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The Caledonian. [volume] (St. Johnsbury, Vt.) 1837-1867, August 22, 1837, Image 1

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AJ"t- fcrY T V'
TEItMS The CAi-EnPNiAN will bo publ'iHhod
wookly at $2,00 por onnum, or at $1,50 if pnid in
advanco. If paymcnt is mudo within rix months'
from tho timo of subscrib'mg it will bo rocoivod as
advnnco pay. No pnpor will bo discontinued until
nll arroaragos aro, pnid, oxcopt at tho option oftlio
publistior.
03" Advcrtisomcnts will bo msortod for tlio cus
tomary priccs. Porsons aro requcstod to stato tbo
numbor of weoks thoy wish tlicir advortisomonts
pubhshod, otliorwiso thoy will bo insortod till for
bid and chargod accordingly.
YOUNG MliN.
VVo find tho following just rcflections, nnd ex
ccllent icmnrks, in tlio Noriolk Bcncon. They
oro oddrcsscd to tlio good sensb and dcop reflcc
tion of tho Young Mcn of our country:
It is clonr tliat tho yourig mnn of tho presont
ogo is oltogothcr n difforcnt person from tho young
man of tlio last. In his habits, plensurcs, nnd.pur
suits, ho is nltogether a different hoing. Tho titlo
of hoy has now no npplicntion. Tlio grndntions
of dress from boy to man exists no more. Tho
lad of cightecn drosses ns expcnsively ns the
grentest gentleman in tlio land his coats nro
from patterns cqually ns fine 111 fact, whatever
moncy cnn do, is donc. Now we are not op-
posed to neutness of tho person, for ho who is
careless in dross is very npt to bo carclcss in
othcr "rospccts ; but it is to the cxccss of dandy
ism that wo object. We object.lo tho lavish'ex
penditure of so much moncy on tho porsons of
our young mon. Lct tho computation bo mado,
nnd tho mortifying result will nppoar that tho
cost of dress from fourteen to twcnty-onc, would
havo bccn sufficient to hnvc dofraycd thc cntiro
oxponscs of a collcgc cducation in thc first Uni
vcrsities of Europo. But thc mero loss of so
much moncy is comparntively nothing. Exces
sivo attention to dress prndnccs a host of bad
results. All tho prbpensities of tlio promature
gcntlcrncn aro dcveloped wliile tho intcllect,
which ouglit to havo heen so nssiduously cultivat
cd in thospringof life, iscncrvatcd impovorish
ed ruincd. Intcllectual plcasurcs havc no charms
for tho votary bf dress. Tlio light of cignr is tho
thostar that guidfcs him, and hie tlicatro of action
is tho hauntof in'upiity. By and hy ho bccomcs
engagcd in busincss on his own nccount. Ho is
soon marriod to ono, it is fair to presnmc, ns
cmpty hcnded ns himsolf, for ho kas not wit
cnough to nspirc to tho hancl ofa womau of scnso,
who evcn if sho wero favorably disposed towards
him, would first put him on tho pcnitcntinl stool.
Wcll, thc honcy moon hns passcd (a moon whoso
light was very liko unto daikncss,) nnd in tho
coufso of timctho duties'of n fatherdovolve npon
him. But alas ! such n niind scuks no joy from
tho domcstic hcarth. Domostic plcasurcs hnve
no reiish for such an nppctito the gatnbling tablo
and, tho bottlo bccomo his altar and his God. His
wifo withers nway, and his childrcn, evcn wliile
their fathcr is abovo the sod, are tho vericst or
phans nnd outcasts of tho canh. And whcn
death ovcrtnkes the misguhled hcing, whcn tho
clods of tlio valloy arc conccaling tho degradod
dust from tho sighf, it may bo that tho indulgcnt
mothcr, thc kind fathcr, rejoiccs in tho rnidst of
their sorrow, thnt thc world will no Iongor be
hold tho degradation of th'jir worthless son.
now oltou hns such n sccne been prcscntcd to
theview! and nll, nll flowing from the gratifi
cation of youth in falso nnd llcot'mg plcasurcs,
and the evil habits produced by such indulgcnco.
TlIE DEATH OF THE YOUNG. Bcailtiftll IS thnt
scnson of lifo whon we can sny in thc langungo
of Scripture, "Thou hnst thq dcw of thy youth."
But of theso flowcrs, dcatli'ga'thcrs many. He
plnces them upon his bosom, and his fonn is
changcd to something lcss tcrrilic thnn before.
Wo learn to gnzo and shuddernot ; for hu carries
in his arms tho swect blosoms ofjour carthly
hop.es. Wo shall sco them all again, blooming
in a happier land. Ycs, death brings us again to
our friends. They nro waiting for us, nnd wo
shall not bo long. Thoy havo gono beforo us,
nnd aro liko the angols iu heaven. They stnnd
upon tbo borders of tho gravc, to wolcomo us
with tho countennnco of nfFeotion, which they
woro on cartb, yct moro lovcly, moro spiritunl.
Death has taken thco, too, sweot siater, nnd "thou
hast tho dew of thy youth." Ho hatb plnced
thco upon his bosom, and his storn countcnaucc
wcnrs a smilo. The "far country" soems nearor,
and thc way lcss darlc, for thou hast gone beforo,
pnssing so quickly to thy rest,that day itsolf dios
not moro calmly. And thou nrt tlicro .vaiting to
bid us welcome, whcn we shall havo dono herc
tho work given us to do, and shall go hcnco to
beseen no moro on earth. Prof. Longjellow.
DavcnporCs Eleclric Macldm. Grcat improvo
nicnts havo been mado in this most importnnt
mvontion sinco our last noticc. A machino is
now in operation which is moved by four smnll
gidvanic batteries.of tho sizo of n (pinrt mcnstiro,
and which. wo learn will rniso fivo hundrcd lbs.
one foot 'per minute. A wheel is turned by it
witn grcat forco and velocity, nflbrding sufilcient
powcr Jor n lathc, a good numhcr of cotton snin-
nnLni7 15Pht m,nch5ny- A grist-mill might
bo movcd by lt with very little adclitbn of powor.
The gicat problem of tho extent of powor attain
ablo would scem to bo nnarly set nt rest. But
ono most importam fact, or rather principlo, ro
mnms to bo considcred. lt is nscertaiiied that a
gnlvanic battcry will supply olcctricity to many
bodiesjas rcadily and fully as to ono, (as ono hund
rcd persons who mny join hnnds to receivo a
shock nre oach as Bensibly afTectcd as onc alono
would havo been.) A single battcry, thcn, of
suitnblo dimensions may he rclied on tb genorato
tho power required by any extcnt and varietv of
machinery. JVew Yorlcer. '
Tho London Morning Chrouiclb hns fivo
columns.as a biogrnphioal skctch of
WILLIAM TlIE FOURTH.
Ho wns born on tho. 21st of August, 17G5.
At tho ngo of 13 hc wns a midshipman, aud
though tho son of a King, (Georgo tho Third).
was kopt on a footing with tho other inidsliip
mcn. Undor Admiral Rodney, ho was in tho
floet which, in 1779, capturcd tho wholo of a
Spanish convoy. Eight dnys aftcr ho wns in a
scrious fight with tho Spanish flect undor tbo
commnnd of DonJuan do Langnrn. Thc rcsi
duo of his timo nsn midshipuinn thcPrincc serv
cd in tlio West Indies, nnd off tho coasts of No
va Scotia and Canadn. On tho North Amcrica
stntion ho sorvcd undor Lord Kcith in tho War
wick, whcn hocapturod L'Aiglc, a largo Frcnch
hrig, Ln Sophio, of 22 guns, nnd tho Terrior
sloop of war, off the Dclawaro river, 11th of
Soptcmbor, 1782. IIo nftcrwards joined Lurd
Hood, who introduced him to Nelson on board
thc Barfleur. In 1783 ho wns nppointed third
Lieutenant of thc Ilobo frigatc. In 178G ho wns
nppointed first Lieutenant of thc Pegnsus, of 28
guns, and soon nfter ho was mndu Captain, and
ordcred to Nova Scotia. Hc thcn proceedcd
to tho Lcoward Islands, nnd was thcro undcrtho
commnnd of Nclson. Nelson spoke very highly
of him ns an obcdicnt nnd nttcntive officcr. In
Dcccniber, 1787, nfter rcturning to England ho
wns nppointed to thc commnnd of tho Androin
cda frigate, in which he sailed for tho West In
dies. Tho I9th of May, 1789, ho was crcatcd
Duke of Clarenco and St. Androws in thc king
dom of Grcat Britain, nnd Earl of Munstor in
Ireland. On tho 3d of Septcmber ho was mado
Renr Admiral; nftcrwards he hecamo Admiral
of thc Ited: and upon the death of Sir Pctcr
Parker, in 3811, ho was made Admiral of the
Flect.
The union ot William tho Fourth with thc
cclcbrated Rlrs Jordan, commcnccd in 1790,nnd
cndurcd for 20 ycnrs. Shc wns ono of tbo most
captivating women of her timo, and tho Princc
was "very much attnched to her. She was of
tho Theatro. By her he had sovcral childrcn.
In 1810 thoy part'ed, which gayo jlr Jutd'in tho
greatest pain. His nccuninfy cmbarrnssmonSj'
shc says, wcrc thocausc of thc pnrting. In 18
18, hc was marricd to tho now Dowagcr Quecu
Adolaidc. Asduko of Clarenco, he ndvocntcd
CatholicEmancipation in tho Houhc of Lords,
nnd mndo n spccch in its hehnlf.
Junc 2G, 1830, thc Duko bccamc Kingof Eng
Innd on tho dcnvso of Georgo tho Fourth. Hc
wns a man altogcthcr the rcvcrso of Georgo tho
Fourth, and moro liko his fathor Georgo tho
Third. His course as King is in tho momory
of thc public.
Thc young Quecn of Grcat Britain, Victoria,
is just 18,ycars of ago, and a bold, spiritcd girl.
Sho fihowcd it thc other day by rcfusing to lct
her unclo namo her household for her on nssum
ing her cstnblishmcnt as heir npparent. Sho
was willing to give up an allownncc from Par
linmcnt, but insistcd on nnming her own offiBcrs.
It is nn nmusingillustrntion of Hcrcditary Chief
Mngistracy, to seo tho most intcllcctnnl nnd pow
erful nation of the cnrth rnlcd by n girl of 18.
Ncvcrtholcss it will do very wcll, Jor Royalty Is
pretty much an nbstraction in England, and a
girl will do ns wcll ns an old man. Thcgallant
ry rff thc nation will bo callcd into action, tho
young Queen will probnbly takottho popular
sidc of politics, and for a timo nt lenst, the gov
ornment will go on brilliantly.
It is wcll known thnt tho Duchcss of Kcnt,
the mother of tho new sovcreign, is hcnrtily n
whig, in feeling nnd m policy, nnd it is scarcoly
to bo doubtcd that tho Qucen shares Iicr o'pin
ions. It is possible, indccd, that Her Majcsty
will choose to form her own lino of conduct,now
that tho crown is hcrs, on which her eyes havo
been fixed from childhood; shc is'snid to possoss
much strength of charactcr, nnd wo havo heard
anccdotcs, from sources of high nuthenticity,
which would load to tho bolicf that sho can and
will bo inistre&s, in nll things; but sho is very
young, and cannot but focl that her situation is
onc of grcat and fearful responsibility. Youth
and inoxporicnco may for somo years provcnt
any signal display of that decision which is be
licved to form a prominent feature of her char
actcr; and inthat caso, no immediato chnngcs of
importanco may tnko placc, cUbcr of nien or
mensurcs.
THE WEST.
The following is nn oxtract ofa letter of a trav
cllcr in tho west to the New Fork Express, dntcd
Milwaukie, Wisconsin Territory, July 1837.
This town, liko Chicago, and many othcr
western towns, is fast rising in importanco. It is
now but thrco years sinco it wns purchnsed from
tho Indians, and thc land for fifty milos back of
it was ohly surveyed last ycnr, and nono of it
has been ofTored for sale by tho govcrnmont cx
ccpt about tvvo miles squaro on which tho town
is now built ; but it is "heing" squatted upon daily
by thoso who had rather livo on lands belonging
to tho government, tlian livc on thoso that thoy
uro obliged to pay for. Besides, they can spec
ulato onwhat thoy cnll '!claims" bcttcr than on
decdcd lands. Tlio making and sclling clnims
has been a grcnt busincss during the last ycar in
this soction of tho conntryjgA young man from
tho Eastern Statcs, wiUPjuIt tnoney enough to
g:t horo, would, on Insarnval, go to work for a
mouth, nnd cnrn twcnty or thiriy dollars ; by tho
timo his mouth was out, ho would' havo lcnrnt
tho art of mnkiugn claiin, (squating on tho pub
lic lands;) hp would go into tho woods, and
with nn axo cut down a fow trces, and girdlo a
few more, and throw togcthcr a fow logs in the
form ofa country cow-pcn, and como back to
town and oflbr hiselnini for stile say for ono or
two hundrcd dollars which amotini ho would
not unfrcquently obtnin. llo would then havo
sufiicientcniiital to hiro somo one to make othcr
clainis for him, whilc Jin hinisolf would takc
board at ono of tho prineipal hotels and pass for
a gentleman speculator, constnntly making claims
through his ngent, nnd ngain sclling them for
what ho could get. In this way somo havo kcpt
up this now modo of living. But tho great re-
vulsion which hns justshaken our wholo country
to itstoundntion, has broughtup theso mushrootn
speoulators all standing, as thoro isno longerany
purchasera of claims, and not a boat that luaves
the port, but what takes them off iu largo num
bers. As thcso claimants havo rolinquishcd all
hbor and livcd out all of thc money thoy may
huvo bccn in tho possession of. thcv aro now
compellcd to rettirn to tho East, or remain as
idlc loungerp, or boarding atj ono placc as
long ns they cnn gct trustcd, and thcn oxchang
ing it for auothcr ns it is impossiblo for them to
obtain work nt thc prcsent timo in'this soction of
thc country. Tho samc grcat cnuso that has
prostrnted nll kindsof busincss nt tho East, is now
bcginning to bo felt here. Tio sale of town lots
is not only cntirely chcckcd, but thcse lots huvo
wonderfully diminisbcd in price. Somo fow
buildings aro iu thc coursc of crection, but it is
beliovcd that whcn thoso are finishcd, ull opora
tious will bo sus)endud."
From tlio N.Y. Daily Express.
C1TY AND COUNTRY LIFE.
The poets of old Romnsnngin lotid strainstho
prniscs of tho country, nnd happy wns that Ro
man who had his farm, his garden or his villa,
arounu me naso ot csoractcv or on the shores of
iha bcuutiful B.U02. Ciccro was a farmcr as well
aS-'Matqsman and an orntor. All tho illtiatilous
men of Kotno lighted in qtiitting thc Forum,
thc Campus MardtJs, .i"l tho walls 6f tho "IIoth
cr of Emjiires," to pnsstire suinmer solstico in
tho cool grovcs, with nymphs and boVyj-Sj-ior. in
tho season of tho harvcst, to rujoico with tho
bacchnnnls, and to sec them fiolii; iu the games.
Evcn so in England nnd tho contincnt of Eurojic,
now. Londou, tho mistrcss of modcrn tinics. as
Romc was of the oldcn, is desertcd of inuub of
its populntion in summcr nnd nutumn. Tho
possession of land is tho passport to geniillity in
Europc. Thc grcat nlcttcriiich, thc Ausirinn
Envoy nt Londonl boasts of his famotis viuevard
on tho Rhinc. A landed estato is tho first aim of
nobdity in England. Titlcs thcro,. conic from
land. -Hcncc, agriculturo is tho work of scicncc
and of art, aud as much knowledge and art aro
demandcd to ctiltivate, and Iny out tho park, to
adorn it with trees nnd with fountains, as to fill
the gallery, or tho studio, or tho uicho of thc
pnlin'p.J
Ilow happens it thcn, thut in our parl of our
country it is not so in tho south that ngricul
turo is nvoided as much as it can wcll bc that
tbo son flies off from tho fields to tho countcr,
tho daughtcr to tho city or the factory all pant
ing to cxchango tho frce, glorious nir of heaven,
for tho dusty, noisy, crowdcd thoroughfaro, say
of Wall-street, Pearl-st.or tho Bowcry ? Whenco
thnt mndness thnt rnakes the workiii'' mnn chcr-
lcb tho ceilnr or tho garrot, for himsolf and his
childrcn, whcn hc cnn hvo butter nnd wenlthicr,
on the borders of tho wildcrncss, with sky onongh
ovcr his hend, cnrth enough under his feet with
tho green grass to tramplc ovcr, and tho proud
trees for a sbado.
There is a beliof in our country it oxists no
wbcro elsc that agriculturo is a v.ilgnr oecnpa
tion, demanding no tasto, no genius, and nothiug
but tho turning of tho sod, and cho lcvelling of
tho trces. Ilow falsc is this ! W hy, tho Vatican
in its way, is not moro boautiful with tho choicc
works of oncicnt aud modern art in it a Belvi
dere Apollo here, nnd a Itaphnel fresco there
than an English pnrk in its way whero a land
scapo is workcd out as a picturo has been a trco
slinpcd to fit this viow, and hedge designed to
aid that now pcrhaps a fountaiti or a watcrfall,
anon a herd of dcer it may bo a lull crcatcd by
industry, or a little rivcr, with the gods and god
desscs presiding over, fitted to run in tho lino
that hcnuty is demanding and nll harmonizing
with Nature, ns tasto and gonius and scienco
huvo aided in adorning it. Even the cottage of
tho laboring Englishtnan with hi frontdoorso
ni-ut, me roses, aud ivy, nnd woodbino creepingj
pver and adorning it, nnd thc well trimmed hedgo
I. ua irour, is a jewei upon tlio tuco ot tlio eartn,
and tastc has made it so, for naturo has dono but
littlo for her fathor-land.
We know not why it is, but so it is, thero is in
tho Northern Statcs a most unconq'.icrablo avcr
sion to agriculture, and tho conseque'nco is, with
New England in particular, that a furtuinK peo-
plo nro fed from nhroad, by tbo agriculturo of
oiucr atates, or ot torcign nations. Thc multi
tndo seem more to lovc tho throiig the city:
thc tinkling of money in tho shop of tho broker,
or tho rustlo of silk nnd calico in tho shon of tho
dealer, than tho notes of tho swect songstcr of
ino woocts, tlio rich beauty n the trees, or tlio
inviting verduro of spring and summcr. Ono
reason is, that wo huvo no farmcrs, such as the
farmers of England, of Holland, or of Lombardy,
who cmbollish nature, and mako their homcs
more delightful thnn tho lofiicsl palaces of tbo
town. Our men ot wealtb, in thc country, who
hnve sons to cducntc, Jprefor to mako them into
third-rato Inwyers, fourth-ratc parsons, andith
ratc doctors, rather than to bring them up in tho
way thatshould teach them to miae a double crop
from the samc acro of InnJ, br to intfoduce somo
now product, whioJi Bliould double tho availablo
tnenns thp-now havc.
As n farming pooplo, thc mcnns of crunting
wealtb from landed estatcs nro not yct hnlf dcvelo
ped. Thcro is no renson on oarth why this should
not bo a vino growing country, nnd ynt is not!
There is no reason why the Old World rIiouI I
find us in silks, nnd yot it docs. So varied is our
soil, our climnto ; nnd so oxtendcd our lino of
latitude, from tho rocky nnd frnzen rps;ions'oftho
rivcr St. Jolui, to tho snndy Sahino, that we havo
al thc capa'cities of "doing ovory thing for our
solves ; nnd yct nt this moment, wo nro oppi cssnd
nnd ovor-biirthcned with n prodigious foi'cign
,debt. The ootton plantqrs mako moncy why
mny not tho hemp growers? Tho sngnr plan
ters mako money : nnd why not tlio stock grow
ers of evcn tho Green Mountnins? Scicncc is
what is wnntod first, nnd thcn nrt nnd tnstc will
como ns hnndmnids. Ediicnto thcn, your boys in
collcge, if you choose a good cducation hurts
no mnn but mako fnrmors of them ufterwnrds,
if yoti wish them to bo hnppy nnd wcnlthy.
Fiom thc Boston Atlus.
TEXAS AND CANADA. ,
Wo hnve cver cxprcsscd the most decided op-
position to nny enlargomont of our torritovy by
tho plunder of our ncigbhors; nnd hnve always
taken strong ground againsltho policy ofinvolv
ing oursolvcs in n wnr, out of inero sympnthy
for iho "cnusc of lihorty," whethcr truly or falso-
ly so dcnotninated.
Still, wo havo always been in fiivor of vigor
ous nnd decided mensures; nnd whcn nny coursc
of policy hns hcen once ndoptcd, nlthough ngaiust
our wishcs and our judgmcnt, wc nro dcsirous
to hnvo thnt courso of policy lully nnd thorough
ly cnrricd out. It is only in that wny, that
mcnsUrcs can hc tested, nnd their truc practicnl
charactcr he fully dcveloped.
If then our southomi friends persistin demnnd
ing thc nnncxntion of Tcxas to our Southwest
ern frontier, wo shall sot up aclnim to n corrcs-
ponning eniargement ot tcrriloiy, upon our
North Eastern frontier. If they cry out for Tex
as, wo shall cry out for Canada; if they are rc
solved upon a war with Mexico, wc must havo
a war with GnnAT Britain!
JjCI us see how theso mattcrs will operntc. If
wo nre involvod in n warVith Mexico, nnd hnvo
to sond n sorics of crusading nrmics under the
lead of Southcrn chivnlry, with humano Jlnglo
Saxon idea of oxtenninating the Mexican peoplo,
and Iaying opcn tho country to bo re-populatcd
uy Biiponor racc; sucn nn ovent mny uo very
grntifying to many of our- friends at tho South,
jKStehnvo much.lcisure on their hunds; who ure
full of nspu-ntiono.Cc,1.militnry glory; who nro
not tuiacquaiutcd with tho bistory of t'nr Synn
isIi Conqucst; and whoso fiincy hns been intox
icated by revclling iiTthe rccollcction of the henps
of gold, tho board of precious stones, rind Iho
broad lands, by which tho Spanish ndvcnturcrs
wcrc rewnrdcd. Such n wnr mny bc very a
grccablo to them; but wo know that our North
ern cnmmcrco will be plunderod and ruincd by
privatcers of nll nations, under the Mexican flag;
and wo know furthcr, that thc north, without a
pnrticlo of intcrcst in tlio quarrel, or advantage
to bo oxpcctcd from it, will bo callcd upon to foot
almost tho cntiro bill ofexpenses. Of theso ex
penscs no trifling Bharo will fall upon New Eng
land, which has always borno tho htirdcn, though
it hns not always sbarod tho glory of thc fight.
Now it is no moro than rcasonablo thnt wc
should have somo sort ofoflsct for all thcso nd
vnntagcs. A war with ftlexico might bc sporl
to Southcrn friends, but bc death to us. Now
n war with Great Britnin for thc nnncxntion of
Canadn, would afford us oxnctly tho ncccssary
compcnsation, no doubt such n war would bo
very trouhlcsomc and oxpensive; but its prinei
pal cvils would not light upon tho north. Brit
ish nrmics havo scldotn shown much disposition
to land upon the iron bound const of Now Eng
land; nor havo thoy ovor bccn able to pcuetrato
for many miles into our densoly populatcd ter
ritory. They cbnfine thcmsclvcs for tho most
part, to invasionsof tho Southcrn States, nnd to
the cnpturc, plunder and dcstruction of Soiuh
orn citics. Porhnps in case of n now war, thoy
might procccd to oxccute the plan suggestcd dur
ing tho last ono; occupy somo conveniont point;
proclaim liberty to thc slaves, nnd march to con
qucst under tho hnnncrof omancipatioii, lightcd
on by tho glnro of burning farm hoiiscs and vil
Inges. A terriblo calumity this would bo, but
h!vvould light wholly on thc south. Mcanwhile
jtho north, cspecially tlio manufacturing Statcs,
would find consolntion for tho cxpenscs nnd ch
Inmilics of tho wnr, in tho monopoly of mnnu
litoturing supply which it would confer upon
them; and howover much tho south might suf
fer during the continuatinn of thc cdntcst, it
would tcrminnte at least, in tho oxpulsion of the
invaders, and tho nnuexntion of Canadn; thcreby
opening a most wido und valuablc fiold for the
cxtension of our Northern cornmerco, and the
exclusivo introductiou of Northern mnnufacturcs.
Tho pecuniary intcrcst of tho Northern Statcs, in
tho anncxntion of Canada is obvious, nor nre
thc political advautagcstobccxpected from such
a union lcss worthy of considerntiou.
It will beobserved thnt wo stato all this mat-
tcr lfjpotheticnlly, nnd under cover of nn if. If
opr Southern friends do so and so. wo do so and
so- If they go for Texas, wc go for Canada.
Most sincerely do wo hopotlmt neither meastiro
mny be hdoptcd; but 0110 necessnrily, brings on
thc. othcr. Wc aro for pcnco with alljhof world,
nnd justiuo to nll our noighhors. But if our
Southern brcthrcn nro detcmiincd to c.onvcrt us
nto land piiates.nnd drag us into u murnuding'
expedition, we nro peifcctly.iesol.ved not to ho
chcatcd outof cur sharo of tho plunder. Tho
South may rest nssured that this is not n irioro
privato opinion of our own.. (t is tho unnni-
mous feeling of tho north, nnd not only so, it ia
the . uttled policy of the novth.
Philadelphia, August 0lh. Ilorriblc and Dis-
trcasing Jlccident. Wc rcgrot doeply to learn thnt
last evening lurs. ualias, motncr ot tho iion. Uoo.
M. Dallas, Amoricnn Ministcr to Rusain, was in-
stantaucously killed, hy u mclnncholy cnsiinlty,
tho particulers ot wliicu, ns they havo rcnched
us, nro theso : Mrs. Dnllns wns retUruing nfter
night fall in n carriago from tho country, nccotn
panicd by Mrs. .lex. Cnmphel), whon in pnssing
through Urown-st. tho horses attnched to tho vo
hiclo took fright nnd run awny. Tho brcaking
of somo part of the hnrness broiight u pieco of
wood eonnected with it, in contact with the hcels
of thc horses, and incrcascd their progrcss to
their topmost speed. At this juncturo tlic tim
orous drivcr sprhng from his scat, leaving his
horses to their own gnidanccand dircction. Tho
furious animals swept along tho .strect, until, on
coining iu contact with somo obstaclc, or turning
a corner, thc carriago was upset,.aud ono of tho
affrightcd inmates dashed hendlong on tho pavc
mcnt. Mrs. Campbell was tho lady tbrown out, nnd
wo ure grutified to henr that she was snved, ns
by a miraclc, although it pains' us to add, that
sho wns soveroly bruised und woundcd, und it is
grcnt ly fearcd, may not survive. Mrs. Dallas re
mniiicdin tho enrringe, if wo mi'stakc not, until
thc horses were arrested iu their flight. Being
taken into a housc, sho was scnrcely nble to
spenk, and merely comlaincd of the oppres
sion of her dress, which prevented her from
breathing freely. A groan or tvvo ehsued, and
thc Inmentcd lady had (ceascd to live. Thero
was no extcmal injury upon her person, oxcept;
nn inconsiderable bruiso upon hernrm nnd it is
belicved thnt shc dicd of npoplexy, resultingfrom
extreme tfci ror although it is not improbnbto that
tho discovcry of somo intcrnnl hurts might result.
Irom a thoroughpost mortem cxnminntion.
Mrs. Dallas was an amiable, nccomplisbed,
uiid high-bred womnn ; oho who hns fulfilled iti
her day nnd gencration with exomplnry purity
and truth, tho duties of a wife, a mother, and a
mcmbcr of tho socioty which sho has so long
udorned. Her loss will be decply doplored by
all who love goodncss nnd virtuc, and tho bene
ficial influenco of pcrsonal worth. Phil. Gaz.
Froni tho Tallalinssco Floridian of July 29.
Tragical occurrence. On Satunlny last a ntim
bor of citizcns boing.asscmhleil nVSheli Point, in
this county, a quarrel arose, Wenpbns wero re
sorted to by scvcrul on cach side,- and wo regrot
to sny it resultcd in tho death of Arthur Macpn
Efl..and nlso Mr.-Qli:usou. tho" forrnor . bv n
stab in tiio abdbm'en,'aud'tiiedttery a gun-shot
ound. Threei brpthers, McssrsNathaniolx-W-,
"Jolm and Willinm II. Walkor, and Jolm M.
Ilaughton nnd Jnmcs Honanl, wero all ulso se
vercly wounded, cither by gun or pistol shots.
The nccounls ot the cnuso nud circumstnnccs of
this horrible affair, aro so contrndictory, that we
cannot vcnture evcn to allude to thein. Thc
wholo matter heing in courso of judicial invcsti
gation, is alsoi reason why wo should forhenr
doing moro than express our most poignnnt feol
ings of regret nt this occurrence, and thnt wo
dceply sympathizo with tho friends of thosc who
havc thus, liy an unfortunato nnd untimcly out
break of violcnce, bnen hurricd into cternily.
Somo wagshnvo proposod thnt the spruco old
Hcau, Vun Buren, should try his magical powers
of ncgotiation in patching up n trcnty of nllinnco
with thc Bellc Queen of England. Pcrlmps it
wns with somo such sneaking notiou that ho
talkctl so largely of tho " Kxndcrhook Family"
whcn among tho nobility of England. We daro
say that King Matty would gracc the prescnco
chambor of Queen Vicrv quito ns hnudsomely
as the Gcrmnn importations, ori which the Royal
Family of England havo gonerally dc)onded for
matrimonial spliccs. It would bo no doubt quito
as much to his tasto as tho splondor of thc East
lloom, and if ho would take Dick Jojinson and
hissables with him, wc, for one, would rojoicc at
tho riddance.
FROM fllEXICO.
Slips from the New Orleans papcrs df August
5th, contain a letter from Tampico datcd July
22d which states that Gen. Bnstamcnto had do
innnded from tho Clergy a loan of $5,000,000.
This wasso littlo rclished by them, that they itn
inediately camineticod negotiutjons with Santn
Annu. 4By somc meaii3 or othcr tho Government
obtainod iuformntion of this, and imuiediatoly
sdmmoned SantaiAnnri 1 beforo a Court Martial to
answor to certain cliarges agninst him touching
his procecdings in tho lust Texnn cnlnpnign. Ho
retumod;nn answor in thcso words "I cannot
I should not and I will not." On tho roceipt of
this refusal, a strong detachmcnt of cavalry was
despatched from ftlango del ClaVo with orders to
bring him to tho capital, but on their nrrival nt
Tampico ho could notbo found. ItlwnB'rumored
that ho had gono to Vera Cruz.. Tho stuno let
ter montions a currcnt report thnt Victoria nnd
Bravohad espouscd tho causo of Santn Anna.
Tho New Orleans Picayuno of "tho 4th says,
" The Rivcr is high and so aro provisjons. Th.erc
is somc yellow fevor in the city, os thero is every
summer liothing liko gcnernl sickness, however.
Four months ago wo could couut from 80 to 100.
steamera at tho Levec now wo cnn count but
from 15 to 20. Two months ago vvo'could count
upwards ofa hundrcd sea vessels noV it is hnrd
to find nbovo a bakers dozcn."
Sinnular Circumslunco. VVo aro informod by
Mr. fit&fj. Powors, of Onslow County, that his
dniiglitor&jJaQVltia, a girl six nnd a hnlf yoarsold,
spoko tdinfjRjf the ji'tst timo sincc shctcas'born, on
tho 24lli filtimb! Ho doeg not say, but,.w,o pro
stirno 3uch to bo thofact, thnt his daug$jjr hns re
sidod with him duringthisBingulnr sjlolico.i jVfr. P.
is a schoolmnstor, nnd tho child;hnf nttpndpd his
scliool for sovoral months rooiting hor. JosBonaVoruji
Inrly to hor brothor, to wliotri' nnd tOotliVrs""rfib
talkod freoly'altliougli 'Bho'fbnnafldmpoSsiblo, as
sho now says. tospoak to Iicr.utfi.cY boforc.tho.day
abovo moiitioiie.d. Jt'cwbureh Jf- C. Sjiect . .

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