OCR Interpretation


Washington standard. [volume] (Olympia, Wash. Territory) 1860-1921, November 12, 1920, Image 7

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022770/1920-11-12/ed-1/seq-7/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for seven

WALLA WALLA INMATES
MARK MONEY ON EAKM
Net profits totaling $16,200 were
made from various agricultural en
terprises at the state penitentiary
during 1920, according to the report
submitted by Henry Drum, warden, to
the state board of control. TRe re
port in detail states:
Value of land, state owned, $16,-
036; buildings incidental to the farm.
Secretary Colby
Says:
"I CAN only merge my voire ir.
* the great chorus of praise
and tribute which the work of
the Bed Cross has called forth
and which It litis fully earned.
Its record In the war Is a tine
monument to great giving, great
doing and great achievement. It
Is not only worthy of support,
but it Is our duty to support it,
each of us. to Ihe full extent
•f our ability."
Secretary of Stale.
• E SURE TO RENEW YOUR
MEMBERSHIP DURING
RED CROSS
lonmr
ROLL CALL
November 11-25, 1920
SATURDAY SPECIALS
IN
k I
FRESH STEER BEEF
WE CAN SAVE YOU MONEY ON LARD. BRING
YOUR PAIL.
Pure Lard, lb 25c
Compound Lard, lb 20c
Pot Roast, per lb .. 15c and 18c
Boiling Beef, per lb ..., and 15c
Leg of Spring Lamb, lb 28c
Lamb Chops, lb 30c
Shoulder Lamb, lb 22V 2 C
Liberty Steak, per lb 20c
Pork Sausage, per lb 20c
Shoulder Pork Roast, per 1b... 30c
lioin and Rib Pork Roast, per lb 32c
Pig Head, per lb lfc>
Best, Bacon on the market, by the aide, lb 40c
California Backs, Saturday only, lb 28c
Acorn' Bacon 32c
Link Sausage 30c
WE HAVE—
-500 pounds Dry Salt Backs, lb 25c
500 pounds Bacon, lb 40c
ABSOLUTELY SATURDAY ONLY
Olympia Cash Market
210 West Fourth Street.
$33,000; value of implements and
machinery, $2,760; value of 1920
crop, farm. $15,332; value of 1920
crop, garden $J,062; net profits for
year 1920 from the hog department,
$4,500; poultry, $3,600; dairy, $4,-
600. creamery, $3,600.
Warden Drum states that 160'/£
acres of land was farmed during the
last year with an average of 50 in
mates at work on the farm.
APPEE <;RAI>IN<; NECESSAUY
FOR DISXKIIUTION OF ( HOI'S
The cornerstone upon which rests
the successful distribution of the
apple crop, wh'.ch in 1919 reached
some "8,000,000 bushels, is grading.
Were it not for a more or less uni
form system of grading, which even
now <n many instances is defined only
by the general term "trade practice."
the marftef'ng of this great crop
would be accompanied by uncertainty
and losses that would ruin the busi
ness, say marketing specialists of the
Bureau of Markets, United States De
partment of Agriculture.
But. even more efficient grading
practices are necessary to create con
fidence between sellers and buyers
and to eliminate waste. According to
these experts the chief difficulties
with present state grading laws are
the'r dissimilarity and disregard of
market practices. Three essentials
to the successful standardization of
apples and other farm products are
cited:
(1) There must be decided public
sentiment in favor of grading regu
lations.
(2) The law should conform with
good commercial practice.
(3) There should be proper inspec
tion of shipments at both shipping
point and destination.
Tests made by the United States
Department of Agriculture with 130
lots of Australian wheats recently in
troduced Into this country have
brought out three varieties adapted
for growing on the Pacific coast,
where they have produced larger
y'elds than sojne of the native com
mercial varieties. They are known
as Federation, Hard Federation, and.
White Federation. The Australian
varieties in general are susceptble to
most fcereal d'seases, but many of
these are not destructive in the Pa- :
ciflc coast region.
Pract'cally one-fifth of the remain
ing timber of the country is contained
in the national forests.
THE WASHINGTON STANDARD, OLYMPIA, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, NOVEMHER 12. 1:J20
Five Minute Chats
on Our Presidents
#«/######
Ey JAMES MORGAN
(Copyright, 1020, by James Morgan.)
THE SECOND HARRISON
1833—August 20, Benjamin Har
rison, bom at North Bend,
Ohio.
1852—Graduated from Miami col
lege, Ohio.
1861-65—Colonel and brevetted
brigadier general in the
Civil war.
1881-7—ln the United States sen
ate.
1888—Elected president.
1889—March 4, inaugurated the
twenty-third president, at
the age of fifty-five.
1892—Defeated for re-election.
1901—March 13, death of Ben
jamin Harrison at Indian
apolis, aged sixty-seven.
BKNJAMIN HARRISON S adminis
tration prbved to be only an In
termission between the two nets of the
Cleveland drama. History gives but
u pnssing glance at the one president
whose predecessor became his success
or, who had to give up the presidential
chair to the man he took it from.
Although Harrison had more brains
thai Cleveland. Cleveland had a larger
nature, and that is what counts most
in the leadership of men.
Notwithstanding Benjamin Harrison
was the grandson of a president. In
whose house he was born, his father
was poor and the boy was brought up
plainly.
Cradunting from a small Ohio col
lege, Harrison married at twenty the
girl to whom he engaged himself at
eighteen, and they went to housekeep
ing In a lUtle three-room cottage In
Indianapolis. He was not admitted to
the bar until after his marriage, and
the first money he ever made was as
a court crier at $2.50 a day. Later on
lie helped out his lean practice with
his salary as clerk of the supreme
court of the state. Then came the
Civil war. in which he served gallantly
as a colonel and marched with Sher-
Benjamin Harrison.
man to the sea. Afterward he rose
to a hlch and prosperous rank in the
practice of law.
The only political office Harrison
ever held before his election to the
presidency was a seat In the senate.
Defeated for re-election to that body
in the year before he was elected pres
ident, he left Washington with no
thought that he would soon return as
president-elect, and he frankly de
scribed himself as "a dead duck."
The only candidate that the rank
nnd file of the Itepuhllcans wanted to
nominate In 1888 was Blaine. But he
was not well, and he refused to make
a contest for the nomination. At last
he cabled from fcotland: "Take Har
rison." And the convention Indiffer
ently took him. > •
The more notable events of the Har
rison administration—the McKinley
tariff act; the silver act, which more
than doubled the purchase of that
metal -by the treasury; the Sherman
law on the subject of trusts; the de
pendent pension act, and the first Pan-
American congress—hardly belong In
this little story, because none of them
originated with the president himself.
He did not rise to leadership, and con
gress took the reins. All the while he
sat In the White House In cold aloof
ness.
Wlth the cry of "God help the sur
plus!" the Republicans gave the coun
try in Harrison's administration the
first "bllllon-dollar congress," the ap
propriations for the twq-yenr terra ris
ing to that unprecedented total. To
the popular protest Speaker Reed re
torted: "Thip is a billion-dollar coun
try." But the country did not feel rich
enough to pay the higher tariff rates
of the McKinley act.
That law was passed only seven
weeks before the congressional elec
tions in 18JX). Of course anyone who
had anything to sell seized upon the
excuse to mark up prices. The "shop
ping women" rose iir their fury at the
higher cost of living, and the voters
overwhelmed the Republican majority
in the house.
That wns the forerunner of a still
greater political overturn In the presi
dential election In 1802, when Harrison
went down under a sweeping victory
for Cleveland.
CLEVELAND CAME BACK
1893—March 4, Grnver Cleve
land inaugurated a second
time, aged fifty-five.
May, a great panic began.
July 1, Cleveland went
under surgical operation
for cancer.
Oct. 30, The Silver act re
pealed.
1894—July 4, Cleveland sent
troops to Chicago to inter
vene in railroad strike.
Aug. 27, the Wilson-Gor
man tariff became law
without president's signa
ture.
1895—Feb. 7, Cleveland made
arrangement with J. P.
Morgan and others for
protection of gold reserve.
Dec. 17, sent in his Ven
ezuela message.
1908—June 24, Cleveland died
at Princeton, N. J.,
aged seventy-one.
G ROVER CLEVELAND had no
more than left the presidency In
defeat and settled down to the prac
tice of law In New York City than It
was seen that he was still almost as
much the leader of the Democratic
piirty as when he was In the White
House.
In the four years of his retirement,
he seldom saw party leaders. Yet so
strong was the reaction against the
Republicans and so loud the call for
him in ISO 2 that he returned in tri
umph to the White House.
One of the periodical panics of the
10th century smote the country with n
financial and industrial paralysis in
1893, only two months after the In
auguration. As usual, the party in
power caught the bluine, and day after
day a leading Republican newspaper
shouted in gleeful headlines"Another
bank gone Democratic!"
As the first means of restoring con
fidence, Cleveland called a special ses-
Grover Cleveland.
slon of congress for the purpose of
having It repeal the Silver net of the
Harrison administration. The next day
he submitted himself to the surgeon's
knife for the removal of a cancerous
ulcer which had appeared in the roof
of his mouth. His grave physical con
dition was concealed from the panicky
mind of the public, and the operation
was performed in the closest secrecy
aboard a yacht as It steamed slowly up
the East lUver, off New York. Not un
til many years had passed was It
known that when congress assembled
he faced It with a rubber Jaw.
Under the pressure of the president,
the Silver act was repealed, but only
after a bitter struggle which left the
Democratic party hopelessly split The
passage of a tariff bill divided the par
ty still more. It was such a lobby
made, log-rolling measure that Cleve
land refused to sign it, but let It be
come law without his signature. After
that the Democrats'went down In de
feat in the congressional elections of
1894.
In the depth of our domestic
troubles the president sent his famous
Venezuelan message to congress. In
It he announced that the British gov
ernment had rejected all our
for the arbitration of a land dispute
which it was pressing in South Amer
ica, and he boldly proposed that we
ourselves should decide the question
and then proceed to enforce our de
cision.
Stocks tumbled headlong in Lon
don and New York, and there was
much wild tnlk on both sides of the
Atlantic. But the president confidently
reassured his troubled private secre
tory, "Thurber, this does not mean
war; it means arbitration." And that
was the outcome of all the hubbub.
Cleveland's outburst of plain speaking
had the effect of awakening tbe Eng
lish people, as never before, to the val
ue of American friendship, and it
opened a new era in the relations of
the two governments.
Cleveland's hardest, longest battle in
his second administration was for the
gold standard. Almost alone he upheld
it throHgh four years, abandoned by
roost of the Democrats and unaided by
the gold Republicans in congress, who
were afraid of "hurting the party"
with the silver people.
Furm Bookkeeping.
Fajiners, as a rule, are highly in
dividualistic in their methods, and
farm business conditions vary wide
ly. Accordingly, ready-nmde sys
tems of farm accounts seldom bring
out all the facts that the farmer
ought to know. Systems must bo de
veloped to fit each man's require
ments. and efforts to shape one's \
needs according to a prepared system '
not based primarily on these needs!
will almost Inevitably result in fail-'
ure.
Seattle attorneys in the r'ty Tues
day to attend the session of the state!
Courtesy and Attention
Shown you at this hank will confirm your decision to let
lis handle your banking business.
Every department is throughly and systematically organ
ized. and is in charge of competent and experienced people.
You should consider these things when you choose a bank
as the depository of your funds. We believe that
"He profits most who serves best."
CAPITAL NATIONAL BANK
FIRE! FIRE! FIRE!!!
A wise man once said : "Only the fittest survive."
Which was but another way of saying: "Only the pre
pared escape misfortune."
Are you prepared?
Of course you think you are. But are you?
It is but human to arm for defense when a known danger
is lurking nearby.
THE $1.50 CARBONA FIRE EXTINGUISHER
• #
is chemically perfect. It is filled with a liquid which, when it
strikes flame, exudes a dense, cloud-like vapor. This vapor is
heavier than oxygen and when it settles about the flame dis
places all the oxvgen. Fire cannot burn without oxygen
THE FIRE IS OUT.
Secondly, The $1.50 Carbona Fire Extinguisher is a glass
container and so much lighter than its competitors—all metal
—that it is easily handled, while it requires the strength of a
grown man to handle the others with effect.
The glass container offers manifold advantages, not least
of which is that there is no corrosion. In the metal container
there is always corrosion, and frequently when one is brought
to play it is found that it is so corroded the liquid fails to leave
it and the fire gains great headway.
The $1.50 Carbona container js fastened to a wall or stan
chion with a screw joined to a staple r unning through the cork.
One pull and it is released, uncorked and ready for use: There
is no delay and it is applied in such quantities as desired with
deadly results.
CARBONA FIRE EXTINGUISHERS CHOKES THE
DEMON FIRE '
N
For Sale by
PARROTT & HAHN
GENERAL MACHINISTS
309 West Fourth Street Telephone 218
" >1- f
THE roomy and well
equipped body of
the Oakland Sensible Six
Sedan rides on a frame
N
of tough steel six and
one-half inches deep.
Similar solidity extends
throughout the entire
car. It has the power
and strength for every
driving condition. In
spect it, now, at our
salesroom.
1
OAKLAND'
SENSIBLE SIX ,»
I OLYMPIA GARAGE CO.
PHONE 143
supreme court wore H. Ballinger,
Joseph M. Glasgow, Stanley Padden,
jGeorge H. Rummens and James B.
Murphy.
Toledo. —New SIO,OOO home o(
Toledo State Bank competed.
Walla Walla.—New hotel to bo
! erected here.
PAGE SEVEN

xml | txt