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Washington standard. [volume] (Olympia, Wash. Territory) 1860-1921, June 27, 1919, Image 7

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POOR ROADS OR GOOD ROADS ;
THEY AFFECT COST OF FOOO
MAN WHO NEVER l/K.W ES CITY STREETS HAS IIIKKCT INTEREST
IN WOKIi IOH BKTTKII HKiHWAVS; KXII OK WAR SKKS
MOVEMENT WITH NKW IMPETI S
(Special Information Service, I*. S. Department of Agriculture.)
The man who never gets out of
sight of the ta'l buildings as well as
the man who has jet to see a city
skyscraper, should be a booster for
better roads. Highways are used in
transporting practically every article
of food at some stage in its journey
to the consumer's table. Had roads
add to the cost of transportation, but
good roads cut marketing costs.
From the time when farm products
were first hauled in wagons to mar
kets there has been an interest in
better roads as a means of reducing
the cost of transportation, but im
IT'S FUNNY
How some fellows say they weren't
Speeding, but Just, hurrying, when
They get picked up by Slim Peterson,
Our trusty speed cop.
Seems to me a tough job to decide
Whether a feller would liave to hurry
In order to speed, or whether he'd
Have to s|ieed in order to hurry.
W( week Pete caught up with our
Good friend ('. T. Hutchins, the
Big boNH of the Goodyear Tire &
Rubber Co. in this territory, and
Invited him to come hark to town
And meet, a good pal of Pete's,
Namely, one Walter Crosby.'
Hutchins said he didn't have time.
Was In an awful hurry, and all
The usual sort of bunk, and said
A lot of other things unladylike
*
That I wouldn't dare to repeat.
Well, to cut the story short. Hutch
Got thirty cents ($<H)fl00.80) change
Out of a full grown Twenty Dollar
Bill, regular money (no checks
here.)
Hutch said he never did it before
And wouldn't do it again, and all
That sort of sti|ff, but Pete told
Him that was alright, he could do
It as often as lie wanted to—we
Need the money anyway to build
M<»re good roads.
Now, the thing I want to
Remind you of is this, that
'GOODYEAR TIRES render the
Lowest cost per mile wifti
The most satisfaction, and
The sooner you start using
Them and taking advantage "of
Our tire service, the sooner
YOUR TIKE TROUBLES ARE OVER
' Yours en«TIRE-ly,
EDDIE.
Rese-Nepple Auto Co.
INC. 0
215 Main St. Phone 010
WE ABE PAYING
10W
PER LB. CASH
FOR CASCARA BARK IN
SMALL LOTS.
IF YOU HAVE QUANTI
TIES, SEE US.
Bark should he bone dry
and finely broken, so that
sacks can be filled compactly.
f
Barnes&Bowen
GROCERS
4th and Columbia Streets
PHONES 48 AND 49
proved highways means more now be
cause of the extensive use of motor
trucks in hauling products from the
farm to the railroad station or direct
to the city markets.
Trucks are not only replacing
horse transportation but in many
cases they are supplementing and
even doing the work of railroads. In
fact, motor trucks offer a solution ot
modern transportation problems, but
roads built only for horse-drawn ve
hicles or light automobiles will break
down under heavy motor traffic.
Maintenance of thousands of miles
of roads so that the enormous gov
ernment and commercial truck traf
fic of th'e past two'years could move
has taxed the abilities and called
forth every energy and plan on the
part of highway officials. In many
states officials found themeesvls with
out sufficient fumis to handle proper
ly t|»e repair and rebuilding work nec
essary. Nearly all of them had to
struggle under the handicap of an In
sufficient labor supply, and to
meet the increased cost of labor and
material. 1
Only a few states were unaffected
by the restrictions on the supply and
transportation of materials which had
to be brought from a distance. Nona
escaped the difficulties which followed
the great and rapid increase in traffic
at this country's entrance into the
war. From New England to the Pa
cific coast new demands were made
upon the highways; and unusual con
ditions developed everywhere in
maintenance and construction. In
several states high type roads, which
had originally been constructed with
out sufficient foundation to meet the
new demands, had to be rebuilt, and
part of thfs construction work was
carried on while the heavy traffic was
kept moving.
The extensive use of motor trucks
for transportation during war time
has emphasized the possibilities of
well-built roads as a means of mar
keting farm and other products. Solv
ing road problems when there was a
constant procession of heavily loaded
trucks traveling over them has been
a great lesson to road officials, which
will be put to good use In peace time.
The federal aid road-building pro
gram for this year is stupen
dous in the history of the world. The
expenditures for road construction
for the year are likely to reach $500.-
000,000. Plans have been made for
tbe construction of continuous high
way systems, the states through which
the highways are to pass cooperating
with each other as never before.. Im
proved roads will not terminate at
state lines, but will run from one
large marketing center to another.
More than $45,000,000 worth of
motor trucks, to be used in road con
struction work, will be distributed by
the secretary of agriculture through
the bureau of public roads to tbe state
highway departments. These trucks,
about 20.000 in number, have beep
declared surplus by the war depart
ment, and all that the states must do
to acquire them is to pay the loading
and freight charges.
The trucks range in capacity from
two to five tons, 11,000 of them are
new, and all are declared to be in
serviceable They will be
apportioned to the states only puon
request of the state highway depart
ments on the basis of a request re
ceived from the respective states with
the apportionment provided in the
federal aid law approved in 1910.
The requirements of the law are such
that nope of the trucks will be dis
tributed to counties or individuals.
Further interest in the nation-wide
need for good roads is shown by the
fact that shortly before the last ses
sion of congress adjourned that body
made an extra appropriation of $200,-
000.000 in the postoffice appropriation
bill to meet the federal part of the
road-building program. This is the
largest appropriation ever made by
any government for a similar purpose,
say road officials of the department of
agriculture.
Many Farmers Helped by Farm Usui
• Act.
WASHINGTON, D. C.—-Up to June
1, $223,311,766 had been loaned to
87,816 farmers by the Federal Land
banks established under the farm
loan act. The number of loans made
during May was 3,683. amounting to
$11,342,855. During May. 6,204 loan
applications were received, asking for
$20,354,620, while the number ap
proved was 5,944, amounting to $17,-
608.080.
All of these loans are long term, at
low rates of interest, which the farm
ers were not able to get prior to the
establishment of the land banks.
Anna Rose Manker filed suit for
divorce In the local superior court
Wednesday against James Manker,
alleging abandonment and cruelty.
Mrs. Manker alleges that when she
married the defendant she had
$2,400, part of which he spent and
thft other half he invented in prop
erty here and then deserted her. The
couple were married in April. 1919.
THE WASHINGTON STANDARD, OLYMPIA, WASH., FRIDAY, .lI'NE 27. 1:• T»
WHAT KKATIKKS OK SIMPLER
HIVING, MADE NECESSARY BY
THE WAR, ABE WORTH RE
MAI XING'.'
The reading of such a topic sug
gests an easy solution, but when try
ing to formulate iliat solution. 1
found it wasn't quite so easy.
The first point that attracted my
attention was. "Made Necessary by
the War." How guilty ecah of us
should feel that the war was made
necessary to discipline us. How
many here have thought of this war
iis a means in the all-wise plans of
our Heavenly Father to bring us
nearer to Him. How often His his
tory has told us He sent war upon
His chosen ones to direct their atten
tion from the ways of the world to
Him.
The Americans were the most ex
travagant nation in existence before
the war. Exxtravagance is parent to
waste, and waste in turn is parent to
sin; if sin will consume the individ
ual, so will waste consume the na
tion.
Our Heavenly Father allowed no
waste In His creation, neither should
we allow waste in the material
things that so graciously are put at
our disposal. If no waste is allowed
and prudence and wisdom chosen as
our guardians, then we have taken
the strongest step toward simplified
living.
The question asks, "What features
of simpler living, made necessary by
the war. are worth retaining?" Now,
if we wished to make It more impera
tive, might we not ask it in these
words, "What features of simpler liv
ing, taught us by the war, dare we
now eliminate?" and wouldn't the
answer be the same? "Very few,"
unless we would be like the colored
I waiter who approached a «>atron in
a restaurant to take his order. The
gentleman, after looking over the
menu, said to the waiter, "Yoiff yiay
serve me dinner as mentioned here,"
pointing to the card, "only eliminate
the eggs." The waiter bowed, say
ing, "Yes-sir, yes-sir," and departed.
Presently he returned and approach
ing the gentleman said; "And how
did you say you wanted your eggs,
sir?" The gentleman now saw be
had used a word not in the waiter's
vocabulary, so he repeated, fl said
eliminate the eggs." The waiter said,
"Oh, yes, I see, yes-sir, yes-sir." J«Iot
being satisfied, he again approached
the gentleman and asked the second
time, "How were those eggs to be
done?" The answer was: "Just
eliminate them." When the waiter
brought in the dinner as ordered he
said, "Here is your dinner, sir, but
we couldn't serve the eggs, as we
done broke our eliminator."
The most prominent attributes pre
sented by the war were conservation,
generosity, economy, self-sacriAce
and brotherly-kindness. i
The word conservation defines
itself, for who here will evdT forget
to associate conservation with the
past war? Conservation is surely
worth retaining, so uftthout further
explanation we will label it- feature
No. 1.
Generosity was cited as an attri
bute in the light of charity. We
gave freely of our dollars for democ
racy in the war loans, for Red Cross
wofk, for the Y. M. C. A., for the
Salvation Army, for reconstruction
and many other uses and not always
with a remunerative value. That
feature is worth retaining, for if it
needed dollars to make the world
safe for democracy for tbe coming
generations, then it will again take
dolars to spread Christianity in tbe
missionary movement both here and
abroad to make this world' a safe
place for tbe coming generations. The
call for civil giving should not bfe
stronger than the call for Christian
giving. Therefore, the attribute of
right-giving will be labeled feature
No. 2.
Economy was next cited. That in
cludes economy in food, clothing and
resources. To economize doesn't
mean to stint. We women who had
mother? who lived during the recon
struction following the Civil War
| didn't have as hard a leasop to learn
as those less fortunate, as economy
was a virtue then and should be now.
To economize doesn't mean to substi
Not Positive, Comparative and
Superlative
—BUT
Positive, Negative and
- Superlative
THAT CAN ONLY BE THE
Eveready Battery
MCNEILL BATTERY
ST A TION
OPPOSITE CAPITOL
210 East Sixth Street Olympia
tute. either. We have learned many
appetizing ways of serving some i
foods we seldom used because we;
thought we didn't need to economize i
and th'-rcfore wasted that which we
were to learn was of great value
Substitutes in most cases are O. K..
but the continual use of substitutes
without the food value in calories to,
the human system is waste in health
c utists tiro now trying to prove to
us that it was the use of too many i
substitutes ir. our flour and bread
jthat robbed the system of some vital:
elements that could have counteract-;
ed the ravages of the dread influenza, t
Those who learned to economize in
the food proposition can sympathize'
with the less frugal woman who,
asked a thrifty house wife, "Oh, what
will we do now that Lent is here?"j
when she received this reply, "Lent, 1
what is six weeks of Lent, since we!
have had 12 months of Hoover?"
Clothing should be bought and j
used in an economizing manner, tak-i
ing these basic reasons. Buying un-i
necessarily or buying too much and|
cutting to a disadvantage. And, j
again, don't be afraid to remodel, as
the styles can be very prettily fol-1
lowed by combining two materials to i
advantage.
Our natural resources, such as
iron. coal, wood, oil, gas, etc.. can be
economized if not substituted as was
proven beyond a doubt by our "gas
less Sundays last fall when by each
economizing just a few quarts or gal
lons at mast sent so many million
gallons on its way to hasten the close
of the war.
Thus proving that economy in food
clothing and resources has helped to
make simpler our living scale and
therefore must be retained to a
marked extent and counted as feature
No. 3.
Self-sacrifice and brotherly-kind
ness were the humanitarian features
that have helped to elevate our lives;
for without self-sacrflce how could
our loved ones been taken from our
sides and the ladies of the land given
up their other duties to make surgical
supplies and hospital garments for
the Red Cross. And without broth
erly-kindness, the great movements
of the Red Cross, Salvation Army,
hospital units, and kindred organiza
tion's been brought to the boys so in
nosi of them?
I ,So self-sacriflce and brotherly
kindness as features of No. 4 have
helped to take (Air selfish natures
into broader channels of right living.
As each of us must have learned
something vital, let it be in any phase
of life, whether in conservation, gen
erosity, economy, self-sacrifice or
brother-Iy-kindness, so r,etain and
nurture it, and then by our united
forces make life one glad, sweet song.
-nrMrs. Herbert W. Allison, lecturer
of Middle Spring range No. 1728,
Shippenburg, Pa.
inßead at the Cumberland County
Pomona.
,>! ( The above, clipped from the Penn
sylvania range Newa, la just as appli
cable to Washington as to the East,
so we take pleasure In coppying it.—
Ed.)
FARMERS BACK WORLD LEAGUE.
><•
WASHINGTON, D. C.—From two
authorised sources it has developed
that the farmers of America are
standing behind the league of na
tions, want America to enter a peace
and have not been Influenced
by the* opposition in the senate.
I Thomas C. Atkeson, Washington
representative of the National Grange,
state that the fundamental idea of
the league of nations —the, preven
tion of war—has won the united sup
port of the farmers of the country.
"Until the opponents of the league
can offer a workable scheme that has
this same purpose," said he, "they
cannot hope to swerve the farmer
from his stand."
The National Grange, which has
large organizations of farmers Ln 33
states, in a convention at Syracuse,
N. Y„ last November, unanimously
adopted resolutions favoring "a
league of nations to conserve peace;
the establishment of a court of arbi
tration and the establishment of an
international police force under such
'tiles .incf regulations as the peace
envoys shall doterm,ic
Atki s.in has just assured th» prps
irien' < 1 his bcliei that the "Americ- n
farmers havp faith in the abiliti and
patriotism of (hp American ;."ace
coill'lii-. :nn ail' believe tbev Will do
all necessary to protect he interests
ot the .'nitfd States and promo: the
pea< e and ha-niony o: the world, just
as far as possible."
Charles S Barrett, president of the
\auonal Board o. Farm Organize
lions, who has just returned from
London and who has just, returned
from London atui Farts where he pre
sented a petition to the American
peace delegation in beiialt of the
farmers of the county, declared it as
his belief that the final draft of the
league of nations will win the sup
port of all America.
lie hoped the endeavor to have in
cluded i nthe league a special body
having ihe international interests of
agriculture directly in charge will be
successful. A cable backing up his
presentation of the measure was for
warded to the president today.
Barrett is in recetpi of a report
from A. A: Elmore, president of the
Farmers' Union of Ogden, and flebl
representative of the national hoard,
that the farmers of the West are
This Is Important
We can't make much money on your first purchase.
We know that the only way to build a permanent
business is to show you that it will pay you to be
come a permanent customer. The only way we can
prove this to you is to sell you goods of the HIGH
EST QUALITY and to give you the best in all
REPAIR WORK.
THERMOID COMPOUND TIRES
GATES SOLE TIRES
#
All Tires and All Work Guaranteed.
%
i■-■ . • '
Tire Service Company
S. R. HOLCOMB, WALTER H. DRAHAM,
113 W. sth St. n Telephone 779
IT IT'S A HALF-SOLE IT'S A GATES
« ■ ■
M 1 ■ ■ . ■ ■ I. ,
CHAUTAUQUA
j • ' ' ,f • y , ■: ■ <>l :
V
7 Big Joyous Days
A Solid Week of the Best Music, Entertainment s Lectulres
that the Country affords—Ellison-White quality. A Bigger and
Better Program than ever this year and the whole weelj is
yours for the price of a Season. Ticket. '
PROGRAM BOOKLETS AND CHAUTAUQUA TALK TO BE
DISTRIBUTED SOON. WATCH FOR THEM
26 Big Attractions
Here are only a few of them:
PRIVATE PEAT
Famous writer and humorist. Worth the price of
a season ticket to hear his "Two Years in
Hell and back With a Smile."
MART ADRL HAVE
Noted coloratura soprano of New York appears
on the foutrh evening, assisted by her
company of Recital Artists.
APOLLO CONCERT COMPANY
Five musicians known throughout the Chautauqua
world. One of the big musical attractions
of4he platform for the last decade.
CZECHO SLOVAK BAND
.laroslav Oimera brings his famous Czechoslovak
Band for two full concerts on the fifth day.
Madame Helen Cafarelli, Soloist.
"TURN TO THE RIGHT"
Edwin M. Whitney, America's,foremost interpreter
of plays, presents in monologue form the metro
politan success, "Turn to the Right."
EDWARD F. TREFZ
Member of American Food Mission to Europe, former
assistant*to Hoover in Food Administration
work. Great lecture on Reconstruction.
Season Ticket Prices: Adults 92.50, Students $1.50, Children SI.OO
War Tax not included.
Olympia, July 12-18
Tent will be pitched en old high school grounds.
heartily in support or a league of
nations.
"More than 75 pot - rent of the
farmers arc for a league of nations,"
he suit).
Barret' declarm! that ■ tie. problems
of tlie farmer the world over can be
simplified liy the right, sort of a
league of nations.
"1 talkeu to I'renilers t'lcnienceau
ond Lloyd George," lit) said, 'and
they told rne they would support an
international farmers' organization,
to b" affiliated with the league.
"Mi. Lloyd George inv'ted us to
rail an international convention of
farmers to be held in London. I be
lieve that i he producers of foodstuffs
of the won Id will be given full recog
nition. But even if it does not come,
ihe farmers wil be in hearty support
of the league of nations. They are
heartily sic kof war, and they believe
the league will prevent it to a great
degree, if not entirely."
Lester Chllson, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Ross Chilson of Ward'B lake, who
served overseas with the 90th divi
sion. participating in the big Allied
drive that broke the Hlndenburg line,
was discharged at Camp Lewis Tues
day and returned home in time for
the Welcome Home celebration.
PAGE SEVEN

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