Comparisons of Feeds and Ways of Feeding by State College;
"Better the Feed, Better the Hog."
The hog that rustles bis living in
old stack bottoms and eats snow until
spring, and then is fed up for market,
bas lately been compared with the
pig that is comfortably boused and
well fed in winter, by the Washing
ton Experiment Station—the object
being to see which pig produces pork
with the least cost, per amounts or
feed consumed.
This experiment, upon which a bul
letin by William Hislop and K. B.
Krantz will be published soon, shows
Feeding alfalfa from self feeder on Btate College Farm
that the stack-fed pig comes through
winter in good health and with an un
diminished appetite, but with a stunt
ed body, as compared with the more
carefully housed and fed animal. The
pig that has roughed it through the
winter is not as heavy an eater in
spring as is the better nurtured hog
—because the former is a smaller pig
The feed that is eaten by the small
pig, however, Is transformed into
pork at a cost lower than the similar
cost incurred by the Jarger pig; but
STOPS BUYING MIMTIIONS.
Great Britain Notifies American
Plans to Complete Contracts
Munitions makers in this country
have been notified by the British
government that all contracts for the
manufacture of shrapnel and other
shells must be completed by March
31, and that on that date all con-
tracts in existence for these war ma
terials will lapse.
The English government, during
the last year, has brought its produc
tion of munitions to a point where
it is no longer necessary to import
them. That the move would be
made by the British has been known
in this country for the last six
months, and the big plants have been
preparing to put their shell making
machinery to other uses.
quent lav interest from 15 per tent
to 12 |>er rent.
The legislature failed to pass sev
eral proposed amendments to con
stitution; act extending private way
of necessity law for private corpora
tions to acquire power sites; hill to
abolish state bureau of ins|tection;
bill to provide #15,000 for inspec
tion state auditor's office; bill to per
mit public officials to hire own fx
|K?rt« for examination of own rec
ords.
Passed hill providing assessed val
uation and actual valuation synony
mous to determining constitutional
limit of indebtedness of municipal
cor|K»rations and bonding limit; hill
requiring counties and all cities of
less than 104,000 together with oth
er municipal corporations to follow
budget law.
Passed bill putting jitneys and
auto stage lines under public ser
vice commission, but It was vetoed
by governor. Failed to pass bill lim
iting liability of jitney bonds of s•>,-
000 for small cars and SIO,OOO for
largo cars: seven-passenger dividing
line to meet objections of present
law held by supreme court to mean
that $2,500 jitney bond is for each
passenger, not for car capacity.
Increased fixed tax levies for high
er educational institutions from 1.05
mills to 1.58 mills; military from
.02 mills to .03 mills, and made lialf
miil tax levy for new capitol building
purposes. Total increase fixed by
levies 1.04 mills. Killed bill for
fourth state normal school at Oen
tralia.. Provided for new armories
at Walla Walla and Aberdeen and
established one at Everett, but made
clear not one to be built until funds
available.
Killed bills providing bi-weekly
pay-days for railroads; state boiler
inspectors; permit candy makers to
employ girls nine hours day during
rush season before Christmas; state
powder plant; state cement plant;
elective public service commission;
state printing plant; publication
school text books by state.
the larger pig produces the most pork
in the same period of time, and wins
in the comparison by this margin.
• Another lot of pigs was used to
determine whether meat meal tank
age, or "pig meal" is best to combiM
with rolled barley in preparing pig*
for market. Tbe tankage product
gave the better results. Pigs that
had a pasture of peas and oats
did better on the barley and meat
meal ration than did the animals that
had the same ration in "dry lot" or
in combination with a pasture of
young alfalfa.
In another experiment, pigs which
had been fed a grain ration in "dry
lot" were transferred to an alfalfa
pasture, and along with tbe pasturage
were given a ration of rolled barley,
buttermilk, and the standard mineral
mixture. In dry lot the pigs produced
pork for $6.67 per hundred pounds.
In the alfalfa pasturage with butter
milk and other items to make a com
plete ration, the same pigs produced
pork for $3.37 a hundred.
TO EXTEND CIVIL. SERVICE.
President to Put All Postmasters
Under Classification.
WASHINGTON, March 16.—Pres
ident Wilson will issue an executive
order on April 1, placing all first,
second and third class postmasters
under civil service rules, it was au
thoritatively announced here today.
The decision was reached at a con
ference between Postmaster General
Burleson and the president.
During the session of the sepate
just closed. President Wilson con
ferred with a number of senate lead
ers and informed them that it was
his intention to put all postmasters
under the classified service.
Mr. and Mrs. Mitchel Harris are
enjoying a pleasure trip to San Fran
cisco, in celebration of their twenty
fifth wedding anniversary.
PAGE THREE
FUNK. KENNEY, REOER
AND MB ARE NAMED
Chamber of Commerce Chooses Them
as Trustees at Annual Klection
Tuesday
When F. R. Klumb of the Capital
City Creamery and James Martin of
the Martin Hardware store agreed
Wednesday morning, after consider
able argument, that the former
should accept the position, the an
nual election of trustees of the Olym
pia Chamber of Commerce, which
had resulted in a tie so far as these
two were concerned, was settled.
The election was held Tuesday,
prior to the annual meeting that
evening, and resulted In the re-elec
tion of Geo. H. Funk, Joseph Reder
and Frank M. Kenney and the tie be
tween Klumb and Martin. President
P. M. Troy presided at the meeting
and recounted the work of the Cham
ber during the past year, C. H.
Springer, treasurer, submitted a
financial report, and Secretary B. F.
Hume reviewed in his report the dif
ferent activities of the organization.
Following the business session, the
members mingled in an informal
social gathering, for which Applju
was furnished by the Northwest Fruit
Products company and buttermilk by
the Capital City Creamery, and
doughnuts were handy.
The trustees will meet at a lunch
eon next Tuesday noon to re-organize
and elect officers for the coming
year.
WOMAN'S CLUB OBSERVES
34T8 ANNUAL REUNION
Thirty-four Women Celebrate Anni-
versary of Oldest Organization
of Kind on Coast.
Thirty-four members attended the
reunion and luncheon at the Wom
an's clubhouse last Saturday after
noon, when the Woman's club cele
brated the thirty-fourth anniversary
of Its founding. The local organisa
tion was the first of Its kind in this
state and on the Pacific Coast. It
has a membership now of 45 of the
prominent women of the city.
Nine women organised the club in
1883, only four of whom are living
today. One of these, Miss Janet
Moore of this city, was a guest of
honor at Saturday's reunion. The
others are Mrs. Mary Shelton Ciphert
of Shelton and Mrs. P. C. Hale end .
Mrs. Samuel E. Start of California.
Another guest of honor Saturday wee
Mrs. Lavlna Hartsuck, 90 years old,
the oldest member of the club to
point of age.
Talks were made at the luncheon
by Mrs. J. W. Mowell, who has been
president of the club for the past six
years, by Miss Moore, Mrs. Hartsuck,
Mrs. George Blankenshlp, Mrs. O. O.
Ellis, Mrs. Kate L. Young, Mrs.
Charles E. Hewitt and Miss Elizabeth
McDowell. Mrs. Mary V. Johns,
chairman of the committee on ar
rangements for the anniversary cele
bration, introduced the speakers. The
other members of the arrangements
committee were Miss Moore, Mrs.
Thomas Macleay and Mrs. Emma B.
Eastman.
FURTHER LIST OF NEW
DIRECTORS FOR SCHOOLS
O. T. Mercer Appointed for Majrtown
—Winners In Other District*.
County Superintendent O. C. Goss
this week appointed O. T. Mercer
director of the M&ytown school dis
trict, one of those in which no elec
tion was held at the regular time.
The oce has received further report*
of the election results in other dis
tricts as follows, those re-elected
being indicated by stars:
Hays, Mrs. L. A. Wood; Tumwater,
D. F. Cook*. W. B. Lloyds*; Rainier.
Thomas Gchrke*; Mima, Mrs. Charles
Van Vleet, Mrs. M. O. Britton;
Skookumchuck, E. F. Prince, L. M.
Tyrell; Moorhead, Walter Long
mire; Colvin, Fred A. Colvin; Buco
da, Mrs. Amy E. Gillespie; Cattail,
Edwin Tharp; Gull Harbor, J. N.
Wiseman; Mountain View, W. A.
Manke.*
Spurgeon Creek, G. W. Manler,*
J. C. Martin; Meadow, Charles Sie
gel*; Oak Grove, A. A. Page; Puget,
Mrs. Geo. Gartley; Pleasant Glade,
J. W. Davison;Hunter's Point, W.
C. Titus, C. W. Lull; Mud Bay,
James Tobin*; Butler's Cove. H. W.
Myers; Zankner Valley, John O'Con
nor*; Alder Grove, Willis Farrell;
Brighton Park, A. G. West*; McAl
lister Springs, Joseph Frost,* E. L.
Thornton,* and McLane, John Aus
tin.
Hay Perring, until recently an em
ploye of the local office of the North
ern Express company, is now con
nected with the company's office at
Missoula. Mont.

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