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Washington standard. [volume] (Olympia, Wash. Territory) 1860-1921, October 04, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022770/1918-10-04/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. LVVII. NO. 30
COUNTY BEHIND ON BOND QUOTA
WILL FIGHT TO REINSTATE OFFICE
r, OF COUNTY AGENT
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE JOINS WITH FARMERS IN URG
ING COMMISSIONERS TO PUT APPROPRIATION BACK
INTO NEXT YEAR S BUDGET BERGSTROM ISSUES
STATEMENT DETAILING WORK OF PAST YEAR
GRANGES TAKE UP CAMPAIGN FOR CON
TINUANCE OF DEPARTMENT.
✓ *
Petitions requesting the reinstatement in the county budget for
next, year of the appropriation for county agricultural agent elimi
nated by the commissioners last week, are to lie presented to the
commissioners at their meeting next Monday when the budget will
he finally acted upon, and it is expected that delegations will wait
on the commissioners, asking the re-establishment of the office.
The petitions are being being circulated generally throughout
the county by farmers, and the Granges have likewise taken up the
fight for the continuance of the office. The first to act 011 it was the
Brighton Park, which adopted strong resolutions at its regular
meeting lass Saturday night, and scut copies to all the subordinate
Granges of the county, asking the co-operation and support of
each.
Generally the petitions, in asking the re-establislunent of the
office, also ask the re-appointment of C. H. Bergstrom as agent. The
latter, in explanation of his work and to give an idea of the scope
yjfc-it, issued a statement this week covering the 12 months from
•OPptcmher 1. 1 !H7. to September 1. 1918. showing he had spent 209
days in the field and 94 in the office.
During that time, this statement says, lie received 1891 per
sonal calls at the office for information and assistanee, not includ
ing telephone calls; wrote 233 letters in answer to requests for infor
mation; mailed 4.224 circular letters; visited 523 farms on official
work; mailed 3,075 bulletins in addition to those distributed person
ally or called for at the office, and mailed 3,950 copies of the '•Farm
ers' Exchange."
In the same period 2,502 persons attended various meetings
conducted under the supervision of the office, and 16 agricultural
extension workers carried on special work in the county under the
county agent's supervision.
The statement says in conclusion that the total expense of the
office to the county for the 12 months was S9OO for salary and
$987.09 for office expenses, including stenographer, material for
demonstrations, traveling expenses, etc., the allowance for these ex
penditures being $1,200.
In,the budget as proposed this year, the county agent's salary
was to' have been increased S3OO to $1,200 a year and SOOO addi
tional appropriated for special extension work, as during the past
year, the appropriation being lumped as the agricultural agents in
the counties have been appointed directors of the extension activi
ties in their districts, by the State College. The S6OO was to pay
the county's share of the salary of the county club leader and the
Home demonstration agent.
Oim WELCOMES
%' SHjmnD CHIEFS
LARGE CROWD ATTENDS LUNCH
EON IN THEIR HONOR
WEDNESDAY.
J. D. Kuhns, manager, and E. W.
Heath, superintendent, the new offi
cials in charge of the Sloan Ship
yards, were honor guests at the reg
ular luncheon of the Chamber of
Commerce at Meath's Wednesday
noon, when some <5 local business
and professional men gathered to
welcome them to Olympla.
In short but well put remarks
Mayor Jesse T. Mills and C. J. Lord,
head of the shipbuilding division of
the State Council of Defense, assured
the new officials of Olympiad great
interest in the yard, mentioned the
impatience and anxiety of residents
over past delays, declared the citi
zens here had no thought or desire
to meddle in the conduct of its af
fairs but wanted to see ships built,
and offered whatever help the city
could give.
Manager Kuhns, in replying, said
that he and Superintendent Heath are
iferking together for the one object
building ships, that they proposed
to overcome the handicap in which
the yard Is placed and that they had
the kindliest feelings toward Olym
pia and Its residents.
Washington Stan&ari)
ESTABLISHED NOV. 17, 1860
TAKE UP PLANS TO
REDUGEAGGIDENTS
LOCAL BRANCH OF NATIONAL
SAFETY COUNCIL FORMED
WEDNESDAY.
A local branch of the National
Safety Council was organized
Wednesday evening at a meeting of
75 employers and employes of the city
at the Chamber of Commerce, under
the auspices of the industrial insur
ance commission.
The following temporary officers
were named: C. D. Adams, presi
dent: H. C. Flagg. secretary, and It.
T. Lindsay, treasurer. A member,
ship committee was also selected, con
sisting of Frank Thomas, F. D. Ilal
ston, R. G. Wright. C. H. Springer, E.
W. Heath and C. D. Adams, and an
other meeting is to be held Monday
evening, the 14th.
Steps to be taken to lessen the
number of accidents in local indus
tries will be the province of the new
organization, whose purposes were
explained by Harley L. Hughes,
chairman of the industrial insurance
commission.
Talks also were made by Superin
tendent E. W. Heath and Manager ,T.
D. Kuhns of the Sloan Shipyards, R.
J. Hoage, safety engineer of Taeoma,
A. J. McCaughan of the Ship Carpen
ters' Union, State Labor Commission-
"HEW TO THE LINE; LET THE CHIPS FALL WHERE THEY MAY."
OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON,
ARMY CALLS MECHANICS
Six Thurston County Boys to Got
S|>eciul Training at State College.
Another rail for 6<U) men from
this state for special training along
mechanical lines, for general mili
tary service, was issued by Provost
Marshal General Crowder this week,
and Thurston county is called on to
send six registrants to the State Col
lege at Pullman, October 15. They
have an opportunity to volunteer
until October 12.
Auto mechanics, truck drivers,
carpenters, blacksmiths, horeshoers,
machinists, motorcyclists, radio op
erators, general draftsmen, topog
raphers, surveyors and wheelwrights
are wanted. Grammar school edu
cation or its equivalent is required,
and some experience or aptitude for
the lines offered.
HUNTING SEASON ON
AND PROSPECT FINE
TUESDAY, FIRST DAY, SEES LO
CAL SPORTSMEN TAKE
TO WOODS.
Many Olympians broke for the
woods bright and early Tuesday
morning, the first day of the hunting
season, after the county auditor's
office had done a rushing business
all day Monday, issuing SIOO worth
of licenses that day.
The season is expected to be an
unusually good one, especially for
upland birds, and first reports bear
out expectations. The new federal
migratory bird act is said to afect
the local situation in only one re
spect. that is by limiting to eight the
daily bag limit of geese and brant.
The season for ducks and other
water fowl runs to January IT and
the limit is 20 a week, with not more
than 30 in the hunter's possession at
any one time. Throughout Western
Washington, two deer and one moun
tain goat of either sex may be killed,
except in Whatcom, Skagit and Sno
homish counties, where only one buck
deer or one mountain goat is al
lowed. This latter limit also applies
to Eastern Washington.
Game wardens generally are call
ing hunters' attention to the follow
ing regulations:
Unlawful: For man, woman or
child to hunt without a license.
Unlawful: To shoot at water fowl
from any kind of a boat, except or
dinary row boat or canoe, propelled
with side oars not less than five
feet in length.
Unlawful: To hunt or cha&e deer
with dogs, or kill deer In the water.
Unlawful: To kill moose, caribou
or elk until 1995.
Unlawful to kill any seagull.
er C. H. Younger, J. W. Brislawn of
the industrial insurance commission,
and Dr. J. W. Mowell, its chief med
ical advisor.
Belgians Get Lot of Clothes.
It didn't take Olympians long to
respond to the call for clothing for
Relgian relief purposes and Wednes
day Mrs. W. V. Tanner, who had
charge of the campaign, announced
that 600 pounds more than the re
quested three tons had been donated.
Some 30 large dry goods boxes were
packed with clothing and shipped to
the headquarters of the Relgian Re
lief society in New York Wednesday.
About 49 tracts of land in the
county on which the taxes were de
linquent were sold by County Treatr
urer Fred W. Stocking last Saturday,
bringing in approximately $3,000.
The youngsters who belong to the
Tuniwater Junior Red Cross picked
blackberries one day last week on the
farm of Mrs. Sarah Crouch and sold
them to the local cannery for $13.92.
the money being deposited by Mrs.
Ada .T. Lewis, head of the Junior Red
Cross work in the county, to the
credit o? that organization.
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1918
SEVEN COUNCILS FORMED.
All Other Districts to lit* Organized
by End of Next Week.
Community Councis are being or
ganized by the Thurston County
C'ounei of Defense in every part of
the county. Olympia, Yelm. Lacey,
Gate, Rochester, Case School and
Schneider's Prairie have already
completed organizations, and all the
people of those and all other com
munities are being ar.kcd to sign the
Pledge of Patriotic Service.
Mr. George F. Yantis, chairman of
the committee on organization, ex
pects to have Community Councils
going in every part of *he county by
the end of next week. There are to
be active auxiliaries of the County
Council and are to handle all
patriotic activities in their districts.
LOAN ENTHUSIASM
HIGHER IN COUNTY
FOURTH BOND ISSUE GOING
STRONG IN OUTLYING
DISTRICTS,
This Fourth Liberty Loan is going
letter in the country districts of
Thurston county than any of the
preceding loans, according to the
statements of the Liberty Loan com
mittee, Several communities have
alrorfdy gone "over the top" with
completed quotas—the distinction of
being first belonging to Maytown,
which in now trying to double its
quota.
Interesting meetings where sol
diers entertained have been held at
Tenino and Grand Mound. Other
meetings have been arranged, one
being held at Rainier Friday even
ing.
Sergeant Plunkett. who saw serv
ice at Chateau Thierry, said at Ten
ino:
"There is no 'No Man's Land' in
front of the American troops —it is
fankee Land. We put up a sign
and we made good on it."
"America has put up a sign and is
going to make good on it. This Lib
erty Loan is the present means ot
our making good. It is 'The Amount
of Money the Nation Now Needs,'
and because Uncle Sam needs the
money, we must go over the top with
the full quota," says Rev. R. Frank
lin Hart, county publicity manager
for the Fourth Liberty Loan.
"Too many people have, only been
purchasing what amount of bonds
they have money in hand to pay for,"
he continued, "but that is not
enough. The nation is asking not
only our present savings, but also all
our possible savings for the next five
months.
"OUT quota is the amount the na
tion needs from us. Whether it is
easy or hard to raise makes no dif
ference. All that does make a dif-
ference is that Uncle Sam needs the
money. And no right thinking Amer
ican will hold out on Uncle Sam.
"Buy bonds, for that is the only
way you can get what you want and
then get your money back. For
bonds mean victory."
.j. * .j. * .j. .5.* ** * *
YELM MAX HAS FIRST *
❖ NUMBER IX THE DRAFT ❖
The first number drawn by <•
❖ President Wilson in the big lot- ❖
•> tery determining the order num- ❖
❖ her to be assigned registrants ♦>
under the new draft law wa3
322. held by Phillip Roberts of •>
>Yelm. The fourth number ❖
drawn, 1027, is held by Henry ❖
•> Chester Dopp of this city. Rob
<• ert Burns Gllsen of Tono held •!*
the eighth number, 16997. *
»*« »*♦ »*« »*« •*« »j« *s*
After spending the past year
here as reporter for the local dally
papers, Miss Marion Troy, daughter
of Attorney and Mrs. P. M. Troy, re
turned to the school of journalism at
the University of Washington this
week
PRICE FIVE CENTS
OLYIHPIA LAGS; OUTSIDE DISTRICTS
GO OVER TOE TOP
TOTAL TO FRIDAY ONLY $236,550, LEAVING ALMOST $500,-
000 OF COUNTY'S PORTION STILL TO BE SUBSCRIBED
MAYTOWN FIRST TO EXCEED ITS ALLOTMENT
YELM, UNION MILLS, LACEY, ROCHESTER,
TONO AND GATE ALSO SUCCESSFUL BAN
QUET FOR CAMPAIGN WORKERS
SATURDAY NIGHT.
Friday Thurston county was almost a half a million dollars
short on its quota for the Fourth Liberty Loan and only two days
remaining of Honor Week.
Subscriptions at the banks Friday morning totaled only $224,-
050. Adding $12,500, the county's share of the state's purchase
of $1,000,000 wortli of bonds, the total is $236,550.
The county's quota is $725,000.
Olympia is falling down—the outlying districts of the county
are going stronger than ever before. Most of them had gone over
their allotments after the drive had heen on only three or four days.
Maytown was the first to go over —its residents on the first
morning of the campaign, last Saturday, subscribed $7,600 or $2,600
more than its quota, and they're still going.
Union Mills and Lacey, with an allotment of $20,000, reported
$22,000 Friday morning, with expectations of making it $25,000
before the end of Honor Week.
Tono, with a quota of $15,000, reported $22,000 and a determi
nation to make it at least $25,000.
Yelm has gone stronger than any—with a quota of $5,000, it
had reported sll,lOO Friday.
Rochester has gone over its allotment of SIO,OOO, apd Gate,
too, has bested the $2,500 assigned to it.
No reports have been received from Rainier, Bordeaux or
Little Rock, while Tenino, including Bucoda and "Mcintosh, handl
ing its own drive and had not reported Friday.
Olympia's quota is $447,500, but its subscriptions to date are
less than half that amount.
The shipyards campaign is going strong and is expected to be
100 per cent by Saturday evening. Friday morning George Mueller,
who is directing the drive there, reported total subscriptions of
$65,000.
Up to Friday morning the two local banks had received sub
scriptions from 1575 persons, 895 at the Capital National with a total
of-$141,500, and 680 at the Olympia National, aggregating $82,550.
Olympia's poor si owing is based on the fact that, unlike former
campaigns, most of the purchasers are buying small bonds and pay
ing cash for them, instead of subscribing larger denominations and
paying for them on the installment plan.
"Sixty per cent of the subscriptions are cash," President C. J.
Lord of the Capital National bank said Friday, "and if a person
can buy a SIOO bond and pay cash for it, he can just as easily buy
a S2OO bond, use his credit and pay for it in five months. That's
the way most of the purchasers did in the other three drives. The
fact that it isn't being done now is responsible for Olympia's poor
showing."
One notable feature of Olympia's Honor Week campaign has
been that up to Friday all but one of the half dozen persons who
were listed as "slackers" in the Third drive for failing to buy
bonds, were early buyers of this issue.
A special meeting of the Liberty Loan campaign committee was
held at the office of Chairman Thos. L. O'Leary Friday evening,
when the list of purchasers was closely scrutinized and compared
with a card index of residents of the city, and special committees
detailed to call on those who made no subscriptions who the com
mittee thought should, and also on those who the committee thought
should have bought a larger amount.
The committee also voted to publish a "slacker" list in this
campaign.
The bitf event of the campaign, from the standpoint of the com
mittee workers, will be the banquet to be held at the Elk's hall
Saturday evening, when Honor Week reports will be submitted by
committeemen from all the districts of the county, total subscrip
tions announced and plans laid for the remaining two weeks' work.
Chairman O'Leary will preside at the meeting following the
banquet, some special entertainers are expected from Camp Lewis
and some of the French and British soldiers from there have been
invited, and talks will also be made by several leaders in the local
campaign work.
CITY ORDERS CLEAN-UP
OF DOWN TOWN ALLEYS
Inspection by Army Officers Results in
Instructions to Property
Owners.
A general clean-up of the alleys
throughout the business section of
the city was ordered by the counci'
at its regular meeting Tuesday even
ing, following an inspection by health
s ?VHOLE NUMBER 3032
officers from Camp Lewis, who
warned city officials that unless men
aces to health were removed steps
would be taken to prohibit soldiers
visiting Olympla.
In a number of alleys throughout
the business section the army officers
found piles of old refuse, offal and
garbage, broken sewers and pools of
stangnant water. Mayor Jesse T. Mills
notified Chief of Police Cusack to
have property owners clean up the
objectionable premises. If this is not
done, the city will enforce the provi
sions of the sanitary ordiuance, im
posing a fine of SIOO or Iraproson
ment for 30 day 9.
Published
Continuously
58 Years

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