OCR Interpretation


Washington standard. [volume] (Olympia, Wash. Territory) 1860-1921, November 12, 1920, Image 3

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022770/1920-11-12/ed-1/seq-3/

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FILL BEST HIE 10
SELECT SO CORN
SHOULD JOT HE LEFT UNTIL
SPRING WHEN' (;<>OI) HEED
CORN' IS SCARCE
Early selection of sed corn is of
special importance this year, accord
ing to specialists of the Department
of Agriculture. Much of the corn
crop is at least two weeks late, and
early fall frost would cause a repeti
tion of the conditions In 1917, when
a large part of the corn crop was
frozen and was unfit for seed. The
following spring, seed corn was very
scarce and high.
Good seed corn is the secret of a
good corn crop, and autumn 'is the
time for the selection of corn to be
planted the following season. Many
farmers put off seed selection until
the spring when there is a scarcity of
good seed corn. There is danger in
I this delay every year, but when the
jcorn /rop is late, as it is this year,
jthe danger is especially great. Each
spring the Department of Agriculture
receives reports from many sections
.telling of the willingness of farmers
I to pay good , prices for seed corn and
their inability to obtain it.
! This scarcity could be prevented
j by selecting the seed when it Js most
abundant and when the very best can
|be obtained—at ripening time when
I it has been in no way reduced in vi
ital'.ty. Many let this opportunity pass,
the farmers expecting to purchase
their seed corn on y to find that they
can not buy at any price in the winter
or spring as good seed as they could
have selected In the autumn.
Requirements for First Rata Seed.
! Until a community has its expe
rienced and honest corn breeder, the
best place for the farmer to obtain
seed corn is from fields on his own
farm or In his neighborhood that wer:
planted with a variety that has gen
erally proved most successful in that
locality. By far too many farmers
consider seed good simply because it
will grow. To be first class, seed
corn must be —
Well adapted to the seasonal and
She Keeps Faith With You— Hfc>»
WiO You Keep Faith With Her?
STILL ifoGREATUT
» ANOTHER
Quietly, but effectively, the Greatest Mother in the
World is toiling and drudging for you and yours.
• > £he has not forgotten the crippled, blinded remnants
of the war in Araay and Nary hospitals. To the victims
' ~ of disaster in war she still brings blessed relief.
f ' * -
JV * . She does more. She takes to her arms the victims of \ ,
disaster in peace, the victims of floods, fires, tornadoes
t . • and other catastrophes. Over 30,000 such unfortunates •'
were shielded and sheltered by her this year.
'*■ . '
" In preventing disease through education, in saving
lives through careful nursing and by teaching first aid
In accidents the Greatest Mother in the World—your ■
RED CROSS—is keeping, faith with you; keeping •A*';
* faith not only in your own country—aye, in your own
vicinity—but also in devastated foreign lands.
- 1
Will you keep faith with her? The good she has done
in the past has keen possible entirely through the help
of your membership. Will you continue to sustain her
as she continues to sustain you? Then join the Red
Cross or renew your membership. Send your applica
tion on the enrollment blank below to your nearest {
Red Cross Chapter.
RED CROSS
Fvuxni
ROLL CALL
♦ . »
November 11-25, 1920
Tear off and atnd to your nearest Red Crete Chapter
ENROLLMENT BLANK
THE AMERICAN RED CROSS
/
CHAPTIR
Chapter Addrw
In reepenae to ywir appeal far member* to carry Name
•MI the humanitarian warfc ef the (ISD CROSS I an- • a " ,# »..i...«wm
•laaa my membership faa af 9 ind deal re iHifreaa
to be an railed a member far tf2l.
MEMBERSHIP PEES— Annual, $1; Contributing, $5; Sustaining, $10; Life, SSO; Patron, SIOO
*
j I
THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTED BY
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
TIIE WASHINGTON* STANDARD, OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON, Fill DAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1020
soil conditions where ft is to be plant
ed.
From well-grown productive plants
of a productive variety.
Well matured and preserved from
ripening time to planting time in a
manner that wi'l retain its full pro
ductivity.
The importance of these three re
quirements has been demonstrated
through experiments by the office of
corn investigations, Bureau of Plant
Industry, United States Department
of Agriculture, and the results given
in Farmers' Bulletin No. 1175, re
cently published by the department.
At corn ripening t'me, specialists
of the department adviße, drop all
| other business and select an abun
dance of seed corn. The process is
too important to be conducted inci
dentally while husking. Seed corn
1 should be selected from stalks stand
ing where they grew. In this way the
seed corn can be obtained from—
| Stalks that have an inherent ten
j dency to yield well, as shown by their
superiority over surrounding stalks
| that grew under similar conditions.
: Such seed inherits high producing
power.
Stalks without suckers. Such seed
produces fewer suckers than seed
from sucker bearing stalks.
Storm proof stalks with ears at a
desirable height.
Stalks that are free from disease.
Among the best methods for the con
trol of several important corn dis
eases, including the ear and stalk
rot, is the selection of seed corn from
disease-free stalks. The selection of
disease-free seed corn is d'.scussed in
Farmers' Bulletin No. 1176. entitled
"The Control of Corn Root. Stalk,
and Ear Rot Diseases."
Husk Ears From Stalks.
As soon as the corn matures, the
farmer should go through his fie'd
*ith a seed picking bag and husk the
ears from the stalks that hav e pro
duced the most corn without having
any special advantages, such as space
mo'.sture, or fertility. Avoid the
largo ears on stalks standing singly
with an unusual amount of space
around them. Preference should be
given the plants that have produced
most heavily In competition with a
full stand of less productive plants.
In all localities the inherent tendency
of the plant to produce heavily of
sound, dry, shelled corn is of most
importance.
Late maturing plants with ears
thai, are heavy because of the excess
ive amount of sap should be ignored.
Sappiness greatly Increases the har
vest size and we'ght, and is apt to
destroy the quality. In central and
southern states, all other things being
equal, short, thick stalks are prefer
able. Short stalks are not so easily
blown down, and in general are more
productive than siender ones.
The day the seed corn is gathered
the husked ears should be put in a
dry place .whare there '.s free circula
tion of air, and placed in such a man
ner that the ears do not touch each
other. This is the only safe proced
ure. If left in the husk long after
ripening, it may sprout or mildew
during warm, dry weather, or become
infested with weevils or grain moths
or their eggs. ,
There are various ways in which
aged corn can be prepared for drying.
The ears may be hung on strings of
b'.nder twine or cord. Wire racks
may also be used. The farmer, how
ever, may exercise his own ingenuity
as to what method he will use. but
should be certain that the corn is
stored in a place where It will not be
exposed to damp atmosphere or rata
or other destructive pests.
The Charm of Winter Driving.
Do you know the charm of winter
driving? The bugaboo that it is tor
ture to drive a car during the winter
months is every year frightening
fewer motorists. Main roads are no
longer snowbound but are kept open
to traffic throughout the winter.
Automotive manufacturers have
device after device for the comfort
and safety of winter driving. Even
when the streets are slippery, you are
just as safe driving your own car
carefully as walking. Non-skid de
vices and practical geared-to-the-road
treads have reduced the possibility
of skids to a minimum.
If the motorist is cold, he has only
to pull out the floor boards over the
engine to enjoy the warmth Vrom the
motor. This beats waiting on the
corner for a public conveyance. Time
is also a factor to be considered. The
average motorist carries insurance
against the periods when it is laid up
for repair.
This insurance is as effective in
the winter as in the summer. It costs
the same for summer and winter
alike. And the ordinary man values
his tim« about the same regardless
of the season of the year. Tire and
car overhead remain about the same
throughout the year, and deprecia
tion remains much the same whether
the car and tires are used or put in
storage.
Thundering over the road is of
course not to be considered in winter
time, but the motorist who bought
his car for the purpose for which it
was built wll) not only find winter
driving a pleasure but a profitable
business proposition.
INCREASED COSTS COMPEL
FARMERS TO AVOID WASTE
With the increasing price of land,
feed, and the higher cost of labor, tt
is becoming necessary that the farm
er eliminate, as far as possible, any
waste. He must make use of all the
by-products of his business much the
same as the manufacturer does. Corn
is produced in practically every sec
tion of the country, primarily for the
grain, and frequently the stover Is
disregarded.
Properly cured stover is relished
by live stock, but that which is left
in the open during disagreeable
; weather is far from being palatable
or nourishing. Stover protected from
the time it is cut in the field is a val
uable feed for young stock, idle
horses, and cattle that are being car
ried over the winter on a cheap ration.
The best way -to handle .corn stover
is by means of the shredder." This
method makes it possible to get it in
the barn before the feeding qualities
have been Injured by the wqather.
Enough room should always be re
served in the barn to accommodate a
good supply of stover. Hay may be
safely stacked out, but It is unsafe to
try to stack shredded stover. Care
must be taken to give the .corn ample
time to cure before it is shredded,
for it may heat in the mow and be
come worthless through subsequent
molding.
LICENSE TAOS OOMING
FROM PORTLAND SOON
Early in December the first con
signment of license tags for motor
vehicles will arrive In Olympla, ac
cording to J. Grant Hlnkle. The
Irwin-Hodson company of Portland
Is manufacturing the tags for 1921.
Last year the plates were made by
a Minneapolis Arm. Eighty tons of
steel is being used in • the construc
tion of 200,000 sets of tags. The
color In 1921 will be brown with
white lettering.
Oentralia.—New $125,000 Etka'
homo completed.
South Bend.—New roadway to be
built to mill if Lev/is Mills and Tim
ber Co.
BUSINESS
DIRECTORY
REAL ESTATE
JOHN C. ELLIS
Heal Estate
Loans
Insurance *
524 Main Street
BIMONI2HNO
WHEELS PAINTED
Running Gears cleaned mod
painted, Cars washed, polished,
simonized, and greased.
S. SENTER
Corner Fifth and Columbia
WELDINO
RELIABLE WELDING
WORKS
Oxy-Acetylene Wed log
and Brazing
11S West Third St. Phone ITS
E. H. Carlson Fnl H. Rtlaaa
OPTICIAN
Dr. OR. Ridge w«j
OPTOMETRIST
Graduate •( Tin
optical S«haoU
108 Bast Fourth Ofllec Pheae ISS
Olyjla. Wa«h. Ho. Pheae SOT
ATTORNEY
Phone 8#
A. W. TYLER
Attorney-at-Law
Room 2, Funk-Volland Bid*.
Olympia, Wash.
DENTIST
Office Hours: • a. m. to 5:10 p. a.
Phone 2SI
DR. MARK ROBLKB
pENTIST
White House Olympia, Wash.
LOGOEBB' HOTEL
S. 8. OOWHH, Prop.
SOFT DRINKS AND OANDDES i
CIGARS AND TOBAOOM
CATV TABLES
Comer Third and Mate
MATERNITY HOMB
MAXWBLL MATBRNIiFT [
HOMB U
711 West Fomrth Street I
■ **—**' ---,1
Hi
Olympia Junk Co.
M. Baafcowlta, fujilHw
Dcalera la Niw and tMOid-Hu(
Oooda. Lofiiri' Outfit*. kill MC
sra.rv.iKs. test S%..°si :
W• Pft* •••% RIAPKft priOMa *WPt
fcuy and Mil br tha place or earloaC
Prompt attention paid to pk«B
order*
Colombia 81, Olympia. WHL
Phone AM
LOOOBD OFF LAND
For Ml* in this county to MtMl
■ettlera, op wi; term*. Prioe fI.M
per acre and ap. Write for map
glTinc all Information.
Wejrerhaeoser Timber rnmp—j.
Tacoma, Washington.
k
Qtrawbeny
O plants
Mamhall, Gold Dollar, and
Clark Seedlings $6.00 per •
thousand plants; order early
before the prices advance
Fall or Spring deliveery.
Brigg's Fruit Ranch
Olympia, Wash.
t
Telephone 977
HARRY L. PARR
Attorney at Law
103 sth St. Olympia, Wash.
Opp. Olympia Natonal Bank,
PAGE THREE

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