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Puget Sound dispatch. [volume] (Seattle, Wash. Terr.) 1871-1880, August 29, 1872, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84022793/1872-08-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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_ ' gym p, 1» « - _ - - _ .
‘ ‘ ...W.ya=a¥gi‘.. ‘ -
" /—\ ' A "’ ”;..«- 1333",”; T: £31," a ' '.A m
- * k» ~ ~»: :5? lat ‘ /——\_
' / » #1111? _~ $713.? i
\ ' It 1': I‘3s’?i!€ 1,; “AZ; ‘ ‘1 V ~
Vol. 1.
Zugct 50am! il ispnttlx.
‘9 U
PUBLIHKED :vmn' ramsmv nonsmo.
BROWN & SON,
“mu: Knows. mm a. mws.
Pablmhers ln'] Proprietors.
TEBJIS:
single Cupy Ono YL'l'l‘.... .. ..... ..S3 00
.. -' Six Mnnth5.................. 201)
u " Three “ .................150
singlo Sumner“ 1!
Paydhln Int-richly l- Adv-nu.
BYPES 0F ADVERTISING:
3m. Sqmra n! [2 Lines. mt Insertion. . . . .52 00
gm-h subwqurnt Inst-rtwu. ....... ... . . . l 0!) ‘
churly' I'IJ quarterly alvertisemcnts It the ‘
0W6?“ rates. \
\
JOB PRINTING
t evr-ry description done at the most muon
nhl: rams.
AGENTS:
C!ylnpin...... .... .......Cnpt. Frank Tarbell“
Neinwnom.... .. .. ...lrvhxg Ballard.‘
Fn-mria. B. U ... .. .Chnrl-ys McCormick. .
In." Tuwnsend....... ....... ..Geurge Burthrop‘
Part Di~'OVPfV.. . ..... . .. . . . . . . . ..M. McMahon
gnuhumish City...... . . ..... .. ..E. C.I-‘ergn.mn
shrunk-r. ......................meph (iibuon
Sm? thrk.............. ......Hudxmn I: lit-net
Portland” .. .L. Smuuls.
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
mo COCK".
Orangv‘ 1100 M. . ... . . Judge of District Court.
David T. D--nny,. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .County Judge.
Luwix V. Wyckofl..... .. .............. ..Sherifl.
amm- Ke110gg..................... . Audimr.
Oliver C. 5h0rey........ ............Tressurer.
«pawn-F. Whitworth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Sun’eyor.
lelium 11. Shoudy.... .. ....... .. . . Assessor.
Josiah Same. . .. ..Comnnr.
Peter SIM‘, Hum-y L. Yonder. Ind l-‘nncis He
Satt, Caunty Cummisuioners.
CITY OF SEATTLE.
0.. ?_ scam»... Mayor
lv."‘l'g-f Ma‘Cunz‘Jn ... . . .. . . .. . . .... .. . . .Clcl'k.
(“ml-Na I! Burn-At. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Trensurcr.
I'. C. [Hakim-1.... Recorder
1.. V. WVl'kan. ... . .. .. . ..Marshnll.
8.-ri:h 8ruwu........... . ..City Printer.
Frank Twlnthias, J. )1. Lyon. L. B. Andrews,
Samuel F. Coombs. Daley Guam, )1. 18. Mad
duck~',Juhn 'l'. Jordan. Councilmen.
- ~<.>—~—— ‘
Tax-nu of Courts- 1
Atrium: com. 1
2d )lundny in January.
Dunner com.
Sn \rrLz—Xst Monday in Frbruary Ind An- ‘
guat. 1
Poxr Towxs:xn-ith Month: in February ‘
ml November. ;
Srmmvomt— 3d Monday In Jlnunry Ind July. ‘
ULYMPIA—3d Monday in March, ind 2d Mon- 1
day in November.
Vncouvnn —-ld Monday in April md 3d Mon-
day in Ortnlwr. ‘
Wu.“ Winn—Ed Monday in Mny 1.1111411:
.\lrmduy in Si-ptcnflxrl’.
(‘ISTEI'A'ILLE—Qd Monday in July.
Yum“ Cur—4th Monday in October.
You CoLerua—zzd Mnnday in June.
AH—
MAIIA.
Th: Sauna Mails arrive sml depart as fol—
! m's‘ :
Oregrm, California and Atlantic States, rid.
Olympia. Taurus and Sh-ilucoom : Arrive Mon
.!.-.y< :ml Thursdays. 6 o'clnrk, A. )1. Depart
Til“§'la}‘~ and Fridays. 10 r. )1. Close 9P. at.
Victoria, m I’m-is Madison, Gamblr. Lndlnw
an l Tuwnscnd. Til-5.1:” Ind Fridays, 10 P. x. ‘
Ur-part .\l'mduys. l: 15 A. L; Thursdays, 515
A x. Cluse I; A. u. and 9P. x. ‘
\T .mtmm, rim .\lukrllm.snohomiuh. Tulalip, 5
i'd-Jpevill-n Cuvcth. L'tsahdy. Lurouncr. Fi- ‘
dam and Samish: Arrin, Wednefilays. 8 P. u.
D-p~ur'. “0111251. 9A. )1. Close 830 A. I.
Franklin. riu. White River Ind Shughtgrz‘
\rrivcfl. \lenchnys. 7 r. x. Departs. Tues
dn)". 7 .\. :1. Close! 6 30. A. x.
Snwluul-uie. via. Black River and Squat :Ar
mm, \\'mln¢s.l,iy.~u. BP. M. Departs, Tuesdays.
Y .\. \l. Closes 630 A. X.
Par: Orrhargl, rim. Port Blakrly: Arriws,
hes‘liiyn. 11 A. M. Departs, Mondays. ll A. x.
(hm: N {5.
M
Hum 310 “mm. Jan! 13.531.
McNAUGHT a. LEARY.
lttornoys at Law,
Seattle, W. T.
ngl practice in Supreme 3nd District. Courts
4 Walkington Territory.
_____- A__—.__——-.——‘
JOHN J. McGILVRA,
At torncy at anv,
SEATTLE, W. T.
m attend to business in :11 parts of the
T-mzory. 20
our": x. no CONAHA. rum :1. lon.
McCONAHA & YORK,
Counselors, .4ttorneys, Solicit
ors in Chancery, and Proc
l‘v‘u's in .fllmriralty.
Omens—No3s 1 and 2 Dispatch Buildings.
SEATTLE, W. T.
WM- YORK, Kora: Pnuc. 20
'3“ 3- Lamar. was. a. mun.
LARRABEE & WHITE. 3
V \
(Ol'rtselors, Attorneys at Law, }
AND 5
. .4, ‘. ‘
Sohcmrs 1n Chancery,
(Dispatch Buildings.)
w' SIG ATTLE.
a: practice in the Supreme ma Dlstriet
! B.
SrDR. G. A. WEED,
OEGEO N AND P HYSICIAN.
naniline on Commercinl Street, one door
0310 f J. R. Robbins's.
[mm Se 119113 from 9 to 12, a. m., and
Res‘ ‘0 0. p. m. . ’
one-hidence on Fim sin-ed, two and
“1f blocks from Mill street, north.
d
R C. C. PERKINS,
9
GP“ Estate, Insurance and
1,- }‘em‘ vigezwy, Notary Pub
-35 Crgmnusswner of Deeds.
“Vesfltngm and Life hum enacted It
'5“. ' Cm “'3 17mm gluin
-9'37.
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON TERRITORY, TIIURSDAY MORNING. A'UGUST 20, 1872.
IRVING BALLARD.
Attorney (f: Counselm at Law,
Stcilucoom, W. T.
Elm-”'l‘.“ ‘3‘?" °°“"‘ ”' 1““ “mm”
ln ‘ .
an Co mm. 1 ONT-Wu Tet-mot) . once
McNAUGHT 8: LEARY.
SEATTLE, W. T.
Real Estate and Tax Agents,
REAL ESTATE bought and sold.
LOANS negotiated.
CLAIMS collected.
FOR SALE.
LOTS IN CITY OF SEATTLE, im
proved and unimproved.
Also, LANDS in King. Kitsap, Sno~
homish and Island Counties.
Tracts at HOLMES' HARBOR. CA
MAXO ISLAND, )IUKILTEO, PORT
TOWNSEND, PORT DISCOVERY.
NISQUALLY. etc. etc.
Also. several Bottom Laud FARMS.
under cultivation, on the White. Black,
Cedar. and Duwamish Rivers.
AGENTS— -For Remington and Osgood. I
New York ; Benjamin Flint, San Jose, z
California, etc. etc. ‘:
fiICNJCGKT & LEARY.
JAMES XCSAUGHT, I
was LEABY, f
Seattle, W. T. Aug. 28. 187]. 15tf.
NOTICE! 2
TO THE PUBLIC !
As THE OLD'TSNUG SALOON"
has gone from us, no more
Can be got there.
Ti: ~ r.
ADA ‘ e
The people of Seattle mutually agree
that they can't get along without
And his COLD TEA, at the
OR() FINO 2
Signed by
SAM RAYMOND.
and 10,000 others.
(7? DOUBLE AND SINGLE BED
DED ROOMS—by the day or week. 7tf
R. ABRAMS'
LIVERY STABLE,
Cor. Commercial and Washington Sts.
SEA TTIIE, IV. T.
This Livery Stable is in the centre of
the city, and to persons desirous of
having Buggies, Carriages, and spirited
saddle animals, can find them at. this
stable.
Homes boarded by the day or week.
R. ABRAMS.
n 63!"
J. A. )[C DONALD. 3. WHY
PONY SALOON,
KEPT BY
MCDONALD 5; MURPHY.
‘ Connncrcial Street.
1 Opposite Schwabacher‘n.
iThis is the place to visit to have the in
} ner man replenished—and not drugged.
Cigars, Tobacco, Wines and the best of
Liquors always on hand.
15“
GhOWERS 0!" AND DEALERS IN
0 O » .
flatworm 4mm and
firandg,
626 Montgomery Street
(ancment Montgomery BTock.)
San Francisco.
‘ December 1. Im. 1:
‘ SIGN
i an
‘ Ornamental Painting.
J'. F. COCHRAN E.
Mill street, near the P. 0.
LETTERING IN THE BEST CITY STYLES.
Ornamental P-iufing Ind 61min; on
Glass. Charges mumnnblc.
Seattle, am, is, 1372. 3311.
A. BIkGIIEY, M. D.
Homoepatnic Physician and
4 Surgeon,
At the United States Hotel,‘ gentile,
W. T. JylS.
_——‘____.—————-——————
SUGAR GURBD RAMS!
A max SUPPLY OF CHOICE SUGAR
CURE!) RAMS. of our own cutinz. {or
3-12 It 18 cents per lb.
_ Boom, FOSS a nonsr.
April 4.
____________._.__—————
. . .
DENTIS T R Y '
DR. 1. G. IRAS“, - ' DENTIST.
0‘32“ m?m‘éu..t°°“m"'°'wmu ‘
wmblt'dbii: hm. mu Ira-Run ‘
our-clon- to gm 3m mu ‘
REMEVAL
S. P. ANDREWS
Hes removed to his New Store on
Commercial Street, between Stone‘k
Burnett’s & Schwabacher Bros & Co.,
where he is receiving additions to his
Stock which make it the
Largest ever brought to this
market, which will be sold at
prices that defy competition.
Stoves and Tm Ware.
% E_:’
UUUKIAG,
PABLO]?
AND BOX
STOV E S ! !
AND
PORTABLE BAKERS
Ever brought to Puget Sound.
BUCK’S CELEBRA'K ED
COOK STOVE,
With or without extension, and for
either Wood or Coal.
Also, a. General Assortment of
Kitchen Furniture
French (md English "fires,
Japan, Yin, Copper and
Sheet Iron “fires.
Yin and Jletalic Roofing,
Lead and Iron Pipe.
Iron Pipe cut and fitted to suit.
A GEXERAL ASSORTMENT 0F
PIPE FITTINGS.
JOB WORK
All work pertaining to the business
done at short notice nnd in a workman
like manner.
GIVE DIE A TRIAL.
1 Orders from abroad promptly attend
ied to.
1 mass TO sun rm: TIMES.
‘ [2764111 and examine before purchas
-1 ing elsewhereg
‘ s'roiu: 0x
COMMERCIAL?" SEATTLE, W. T.
S. P. .ANI3REWS.
April 4, 1872. 20”.
E. A. FARGO,
mmnTl-zn AND JOBBFB or
Brandies, W ines and Liquors.
316 Front Street, corner of
Commercial,
SAN FRANCISCO.
LLOYD WHISKEY!
Sole .Jg‘mzts on the Pacific
‘ Coast for Hm sale of the cole
; brutal LLO YD ILEJV' TU CK 1“
‘ IVH I SICE I" .
‘ December 1. 1871. m.
1 .._,, _.w_4_ H_,___._
L. P. SMITH.
j Wratch Jlalver and Jeweler,
CAN ALWAYS BE FOUND AT HIS
old stand at Coombs & Pumphrey's
Book Store, Mill street, Where he is pre
pared to do allkindsof Watch and Clock
repairing on short notice and in s satis
factory manner. Jewelry made to order 1
and neatly repaired. i
Seattle, May 24. 1872. 1
________.__~_ ‘
us. 11. mums, 3
Imam onus a
Foreign and Domestic Wines, ‘
Bnndies Whiskies, I'3th i
No. 15 Commercisl Street, Seattie W. 'l‘. i
Genuine Cutter Whiskey Alwyn on ‘
hand. ‘
st!
THOMAS T- MINOR,
Physician and Surgeon
Omen—Next door to tho Custom
Home.
W'ngéfll, W. 'l'.
35m gtwnmmt
Decision of igdge Jacobs.
In the U. 8. District Court. Thin! Ja
dicial District, W. 13., holding Toms
at Seattle.
Frank Grifin,
VS.
E. A. Nickels, In Admiralty.
Hilton,
Bowling.
Justice Story, that great Jurist, in ‘
speaking of a casesimilar in nearly all i
of its facts and averments to this says: I
“The principle of law upon this anh-l
jeCt appear to me to be equallys clear ‘
and salutary in point. of policy. The
master has the supreme authority
on board of his ship; and has, moreover
a sort of parental responsibility and du
ty devolved upon him. for the due exer
cise of it. It is his duty to prevent us
far as he may, any undue exercise of
authority by his suboidinate officers.
. and any abuses. injuries and trespasses
by them. If he is present when any of
j the subordinate officers inflict chastise
inient upon the «new. be is bound in du
‘ ty to interfere and restrain it, if is it im
proper in its nature and character, or
Junjnstifinble under the circumstances.
1 If he may ink rfeie and he does not, he
imust be deemed to assent to and en
; courage it; for no oflicer in his presence
1 has a right to inflict punishment with
out his assent or direction, unless upon
an emergency which admits of no delay
It is not sufficient to excuse himself
from this interposition upon any notion
of courtesy, or of upholding the author
ity of the officers. or supporting hur
mouy and discipline of the ship. The
law has entrusted him with summary
powers. for the good not of the officers
alone, but of the crew also and indeed
‘for the general good of of the maratime
;service. in whice he is engaged. While
he should uphold the just discipline of
‘of the ship with a steady confidence, he
‘is to take care that the crew are not
‘m: de the victims of the insolence, the.
passions or the caprices of the officers
under him. If he will stand by and see
the seamen cruelly,hrutally and unjusti
fiably beaten without interference he
ought not to complain that the law forc
es upon him the conclusion that he up
proves what is done and means to en
courage it by his silence and his author
ity. He becomes thereby the abettor
and supporter of the deed, upon the rea
sonable ground that he who knowing
allows oppression shares the crime.—
Sucb, in my opinion, is the dictate of
the law on this subject. and it is whole
some as an admonition and prosecution
‘against the undue resentment and op
pression of officers which so often ends
in the open rebellion and mutiny of the
injured crew."
2 Sumner. p. 11 and 12.
Thomas v. Lane.
Again, in the case of United States vs
Taylor, 2 Sumner, 538. he says: “ The
master has the sole authority when on
board to authorize punishment to be in
flicted on any of the crew; and if he is
present when any punishment is inflictv
ed by asubordinnte'oflicer and can pre
vent it and does not he is personally re
sponsible for the act, and by his nequi.
escense adapts it as done by his author
it ."
yThe doctrine as IbOVO stated is not in
conflict with the quotation from his
work on Agency in which Story says
that the master is not responsible unless
an act’is done by his‘ authority or done
by his subordinates in the ordinary dis
charge of their duties, which are, of
course,commanded ind required by him.
I quote from memory; I have not the
book before me.
The question is. what are the princiv
plea by which we may determine wheth
‘er an act is done by his authority or
‘ not. The principle laid down above is,
phat if he is presenl and might have
prevented itvand did not, then it is done
by his authority. Again; if he stands
1b: and sees the seamen cruelly. brutal
?ly and nnjustifiably beaten without in
terference. his non-action and silence is
acqnimense and authority.
Such isthe law governing this case;
now what are the facts from the evi
dance:
1 1. We are impressed with the fact
i that every man whose duty it was to
Ito be on deck and who by the acknow
ledgement of all who were on deck and
‘near to the spot of the «fray swear poa—
itireiy that Capt. Nickols was on the
spot from a time prior to the first mate's
coming fromd with an iron bar till the
bleeding and mangled victim was lifted
from the deck end was taken forward to
have his wounds dressed. They were
‘but two or three yards away during the
whole time. They were there not us
idle spectators but because their duty
iculled them. They with xingnler unau
fimity on ell the material point: lane.—
thistrnethntineomeofthe minorpar.
1 ficnlan they do not ngree; but this nth.
1e: strengthens than weeken- thoir testi
mony. ' '
§lfeuhonnotthen¢oldfluum.
story in All it: minute puticuhn and
with the mo form of‘lpeech no one
would believe“. Thu-cum:
of then potions from the nll'nym
‘not'mtourymlt undue-t «then
were nearer still. The carpenter and]
especially the cook was quite a distance
away. onefahout 70 feet the other over a 1
hundred. Now the other thing being
equal those who were immediately 1
present had the best. means of knowing I
whereof they asserted and ought tobc
believed in preference to the othels.
They being nearest there was no rea
son for migtake; the others, from their
distance and from the intervention of
objects might have been mistaken.
There were {our of these persons and
three of the opposition witnesses inclu
ding the Captain.
The testimony of these four inac
knowledged to be fair,but that of the
fourth, is said to be impeached. The
misfortune about this 9111111 to impeach
is that )lengher. said witness, is cor
roborated by the testimony of the oth
‘er three and by circumstances deVel
toiled by the carpenter and the cook. I
i cannot disbelieve Meagher without dis
‘believing nearly all the witnesses who
have testified in the case. A man may
have a bad reputation for truth and ver
acity and yet tell the truth. If the case
depended upon his testimony alone
l'luinlifi' ought not to succeed. Abad
reputation for truth and veracity only
affords a presumption against the truth
fullness of a person's testimony, it may
be true after all.
Not only had the Plaintiff‘s witnes
ses the best opportunities for informa
tion as being nearer to the facts sworn
to; they were under no apparent influ
ence to speak falsely. They had dis
solved their connection with the ship
and its owners and were under no ob
ligations whatever to Pluintifl only that
of justice. It does not appear that any
of them knew Plaintifi' before this fatal
voyage: there were therefore no long
continued friendships to warp their
judgments or color their stories. The
witnesses for the defence keep up their
{business connection with the ship; this,
git is true, is but a slight circumstance
1 but one entitled to consideration in case
‘of conflict of testimony. The statement
lot the witness Sullivan was fair in all
its details. and strait. forward in all its
developments. He showed every dis
position to tell the truth, was close to
the slimy during all the lime, and his
development on the stand was un
oxceptionul. If his tectimony is false
it is a remarkable invention. The
Captain bore testimony to his knowl
edge, candor, and nprightness when he
made the the attempts which is not de
nied to keep him from attending upon
this Court. -
I ma compelled to find from the test
imony therefore, that the Captain, not
withstanding his statement to the con
trary, was present during this ufl‘my and
that he might have prevented it, but did
not, that he by his silence and non ac
tion aqu iesced in the assault there made
and is in law responsible for the conse
quences.
A few words in regard to the damages:
That this man knocked down was stair
bed in the back and his skull stove in,
are not denlzd. Paralysis of one side
is the consequences. Thereis no doubt
but what he is a physical wreck {or life,
near one half of him is dead to all do
feet: and purposes. For the rest of his
life he can take up the monmfnl lament
‘of the Apotle Poul. “ who shall deliver
line from the body of this death." No
‘pecuninry compensation can ever fully
compensate him In the hopes that
these defendants may be able to reach
it and that they may have some enduce—
ment to it I have concluded to find
against them in the sum of 32 500011151.
0. JACOBS, Judge.
A Ver‘adious Executive.
Gov. Ferry's mythical “ thirty Demo
crats," through whose negation he
obtained a seat in the Ten-itorial Con—
vention {or which he was defeated m
primary elections. are having a local
fame equal to Jack Falllstufs “ ten men
in buckrum." Ind by the same token.
have given the inventor n no less envia
ble repumtion for the trick of invention
than that in which Shakespeare investn
ed his jolly knight. So notorious has
this fact become. that should we be call
ell upon under oath to answer the ques
tion : “ What is E. P. Ferry's charac
ter for truth and veracity in the com
munity in which he lives ?" we should
be compelled to answer: "Bod ! very
bad !” This idiosyncrscy of our chief
Executive has become so proverbial even
among his own partisans that the “by
suthority" statements of his on: per
sonal organ are regarded as “ Ferryism,"
another nsme for esnards. The Kel
amn Beacon. I might out Bepubliesn
paper. makes the following comments
upon the positive denial made on Fer- ‘
ry's authority, of s statement published ‘
in the Tribune, another Republican pn- ‘
per. Before the late Republican Con- ‘
vention there were seven Republican
pipers published in this Territory.-
Now only two 0! those endorse the ring
which controlled the notion of the Con
vention; and both of those srb silpp’ort‘
edby Federsl petronsge. The Beacon
nys :
Emu-tom Dismal-fist Sink
day's Olympis Courier meat in so
indignant denial of the story in the Tri
bune that a caucus was held at Seattle to
lay plans for the withdruwal of Gar.
fielde from his candidacy for Delegate.
The folluwing is me “ Oregon style "
in which the Courier deals its blows :
“New plot of the Ring." The ’l‘ri
bune under the above head. has mnnu
factored a wholesale lie." " " " ” We
need hardly say to our readers that there
is not one word of truth in the whole
story from begiuutng to end. No meet
ing was held. no discussion hall, and no
purpose exists, nor has existed. of with
drawing MnGarfielde from the canvass.”
Since His Ex'cy Gov. Ferry set such ‘
an example of criticism before the Kal- \
amn Convention about those “ thirty ‘
Democratic votes," his course appears
to be the fashion over there, and we
feel inclined to put this negation of the
Governor's organ with his thirty Demo
crats I The Tribune hits the afiirmative
of the Seattle com-us and L. P. Beach’s
ahenism, as also Gov. Perry about those
Democratic votes. We are some shut
interested in the denouemmt of these
special aflirrnatives; and if not. soon
forthcoming. we shall believe His Ex
cellency has infected the district like
unto a. place described iu’l‘itus i-12.
P. s.—-Siuci: the above was in type,
we have received informaticn from what
we esteem undoubted authority, that
the statement of the Olympia Tribune is
true in every particular ! The denial of
the Courier is to be counted as on a par
wish the “ thirty Democratic votes !"
But the project of the conclnve fell
through in its effects toward Gnrfielde.
because the man pitched upon to oust
him would not be used to “ pull chest
nuts out of the fire ” for Struve !
A_ Brave and—Manly Letter.
Those of the Illibeml faction who are
so fund of circulating the slander tbnt
the Liberal nominee for President has
no firmness, will do well to rend the fol
fowing extracts from HORACE GREELEY'S
letter to the Union League Club, the
the members of which had threatened
to expel him for becoming one uf Jef
ferson Davis’ bondsmen. The letter
was printed in the Tibune of May 23d,
1867:
By these presents Greetings—To
Messm. George W. Blunt, John .L Ken
nedy, John 0. Stone, Stephen Hyatt,
and thirty others. members of the Uu
ion League Club :
Gentlemen : I was favored on the
16:}: instant, by an oflicial note from out
courteous l’resndent, John Jay, notify
ing me that n requisition had been pre
sented to him for “ a special meeting of
the club, at an early day, for the pur
pose of taking into consideration the
coniuct of Horace Greeley, a member
of the club, who has become 1:. bonds
man of Jefferson Davis. late chief oflicer
of the Rebel Government.”
Gentlemen. I shall not attend your
meeting this evening. I have an en
gagement out of town, and shall keep
it. Ido not recognize you as capable
of judging, or even fully apprehending
me. You evidently regard me use weak
sentimentalist, misled by a maudliu
philosophy.
I arraign youasnarrow-minded block
heads. who would like to be useful to a
great and good cause. but don't know
how. Your attempt to base a great. en
during party on the hate and wrath ne
cessarily engendered by a bloody civil
war is as though you should plant a
colony on an iceberg which had some
how drifted into a tropical ocean. I tell
you here that. out of a life earnestly de
voted to the good of human kind,
your children will select my going to
. Richmond and signing that bond as the
wisest act. and will feel that it did more
for freedom and humanity than all of
you were competent to do, though you
had lived to the age of Methuselah.
I ask nothing of you. then. but that
.you proceed to your end by a direct.
frank. manly way. Don't slide off into
a mild resolution of censure, but move
the expulsion which you proposed, and
which I deserve. if I deserve any re
pioach whatever. All 1 care for is, that
you make this a square, stand-up-fight.
and record your judgment by yeas and
nays. I care not how few vote with me.
nor h. w many vote against me; for I
know that the latter will repent it in
dust and ashes before three years have
past. Understand, once for all. that I
dare you and defy you. and that I pro
pose tofight it out on the line that I
have held from the days of Lee's sur
render. So long as any man was seek- 1
ing to overthrow our Government he 1
was my enemy; from the hour in which 1
he laid down his arms he was my for
merly erring countryman.
So long as any is' at heart opposcd to
the national unity. the Federal author
ity. or to that nuerticn to thz-equnl
rights at all men which has become
mimetic-fly indentified with loyalty and
irrationality. I shall do my besttode
\privo him of power; but whenever
‘he m to bethus. Idennndhierb
-1m» to .n prvilegu «America
lcitlunshipa I give you fair notice that
I shall urge the retranchlnmont of
in!” now _pn|cn’hed for rebellion-0:
noon u I shallfeoleonfidontthlnhir
‘mumummmm'u‘
NO. 4().
the blacks and the unity of the repul-liv,
and that I shall dent-mud a recall of all
now in exile only for participating in
the rebellion whenever the munlry
shall have so thouronghly pacified thm
its safety will not thereby be endan
gercd.
And so, gentlemen, hoping that you
will henceforth comprehend me some
whnt better than you have done, I re
main yours.
‘ HORACE GREIiLI-ZY.
1 New Yonx May 23. 1867.
W~«-
Loxvos, July 20th. 157'}.
The Proprietor of the PCGET Soon: I“ «
urea, Seattle, W. T. -.>
Dear Sir : I beg to acquaint you that
I have no interest whatewr in the man
ut'uctnre or sale of medicines that are
|now being sold and advertised in the
States as "Hollowuy's Pills and Oint
ment."
Gross frauds have been pacticed upon
me by two persons; one Joseph Hnydocls.
and the other Dnvid Pingle, both of
New York, and who at difl‘ercnt time-s
were manager's of my business at 80,
Maiden Lane in that City.
David Priugle now wrongfully sets
forth that he has the copyright to mulm
and sell my “ Hollowuy‘s Pills and Oint
ment," and {or this and other misdoings.
legal proceeding are now being taken
by my representative in New York
against him and others.
Last year I gave it Power of Attorney
to one Henry Martin, at New York, to
put a stop to these practices, but im
stead of doing so, I regret to say he has
grently abused his trust. and amongst
other things. Without my knowledge on!
consent, gave a license for the formzh
tron of a Company styled “ The New
York Chemical C .xmpnny ” to make and
sell “ llolloway's Pills and Ointment,"
which I believe are being advertised in
your paper and this greatly to my detri
ment.
From information which reached Inn
on this subject. I immediately reputed
a Mr. George Martin (my brother—in
law) to proceed to New York to nunnl
the Power of Attorney of the said Hen
ry M. Martin.
I am sure that you, as an honorable
gentieman, cannot desire to and, by
means of your valuable paper, unprin~
cipled parties in committing frauds up
on the American public by the unjusti
fiable use of my name.
I have no other desire in thus address
ing you. than that the American public
should know that the Medicines which
they nmy buy, bearing my name, are
spurious imitations, and do not eminatu
from me, and that I have no longer any
Establishment in America, nor are my
genuine Medicines sold there.
I an: Dem- Sir, Yours Faithfully,
THOMAS HOLLOWAY.
-—<..->——
Tam-z S'ronr or me BULL Prm.--—Un
(let the above caption the Cincinnati cor
respondent of the St. Paul Dispatch
gives the snbjoined statement, which
we may consider ourselves as called up
on to copy, from a due regard to the
" truth of history:"
“ Ever; body is familiar with the story
of the bull pnp sent to President Grant.
which he refused to receive because the
express charges were not paid. The
sequel of the story is, I believe, new,
and at all events, I Will give it at a ven~
true. as related here by ‘a man who
knows.’ Soon after Grant had refused
the pup he learned that it was a. velua~
hie animal, and greatly regretted he had
not paid the charges ($4 50.) He ac.
cordlngly sent one of the Dents down
to the express oflice the next day to se~
cure the pup. Judge of his horror when
he learned that a colored man .had paid
the charges and taken the pup home.—
Dent was directed to hunt up the ‘ L'ul.
cred man and brother ’ and see what he
would take for, the pup. He finally sne
ceeded in finding him, and the price was
set at $95. After a good deal of hag
gling. the price was reduced to $4.0, and
this Grant paid. The pup is now suit!
to be worth S2OO, but Grant has never
l'orgiven himself for his rashness wherm
by he squandered thirty-five dollars and
a half. This is an o'er true tale and
shows the caliber of our model Presi
dent.
Biennium: Rss'ronA-nos T 0 Rmsox.
~—At Temescsl. a short distance south
of the bridge, stands a small white
house, in which lives an honest, indus
trions man named Hsnly, with his fam
ily—a Wife and six children, one of
whom is a girl eighteen years ofnge,
named Kate. This girl had been of nn~
sound mind all her life until last Wed
nesday morning sometimes becoming
excessively violent. On Sunday morn
ing she fell into a. deep sleep, from
‘ which she did not arouse until seventy
two hours lied passed and nsheredin
the morning sun of Wednesdly. From
this long sleep she awakened free from
the thraldom of idiocy. and blessed with
the heavenly boon of intelligence.
She recognizes none of the persons
whom she knew before. with the swap
tion of the members of her own family, ,
Ind usturely feels sud sets in many
respects like e new being. which it my
be well aid she is ism—Oakland
(Cal.,) News.

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