OCR Interpretation


Washington standard. [volume] (Olympia, Wash. Territory) 1860-1921, June 27, 1919, Image 6

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022770/1919-06-27/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for SIX

FAfIK SIX
UVeifhborhood
rtEM
VILANE
Mr. D. W. Allen of Hone, Mont,
spent several days at 11-la-hee re
cently.
Xlfss Florence McLane of Seattle
visited over Sunday with her parents
Mjr. and Mrs. Milner McLane.
. Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Leisure and
Hire. Verot of Shelton were Sunday
guests of Mr. and Mrs. C. Cruson.
Mr. and Mrs. Pierce O'Connor and
Master George spent Sunday at Priest
Point park.
Mr. H. Wages is the first in this
neighborhood to haul in hay.
Mr. and Mrs. James Houseman
were Sunday callers at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. H. Wages.
While Mr. and Mrs. Lavery of But
ler's Cove and young son w ere fishing
here, the son had the misfortune of
getting his wrist out of joint, Mr.
Wages replaced it and the lad tried
Ashing with one hand.
Mrs. Commodore Worthington is
nursing at Mr. Perry Baker's, where
twin girls made their appearance the
other day.
Mr. and Mrs. John Austin were
Sunday callers at the McLane home,
t*he Maples.
Mies Mabel Wages, with a number
. of friends from Olympia. motored to
Tacoma Sunday where a picnic was
Indulged in. Thirty people were
present.
< Mr. and Mrs. William Swan and
Mrs. I. Swlgart motored to Kent Sun
day, visiting Mrs. Swan's mother,
Mrs. Thomas.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Ostby spent Sun
day in Tacoma. A number of Olym
pia friends accompanied them.
Misses Marggret and Florence Mc-
Lane were visitors at 11-la-hee.
PINE GROVE
Strawberries are about gone- Fine
fruit but a short crop.
Several men are working in tbe
upper end of our road, getting ready
for the grader.
-The two Miss Jevons, Mabel and
Marian, are down from Belllngham
visiting their aunt, Mrs. J. N„ Wise

One day last week the Davis and
families of Beaton Harbor
Visited at Mrs. R. H. Carpenter's.
~ Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Wiseman have
another grandson, born to * their
daughter, Sadie McDahiels.
The Olympia Canning company has
hpught the Old Hartley jplace and
wans to raise berries on a large scale.
The B. A. Carltfon family were vis
sting relatives in Olympia last Sun
«P*P- Among , others Mrs. Carlson's
flstar, Mrs. Lipp, Just arrived from
iDtyfllEAntE
S fill I THE HOUSE
■ BMU OP QUALITY
.■ • ■
I PROGRAM
fl WEEK BEGINNING FRIDAY
■ AND SATURDAY, JUNE
■ 97TH AND 98TH
fl JOHN BARRTMOBE
X " ' ;' lh •
■ "THE TEST OF HONOR."
■ '"THE MOONSHINERS,"
■ Comedy.
■ SUNDAY AND MONDAY
■ JIJNE » AND SO
■ CONSTANCE TALMADGB
I
■ "A LADIES' NAME."
■ "BOOTS AND BUMPB"
■' Comedy.
■ TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY
■ JULY IST AND 2ND.
■ "OH. YOU WOMEN." •
H Starring Ernest Treux.
I Lloyd Comedy.
H News Reel.
I SBC 11c
■ ONE DAY ONLY—THURSDAY
■ JULY 3RD.
I HARVEY'S GREATER
I MINSTRELS
I AO—Colored People—4o
I 90—Piece Band—9o
■ FREE STREET PARADE AT
■ NOON.
Curtain at 8:15
H Tickets 11, on sale Saturday, j
H June 28th, at The Bookstore.
I'LL XSAXT GLARE
Mrs. Phoebe Bobbins left Saturday
I for Edmonds, Wash., to spend th"
summer with her sister Mrs. Ledford
Mrs. Lynch, who was hurt in a
Ist reel cur accident last week, although
| still in the hospital, is much im
' proved.
Mr. and Mrs. W G. Miller have 1
moved on to the place they bought :
from T. C. Sleater.
E. T. Palmer has traded his place
to Mr. Olson from near lllack Lake, t
Mr. and Mrs. Felt and babv and
Miss Laura Bigelow of Tneoma were!
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Bobbins j
Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Berg arid Mr. I
and Mrs. Olaf Berg from Enumclaw
were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Bjork
man Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Palmer motored
to Point* Defiance Sunday.
Myrtle Cramp was a week-end
guest of Cora Moulton.
SOUTH BAY
Tracy Kelsey had a stump piling
bee Thursday. June Id. at his home
on the old Bickle place. A very large
crowd attended and lots of work was
accomplished. Mr. Kelsey furnished
the dinner and supper, Mrs. Long
mire and Mrs. Hannaford cooking the
meals for him at the Longmire home,
where they were served.
Pauline Kaywood left Monday for
Walla Walla, where she will attend
summer school.
Mrs. A! Still well went to Seattle
Wednesday on business.
The Longmires, Turners, Sylves
ters. Moores and Hannafords attend
ed the dance at Puget Saturday night.
An enjoyable time was had by all.
George Bullard is driving a little
Grant auto which he purchased
lately. ;
A family reunion was held at the
J. L. Longmire home Friday. June 20,
In honor of the Longmire brothers
and sisters. A fine chicken dinner
was served by Mrs. J. L. Longmire.
Those present were Mrs. Sarah Wil
son and Mrs. Cassle Kirkendall,
Olympia; Mrs. Hattie Sot ten, Zillah.
Wash.; James Longmire and daugh
ter e*U; Tacoms ;fMrs. Mary Johnson,
Olympia. They all departed In the
evening to the Kirkendall home,
where supper was served, all enjoy
ing the evening there,
i Mrs. Dave Whipple has tyeen hav
! lug a severe attack of neuralgia. The
result was she went to a dentist Sat
urday and had all her teeth extracted.
1 Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Glidden snd
Mrs. F. A. Glidden called at the Syl
veeter home Sunday.
HOPP, MONT.
. ♦
Mr. and Mrs, Fred Lehman visited
Mr. and Mrs. Mcwhtrter last Sunday.
) Rev. Mr. Running of. the Lutheran
! faith held services It the Hopp
school house Idst Sunday. There was
a good attendance.
Mrs. Will Rutledge and sons, Mar
cus and Oliver, of Littlerock Wash'.,
! arrived Saturday evening for a visit
t with, her son Forrest and family.
TJhey made the trip by auto in five
Mr. and Mrs. Forrest Rutledge and
. their guesU, Mrs. Will Rutledge and
Meaqrs. Marcus and Oliver Rutledge;
were all-day visitors at the L. M.
Rutledge home last Wednesday.
Mr. and Mrs. Sylvester Mark ham
spent last Sunday evening at the
Welter homeN
Miss tana Brown and Harold
Brown returned Friday from Helena,
where they have been attending
school. Harold- 1 Brown graduated
from the academic department of the,
Montana Wesleyan college, being
salutatorian of his class.
Frequent thundqr storms are the
1 order of the day just now, but we
would prefer less thunder and more
rain. The drought has badly dam
aged the wheat crop.
The Good Roads association is
planning to give a picnic on Eagle
creek the Fourth of July.
The first case in Olympia to be
filed under tbe new small claims
court law, passed by the recent ses
sion of tbe legislature, was filed with
Police Judge Crosby Tuesday by At
torney Harry L. Parr. Under the
new law the attorneys receive no
fees for cases Involving any amount
less than S2O.
There will be a "Welcome Home"
dance at the McLean Grange hall
Saturday evening, a feature of which
will be tbe playing of the popular
war-time airs by a 5-piece orchestra.
The McLane dances are popular
events and a big crowd is expected
Saturday evening.
Mrs. Susie Hanks filed a suit in
the local superior court this week
asking that she be given a divorce
from Volney Hanks. The complaint
states ihat the couple were married
in 1802 and that there are six chil
dren. Mrs. Hanks alleges cruelty,
which she states dates from the early
years of her married life down to the
present time
Ti!'-: WASHINGTON STAND.M.'D. cLYMI f.V WASH., FKIDAY. JI NK 27. irtlft
NO GREAT BIGHES. BUT FOOO IN
PLENTY FROM BACKYARD POULTRY
I
•:»»w \ sif,i;t"x\ I'.IIII v HEN SHELTER THAT
\\ V- X\ OISVXMI XT. XI.SO; R XBRITS MAINTAINED, TOO.
[ < o\X EU I ING XV AS I E INTO I'OOD
XT SMALL or I LAY "*
< Special If arma'm; st-rvice, 1
Too many poultry stories read like
fairy tales in which Aladdin is often
representee as rubbing his magical
lamp and converting poultry poverty
into liock prosperity. Unlike such
warping of the truth, this is the story
of an actual experience of a back
yard pouliryman who was not able to
buy an automobile from his ilock
prolits hut who did furnish fresh, nu
tritious food and an abundance of it
for his family table, in addition to
enjoying his work.
The attractive and serviceable
poultry house designed and con
structed by this suburbanite cost
less than SIOO when it was completed
in 1914. It has a concrete floor,
roosts, trap nests, a water system
and other henhouse accessories. It
is a pleasure to look at this henhouse,
which would be really ornamental to
the backyard of any thrifty American.
The building is 12 by 18 feet, and
is divided into three pens with an
aisle at one end. The house is 7V4
feet high from the floor to the front
eaves and 6 feet at the back. Yel
low pine drop siding of medium qual
ity was used for sheathing and roof
ing purposes, the latter being over
laid with prepared, stonesurface, as
phalt roofing. Adjoining the house,
with direct access to it, are four pens,
one of which is used for small chick
ens, being inclosed with one-inch
mesh chicken wire.
The windows are an attractive fea
ture of this house. They cost com ;
plete $1.50 apiece, those at the side
being bungalow windows of large and
odd 'size which the dealer was glad
to get rid of. The front windows can
be opened both at the top and bot
tom for The side win
dows. which help to provide free cir
culation of air, are practically weath
erproof, as they are hinged at the
bottom and swing inward. The ma*
terial to rthe floor of this house cost
sl2. the owner laying the concrete
floor during the evenings by aid of an
oil lantern.
To begin with this poultryman had
only 15 hens, while his capacity rec
ord has been 60 mature bene and
pullets. A novel feature of his poul
try operations was the maintenance
of a number of- Belgian hares which
he raised for meat. One pen., in the
GAMP TEWS MEN
IN LOST BANALION
HALE OE FAMOUS GROUP WERE
RAW RECRUITS FROM
NORTHWEST.
Half of the men of the fam'btft
"Lost Battalion" of the 77th Divi
sion, heralded to the world by the
New York newspapers as "NeW
York's own," were in reality from
Camp Lewis, declares Lieutenant Ed
ward W. Akes, former Washington
National Guardsman, who returned
to his home in Seattle early this
week from the Lqtterman General
Hospital. Lieutenant Akers was
wounded' while leading two of the
platoons of the unit which four days
later became the '.'Lost Battalion."
"When we went, over the top-in
the Argonne on the morning of Sep
tember 26, 50 per cent of the meii
were replacement troops from Camp
Lewis,'' said Lieutenant Akers re
cently. "A few days before, 1 went 1
»to the town of St. Menehold and got
1500 replacements for the regiment
myself. Several Seattle men were-in
the group and the division had 4000
replacements when it went into the
flgbt. About half in my two pla
toons were Camp Lewis men."
Lieutenant Akers was first sergeant
of D Company of the 161 st Infantry
when that unit left this state ana
was commissioned a second lieuuten
ant at Camp Mills, L. I. He had
served as a sergeant with .that organ
ization when the 2nd Washington
regiment was sent to Calexico in
1916.
Upon the arrival of the 41st Divi
sion in France, of which the 161 st
Infantry was a part, it was made
into a replacement unit and until
August, 1918, when he was assigned
to the 308 th Infantry of the 77th
Division, Lieutenant Alters drilled
recruits. September 26 he went over
the top for the first time, his bat
talion forming the leading wave.
Fifty per cent of the organization
were green men from Camp Lewis
with but three weeks' tiaining in
France and none in the United States.
The second day of the Argonne drive
they were fighting like veterans.
Lieutenant. Akers said, and going in
to the hardest fighting troops ever
had. Machine gun nests were every
where and while working through
the dense underbrush the men did
not know at what moment they might
be shot. down.
On the morning of the third day
of the drive. September 28. Lieuten
ant \kers started forward with two
platoons. He had not gone very far
S. IH-parlment of Agricultures
chicken house was equipped with four
rabbit hutches designed according to
the directions of the I'nited States
department of agriculture.
In the main he raised Belgian hares
only during the fall, winter and early
spring up to the time of the setting
season, when the Hpace occupied by
the rhbbits was needed by the hens.
Then he would reduce his rabbltry to
the minimum point. In this way the
rabbit quarters provided plenty of
space, by the use of partitions, for
six or more setting hens at a time.
After the hatching season the owner
would place the broody hens in the
same pen with several rabbits, as the
presence and hopping about of the
rabbits would ultimately break the
hens of their broodiness.
The remarkable thing about these
rabbit-raising operations was that
valuable food was produced from
weeds and waste, as practically the
only feed for the rabbits was grass
clippings, wild hay and weeds. Dur
ing the young bearing season he
would feed the does a little skim
milk and a small amount of oats, but
never more than one qnart of oats a
week. In the course of two years
he raised and ate about 75 rabbits,
weighing an average of two pounds
apiece. All this meat was produced
as a by-product of his poultry opera
tions with small expense or trouble.
Another desirable point about the
rabbits was that they required little
care as compared with poultry. The
rabbits cwere fed at any time of the
day or night with satisfactory results.
"It is a comparatively simple mat
ter to kill and dress two rabbits In
10 minutes," remarked the suburban
ite, "but I never was able to pick and
dress a single chicken in less than
double that period. My family did
hot tire of the rabbits, because, as a
rule, we altrnated the rabbit flesh
with chicken and other fresh meats.
The profits which I realized from my
poultry and rabbit operations came
entirely from the Belgian hares, as
my White Plymouth Rocks only about
ppid expenses, since I had to pur
chase practically all my feed for
thetn. However, It 1b a great conven
ience for a suburbanite to have on
hand two sources of fresh meat in
addition to a plentiful supply of fresh
eggs."
when he met stiff machine gun re
sistance and received a machine gun
bullet which entered the left side of
his back and' camo out through his
right arm, leaving It paralyzed. He
dropped, and lay in a slight depres
sion by the side of a road
near Binarvllle. His t#o platoons
were held up and could not advance.
Bullets were kicking up the dust all
around him. The enemy was so close
that failing to get him with machine
gun and rifle bullets they threw a
''potato masher," eGrman hand gre
nade, in his direction which added a
second wound to his right arm.
While the enemy amused them
selves shooting at him. Lieutenant
Akers gave orders to his two pla
toons, and following out his instruc
tions his men were able to clean out
the machine gun nest Which had held;
them up and were able to advance.
These same men four days later were
virtually annthiliated while the "Lost
Battalion" was making its historic
stand against the Htfn.
IMP LNIS mm
BE CUT # SHE
ORIGINAL SITE OF 70,000 ACRES
IS TO BE RE- .
TAINED.
The Camp Lewis reservation will
be retained at its original size of
about 70,000 acres, according to an
nouncement of officials of the war de
partment this week. Several of the
officials said that the plan of re
ducing the government reservation
by about 30,000 acres had not been
brought to their attention and that
so far as they knew such action
would not be countenanced.
It is thought that the effort to re
duce the camp site in size grew out
of the fact that a number of the
owners of property in the tract have
retained an attorney, W. H. Abel of
Montesano, in an effort to have the
government reject a distant portion
Of the reservation and return the
property to the original owners.
The property under contention lies
a considerable distance from the
ground actually occupied by the
camp and has not been used by the
government. The farmers and prop
erty holders of the district are mak
ing the effort to get the land back
in belief that its return would in no
way affect the future of the army
camp. *
Congressman Albert Johnson made
the statement that he had no inten
tion ot taking any part in the dis
pute.
More Local Ilojs l!«irli \c« \(irk.
Several more Thurston county boys
landed in New York this week, antonp
them being Sergeant Robert L. Rat
nude and Private Charles K Dnby of
J*: * *
Phone T*7
e>93 IJ J(ft
I. R. MCINTOSH OLYMPIA.mSH.
Proprietors
Do you own a COW?
or a HORSE?
or a PIG?
or a CHICKEN?
Jf you have any stock or poultry to
feed, and are not buying your supplies
of us, the chances are you are over
looking a good bet.
For instance:
Rolled Oats (70 lbs.) .$2.26
Scratch (100 lbs.) 4.10
Mill Run, 100 lhs.) 2.06
Bran (100 lbs.) 2.00
Shorts (100 lbs.) 2.16
These are specials for this week, but
you'll always find our prices reason
able and our products the best.
We can do it, because we sell for cash,
f. o. b. the warehouse; because we have
' low rent, and overhead expense j ami
because we have our own experienced
buying agent cast of the mountains.
Don't buy inferior products; at high
prices. '
It isn't fair to your stock. •>* ■»
BAKER FUEL CO. PHDHF 7
Cor. Seventh A Columbia | IIUIIL I
FUEL, HAY, GRAIN and PRODUCE
Feist and Bachrach
i
SUCCESSORS TO ROSENTHAL'S
Heavy White Wash j
Materials
FOB SUMMER WEAR '
■ > t*-;l
We have a splendid showing of new weaves in these excel
lent wash fabrics. Many excellent new styles are shown in the_'
latest fashions for summer- wear that are designed of these
materials. Our phttern department is an excellent aid for those
that likie to do thejr home sewing.
36-inch Heavy Striped
Gaberdines
•' , *
That will be excellent for the designing if separate skirts and
suits. These are in several stylet? of stripes and will be appre
ciated for their excellent washing qualities—s9c to $1.25 yard.
Plain White Poplins and
Gaberdines
Artistically designed. These fine and attractive weayes are
Very pretty for a fancy skirt or dainty dress. The young miss
will be pleased with the delightfully pretty style that can be
made up for the summer wear. Priced at 39c to SI.OO yard.
27 and 36-inch White Pique
1 hat come in fine and heavy cords. Excellent and serviceable
summer frocks are made of this popular wash fabric. Infants
and children's coats that are distinctive with dainty lace col
lars will be found very much in style this season. Smart los
ing skirts are appropriate made of these snowy white fabrics.
Priced at 59c to $1.25 yard.
Olyinpia. of Rase Hospital Unit No.
Private Harry A. McCoy of Olym
pia. of the 28.'!r<l Military Police, and
Corporal .tohn Eko of Rochester, of
the Quartermaster Corps.

xml | txt