OCR Interpretation


The Russellville Democrat. [volume] (Russellville, Ark.) 1875-1898, April 22, 1875, Image 3

Image and text provided by Arkansas State Archives

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84023017/1875-04-22/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

the democrat.
By Russellville Printing
Association.
\!l , on huslmiHjj should be
addressed to.
B. F. JOBE, Business Manager,
UiissiUvilUs Ark.-.n-a*.
LOCAL Al l airs.
_Beef sold iu tov u last week at
V
8(«T2 cents.
_W liv cannot Pope county hold
a county fair this fall?
Sunday the mercury stood at
71 iu the shade.
—Wheat is heading out, and
harvesting will soon be at hand.
—A communication from “Pau
line” will appear iu next issue.
_A lew scattering bales of cot
ten still continue to arrive in town.
— Invest a dollar and a half in
Ihe Democrat, and we guarantee
you will not regret it.
—Fix up your fishing tackle,
no more cold weather will spoil
your sport from now on.
_The circulation of the Demo
chat has been increased by a num
ber of new subscribers this week.
_Mr. Lawrence ltnssell was
chosen to deliver the address to
the Sunday school at the May-day
celebration.
—We were pleased to note an
increased number of the little
children at Sunday school last Sab
hath.
-11 IS lime IUI lUlllit'ia w uv;
^ fixing up their reapers and thresh
ers. Wheat will be ready for
harvesting in a few weeks more.
—From the 1st of September up
to the present time there lias been
3809 bales of cotton shipped from
this place.
—Phil Sheridan passed through
Little Rock on his way north,
last Monday. May we never see
liis like in the south again.
.* —We notice Capt Jim Russell
sports a tine cane. Engraved on
the head is, “K. J. W. to James
W. Russell”
—Miss Tenuie Williamson was
selected by the Sabbath school
last Sunday to prepare an essay at
the May-day celebration. An ex
cellent selection.
—Quite a number of our town
people went down to Mt. Zion
y. Church last Sunday. Presbytery
convened there Friday before, and
they have had an interesting
meeting.
—Many of our young people
took advantage of the beautiful,
springlike weather of last Sunday,
to take a run out of town. We
.heard of a pleasant party going to
Norristown.
—Quite a quantity of the peach
blooms arc dropping off, from the
effects of the frost of the past
week. It is supposed, however,
that without further damage, we
will have two-thirds, or perhaps
three-fourths of a crop.
— J he store or J. 15. r,nvin since
the arrival of his new and well
selected stock of goods presents a
handsome appearance, and our
word for it, he is selling cheap.
—See advertisement in another
^ column, of M. 15. Roys, for clean eot
k ton rugs. This will give every fam
ily in the country a chance to ex
change their old rags for tinware or
any other merchandise in ids line.
—Our young friend, Mr. Geo.
Cunningham, and his bride came
down from Clarksville on the cars
last Thursday morning. We wish
the happy couple a smooth sea and
balmy breezes in their sail over
the ocean of life.
—A special train, drawn by the
* new locomotive, put up at Lit
tle Rock, came up last Saturday.
' The engine was bright and shi
liing as a new pin. The Presi
dent and Superintendent of the
road were aboard.
—There was several drunk men
in town last week, llut so far no
one lias been before the Mayor’s
court for violation of the ordi
nance making it a penal offence t<
sell liquors by the drink.
—It affords us pleasure to an
hoiince the location in our town ol
< bl. W. ('. Ford. Col. Ford is n
lawyer by profession, and is a na
live of Kentucky, but more re
* ccntly lias resided in Mississippi.
We bespeak for him the courtesy
and hospitality of our people.
—There was a slight frost Sun
day morning, but the day was
bright, warm and pleasant, am
the song of a thousand forest war
biers tilled the air with delightfu
music. Altogether, the day wai
one which was calculated to lil
the soul with adoration am
thanksgiving to the bountifu
^ . Civer of all good things.
—Judging from indications
which we observed last Sunday,
we think there is a fair prospect
for an increased amount of travel
over the Little Rock & Ft. Smith
Railway—especially between this
place and Atkins. For »n explan
ation, ask George Etter.
—The Sunday school pic nic
and May-day celebration will be
, held on Illinois bayou, at the
mouth of Mill creek, about two
n.iles from town. Other Sunday
Schools from Dardanellc, Dover,
Atkins, Clarksville and perhaps
Lewisburg are invited and a grand
time is anticipated.
—The Fort Smith Herald of
the 10th comes to us very wee
and small, but neat and nobby as
a pin. Severe sickness of the
editor is a sufficient excuse. We
hope you may soon be yourself
I again, Major!
—1). P. Upham, of Clayton Mi
litia fame, who lias been under
arraignment for the murder of two
citizens of Woodruff county in
1808, has been discharged, after
an examination into the case by
the Pulaski Circuit Court.
—Remember J. B. Erwin has
removed to the two story brown
storehouse on Tucker’s corner.
He is just back from the markets,
and has a handsome stock of goods
on exhibition. Everybody seems
to be pleased with his low prices.
-All lUbCIVOlUJg vwiu*««u.v»
tion from a Dover correspondent
1 which we intended to publish this
week, has been mislaid, and we |
must ask our correspondent to
look over our carelessness.
—A stroll out to the graveyard1
last Sunday evening, impressed us
very sadly with the neglected and
dilapidated condition of this rest
ing place of the dead. Cannot
some plan be devised to have the
grounds trimmed, cleaned oil and
enclosed? It is really discredita-1
ble to the town to evince so much
indifference about our graveyard.
It ought to be the most beautiful
spot to be found, whereas it is
now about the most shabby look
ing.
Improved.—The Russellville
Democrat under the control of J.
E. Battcnfield has been improved
and enlarged to an 8 column pa
per, and is now without exception,
the neatest paper in the state, and
is always filled with good reading
matter. We rejoice at the suc
cess of our young friend, and hope
it may continue to be well with
him.
We are indebted to Major Sparks
of the Ft. Smith Herald for the
above handsome compliment.
Thank you, Major!
THE POST OFFICE ROB
BERY.
The robbery which was perpe
trated upon the Post Office at this
place last Sunday night a week
ngo, but which has been kept
quiet by request of the Post Mas
ter in hopes of gaining some clue
that would lead to the apprehen
sion of the thief, is still vailed in
mystery. It was at first supposed
that the thief had entered the Post
Office at the front door by means
of a key made for the purpose; but
subsequent investigation proves
that the entrance was effected by
forcing the bolt at the back door,
which gave admittance to a back
room. The door which le i from
this room to the Post Office was
then opened by chiseling around
the bolt. The thief, whoever he
j was, was evidently well acquainted
| with the premises and the situation
of the desks and money drawer;
for nothing was molested except
the drawer containing the money
I and registered package. About
$20 in money and some registered
matter was abstracted from the
drawer, which was locked again.
Suspicion rests strongly upon
a youngster of doubtful character,
i by the name of Earn well, who has
1 since sloped from the country.
*•*—
CiO TO WOBK.
_
A Few Words of Wisdom from
Bov. A. B. Wiuticld.
Editors Gazette: You were
kind enough to quote my jocular
I remark to the legislature, to wit:
“That Arkansas has the laziest
men in the world." Well, I don’t
■ propose to take that back—for it
' is too true—but I don’t want the
I remark confined to any class or
locality, hut to all, whether in
city, town, village or county. Our
people are neither industrious or
thrifty, but indolent and extrav
agant. A want of enterprise
characterizes our entire people.
True, we have had a most miser
ably managed government, and
u fearful and devastating drought
i visited many portions of our
state last year, and the fearful hot
winds of August, 1874, played
fearful havoc with the crops, but
all of these will fail to account
for the terrible destitution that
now prevails. One cause is, too
many are congregating' in our
cities and villages. Every little
town and village of Arkansas, as
well as the larger cities, are
crowded with a poor population
that are of no benefit, but really
a curse to them. Both white and
black are found in tins class.
IIow these people live, no one can
tell. Great strong men in rags
arc found wandering around beg
ging. Bands of colored people
have flocked to all these towns and
cities, and will not for any price
go to the country and work the
rich productive lands of the state.
Too many of our young men are
trying to live without labor, and
arc endeavoring to seek clerkships
at less than a living price, and
driving married men out of their
legitimate business. Too many
good farmers are giving up their
business and seek clerkships at
prices that will forever beggar
them and their families. We
need more farmers. Too many
consumers and too few producers.
C'omc friends, white and colored,
3’ou are needed to till the soil.
Laud is cheap; now is the time to
get you a home. Homestead your
IfiO nrrnft find <rn In work. TCvnrv
tiling you do will tell. You can
give yourself and family a good
living with very little labor.
Your taxes will not eat you up.
Live hard a year or so and then
you can live well the balance of
your life. You will be felt as a
man of weight, and a citizen of
real worth. Live in town or city,
and you are dependent on men of
capital. Come, you strong,
health}', able-bodied young men.
You are needed at the plow and
hoe—there is real dignity in labor.
Come, get out in the country, and
help improve our grand and grow
ing state. You are really depre
ciating jour manhood in clerking
at your present salaries, and in
juring men of families. The pro
fessions are all full, and we want
some working men to Jig the
earth.
Second cause—Our farmers
don’t work to advantage. You
plant too much cotton, and too
little corn and wheat. As long
as our people insist on living on
a large cotton crop, so long will
we be a very poor and oppressed
people. People of Arkansas, will
you not, when jou read this, plant
a few more acres in corn? We
want immigration, and we will
not get it so long ns Texas has
corn at lift}' cents, and we sell at
$1.50 and $1. This is the year
for an abundant crop of corn.
Have corn at fifty cents next year,
and thousands will come to staj’
with us and help to improve our
country. If jTou want immigra
tion, then show your faith bj’ j our
works, and plant a full crop of
corn.
Third cause—You plant too
much land, and do not take time
to fertilize and improve j'our land.
Plant less and cultivate well.
Plow deep. Hoe well. Keep
clean. Manure every acre you
can. uaise every tiling you can
at home. If you will use tobacco,
raise it—but if you will have
whisky, then bargain for poverty
and wretchedness.
A closing word to all our peo
ple. This is a hard year. Many
“re suffering for the necessaries
of life. Let your charity abound
to the poor and needy. Don't
mortgage your property and then
buy luxuries, lie content with
meat and bread, and next year,
God willing, we will be in a hap
py anil prosperous state. Let us
all work and practice economy,
and ns certain as time moves
on, our Arkansas will be the
giauil state of the great west.
A. R. Winfield.
A SPLENDID OFFER.
We will send to any one for
warding us #3.50, the Democrat
and Arthur’s Illustrated Home
Magazine for twelve months, and
will give free to every subscriber
for the two, a splendid premium
engraving. #2.50 a year is the
price of Arthur’s Magazine—so
that your own county paper will
cost you only #1.00 a year, and you
will get the premium engraving
free.
A MAGNIFICENT OFFER.
A very liberal contract, which we
have just completed with the Weed
Hewing Machine Company, will en
able us, we hope Co place their cel
ebrated machine in many families
throughout the country. So line
an opportunity to secure a flrst-elass
sewing machine seldom occurs.
May we not expect the friend** *jf
this paper to make an earnest, uni
ted effort to extend greatly its circu
lation and thus help to increase its
j influence. We will; liberally re
I ward those who work for us. Read
er, can you not form a club In your
neighborhood and secure this sew
ing machine premium. A few hours
of well-directed effort will obtain it.
Postmasters in the smaller towns
and villages can, with a little
thought ami effort, easily send us
the requisite number of names,
lias the parsonage a sewing ma
chine? If not, call upon a few la
dies and gentlemen of the congre
gation. Tell them your plan and
ask them to help. In the congrega
tion 50 names fan with little diffi
culty be secured. Send us the $75
and we will forward for one year
this paper to each of the 50 subscrib
ers, which will pay them the full
value of their subscriptions, and in
addition, we will make a present,
to any person you may designate, of
a beautiful sixty dollar Sewing
Machine. How easily a club can
be formed in the Masonic or Odd
Fellows or Temperance Societies or
in the Grange? Is there not de
pending upon your society some
poor widow to whom a sewing ma
chine would be for years to come a
blessing? Pass the subscription
paper. ' fifty persons subscribing
for this journal at $1.50 each, w ill
seethe for themselves, without any
extra change, the paper for one year
and a most valuable present for some
needy family. Try it, friends.
Don’t wait! Begin’ the work at
once. Send us word that you have
undertaken the formation of such a
club.
Remember, the machines are war
ranted to be perfectly new, latest
improved, and in perfect order.
— — » -
ATTENTION GRANGERS.
We are now prepared to furnish
the Democrat and the St. Louis
Midland farmer both, twelve
months for the small sum of one
dollar and seventy-five cents. The
Midland Farmer is a handsome
eight page Agricultural journal
issued monthly, and is replete with
well-written agricultural essays
statistics, market reports, <fcc\, &c.
Specimen copies maj’ be seen at
this office.
The following named gentlemen
are fully authorized to receive
and receipt for the Democrat, to
wit»:
J. B. Erwin.
Dr. E. B. Harrell.
James M. Harkey.
James W. Russell.
J. L. Shinn.
Geo. E. Howell.
James G. Ferguson.
Robt. J. Wilson.
M. B. Roys.
James I. Potts.
S. A. Buck.
Dr. J. W. Pruitt.
Joshua A. Hearn.
E. II. Poe.
J. F. Munday.
James Fowler.
J. H. Battenfield.
Dr. Geo. W. Harkey.
G. E. Burney.
John Quinn.
M. H. Baird,
Henry Harkey.
H. Clabe Howell.
Eld. J. B. Dalton, Magazine,
Sarber Co., Ark.
MARRIED.
On Sunday, April 18th, 1875, at
Mount Zion Church, Mr. M. II.
Baird and Miss Mollie Quinn.
Ceremony by Rev. J. S. Wilbanks,
May the happy couple find
wedded life one perpetual round
of happiness and unalloyed pleas
ures. May no discord ever mar
the peace and happiness ol their
blissful union.
DIED.
On Sunday night April 18th,
1875, Rev. Jno. Patrick.
Thus has another good man
and faithful Christian taken leave
of a world of trials and troubles
and gone to that happy abode
above where peace and joy abide
forever-more.
J. M. MARKET. I MR. G. W. MARKEY
J. M.HARKEY&BRO,
DEALERS IN
DRUGS,
MEDICINES,
PAINTS, OILS,
DYE-STUFFS,
PERFUMERIES,
SOAPS,
STATIONERY,
FINE ROBACCO,
AND CIGARS.
ALSO
Wholesale Liquor Dealers,
North-east corner Main & Jefferson
Streets,
Russellville, .... Ark.
[tl-1]
D H. HARKEY,
DEAI.KR IN
Dry Goods,
Am. 1
GROCERIES,
Bi chanan Street,
Russellville, Arkansas.
I Imvc on hand a complete stock of Family ■
Groceries, which I am offering at the
very lowest price*, for CASH.
1 always keep on hand Pork, Flour, Sugar
Coffee, Teas, and a great variety of Can
ned goods.
Give me a call.
D. H. Harkoy.
l+i-i
MARKET REPORT.
Oemce ok the Democrat,)
Thursday, April 22, ’75. f
CORRECTm> WEEKLY,
And cart be relied upon as correct.
COTTON—
Low ordinary', [email protected]}
Ordinary, 11 @12}
Low middling, [email protected]
GROCERIES—
Coffee, prime Rio, 26(827
Choice, [email protected]}
SUGARS—
Fair Brown, [email protected]
Coffee C, 14
Coffee A, 16
Crush, 18.
MOLASSES—
I’. R. [email protected]
C. II. . 87}@90
Riee, choice, 124
Soda, [email protected]|
Pepper bik. 50c
Salt, bbl. • $3,25
“ sack, 2,50
Meat, clearsides, salt, 15
“ rib “ 124
“ shoulders, 11
Cas® Avery } [email protected],50
Flour. XXX pr bbl. [email protected]
Corn meal pr bu. [email protected],00
DRY GOODS—
Prints, 8 to 12}, Domestics, brown
4-4 8 to 12}, bleached 10 to 20
.Teans, 30 to 05. Flannels, 40 to 00.
Drills, 15 to 18. Ticking, 20 to 40.
Cotton yarn, $1,65.
Checked Osnaburgs, [email protected]
Litiseys, [email protected]
Seamless bags 2 bu. 50
“ “ 2} 00
“ “ 3 75
BOOTS & SHOES—
Brogans, 1,[email protected],00
“ Plow 2,25
“ Boys I,[email protected],75
“ Ladies 1,[email protected],00
“ Boots 4,[email protected],50
Ladies elotli boots 1,[email protected],00
HARDWARE—
Axes, 1,[email protected],15.
Nails, G,[email protected],00
Horse shoes 25c.
“ “ nails [email protected]
Castings 9 to 10
Iron C to 10
PLOWS—
“ “ P 5,50
“ “ 2 7,00
Steel “ Pony 9,00
“ Brinley “ 8,.W
Dbl Shovel 7,50
Bull Tongue 75 to 1,00
COUNTRY PRODUCE—
Large receipts of butter. We
quote nice choice, 20c. Inferior, no
sale. Eggs at 12c.
Chickens 1,50 to 2,00 pr doz. Tur
keys 50 to 75c. Veni
son hams none in market
Choicc country lard 14 to lGe. Beef
choice 5 to 7, Mutton 5e. Potatoes
seed, irisn, 2.00 to 2.25 per bu. Pel
tries 25e. Dry flint hides 12}. Coon
skin 10 to 15.' Fox skin 10 to 15.
Mink 25 to 75.
J. H. ROBINSON,
Representing
KIRTLAND, HUMPHREY
& MITCHELL.
Cotton Factors,
—AND—
mm com UEM&m I
No. 114 N. Commercial St.,
ST. LOUIS, MO.
Orders from Merchants solicited and
attended to with care and prompt
ness. [19-ly.]
II. CLABE noWELL. O. E. HOWELL
HOWELL & HOWELL,
JOBBERS AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
SUCAR, COFFEE,
MOLASSES,
TOBACCO,
Flour, Bacon, Salt, &c.,
COTTON BUYERS
*vn
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Buchanan St., near Depot, (
Rc8SKI.LVII.LE,.AbKANSAS
[t3-12m.J
J. B. ERWIN,
DEALKlt IN
DRY GOODS, BOOTS, SHOES, HATS
ALSO A WELL SELECTED STOCK Ol'
QUEENSWARE, GLASSWARE
9 I
and a fine stock of
Sugar, Coffee, Molasses, Its., Etc.
Hill Keep Constantly on hand a
Well Selected st.u k, which will
be Sold
AT LOWER RATES
Than Ever. As I am the only Mer
chant In Knsscllvillc who sells
Exclusively
FOR CASH
1 CLAIM TO GIVE THE
Dost Bargains!!
Como and See for Yourselves.
South East Corner of Main
and Klver .Streets, Rnssolville
Arkansas. J. B. ERWIN.
no-l-l-y.
NEWT ADVERTISEMENTS.
WANTED! .
Correspondence with a limited
number of Young Ladies. OBJECT,
run and Inrnovkment. Address,
••H ARRY” anp “HERBERT,”
Russellville, Ark.
WANTED!
RAGS! RAGS!!
At the STOVE AND TIN SHOP,
IOOO pounds of clean cotton
rngs, for which I will pay one cent,
per ljmiud in trade.
M. B. ROYS.
WANTED!
Young Lady Correspond
ents!
Tjyeach of the young GENTLE
_j» raen below named. Object MatrlniC'
•uy. JNO. J. II ALLKCK,
J ROY FITZGERALD.
RusHellvill ville, Ark.
WARNINC ORDER.
Justices Court of Illinois Township,
iu Pope county.
J. H. retry, plaintiff, vs. John law
less,defeiulent.
THE defendant, John Lawless, is
hereby warned to apiiear in this
court within thirty days to answer
the complaint of the plaintiff, J. 11.
Perry.
Given under my hand this the 17th
day of April, 1875.
G. E. BURNEY, J. P.
13-4t.
DISSOLUTION NOTICE.
NOTICE Is hereby given that the
firm of Battenfleld & Fowler is
hereby dissolved by mutual consent.
Mr. J. T. Fowler will continue the
business at the old stand, while I re
tire. Thanking my many friends for
their liberal patronage while en
gaged in the mercantile business,
and hoping they will continue the
Eimvio fit mi' ciiiioiiiiQnp
I remain, very respectfully,
J. H. BATTENFIELD.
To My Friknds :
Mr. J. H. Rnttenflcld having re
tired from the late Arm of Batten
field & Fowler, I beg leave to state
tluit 1 will continue the business un
der the name of the old firm, and at
the same stand, hoping to receive a
liberal share of the patronage,
I remain very truly,
J. T. FOWLER.
April 21st, 1875. [13-2t.]
HAY! HAY!!
For Sale Cheap
-AT—
HOWELL & HOWELL’S.
AprS-lm.
LEWIS W. DAVIS,
Attorney-a t-L a w,
*“ —AND—
REAL ESTATE AGENT,
Russellville, Pons Co., Auk.
Office on River street, nearly opposite J.
L.siiinn’s store. lll-ra-12
5. B. IIAKRKLL.] U. B. FOSTER.
DAS. HARRELL & FOSTER,
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS,
RU SSELL V1LLE, ARK.
Offer their professional services to tlie
*ublic.
Special attention given to Surgery and
he diseases of women.
Calls by night or day promptly attended
o. l"-tf.|
Office on Buchanan street.
DAN B. GRANGER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Russellville.Arkansas.
WILL PRACTICE IN THE
State and United States Courts.
I’rompt and Special Attention
riven to collections and transactions
u Real Estate. Office on Main
itreet, Russellville, Arkansas.
B. W. CLEAVER,
Carpenter, Builder,
AND
Undertals-er,
RUSSELLVILLE .. . ARKANSAS.
Ml Work promptly attended to aud satis
faction guaranteed.
ggW-Shop South-east cornerof River and
JiltlU BUVOWi
u-n _
The Third Term of
rHE RUSSELLVILLE INSTITUTE
Prof. G. B. Haddock, Pkin.
Opened April 5th, 1875,
Will close July 5.
Rates ok Tuition :
Primary, per month, $2 00
Intermediate, “ 2 50
Ydvaneed, “ 3 00|
fg-Tuition must be settled each
uontli.
13-tf
QUINN & HOFFMAN,
DEALERS IN
Choice Family Groceries,
SUCH AS
Stitliir, Molasses, Flour, Fish,
Crackers, Cheese, Hominy,
Candies, Nuts,
and Canned Goods in all
Varieties. Sour Kraut,
Navy Beaus, Etc., Etc.
We shall endeavor to Weep a complete
Htot'k td‘ all leudlng articles in our line,
and having adopted tlie motto, “(Juick
Hales ami small profits’* we earnestly
pledge ourselves to give as good bar
gains as can be procured elsewhere in
Hussellyille.
We invite all our friends to call and nee us
at the old ('aidwell stand, corner
Main and J cfl'ersou streets.
Quinn & Hoffman.
Rus.cllviUo, Aik.
l+l-It
RUSSELLVILLE A DV’TS.
Inducements!
EXTRAORDINARY!
S. A. BUCK,
PKAl.KR IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE,
Has on hand
A Complete Stock
In all Departments.
Consisting of
DRY GOODS, BOOTS AND SHOES
HATS AND CAPS,
HARDWARE, QUEENSWABE,
AND GROCERIES.
My Stock is equal to any in the
market in price or quality.
I make it a rule to always give the
M O N E Y ’ S WO It T II !
In connection with my store is a
Picture Gallery
Where the young, the old and
the middle aged,
Can secure a
PERFECT LIKENESS.
Main Street .... Russellville, Ark.
[+1-1]
DR. E. R. HARRELL
DEALER IN
DRUGS,
MEDICINES,
Paints, Oils,
Dye-Stuffs,
Perfumeries,
SOAPS,
STATIONERY,
FINE TOBACCO
AND CIGARS.
PHYSICIANS' PRESCRIPTIONS
Carefully Compounded,
Day or Night,
Buchanan St.Russellville, Ark.
[+1-1
W. P. WOOTEN,
DEALER IN
Fancy Groceries,
Canned Goods!
TEAS,
Brilliant and Fearless Brands I of Flour,
THE
“ROYAL11 BAKING! POWDER,
Navy Beans, Sour Kraut,
Anti nil other articles usually found in ft
Urst-class family supply house.
I sell at tliu lowest eaah prices, and res
poctfully ask an inspection of my stock.
W. P. Wooten,
Russellville, Ark.
First door south of Harrell’s Dru# store.
Ruchannau street. [t1-1J
M. B. ROYS,
—DKALKR IX—
Hardware, Stoves,
TABLE AND POCKET CUTLERY,
Carpenters tools, Doors ami vVlnclovrs, etc.
And agent for the Charter Oak Stoves.
I have on hand a large assortment of
FIRST CLASS COD STOVES,
Ranging in price from tit to MO.
I have in oonnectionlwith my store a
TIN SHOP!
In w hich all my Tin Wan) f manufactur
ed of tlic Hkst Matkhial, Please remem
ber this
All Job work
done promptly to onler. Bring ino
your Produce, and with it your
old TIN WARS ami have
it repaired.
Cash 1'aiu run Old Cornu and Bbass,
M. B. HOYS,
Buchanan street, ItusMUville, Ark.
IU-1
RUSSELLVILLE ADV’i
R. J. WIL.SOIM
«< CO.,
KEEP CONS T A N T L Y
on ha n (I
A COMPLETE
STOCK OF
DRY GOODS,
IN ALL TIIE VARIOUS HE
PARTMENTS, SUCH AS
Dress Goods, Ladies’ Hats
Handkerchiefs Hosiery and Notions.
AND GENT’S READY MADE
*
CLOTHING!
UNDERWEAR
Hats, Boots & Shoes.
Stationery, Ac.,
Hardware, Cutlery,
NAILS, IRON, AND
Groceries
Received Daily.
Sugar, Coffee, Syrups
Salt, Flour, Meal, Cheese, Soap
Candles, Candies aud Coal Oil.
HIGHEST MARKET PRICE PAID
for cotton or other country produce,
R. J. WILSON&CO
J. G. Ferguson,
Takes this method of Informing his
friends, and the public generally
that he has a nice selection
o v
D&Y GOODS,
CLOTHING, HATS,
BOOTS, SHOES,
HARDWARE.
LACE GOODS,
RIBBONS, GLOVES,
HOSIERY, SHAWLS,
Groceries,
ETC., ETC.,
t
Which will he sold at extremely
LOW FIGURES.
FOll
CASH,
OR
COTTON.
All that I ask is a trial.
South-east corner of Main and ,let
ferson streets,
RUSSELLVILLE, ARK.
[P-1J

xml | txt