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Orleans County monitor. [volume] (Barton, Vt.) 1872-1953, November 05, 1919, Image 6

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THE MONITOR, NOVEMBER 5, 1919
PAGE SIX
. - .
It is Your Home
That has to he
Furnished
It is your money that pays
for Furniture.
It is for you to see that you
get all you are entitled to
in Real Value and
Service.
We can tell you that you cannot
be sure of 'getting all you are en
titled to unless you come and see
with your own eyes the assortment
of furniture that offers the most of
everything that you desire.
Whether you may need an odd
piece or a whole house full of fur
niture you may be certain of find
ing the desired article from our
extensive stock of character furni
ture. This store offers you the greatest
values, because it is the store in
which values are safe and reliable,
but we cannot better illustrate the
values than by presenting.
Keep in mind we
are agents for
Columbia
Graphonolas
and Records
H. S. ROOT & SON
NEWPORT
Woman Suffrage Sentiment in Ver
mont.
TVio Vormnnt leHslators have been
V,q rvirtcf nart friPTlda of the STlf-
1U1 f - L . .
frage movement out a siaruin
change in the sentiment of many who
have hitherto been unfnencuy was
noted last week when a committee
representing the suffrage interests 01
Vermont-canea on a majun i
legislators to ascertain their views
on a special session for the purpose
of ratifying tne ieaerai suurage
amendment.
irT, xxrn had hitherto been seem
ingly unalterable in their views of
suffrage turned about ana snoweu
themselves its warmest inenas. a
parlv 1.000 miles was made
throughout almost every county in
the state and a poll of legislative
opinion taken. The result surprised
even the the suffrage workers them
selves. In one case a prominent sen
ator shook' the suffrage workefr's
hand on leaving and declared: "I've
been convinced that I ought to sup
port this thing because I've had it
demonstrated that my wife is a bet
ter citizen than I am. I'll come to
a special session and vote for the fed
eral amendment and I'll pay my own
expenses."
What has brought this change
about is a question, but that the
change has come cannot be denied.
stAtp franklv thev have
been won over because of the work j
wnicn women periormeu m me iava
war, entitling them to full participa
tion in the affairs 01 tneir govern
ment if they are equally affected by
great national crises or the results of
misgovernment. And an equally as
tonishing fact brought out by the
canvass was the character of the men
supporting the movement. The re
presentatives of the little towns far
back in the hills were as posted on
the good effects of suffrage in prac
tice in other states, perhaps more so,
than representatives which came
from the larger towns. It was aston
ishing to drive for miles to reach
some little hamlet and find some
farmer's home where the wife took
as much interest, almost, as the
workers, themselves. This may be
due, of course, to the interest natur
ally taken in civic affairs in the
household where the head of the fam
ily was a state legislator. But the
fact remains that there is an entirely
new day dawning for suffrage in Ver
mont, a day in which the idea of the
old-fashioned "suffragette" is no
longer associated with the ideals of
the cause as advocated at present.
Out of scores of legislators inter
viewed in a trip covering the afore
said 1,000 miles, not a single man re
fused to support a special - session
and cast his vote in favor of ratifica
tion. All the legislators were not
interviewed on this trip but the
first man to turn his back and have
nothing to do with suffrage was not
found.
The suffrage workers were radical
ly mrmT-M croA lvc what. thT7 have
found and as one woman of the party
expressed it, "Indications begin to
point toward a landslide for suffrage
in Vermont."
baking bo famous throughout New try and meat dressings they take
rmriand. the place of bread, enhancing Uie
k tr. -body" and flavor as nothing else
This same authority went on to
say that the old-time "baking dayff
is not nearly so great an institution i v nenever a aeucious
as formerly. In those aays a wo fen is sougnt, me wmau
man spent a greater part of her timJ turns to Nabisco, Anola, Lotus, or
In the kltcnen. sne wir w uami,
forv, rrMtM- simincancif Lo tiie ieAi tikeU by tue National Biscuit coin-
latu it:aici jBifeii""v-- - i , . -
- 4. ik.n n V swl4I lnnv TVl molHllfF rWlnSS Of tne
ture or. a pie-crust iuou iu owuui iauj, - ,
duties which play so important ti fmter strips and the cooling, vart-
part in thl-"-' -r tun mn,J fr layers of
woman. V ' Hvi UeUU:frorm a com-
Nnwftdflvs. however, and thank
to a nation-wide plan of selling oven
fresh products or au ki
sands of nousewi
from many an
thereby
Ination that Is simply irresistible.
r, again, when tne neea is ior soua
readily tne mma turns
the perfect soaa
nal fame tne
T7nr aim net 0e National
J. Vl 1 AAA
a century first favorites with
New Englanders Kennedy's
SPECIAL COMMONS, the finest
cracker of its kind.. Rich with the nut
like flavor of the finest wheat. Supreme
in chowders and poultry dressings.
Sold by the pound.
been
.this
to
ill
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eavy Winter Underwear
For Men and Boys
There is a very limited supply of winter underwear on the
market this season and when thepresent supply is exhausted it
will be most impossible to get more and if we do the price will be
much higher, so is it not good advice if we tell you to buy early?
- At present we have a large stock of Men's and Boys'
Union Suits and Two-Fiece Suits that we bought early or
carried over and we are selling them for much less than we could
if we had to buy today.
Wright's Guaranteed All Wool
Union Suits for Men
Bradford All Wool, 75 Wool and Cotton
Union Suits for Men
Also the Cotton Jersey Knit and Fleeced Lined Union Suits for
Men. Sizes 34 to 50.
Men's Two-Piece Suits in All Wool, Part Wool, Fleece
lined and Jersey Knit in all sizes.
Boys' Union Suits in Fleece Lined and Wool, sizes 24 to 34.
Men's Flannel Shirts A large line of Khaki Color, Olive
Drab, Blue, Grey, Green and Brown, all sizes. Price $2.50 to
$5.00.
Also a large line of Boys' Flannel Shirts and Blouses.
A good stock of Sweaters and Beach Jackets.
When you are ready to stock up for winter
LET US SHOW YOU
J. E. FOSTER, Newport, Vt.
n
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pre
Spc
ciaUy
homes.
ers nave
No chowde:
them. What
stew Kennedy's Spe.
NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY
.SrUiiecdaEtsctft
ady
eals.
supply
pantry
ood-eervlng
when it may
are to the chowder. Made to spat
readily In half they are popular
toasted with cheese or- with coffee,
morning and night. For &U poul-
" Tms is the modern trend of good
housekeeping. The woman of to-day
still observes all the old-time tradi
tions In acquiring the baking skill
SAFE, GENTLE REMEDY
BRINGS SURE RELIEF
For 200 years GOLD MEDAL Haarlem
Oil has enabled suffering humanity to
withstand - attacks of kidney, liver,
bladder and stomach troubles and all
diseases connected with the urinary
organs and to build up and restore to
health organs weakened by disease.
These most important organs must be
watched, because they filter and purify
the blood; unless they do their work
you are doomed.
Weariness, sleeplessness, nervousness,
despondency, backache, stomach trou
ble, pains in the loins and lower ab
domen, crravel. dlfflculty when urinat
ing, rheumatism, sciatica and lumbas-o
all warn you of trouble with your kid
neys. GOLD MEDAL. Haarlem Oil Cap
sules are the remedy you need. Take
three or four every day. The healing
oil soaks into the cells and lining of
the kidneys and drlve3 out the poigons.
New life and health will surely follow.
When your normal vipror has been re
stored continue treatment for a while
to keep yourself in condition and pre
vent a return of the disease.
Don't wait until you are incapable of
fighting. Start taking GOLD MEDAL
Haarlem Oil Capsules today. Your drug
gist will cheeTfully refund vour money
if you are not satisUed w'ith reaulta.
But be sure to get the original Import
ed GOLD MEDAL and accept no sub
stitutes. In three sizes. Sealed pack
ages. At all drug stores.
B
B
B
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;a&sssss:
B
OOCKXK)OCKCKXXKXOCOOOOOOCKOOOOOOOCKOOOOOOOOCK
Talk About the Keeping Quality
of Bread
You Can't Keep Our Bread
It is so good you simply
have to eat it.
Buy GOLD MEDAL MILK BREAD
"Your Grocer Sells It."
NEWPORT BAKERY
Telephone 213-3
NEWPORT, VT
WEST CHARLESTON
Additional West Charleston locals
on another page.
Mrs. Herbert Percy has been quite
ill.
Oscar Griggs is working for H. O.
Dane.
The M. "W. A. are remodeling their
halL
Walter Coffey is working for Dan
Allen.
Veda Worboys has been ill and out
of school.
Miss Frances Lyon has been ill the
past week.
Mrs. Ella Church has been ill for
several days.
E. V. Eastman has bought a new
Pakland automobile.
Will Stearns of Holland was in
town one day last week.
Harmon Wing has stored his goods
at his mother's, Mrs. Mary Wing's.
Mrs. G. L. Kinne fell one day late
ly. , She received a cut on her nose.
Chester and Ralph Bean have re
turned to their work at Mr. Nelson's.
A techer meeting was held in the
village school building Friday af
ternoon. Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Kinne visited
their son, Henry, in Morgan one day
recently.
Mrs. Josie Royce fell one day last
week and luckily received only a bad
shaking up.
Mrs. E.J3. Boyd went to St. Johns
bury Friday and is visiting at James
McNamara's.
Mrs. Merton Wilson of Montreal is
visiting at H. L. Church's and Mrs
Carrie Temple's.
Clarence Gray and family, who
have been living in Derby, have
moved back here.
Mrs. A. E. Woodarrf ar,A slaiio-V,
ters recently spent a few days with
"ieuus in vneans.
ami jars. j. xm. laDounty vis
ited at Ernest Going's in Browning-
inn rvna stt 1o4-a1tt 0
Mrs. Morris Burbanli daughter
yt r , wx .r were recent
callers at John Dudley's.
postoffice drumg the absence of Mr.
"llolus one oay last week.
. Oscar Griggs and Miss Tresa Fos
ter, both of this place, were married
by Rev. G. W. Collins h nnav ova.
ning.
Mrs. "Rtfa Wi-kTOA-MS Vine n 4 J i
virwxa uas iciuruU to
her work in Orleans after spending
two Wooli-a of Tnki. TT 1
- " vuu uaja auu one
week at Jay Labounty's.
TTflTTlCrtTl .TArinoAn ntV 1 1
b w vuxjiovu, win luxx oeen
working for W. C. Hinton for some
time, has now moved his family into
Mr. Hinton's house on the Hudson
farm.
Dr. Jillson has had a nice monu
ment set on his lot in the village
cemetery in memory of his wife, who
!w F?ster a one-time resi
dent of this place.
iPW??8,? hilarious time at the
school hall Fndy evening, when a
good crowd gathered to celebrate
Halloween. Apples, popcorn and
games were played.
Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Rice visited at
MrgenV Dwire? ,in -Derby Monday!
Mr. Dwire and family moved last
weeK irom Newport back to ther
ChTrlesn.6 Derby and
Congratulations to Mr. and Mrs.
Raymond Thompson of Holland on
the recent birth of an eight-pound
daughter Pansy Nell. Mr? Thomp
son went overseas and when he re
turned brought a wife, an English
girl. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson and
baby are at the home of his father,
John Thompson. Mrs. John Thomp
son is a daughter of James Randall
of this place.
t
it
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75 - " f
3l
-X
Slat's
Diary
AAAAAAAAAAA
Friday When the teecher ast me
2 describe the Manners & Costumes
of the natives of the Cannonball eye
lands, I wassent.able 2 Deside so I
sed I diddent know. So she ast Jake
which was holding up his hand which
was dirty like common. So she sed
JakeYou may tell us. He replyed &
sed They haint enny manners or Cos
tumes, nary 1.
- Saturday Jake sed 2 me he know
ed how 2 maL-p hntfT-
bet him a rubber Balune he diddent.
ne sea t leed grass 2 the cow which
would give milk & then you churn the
Butter. He hassent got his Balune
yet. Bebby he won't neither.
Sunday teecher allowed me 2 go
home early from Sunday skool today.
The way it happened was thisaway.
She sed Repeet the lOnd command
ment & I sed it was Eat drink and be
Mary today and tomorrow you'll be
Dry She sed 2 me Slats you May
go .home now & study yure Bible.
Which" I did only I diddent study any.
Chicken for dinner.
Monday more chicken today, ma
give me the nekc 2 eat& I objected to
it & pa sed when he was a little boy
he had all wave a fa tiq.L- p. U
- -- j " ut, tilt:
back & the nuckels. I ast him ded he
lute tnem & he sed Yes he did. So I
sed 2 him Well you can have mine.
He diddent.
Tuesday Pa was playing on the
Fonograft & desided he wood get a
church pease so he went 2 the Tele
fone & rung up & then the person
which answered sed What do you
want & pa sed Take Me as I Am. The
fellow sed Who you think yure a
tawking 2. Pa sed Haint you the Mu
sick store which sells Fonograft
reckords & the man sed No this is the
Police stashun. Pa rung off.
t Wene8day-after skool was out
Jake & me went a hickry nutting out
old man Skinnerses thicket, we had
only just got our sacks full when ole
man Skinner cum along & he sed
Wot you kids a doing in my woods
now get out. So we started 2 pick up
our sacks & he sed Empty them durn
you. We did. That ole man is 2
stingy to give a duck a drin.k
ThursdayThe teecher ast Jane 2
name the canal which carrys the fud
threw the body afterthe stummick
Digested it. She revlyed & sed it was
the Alimony canal. I snickered &
she frose me with 1-of her looks.
THIS WOMAN FOUND RELIEF
sorener will 12 ." "A JOlDts' lam" and
relief fr v; g ad ? rd how one man found
HwH. Z kldne? bladder uouble. Mrs G
.Hoestd. Mich-, write,: "1 have been
First Vermont Legion Convention.
About 300 delegates, ex-service
men in the world war, from all parts
of Vermont, gathered in Burlington
last week for the first annual con
vention of the Vermont branch of
the American Legion. One of the
outstanding features of thej conven
tion was a clambake served by the
Burlington Chamber of Commerce.
The convention chose Barre as the
meeting place of the 19ZU convention.
Officers elected were as "V
t Tv,n tvt Thomas of Middle-
XI Co., uviiu -
bury colege was elected the first com
mander of the Vermont branch. Oth
er officers chosen were as follows:.
First vice-commander (army;, ioim
F. Sullivan of St. Albans; second vice
a ottxt TTprhprt. R. Pierce
CUIIlIUaliuci v""" J ' . j
of Montpelier; third vice-commander
(marine), John Ji.. uneesmau y
fnurth vice-com-
UICUU1 J vrv-&w,
mander (army nurse corps), Miss
Lillian LaValley oi nuuanu; c"c
tary or adjutant, Joseph H. Fountain
T,,-i,v,o-tn tronsnrer or finance
Ul ijujiius'"") ,
officer, Redfield Proctor of Proctor;
state war risk or insurance umcei,
W. Gibson of Brattleboro.
irnk. nf trip state executive
committee of 13 were elected as fol
lows: Dr. J. J. Ross of Middlebury,
Joel Lamere of Ludlow, Ray E. Smith
of Rutland, H. L. Newton of Montpe
lier. Paul Ricker of Burlington, E. b.
Smith of St. AiDans, xt. w. jiucu
of Vergennes, Geo. L. Bates of Mor
risville, Max Fisher of Barre, Daniel
P. Thompson of Bellows Falls, Ber
nard A. Donleavy of Brattleboro and
L. F. Edgerton of Rochester.
Two members of the national exec
utive committee to which Vermont is
entitled, were also elected. These are
Dr. H. Nelson Jackson of Burling
ton and Col. Fred B. Thomas of
Montpelier. .
There were several contests in the
convention over delegates to the na
tional convention to be held in Minne
apolis Nov. 10-12. These delegates
were elected as follows: Regular del
egates with voting power, Howard A.
Allen of Burlington, Guy Varnum of
Barre, B. S. Hyland of Rutland, El
mer C. Sanborn of Bellows Falls, G.
H. Horton of Winooski, Stephen S.
Cushman of St. Albans, Wm. S. Cor
rey of Montpelier and Allen Fletcher
of Johnson.
Eight alternates to which Vermont
is entitled and who may take part in
the debate, but not vote, were chosen
as follows: Donald N. Norton of
Vergennes, Donald A. Carty of Bur
lington, Chauncey Adams of Dan
ville, Miss Lillian LaValley of Rut
land, John Shanley of Winooski, Miss
Mary Reeze of Burlington, Mr. Wat
son of St. Albans, and Captain Wil
cox of St. Johnsbury.
The delegates at large elected were
.T Wntsrvn 'Wphh nf RViplhiTmp T nn.
ard H. Mason of Northfield, James E.
iionanue oi .fcissex Junction, Pearl
Clapp of Brattleboro, Carl Webster
of Orleans, W. J. Kelley of Rutland,
Mr. Hunt of Windsor and Mr. Webber
of St. Albans.
Vilas Speeches.
(Brattleboro Reformer)
The Rutland News paints a gloomy
picture of the drouth that will gradu
allv wither the land
half of one per cent becomes the legal
alcoholic content of beverages. It
says towns in general will be "as dry
as a bone." with which Wo o crroo a c
we do with its assertion that they
will likewise be "dry as dust," but
wnen tne esteemed JN ews has the hard
ihood to rTaHi that th
dry as ore of Martin Vilas' speeches
on ins isague ot nations we are oblig-
i i to arop out oi the procession.
Compared to one of the Burlington
senator's efforts, plain ordinary al-
aii oust oi tne desert variety is as
liquid and refreshing as a bowl of
cool buttermilk at twilight of a hot
summer atternoon.
Berry Set
FREE
7-Piece
Berry Set
Worth $1.50 vjTTry
Just think of it! All you have to do is to use Babbitt Soap prod
the Trade Marks, and when you have collected 75 brins? tho UCtS
win give you one ui iuw ueauiuui, terry or salad sets free
S- , t im r r
come i onu ijok m it. nememoer mat Babbitt means reEabfiiy
F. D. Pierce Pharmacy, Barton, Vermont
Diamond-Mounted
Jewelry
Even among the choicest creations in the
world of gifts, nothing takes the place of the
DIAMOND.
Always cherished, the DIAMOND holds a
place of its own . among the things exchanged
as tokens of esteem and affection.
We have a large stock of perfect, finely-cut
diamonds, in the newest platinum, white, green
'and yellow gold, ring, pendant, brooch and
scarf pin mountings.
Any gifts selected now will be laid aside for
you until Christmas if you wish.
Searles & Co., Jewel
34 Main Street,
ers
Newport, Vt.
BBOBBBBEBESBESBCSSBSBSSfiEEEBBSSEBSESSSESSSSEZZEZIZSEn
5 An Exclusive Ladies' Ready-to-Wear Store
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Are You Ready for the Big
November 11th?
"WE ARE "
We have in stock for you to select from the largest assort
ment and most beautiful line of EVENING.1 GOWNS that
we have ever displayed in our shop. Make your selection
early. ' Priced from $30.00 to $90.00
MILLINERY
We are giving special prices on all our dressy Hats.
SEE THEM
Suits, Coats, Silk and Wool Dresses, Velvet, Tricoletti
and Wool Jersey.
is
j 46 MAIN ST., NEWPORT, VT. Phone 14-12 ,
iEll
E(OlU MOT! i I
in Wei .Msnnnuv CiL .
STANDARO DltCUFHYj
There Needn't be a Gold Room
in the House
A portable Perfection Oil Heater will bring tbe
beat just where you want it, when you v ant it,
and in the volume desired. These bri-k ? 11
mornings and chilly evenings the Perfection is
just what the family needs.
Mornings, on u.lng in the bathroom during
Fall evenings to make the lower part of the house
cozy,a Perfection Oil Heater takes the j1"- fur"
nace and fireside.supplyingheatatamininiuni tost.
The Perfection is safe, clean, odorless gives no ashes,
soot or trouble. Burns ten hours on a gallon of kero
sene, and pays for itself in a short time.
Use SOCONY kerosene for best results.
STANDARD OIL CO. OF NEW YOKK
PERFECT
Oil Beaters J

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