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Washington standard. [volume] (Olympia, Wash. Territory) 1860-1921, January 31, 1919, Image 6

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022770/1919-01-31/ed-1/seq-6/

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VM.Y six
World War Hero
Memorials 1
with t orivi- ' . different
urir.- of sorvi«o. V. u de
signs. Indn i<hw T ' coiunnUef»s arc
im *t i to mail t? t . ••* i\. • our cpe-
PC GET SOUND MARBLE f
GRANITE CO.
» IHST w |
MCATTM-"", WASH. £
Established IST I fe
WE PAY HKiHKST 51 ARRET
PRICES AT ALL TIMES
for
Pirat-rl*.«s Lire Poultry, Dressed
Veal and Pork.
Call, or Phone 93. 9«.
Palace Market
Olympia, Wash.
KEEP Children's Feet
Absolutely Dry
"l>rl - Shu" keeps shoes 'dry
*iid you will not need rubbers.
Ono 15-cent can of "Drf-Shu" j
will outlast two pairs of rubbers
and lengthen the life of your
shoes. t liildren's health de
pends upon dry feet.
Try a can of "Dri-Shn"
Paste, in cents. If your shoe
dealer has none, send 13 cents
for trial can.
< AAGAARD
MANUFACTURING CO.
Kverett, Wash.
'■ ; , > 1
Register Itrgiitt
■ 5 iiiDDWiU * "TO. ■: \
■' B*»M Ave. 'Seattle
jßoslef
• ' ' "" l "
\ LOGGO)OFF LAND
' Aments, wild lilmikM tftt MK
I FIUCBO6 AH ACRB WOW.
3 JUM* as* tatos tt Wf.
<■ - Weyerhneyuer Timber Co.
/ ' I
NSHARK'S FRUIT STAND
We Offer tke Best it Fnrit
Confectionary. Ice Cream, Clears
Tobacco
«is styt koitkth it. .
Tree Delivery Phone H
>
■ i i " . V* 1 '
Have Your
CLEANING, PRIMING AND
REPAIRING
done by onion tailors at the
City Dye Works
SOI W. Fourth . Phone M 4
WK GALL AND DKLIVKR
THE OXFORD BOWLING
* ULBT
There's where the Goodfellows
Meet
I
Braeger's Piece
"Hone of the Rummy Club"
119 WBST FOURTH ST.
'1 RED CROSS ACTIVITIES I
• Contributed by
>1 10l |N|; .\> i:K,
'iicuin nfwiipia < 'fia?>u i
is '>. >on,i i /aise f.-v. it i hoi. .1 •.1
: IN V -s>-\ • TI PERSONS ID the JUI' : S » I 1*•
(ion ol ini 1 i:ajtter joined the Ited!
Cross du"ing tliis drive That is an
itieron-.' of fio per rent over last
year's roil. Much of this succ . >
Chairr.an s'liVHige Of the Committer
(■red 's id ' 1:e excellent organization
ami faithful service of the Minute
Women. lint it is hard I; fair to
mention Individuals or societies, for
so many took part in tins great eflort
and all did sulendid work.
The work of the chapter is moving
along with smoothness and precision.
There lias been an appreciable in
crease in the number of workers,
but there is room and need for still
more. Headquarters is a busy place.
Mountains of soft gray outing flannel
are being transformed into myriads
of soft gray petticoats—"warm, but
trying to walk in." one would say.
However, "we should worry " If the
poor refugees want outing flannel
petticoats, probably they know how to
manipulate tlietn.
It was a great disappointment that
our Red Cross was deprived of its
one opportunity to perform genuine
canteen service to soldiers passing
through Ihh city. When we heard
that a trainload of hoys from Camp
Lewis en route to California had
been backed into Olympia from Te
nino on account of washouts, there
was tremendous excitement.
We have no Canteen committee, of
course, as we are oft' the route of
military travel, but Chairman Har
ris rose to the occasion. Immediately
on receipt of the news he interviewed
the captain in charge and gained
permission to give the boys a free
movie show. That was purled off
with entire success. But that was
only the beginning. By overstraining
the telephone system, scores of house
wives were set to work making pies
and sandwiches, and a big feast and
dance were 'arranged for the evening.
And then, all of a sudden, the long
train slipped out of town as suddenly
and unexpectedly as it had come In,
leaving behind it a city of saddened
matrons and maids, and' taking with
it, I am sure, a load of even skdder
soldier boys. But "C'est la guerre;"
as the French have taught us to say.
And what a joyous itime father and
the small boys had eating thoSe pies!
Anyone who has feared that hjar
work for the Red Cross might be
used for the benefit of the Germans,
or* who has not yet learned to trust
the good sense of our national offi
cials, may derive cojnfort and satis
faction from the bljdqt statement of
our general manager that the Arner*
lean Red Cross has. no intention of
undertaking any relief work in Ger
many. No—when you make a worn
an's petticoat or a man's shirt or a
baby's layette you are helping- the
victims of this cruel war, not those
ho,aided and abetted it. J
Oo you remember how eagerly andj
Impatiently we loked forward *o the
time when all onr cutting would be
done at division headquarters by ma
chinery ?«. At last the Joyful news
arrived—and also the cut garments.
And,* oh dear, what awful things they
were to put together. So when a
reqjiest' came this .week that, in order
to nelp a congested headquarters, we
cut ofir allotment of men's shirts by
hfnd, our directress, with pven
greater joy acceded,.
An overdose of black pinafores In
duced a profound languor among our
patient sewers of refugee garments,
but the soft gray material for petti
coats, now filling the shelves, will
sutejy n'ow act as a tonic. Chemises,
too, ought to be fairly cheerful. As
for the men's shirts—what outland
ish styles and hues may appeal to tbe
poor but honest peasant of France
one dare not prophecy. Let us hope
for the best.
That our home service work is not
to be confined to soldiers and sailors
and their dependents is clearly shown
by a general letter just received from
division headquarters. It qays, in
part:
"During the epidemic there have
been many instances throughout the
United States, some of them in this
division, in which whole faniilies, far>
from neighbors and without means
of communication, have been stricken
with influenza and have suffered ter
ribly and in some cases have died
without any care or attention. With
out doubt the Red Cross organization
of branches and community auxil
iaries is sufficiently complete to en
able the chapter to supplement agen
cies already at work in such a way as
to make it impossible for such a trag
edy to occur in the chapter jurisdic
tion."
And we are expressly instructed to
lend our aid in such cases.
The question of the construction of
a road to Gull Harbor through Priest
P-rint park bobbed up again this week
wiien Will Hanna and others present
ed a petition to the city council. The
streetß committee was instructed to
'nvestigate and report at the next
'netting. Previous efforts of Gull
Harbor residents to obtain a road
through the park have been opposed
by the city park board.
Tin: WASHINGTON STANDARD, OLYMPIA. WASH., FIiIDAY. JANTAKV 31, 1!>19
EXECUTIVE MANSION
WILL EE FIXED up
GOVERNOR AND FAMILY WILL
I -cor, \IU.\ Itl UK I i'\ HOME
s'RORTLV
• rnor Ernes: Lister will prob
ed.. I.e iiri'upylng the executive man
• iti a fort th'* |>i i ' nt I• dative ses
sion expires.
Over tin governor's veto last week
an appropriation hill was passed pro
viding $9,000 foi tin? upkeep of the
mansion. Out of this a sum sufficient
to put the mansion in good repair will
he spent. Ihe roof is now leaking,
and it will take some time and money
to make the repairs.
In order to cement the present good
feeling between the governor and the
legislature, chairman James H. Davis
of the house appropriations commit
tee announced, when the vetoed item
was under consideration, that the gov
ernor this year would be given a sum
sufficient to maintain the mansion.
Senator Coman of Spokane, head of
the senate appropriations committee,
will push tlie measure through the
senate.
Governor Lister this week said he
was totally indifferent in the matter,
hut that if the legislature provides the
money he would again occupy the
home 1 lie state provides. He would
not say when he expected to move,
hut he I'd it be understood that lie
would not delay after the legislature
acts.
The appropriation for the mansion
is expected to be hurried through the
legislature, and the last traces of
ihe contest between and
the last legislature wiped out. The
mansion has been closed for two
years, the Lister family occupying
apartments for a while and lately a
private residenie. i
FORD'S WAR WORK
LARGE IN VOLUME
BIG COMPANY TURN'S OUT MANY
DIFFERENT ORDERS FOR
GOVERNMENT.
More than 2,000,000 steel helmets.
Order for 5,000 12-ctlinder Liberty
motors. About 1,500 delivered.
Order for 10.000 caissons. About
7,500 delivered.
Order for 112 Eagle boats, 200 feet
long and 2'5,/feet beam; 50 delivered.
More than 8,000 trucks.
Order for 25,000 regular Ford cars.
More than 6,000 ambulances.
Order for 700,0.00 bearings for the
Liberty motor. The superior stand
ard of bearings turned out by the
Ford Motor company decided the gov
ernment to have this company make
all the bearings for all the Liberty
motors made in the United States.
On this order over 40,000 bearingß
were delivered.
Order for 100,000 cylinder forg
ings for Liberty motors. Here again
the government recognized the supe
riority of Ford work and ordered
Ford forgings for all Liberty motors
made in America.
Order for ,400,000 cylinders for
Liberty motors. Again the govern
ment ordered the Ford Motor com
pany to make all the cylinders for all
the Liberty motors made in America.
Order practically completed and new
order for 300,000 was placed Just
prior to the armistice.
A large volume of experiment
work was done in building two-ton
military tanks, and the government
placed orders for 15,000 of the small
two-men tanks and 2,000 of the large
six-ton tanks, and the huge buildings
were almost completed in which the
tanks were to be built. . Cancella
tion order came before more than a
half dozen tanks had been completed.
Motion picture reels in behalf of
the Liberty loan". Red Cross and Pa
triotic fund work we're made by the
company and supplied to the govern
ment in sufficient quantities to serve
the entire United States in motion
pictures. Motion picture reels in
volume sufficient to serve the armies
of the United States in France, Italy
and Palestine were furnished by the
motion picture department of the
Ford Motor company.
Exactly 34,000 men and women
were employed at the main factory
iin Hignland Park: 6,800 men em--
I ployed at the shipbuilding plant;
[ 4,000 at the blast furnace; 250 at the
carburetor plant, or an average of
145,000 employes, practically all on
one hundred per cent government
: work, under a standard eight-hour
| day and minimum wage of $5 per
i dav.
The date of the first war contract
executed between the United States
and the Ford Motor company was
November 22, 1917.
Production before the war was con
fined to the Ford car, known to the
trade as Model T. The entire efforts
of the company were directed to the
production of this one model chassis,
upon which were mounted five dis
tinct bodies, known to the trade as
the runabout, seating two passen
gers; coupe, seating two passengers;
town car, seating six passengers, and
the sedan seating five passengers. The
last three are enclosed bodies, the
first two are open, with removable
tops.
The fiscal year ends July 31st an
nually, and for the fiscal year 1916-
17 the volume of production reached
WHAT HAPPENED IN DLYMPIA AND
STATE TWENTY-FIVE YEARSAGO
in I'ii- \\ a-Miiiigti.u. Stanilnrd for
Friday Ev ning. l-'ehruary IH!M.
\ol. \\.\lY. Si, tI.
I itiinfr tlw six weeks' war in 1860
'■ Prussia and Austria. 309,000
Pru giant and 330,000 Austrian* took
'' ti' lil. ot the former 2ti.T74 were
•iiied or disabled and 84,160 of the
latter, a total loss of 104,934 men.
Mr. Murphy's Accident—For 34
years The Washington Standard has
had thi personal care and supervision
of the editor, John Miller .Murphy,
who lias seen to it that through pros
perity and adversity, in storm or sun
shine. it lias never failed to make its
weekly visitation to the homes of the
people of this and .other communities.
Last Saturday evening Mr. Murphy
left his home and proceeded to the
Olympia theater, of which he is owner
and manager. Somebody left the
trapdoor of the stage open and he
walked directly into it, falling a dis
tance of 14 feet to tlie floor below.
In a state of consciousness and semi
consciousness he lay all night, being
found there the next morning by
Charles Orange. Help was summoned
and he was removed -,o nis home.
The income tax is the subject of
discussion throughout the country.
There seems to be more or less
suspicion prevalent that adjournment
of the capltol commission bodes no
good. The Standard as yet sees no
real cause for alarm, but with expe
riences of the past on other lines
there is ample opportunity for "sus
picion. *
The friction that lias existed for
•some time between the transconti
nental railways seems to have been
adjusted. They have signed a treaty
of peace and formed a sort of triple
alliance to last one year from
February 1.
Doubtless to show their zeal as
party organs, Republican press
of the state continues the agitation
of a' special session of the legislature.
Religious revivals are in progress
in most of the ehurehes.
The Nesqually bridge on the road
from Olympia to Taconta is reported
in bad condition.
P. W. Stocking, deputy county as
sessor. has moved in from Grand
Mound and will hereafter make
Olympia his place of residence.
People living In the vicinity of
Lane's landing, on the Westslde, have
not yet recovered from their fright
over the visitation of a shark a few
days ago. The monster Jlsh was
about 12 feet in length. It has been
several years since a fish of this size
has been seen in the waters of Budd's
Inlet. *lt was pvobabl ythe same
shark reported to have been killed
this week by Fred Schneider.
Olympia has no member of con
gress but she has an active represent
ative at Washington. The latest or
der is to remove the self-registering
instruments In the weather bureau to
Seattle and much indignation is felt
over the removal.
Sixteen liquor licenses are now In
effect in the city of Oylmpia and only
three in that portion of the county
outside. '
AMERICANIZATION
CAMPAIGN STARTS
SECRETARY LANE liAUNCHES A
MOVEMENT TO REACH ALIEN
RESIDENTS.
NEW YORK.—Co-operation of the
entire nation in spreading to the alien
population of the country the spirit
and truths of Americanism and in
ending illiteracy among the native
born population, was urged by Frank
lin K. Lane, secretary of the interior,
at an Americanization dinner here re
cently, which was attended by monp
than 1,000 prominent citizens from
all parts of the country.
The dinner marked the
opening of a campaign to be conduct
ed by the government through the
bureau of education of the depart
ment of the interior, and in which
citizens throughouut the nation will
be asked to participate. An effort is
to be made, Mr. Lane said, to obtain
from congress an adequate appropria
tion for the campaign.
Asserting that the war had brought
home to America the imperative need
for Americanization work, the secre
tary said that "Americanization," as
it was known in the past, had "meant
only the boycott," but the time had
come when a new meaning should be
given to the word if the ideals of
America were to be preserved.
785,432 cars. For the year 1917-18
the production totaled 708,684 cars,
but almost immediately after the end
of the fiscal year, the plant did almost
100 per cent war work.
Tenino Water Supply Cut.
Tenino's water supply was cut off
during the high water when the dock
at the old Jones mill cn Scatter creek
was carried away, taking with it sev
eral sections of water main. Tenino
housewives are relying on rain to sup
ply the mwith water until the dam
age is repaired.
About 12,000 delivered.
The members of St. Peter's Guild
of the Episcopal church are conduct
ing a rumage sale in the storeroom
at 522 Main street, near the Red
Cross headquarters. It will continue
until Saturday night.
Cx\SH PAID FOR
LIBERTY BONDS
of any denomination
RECEIPTS ALSO BOUGHT
COARANTY SECURITY CO.
103 Fifth Street
STANDARD ADS RESULT PRODUCERS
If your business isn't worth adver
tising, advertise it for sale.
LOfifiEßS' SHIRTS
Made of extra heavy flannel, waterproofed, union-made,
stocked in all sizes.
SPECIALLY PRICED
$6.00 SHIRTS dtJ HA
REDUCED TO S4.DU
$7.50 SHIRTS AA AA
REDUCED TO SO.t?D
$9.00 SHIRTS (tin An.
REDUCED TO I »UO
SIO.OO SHIRTS AA AA
REDUCED TO
OVERCOATS IS per cent off
. MACKINAWS-512.50 value-SIO.OO
We are offering these special reductions to make room for
our spring goods.
Gauthier's New Store
310 EAST FOURTH STREET
Hotel Lewis
, Rooms With Rath *
Strom llrnt. Klevator
One block north o( lulon Depot
*
4 A I'aclfle Ave., Tacoma
1O M H Telephonei Mala 2681
a ;
If You Wear
Crawford Shoes
«
We simply wish to remind you that we are carrying a
larger stock of. them than • ever before. If you don't wear
Crawford shoes then we wish to emphasize that your feet are
, missing a treat and that your purse is being taxed heavier
than is necessary. We will be pleased to back up these state
ments with a demonstration.
€SOTTFILD*S -
211 EAST FOURTH STREET
Use an Electric Flat Iron
It doee away with a hot, dirty Btove.
It is ready to use in a minute and wherever there la an eleo
tric light socket.
And it saves many steps from the ironing hoard to the stove.
Olympia Light k Power Co.

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