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Washington standard. [volume] (Olympia, Wash. Territory) 1860-1921, September 27, 1918, Image 5

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022770/1918-09-27/ed-1/seq-5/

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ALLIES GAIN AS
GEffIUK HEN
GENERAL MARCH POINTS HIT
STRIKINCi CHANGE OK < ON HI
TIONS ON WEST FRONT.
Striking proof that the German
power is fast crumbling came this 1
week in the. announcement by Gen
eral March, chief-of-staff, that the
news from all battle fronts was "con
tinuously good," and that 1,750,000
American troops have now been em
barked for overseas service.
"Just six months ago," said Gen.
March, "the enemy thing his lull mil
itary power against the British lines
in Picardy in the great drive thai was
to end the war in a smashing victory.
Today he is fighting desperately to
hold the tottering Hindenburg line,
the defensive system from which he i
struck that blow and back into which i
he has been hurled.
"Side by side, British, French and
American armies have broken defi- j
nitely the German offensive power, in j
official opinion here. Already the
Help Put the Hun
on the Run!
Our boys in France are doing their part.
. Are you T
The Billions Raised by
Liberty Loans
have made possible the steady gains of
our armies.
More Billions Must be
Raised
until Democracy triumphs and a just
Peace is established.
Buy Your Bonds
j, of the Fourth Liberty Loan J
Today!
Olympia National Bank
Gauthier's New Store
310 EAST FOURTH STREET
Union Hade Goods
This week we are offering an unusual value in new
Greenhood Flannel Shirts
PRICES RANGE FROM $2.00, $2.50, $3.00, $4.00,
$5.00 AND $6.00 EACH.
NECKWEAR OF BEAUTIFUL NEW DESIGNS, IN ALL
SILK MATERIAL, EXCELLENT QUALITY, AT
A new shipment of Nightgowns and Pajamas for men, for
fall and winter wear, priced at $2.00, $3.00 and $3.50.
*
BOYS
SCHOOL SUITS
LARGE VARIETY, ATTRACTIVE PATTERNS,
ALL-WOOL, AT REASONABLE PRICES
GOTTFELD'S
211 FOURTH STREET
American forces in France are more
than half as strong as the whole Ger
man array and the tide of American
fighting men .toward l;raree is con
tinuing at an even pace."
The western battle wall has been
rebuilt by the allied and American
forces, according to national capital
observers. When the first American
army swiftly trampled out the St.
Milji 'l salient the last possibility of a
German strategic stroke passed. The
on< my is fated by a str:\igh' line from
the North sea to the Swiss border.
Along the center of the great
sweep of the front. British and
French armies are. storming ahead
night and day, harrying antl harass
ing the battered German divisons
without rest. Pershing's men stand
before Metz anl Conflans and against
that new threat the enemy must
gather reserves here on this new
front at the very time when every
available reserve division is sorely
needed to meet the allied rush to the
north. Signs of further withdrawal
are manifest along the German front.
In payment for their lavish expen
diture of lives in the abortive of
fensive, the German leaders have now
been compelled by formal decree to
reduce the fighting strength of every
Infantry unit. Instead of 980 men
in each battalion there are now only
850 under the revised organization
THE WASHINGTON STANDARD, OLYMPIA, WASH., FIHOAY, SEPTEMBER JT. VMS
In no other way could the drain be
met.
To military observers this means
that every German batalion or com
pany must face an allied or American
unt of the same type that is at least
15 per cent stronger in fighting men.
There appears good reason to be
lieve that the German losses in priso
ner.. alone since the tide turned
against them in July will reach well
up towards 200,000. The losses in
guns and other material have not
been computed.
With this steadily increasing supe
riority in botli man power and war
material at his command, military
authorities here feel that perhaps the
most vtriking asset Marshal Foch has
acquired in his two months of swift
and victorious counterblows is the
power to take the enemy by surprise
at will.
It is possible, almost over night, to
bring up ihe men and the mobile ar
tillery for a thrust at any sector.
Under the direction of the great
French leader the whole front vir
tually is kept in a constant state of
preparation for attack.
COM COOOCIIS
■mniin won i
Three communications recently re
colved by the Thurston County Coun
cil of Defense show the importance
of the communicy councils now being
organized in every district of the
country.
In a letter to President Wilson,
Secretary of War Baker says:
"New problems constantly arose
and the work of the State Councils
of Defense has notably increased in
scope and in significance. To ac
complish this work they have built
up an organization uniquely suited
to its purpose. Every State Council
of Defense has active County Coun
cils of Defense uuder it, while in
nearly state the organization of com
munity councils, bringing the govern
ment to the people and the people to
the government, is progressing rap
idly."
In reply President Wilson says:
"I am particularly struck by the
value of extending our defense or
ganization into the smallest commu
character of a national system so or
nitles, and by the truly democratic
ganized."
The State Council, after saying that
it is arranging with the representa
tives of various federal officials fog
the early issue of bulletins for* the 1
community of councils, says:
"A series of meetings of commu
nity councils .at which specific cur
rent requests of each federal agency
are read and discussed will not mere
ly assist greatly in the work of those
agencies themselves, but will enable
the communicy councils to carry out
other leBB tangible lines of work,
which in themselves are difficult to
handle but are of real importance."
These community councils are now
being organised in all the city, town
and country com unities of the county
by the County Council of Defense,
under the special direction of Georgo
F. Yantis, chairman of the organiza
tion committee.
Every loyal American ought to be
enrolled as a member.
Prank M. Kenney is entertaining
his father. Thomas Kenney of Fort
Wayne, Wis., who arrived in the city
last week The senior Kenhey plans
to make his home with his daughter.
Mrs. Thomas Kinsella of Lacey.
TROPHY TRAIN WILL
FEATURECAMPAIGN
RETURNED SOLDIERS WILL EX
PLAIN RELICS, IN FOURTH
LIBERTY IA) AN DRIVE.
SEATTLE, September 27.—Public
schools throughout the state are to be
used as community Liberty Loan cen
ters in the Fourth Liberty Loan cam
paign to open September 28. At least
three meetings will be held in each
school under the direction of the
county chairman, one of the meetings
being scheduled for October 12, the
anniversary of the discovery of
America.
Stae Chairman Joseph A. Swalwel:
has called attention to the fact thai
50 per cent of the Liberty Loan pay
ments will not fall due until after
January 1 and that 70 per cent will
not fall due until after December 1,
that farmers throughout the state
should be able to subscribe heavily
during the drive. Mr. Swalwell also
believes that the proposed $30,000
Liberty Bond exemption now before
the Senate will be passed within the
I next ten days and feels that this
jshould greatly stimulate Liberty Bond
buying.
j ('. P. Burnett, publicity director for
the state, has announced that the
trophy train for the state of Washing
ton, composed of a flat car. a box
car, a tourist sleeper and another car
to aei c modate a band, will be starter,
out a f< w days before the drive opens.
This train will be in charge of Pave
.1. .Burns, of th- 7 ; ; ;•••.- i.j artment.
Governor l.ister is planning to ac
company i,, and several returned
American soldiers will he employe,
to explain the exhibit - Arrangements
are being made to have the hand
from the Naval Training Station. I'nl
versity of Washington, accompany tin
train. The present plans provide that
the train will not stop at towns hav
ing a population greater than 25 OOu
and that no stop will consume mors
than two hours. The itinerary is be
ing worked out by R. P. Oldham,
chairman of the committee of speak
ers and singers.
The train is scheduled to reach
Olympia at 7 o'clock next Monday
morning, remaining until 9:15.
The state central committee has
been notified that the order barring
the use of cloth flags has been can
celled and that cloth Liberty Loan
flags may be displayed by individual
plants provided there Is attached a
figure showing the percentage of sub
scriptions among employes.
In connection with the use ot
troops, the War Department has ruled
that all expense must be borne by the
local organization, that the troops
shall not be absent from their head
quarters more than 24 hours and that
no more than 25 per cent of the total
strength of the unit may be em
ployed.
Plans for a service flag parade by
Washington mothers in every city and
town are rapidly being perfected, lv
is planned to have the mothers of
soldiers who have died in Prance lead
this parade, carrying their gold
starred service flags, the other
mothers following according to the
number of sons they have in the ser
vice. The plans call for the use of a
band and the singing of such songs
as "Where Is My Wandering Boy To
night," "Onward Christian Soldiers"
and the "Battle Hymn of the Repub
lic."
FULLER AND HOSLER CONTINUE
AS COUNTY CHAIRMEN.
i
I
Troy and Sams State Committeemen
—Steele and Lewis Secretaries.
Ralph M. Fuller was re-elected
chairman of the Democratic county
Central committee and William
Hoser head or the Republican com
mittee, at meetings of the precinct
committeemen held at the courthouse
last Saturday, in conformity with the
election law.
Attorney P. M. Troy was re-elected
Democratic state committeeman and
County Commissioner J. C. Sams was
named for that place by the Repub
licans. Attorney E. N. Steele was
chosen secretary-treasurer of the
Democratic county committee and H.
L. Lewis of the county auditor's of
fice will hold that position on the Re
publican committee.
Eight More Go to Camp.
Thurston county sent eight morb
men over to Camp Lewis Thursday
to take the places of men previously
sent who were rejected by the camp
physicians. Those who went this
week are: Chauncey Felton John
son, Maynard Duzbury, Ole Sullivan
Ramberg and Ralph Bernard Seeley
, of Olympia, Charles Edward Butts of
Tenino, Peter Clausen of Tumwater
and Harvey Stanley Price of Yelm.
The same day Edward Wilson Horton
of this city went over to Pullman for
specia ltraining.
EL GIN SIX
"The Car of the Hour"
For Patriotic Economy
—economical in first cost,
upkecD and operation.
I.i these times of conservation and greater efficiency your
motor car is essentaliy a labor and time-saving conveyance-
Buy it with the same care as you do other necessities.
The price of the Elgin Six is within your means. Its operat
ing cost is less than many lower priced cars Its cost of up
keep is almost negligible.
Its specifications compare favorably with those cars selling
for several hundred dollars more.
See It Today Immediate Delivery
Olympia Garage Co.
PHONE 143
FIFTH AND COLUMBIA STREETS OLYMPIA
WHAT HAPPENED IN OI.YMPIA AND
STATE TINENTT-FIIIE TEARS AGO
From The Washington Suiiilard lor
Friday evening;, Scptenilier 20,
IVKt. \ 01. XX XIII. No. 4.".
For-'st t'.r s in the Sound country
have driven the cougars and bears
out of their dens and into the \ alley
settlements, where they are seen in
great numbers.
The World's Fair Commissioners
have wisely decided to close the ex
hibition on the :;oth of October, as
was orignally intended. The finan
cial reports show the enterprise is
now sl2.(io(t,oofi "in the hole."
Good 16-inch wood has been sell
ing during the past few days at $2
per cord delivered.
Governor Ferry, who is not in. his
usual good health, contemplates
spending the coming winter either in
the Sandwich Islands or Southern
California.
E. T. Young and A. H. Chambers
have returned from their trip to Bos
ton,. whither they have been the past
few weeks on business for the Light
& Power company.
Preston Troy, who graduated late
ly from the Ann Arbor law school, ar
rived in this city a few days ago and
has formed a partnership with A. J.
Faulkner in the practice of law. Mr.
Troy was a few years ago student of
Olympia Collegiate Institute.
Mayor Robinson started for New
York City on Monday last to look af
ter an interest which he holds in an
invention to raise sunken vessels.
The Benedictine order is seeking
a location for a college in this state
and Rev. Father Claussens has in
duced representatives of that body to
visit Olympia to ascertain if a de
sirable location may not be secured
near this city.
With profund sorrow do we chron
icle the death of our long-time friend
and fellow citizen. Judge Franc*
Henry, who departed this life on Sun
day afternoon last, at his residence
on the Eastside. ■ He had been in fail
ing health for several years past, the
result of pulmonary and abdominal
diseases, the efTect of whtch was man
ifest in this long enfeebled condition.
(A lengthy biography follows.) '
TO
KEEP WELL
' A Teaspoonfulof PERUNA
ThfeeT^saPay^
Has Never Been Down
Sick Since Taking
PERUNA
Read this letter from Mr. Robt.
Minnick, Grass Range, Montana.
"In 1900 I was out in Kansas
running ■ tkmhlßf raglor and
the threshing crew had to sleep
out of doors. One of the crew
broach t a Peruna Almanac to
the engine one day and I was
feeling very 111 from aleeplug
out. I decided to give Perana a
trial and sent for a bottle of Pe
runa and a box of Peruna Tab
lets, which straightened me out
in a hurry.
"I have never been down alek
"lore that time. 1 do not take
uny other medldeea except Pe
runa. I always keep it on hand.
If I get my feet wet, get a cold,
feel Chtlly, or a little bad, I al
ways take Peruaa. People should
not wait until they are down
sick and then take ft. but should
keep it on hand like 1 do and
when they feel bad, they should
use It."
Recommended for Catarrhal
inflammation of every deacription.
Kllis McClelland. son of Mr. and
j Mrs. It. R. McClelland of the West-
Hide, has won several promotions
l -once entering the aviation service,
j and is tin v chief motor Inspector. He
started Saturday on his return to
i i'trk iid ), near Memphis, Tenn, alter
j spending most of a 15-day furlough
here with his parents.
We lutve built, our reputa
tion on
HONEST PIANO DEALING
Now we offer the best phono
graph in the world
THE
Slradivara
ART PHONOGRAPH
"Known for Tone"
A masterpiece in a musical
instrument. No nasal, met
allic or megaphone effect.
Free from all motor trouble.
Plays all makes of disc rec
ords and plays them better.
The Phonograph with a
Silver Spruce Sound Board
Like the Piano.
Cabinet, hand polished,
piano finished.
Seven beautiful models,
from $60.00 to $250.00;
CAPITAL MUSIC CO.
11l East Fifth Phone 893
«• . . " ,
HOTEL LEWIS
Rot and Cold Water, Rooms with
Bath, Steam Heat, Elevator. One'
block north of Union Depot.
1522 Pacific Avenue
Tacoma Telephone: Main 2081
Drink
"Colo"
t
WITH YOUR
MEALS.
—IT IS THE MALT—
YOU WILL LIKE IT.
For Sale by
OTTO BRAEGER
CARI/TON HOTEL
W. D. CLARK
THE HORSESHOE
E. W. KEARNS
FRANK STONE
S. J. SULLIVAN
CAPITAL CITY CREAMERY
Distributers
! LOGGED OFF LAND I
For sale on easy terma to actual 1
eettlers only. Small cash payment |
down, balance in ten annual pay- I
I ments. with Interest at t per seat ,|
PRICK $5 AX At liL AND CP. jl.
l.lhrrt} Hon<l» Inkrn at par. ll
Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. jl
j j Tacoma lllilir. Tacoma. Wuab. |
PAGE FIVE

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