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Washington standard. [volume] (Olympia, Wash. Territory) 1860-1921, November 12, 1920, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022770/1920-11-12/ed-1/seq-4/

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PAGE FOUR
SOI'TH HAY
On November IT. at South Hay
Grange hall, at 1:3«> i>. m., a meet-
In* will be held by the Farm liurMn
t«-plan its work for this district for
the coming year. Puget. Gull Har
bor, Pleasant Glade and South Bay
all arc in what is known as the
Northeast Comunity. Everyone is
cordially invited to be present at this
■reeling.
Mr. and Mrs. S. Y. Bennett, Miss
Mary Bennett, and Arthur Johnston
attended the Sabbath School Insti
tute at South Bay. Sunday, Novem
ber 7.
Why not visit the school soon?
Pred Clark is helping C. E. Town
during the smelt season.
Dr. W. O. Forbes of Seattle and I
Rev. E. A. Bailee of Rolling Bay weroi
guests at H. Crowell's, "Sunday.
Wake up. South Bay. and send in!
some news. We miss yotf.
'
. FAIRVIEW
Mrs. Sheehan and children, Mrs.'
McClellan and little daughter, Miss
Jane Wise and Mr. Kendall were:
Thursday evening visitors at the Lue
decker home.
Mrs. Battle and Mrs. Feldhusen |
were Saturday shoppers in Olympla. j
Mrs. Parsons, Mr. and Mrs. Cooper I
and son returned to their respective
home* Saturday morning after spend
lns several days at the home of Mr.
•ad Mrs. Dougherty at Kapowsin.
Mr. and' Mrs. Kerns and little son
of Black Lake, Mr. and Mrs. Mess,
and Mr. and Mrs. Hammond and
daughter of Olympla, Mr. Leonard
Tarner of Seattle and Mr. and Mrs.
Green and family were visitors at
the Luedecker home Sunday .
The Murphy Motor Company of
Olympla demonstrated the Cletrac
tractor Sunday afternoon for the bene
-
Sifand
Vaudeville
Friday &
Saturday
' THIRD GENERATION"
, ' ind '
Good Comedy, "Sweet
Cookies"
SUNDAY, MONDAY.
TUESDAY
"HALT A CHANCE,"
with
MAHLON HAMILTON
and LILLIAN HICK
Also good comedy.
30c Matinees Daily lie
BOOKS MAGAZINES KODAKS
§ Concerning Curtis
§ Indian Pictures w
S For the benefit of those who contemplate the pur S
H chase of Curtis Indian Pictures for gift purposes we §
' a shall state that we have just received our Holiday g
J Season allotment ol these famous pictures.
O
Due to difficulties that have arisen in connection 5k
with the present production of the Curtis Pictures, o
we shall be unable to obtain any more of them this
season. Our entire stock is now on display in our
north window. If you desire to make a selection
now, your choice will be put aside for you on the
S payment of a small deposit. t 52
O g
H IF YOU WANT A CURTIS PICTURE, MAKE §
£ YOUR SELECTION IMMEDIATELY P
The Bookstore
"Shelley and Kelly"
GREETING CARDS FRAMED PICTURES
fit of H. N. Green Quite a number
of spectators were on hand to viev
the demonstration and after repeated
stunts the general opinion seemed to
be that the traetor was some machine.
J. I) Hrasoli a d family of Seattle
and Miss Minnie Brasch of Auburn
spent the week-end with parents
Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Brasch.
Mrs. Cole and Mrs. Kutledge of
Little Hock were in our community
Saturday afternoon selling tickets for
the Chautauqua which holds forth at
the former place for five days begin
ning the 11th.
Though not a large crowd attended
the dance at Bozarth's hall Saturday
n'ght they report a most enjoyable
time.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Bossuyt enter
tained a number of friends and rela
tives from Seattle as their Sunday
guests.
A big showing was made on the
club bouse this week and should
the good weather continue the home
of the Fairview Improvement Club
w-'ll soon be completed.
It. N. Green purchased a 12 horse
gasoline engine last Saturday to in
crease the power to properly run
his mill.
The county has a crew of men at
work on the Parsons place removing
gravel to be used on the newly grader!
and filled road at Turners Corners.
It will be fine to have that part of
the road in good shape for winter
travel as it was almost impassable
last winter.
Mr. and Mrs. Luedecker enter
tained W. H. Clem and Martin Vogel
as Sunday dinner guests.
A big goat belonging to Mr. Hutson
got away from home and wandered
up to our school house Friday morn
ing where he kept the teacher and
pupils inside most of the forenoon.
He later helped himself to kale, cab-
Rex™"
ENID BENNETT
ft
"HAIRPINS"

and a
Two-reel Christie comedy,
"Don't Blame the Stork."

SUNDAY. MONDAY,
TUESDAY
NAZIMOVA
in
Her Greatest Play,
"MADAME PEACOCK"
First tiqie shown in the
Northwest.
25c Matinees 11c
30c Nights 11c
TIIK WASHINGTON STANDARD. OI.YMI'IA, WASHINGTON. FRIDAY. NOVK.MHKU 12. 1!)20
bage ant! other greens li. the Bue
decker garden where he was caught.
Mr Hutsott wit notified and cant!
to it i the t 'ai. Kv -ry one te"ls
easier .-int" i.e is 1:0 longer in t!><•
ni ighborh>-o.i
IM ;.KT
Quit' a nlimber from here ~t;en»i
ed the Sunday s.'iool convention . i
South li.i.v. Sunday.
W. 1!. Mil'abe was home from
eamp to spend Sunday.
.Miss Kdna Chumbi rs and sister.
Mrs. Bert Boltinghouse. and little
eon, and F. E. Oiddings visited at the
H. .1 Chairrjers home Sunday
W. M. Trosper was out to Sunny
Beach to visit his mother.
David Chipman is doing som°
much needed slashing along the road.
Miss Ruth Marvin has been at
home sick for several days, but is
able to return to Olympia to attend
high school the latter part of th?
week.
JOLLY MASQUERADE
I>A\CE SCINTILLATES
AT BRIGHTON PARK
Indian Maiils, Tramps, Charlie Chap- j
lin, Biibe Ruth, and Maud Mullet' |
March Gaily at Midnight.
A jolly masquerade dance was
given last Saturday evening at the:
Brighton Park Grange hall, withj
Peter Clausen. Jr.. Kay Lewis, and
Frank Clausen as hosts. The largd
hall was attractively decorated with !
cedar boughs. Oregon grape, corn j
stalks and pumpkins, which lent a
most effective air to the occasion. At
11:30 o'clock a grand march was held
and the guests, attired in original and •
clever costumes, marched past the
patronesses, Mrs. J. W. Davison, Mrs. j
Peter Clausen Sr., Mrs. Kuns and
Mrs. Ada J. Lewis, who acted as
judges. Miss Viola Miller and Art
Reder as the Gold Dust Twins, won 1
the first prize while Miss Mary Heye,
as the Bashful Sun Bonnet Girl and j
Bruce Gerth, as a tramp won second
prize. A delicious supper was served I
at midnight after which dancing con
tinued until 2 o'clock,
j The guest list Included the Misses
| Sarah Clausen as a Negro Mammy;
Margaret Davison, Colon'.al Maid;
Elisabeth Davison, Holland maid;
Anna Heye, gipsy; Mary Heye, Sun
Bonnet Gtrl; Lorraine Winters,
Indian Girl; Margaret Goodpasture,'
Clown; Stella Salyer, School Girl;'
Margaret Whidden, • Chinese Girl; 1
Eunice Turner, Indian; Agnes Reder.l
School Girl; Delia feeder, Society
Belle; Dorothy Leach, Chinese;'
Hazel Newman, Goddess of Liberty; *
Viola Miller, Gold Dust Twin; Kath
erine Kulr'.ch, Clown; Theresa Heye, 1
Japanese; Christina Heye, Clown. !
Messrs Golmer Brower, Black
Paced Clown; George Cramer, Clown 1
William Poy, Laborer; Peter Faber, 1
Laborer; Bruce Gerth, Tramp; Carl'
Gerth, Pumpkin Center Marshal; Ed
ward Heye, Ikey; Herman Heye, Ich
abod Crane; Arthur Jones jr. un
masked; Anthony Heye, School Boy;
Henry Kulrlch, Clown; Charles
Miller, Tom Sawyer; B. Verne Miller.'
Clown; G. A. Peters. Uncle Josh; (
Alb.ert Syndler, Maude Muller;
Eugene Seward, Charlie Chaplin;
Allen White, Babe Ruth, and Bud
Willet, unmasked.
Cle Elum.—Mineral Creek company
completes installation of smal stamp
mill.
IDA V FRIDAY
IHA I sat
■ MARY MILES MINTER
I
I "SWEET
I LAVENDER"
■ and
I "THE VIRGIN OF
■ HAMBOUL"
■ SUNDAY AND MONDAY
I "UKBIRDS"

■ A Roscoe Conclin Comedy,
I and Topics.
■ 25c Matinee 11c
I 35c Nights 11c
Blankets for C
I VV. r hours «> 1' sl> cp :ir• • required to "knit tln» raveled sleeve of care" out in the I'resli
a.r. \ mi don't mind opening the windows, n > matter how the North Wind raves, if you can
-i down under warm lied clothes.
Few (it us ever expeeted to see such blank ts offered ;it these prices. Only because we
. e taken advantage of the market are we a' le to make lliis noteworthy inducement. Most.
utKeli'.shly. we urge you to buy a good supply. Ten to one, after you give them a trial you
will say: "These are the very best blankets I e.er bought."
WARM BLANKETS CRIB BLANKETS
Woven of long fibre cotton, full of warmth For the little new one at your house, are
and tnil size. White or plain colors and soft, fleecy blankets (pink for boy and blue
pretty stripes for borders. Unusual value for a girl). Splendid washing and wearing
for late fall buying. qualities.
Per Pair, $4.33 Each. SI.OO to $4.75
WOOLNAP BLANKETS BED COMFORTS
Maximum warmth and minimum weight. ~ ..•
A special process gives this curlv wool-like , PI T Uer 1 ! an t quilt are these
Per Pair, $6.95; Special, $5.95 darable ~onitorts, covered with a fancy cloth
, v ~'j *i i filled with loftv cotton. \ou can t make
If l„ 1 B " ""' y their like for this price.
Each, $2.95 to $7.50
WOOL BLANKETS
Han-baa black sheep of Mother Goose fame BEST COMFORTS
must have produced the wool for these beau- The ideal bed coverings—light, soft and
tiful blankets, fit for a queen's bed. Most y«'t really warm. Hest tilling and especially
pleasing color combinations and bound - well made. Dainty coverings to match your
edges. bedroom wallpaper and decorations.
Per Pair, $13.50 to $29.75 Each, $7.50 to $19.00
What woman would fail to find Christmas cheer in a pair of blankets or a pretty com
fort rolled up and tied with a big red ribbon?
Even a man would be sure to enthuse over a smart new robe to hang over the rod in his
auto. Single blankets in rjch dark colors, useful for auto robes, couch covers or that extra
cover to lay across the foot of the bed, are priced from—

Mottman's
" Where You Can Always Do Better"
MISS BOONE ANI)
>
MR. PRATT MARRY
AT DAYTON HOME
j Word has been received here of the
marriage of Miss Myrtle Boone, for
; mer • county home demonstration
agent, to, F. I. Pratt, of the firm of
Pratt & Watson contractors for the
jnew capitol group. The marriage
|WaB solemnized Sunday, November 7,
at the home of the bride's parents
at Daytoh. After a short wedding
( trip Mr. and Mrs. Pratt will return
to Olympia where they will make
; their temporary home. Miss Boone
is well known throughout Thurston
{ county where she has a host of
friends. . Both Mr. and Mrs. Pratt
are graduates of the Washington
State College at Pullman.
. Morrison Grain Ambitious.
I J. W. Kennedy of the Morrison
jfarm on Chambers Prairie brought in
some fine samples of oats and wheat
last Saturday and left them with the
Farm' Land Agency. The oats sam
ple stood 6ft Bin in helghth and ran
60 bushels to the acre on unfertilized
I land. The wheat was 4ft 6in high
and produced 35 bushels to the acre.
I _
He Likes Tobacco.
In a "close-up" of the new presi
dent-elect Dave Lawrence says:
I Warren Harding smokes a cigaret
'and likes to chew tobacco. That's a
relic really of early days in the print
9hop, where the Idea grew up that
j Harding is a typical American. He
does not affect the statesmanlike
| scenes which one sees so Often in the
attitude of public men. He says
"mebbe" when others might say
."maybe." He talks with the drawl
of a country man rather than -the
precision of the drawing-room con
versationalists.
Cost Pep Mile Proper Test.
"The speedometer tells the tale o>?
whether a tire Is reducing or enlarg
ing tire costs," asserted R. O. Tucker,
, salesmaneger of the Kelly Tire com
pany, distributors of Kellys in Olym
pia and Thurston county. Mr. Tuck
er says that the only way to figure
tire costs is to divide the amount paid
for the tire by the number of miles
it has run. •
i "The cost per mile rather than the
first cost," said Mr. Tucker, "is the
correct way to find out how much a
tire is worth. Bargains in tires, if
all owners really knew it, are the
standard tires that serve them stead
ily month in and month out, never
giving trouble and producing big l
mileage.
"Buying a tire a few dollars below
the cost of a standard make in no way
means that the tire is cheaper. I try
to Impress upon every Kelly user
that he should get records of his
mileage. Kellys, it is true, are guar
anteed for a set amount of mileage,
but that in no way represents the
maximum. Car owners all over this
territory have even tripled this guani
anteed mileage.
"Tire costs are perhaps one of the
largest in car operation and the own
er will find it to his own advantage
if he closely follows the exact amount
of mileage each tire returns."
I : ;
We solicit your battery business.
Let your next battery be a
PERMALIFE
The best battery on the market, but not the most expensive.
McNeill Battery Station
OPPOSITE CAPITOL
Selling the Haddorff
In the first place, the Haddorff i 3 one of the highest grade
pianos made, the complete instrument being built around the
tangible word—TONE. Mfrf V.ii , ,■
There are four essential
• tone, purity, sweetness, sus
talnlng power and uniform
fullness. In securing this
tone a special sounding board
«.s used the achievement of
lng board is devised so that
every note alike receives the
fullest power vibrant rein
forcement. Tersely, It means
that the bridges are in cer
ta'n acoustical relation to the IV |QI / IrW II
ribs, and the ribs instead of VI IFI/ |I II
lessening the effectiveness o! |f)l|r iI w
the board, are mad# to in- » J®® I I
crease its sensitiveness, and
to produce equalty of vibration. We call this the "Homo" vibrat
ing sounding board. ,
»A skillful designing of the
piano plate gives a larger
surface of the underlying
sounding board exposed than
is to be found in any other
plate. This, with the pat
ented wrest plank support,
by which the immense strain
is placed directly over the
main portion of the plate,
gives two more valuable ex
clusive features to the Had
dorff.
Naturally, the scale, which
is the science of selecting the
strings in length and weight, is well designed.
The action itself in the Haddorff is regulated to give a perfect,
touch, being light, elastic, strong and very responsive.
A. T. RABECK MUSIC HOUSE
FOUND ON EAST SIXTH STREET
A place that c»n and will give you
a square deal in batteries and service.
Can you beat It?
MCNEILL BATTERY STATION.
Opposite Capitol.

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